37 Burst results for "sprint"

Fresh update on "sprint" discussed on  America Trends

America Trends

01:42 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "sprint" discussed on America Trends

"Very glad to have you along trending in the news, the latest on the Corona virus, and there are many new numbers to be seeing. The World Health Organization has also now given the Corona virus, its official name. Cove in 19 this as statistics suggest that infections could level off in coming weeks and Beijing, also saying it will hold people accountable for failing to contain the outbreak. The whole thing is trying to go on Twitter leveling a bit, too, but it still has a presence somewhere there. China's National Health Commission said. The country has reported 208 new deaths from the virus. The first time, 100 or more fatalities have been recorded in a single day. The outbreak has killed over 1000 people worldwide, including one death and Hong Kong and another in the Philippines. More than 40,000 infected and those were just the numbers we know. But one of China's top respiratory disease experts predicted the outbreak could peak this month. And things could get better. We will keep you posted Stateside T Mobile and Sprint are cleared for their merger. Ah federal judge has ruled in favor of team Mobil's takeover of Sprint. This deal would combine the nation's third and fourth largest wireless carriers and create a telecommunications giant, and it will take on a tea and horizon. It is a $26 billion merger years in the making. Shares rose and Twitter users replying with suggestions off monopoly, and there you go. President Trump is trolling the Democrats as he takes to New Hampshire, also truly in the mainstream media. Putting a rally there a day before the primary, of course, more overflow crowds and someone wearing a super trump T shirt. You can see if you're watching on white Ta were chatty politics with Michael Heart of the Heart of America show coming up in just a few minutes. Right now, though, we listen in on some of President Trump's remarks. Well, man jester and I am thrilled to be in the great state of New Hampshire with thousands of hard working believing God, family and country. Thank you. Thank you. And I'll tell you what way have more in this arena. And I hate to say this to you. We have more than this outside of the arena trying to get in. So if you'd like to give up your seat away, you're standing so we couldn't get seats. But if you want to give it up, let them come in. You go out. Does anybody want to make that deal? I don't think so. We have more in this arena and outside of this arena, then all of the other candidates, meaning that Democrats put together and multiplied and fake news. These guys will never report that. They don't even like showing the crowd. They always show my face. They never show the crowd. But you know what people can hear the crowd. People can hear the crowd. That is not the sound of 200 people one of their prime candidates today they worked a big deal. They had exactly 100 for people on the fake news said It was a nice class. Very nice If I had one FTC here one FC shades of this massive arena say he's a sell out. But you know what way have never had an empty seat from the day you're excused. Your first lady and I came down the escalator..

President Trump Twitter New Hampshire China Sprint World Health Organization Beijing Cove National Health Commission Michael Heart Hong Kong Official FTC Team Mobil Heart Of America Philippines
Is MLB's Wave Of Injuries About To Get Even Worse?

The Lead

02:41 min | 2 d ago

Is MLB's Wave Of Injuries About To Get Even Worse?

"So you know heading into this sixty game, just sprint of a season, what was the expectation around baseball as far as pitcher injuries were concerned, they're definitely wasn't expectation that injuries would be up this year. We had trainers inside baseball and outside baseball pitchers being worried about the start and stop nature of shutting down and then starting back up again when they would normally be midseason form and then just not knowing how much the pictures were doing in their own time and there's There's even a question of liability of how much you can tell a pitcher to do because what if you tell them, they have to do since we're throwing program and then they contract the virus while they're doing that. So there was this weird dance of like we want you to stay on top of things, but do only as much as you can and please do something, but we're not telling you to do something. So everyone's sort of saw this coming well, so now. Two and a half weeks into the season what has been the reality pitcher injury people might think be up over time. It's been fairly steady for the last ten years except for this year. Basically right now, three times more pitchers have been injured than the average year and twice the worst year on record in the last ten years. So we're talking about the second day of the season until the eleventh day of the season, and it's up three times. We saw the closure in Toronto Giles, the starting. Starting, pitcher in Chicago Lopez. Ver- lander, we're starting to see more and more injuries plus we all the payroll he wants to say, it's just kind of the ramp up and the slowdown, and the fact that we didn't have a real spring training. Those things are true and that's probably a part of it. But the other thing is also true I. Think the pictures, some of them are throwing harder because it's a shorter season. You see jake degrom who already through really hard now sitting like ninety nine. News after the fastball away and quickly it's. Ninety, nine miles now, some serious fair. From the ground when we started tracking velocity in a real way of and around two thousand and two, the average starters. fastball was eighty nine miles an hour flash forward to. The average fastball for starting pitcher right now is ninety, three eight and the party. You throw the closer you throw to your maximum personal maximum more stress. You put on your elbow on top of that. There's a reliever usage problem right now, relievers are getting half the winds in baseball. They're pitching half the innings. They're pitching more innings than they've ever pitched starters are coming. Coming out in the fourth inning now, and that's putting more onus on the relievers who the short ramp-up wouldn't have meant as much relievers. But Twenty relievers are now on the deal right now, that weren't on day two. So I think the relievers shouldering the burden is part of the problem too.

Baseball Jake Degrom Toronto Chicago
Fresh update on "sprint" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

00:48 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "sprint" discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

"You know he didn't just retire gained forty pounds hang out on the Newport beach. Look look what he's doing because he was such a worker so I think that that's what we gotta teach guys. You know at the end of the day I think as much as we can build bridges for there's no doubt about it but you know back the original question Danny I, you know I tell guys you. You gotta be careful with some of those some of those things that you're reading about because. You end up not playing. You know and even though I'm I'm all for it. I'm I'm on the side. You know there's gotta be a way to do more for the student athletes. you know my thing is the NCA tournament. We make so much money from NCAA tournament in men's basketball you know. I think when we go to tournaments sites. That we should be using money to hire former players as a way to put money in their pocket. And do seminars. Thirty minutes while the kids are just wait around for media sessions and wait and be meaning this walk throughs on the court. That you bring in a former player and let him give a lifestyle for thirty minutes but money in that guy's pocket make a difference in the guys lives in that Locker Room that are getting ready to play in that tournament because the more they hear the truth from God that it played and you can help guys at play it just and any bridge program because Greenberg was talking about to try to help our guys get ready for life after basketball's we gotTA do more. Thanks. Thank you straight today because I. Know You got the day off. We got Rivera Beverly Hill. Rich. Yeah, you know lie tough out here you know your choice of Golf Courses Limited right coach. And then every down in have to I. You know I gotTa go down my main man code savage. Our baseball coaches, ucla she got I gotTa hang a guy that's won the national championship the hopefully it rubs off on you. So I. GotTa go down to your old. Club you know. She'll be. Welcome to come back to any member guest. What's this glares? We'll. We'll. We'll. We gotta go have a reunion down at ranch. You gotta be safe take argument. Thank you, guys. At the finish up now Gimme GimMe Gimme the joke give me the deal on the sadness new famous amateur said to good foods. Minds put them together because if you like to. Use So what what's your new latest sack? Said, here's my theory you got to really like something. Okay. And if you put it together with something you really like. It's always good. So what I did I really like imitation crab meat. I really crappy in. Real crab meat but I mean, let's be honest. I'm not going shocking crabs to you know make no sandwich in the afternoon. So I had some crab me I had some bread toasted bread and I and I really liked pepperoni Ella Pepperoni. My last when I go to jail and I'm in on death row, my last meal is going to be like a reward with cheese of meets the net. So I'm like you know what I'm putting them together through some mail air. This theory is infallible like the anyway it's and it was fantastic. It was a toasted. Imitation fake crab. Up for Owning Olive Oil Mayo Sandwich and I'm not GonNa lie you. That thing would go for twelve bucks at a at a store or at a restaurant. My listeners times crush me and say there's I. Love. Shrimp. I Love Shrimp and I love Ice Cream base tell me shrimp and ice cream would not mix I'm GonNa try that I probably this Sunday my birthday. What number great. Video Hey on some on Monday fitting I frigid I. Know we're. Sprint check. My Mom, my I'm philosophies. This I get killed because I've has women. Did you go to restaurant in finding this your life. Every time restaurant which do. Order, that ditch you know exactly what you're getting You'RE GONNA be happy you'll be fat and happy at the end the meal. And every time I do that let's Maximilian here I get my. PARMIGIANA electric these. And I get looked at like. You got the last time. We took effort said Yeah I like it. What are you do? Something different I said because I know. What is wrong with that nothing? Set why go to that restaurant because I like it, I would challenge our listeners. Now again, you can't say like Broccoli and catch up because I don't like brock. So I wouldn't put it when I wouldn't put Broccoli with them. But I challenge our listeners to say. All right. GimMe something that you really like. Carrot was that you really like and tell me it's bad 'cause it's not always good. Always good. What what's bad about it like there's nothing going into your mouth that you dislike. So, there you go. Set Bird but you gotta really like. That's another great reason. To Nasty last question go speaking get into giving you tired of me today. Date, we have confidence motion. I shows to get ready. I'm going to say based on what makes said Yeah, we'll have it in some fashion or form. We're GONNA have confidence when I. Think some leagues will start earlier than. The will we have an NC double A. Tournament? Yes Here's I got no idea. My newest idea were no contract. TB King football style set at odds..

Broccoli Basketball Ella Pepperoni Ncaa NCA Newport Beach Danny Rivera Beverly Hill Maximilian Baseball Greenberg NC Sprint Ucla Brock
Scot Prohaska on Total Athlete Development

Just Fly Performance Podcast

05:35 min | 6 d ago

Scot Prohaska on Total Athlete Development

"Scott. Welcome to the show. It's awesome to have you here Min. Banks. or It's something myself and my team we listened to you guys all the time on on just fly sports It's got a requirement for anybody that works for me to listen to your podcast though. They'll thank you. Yeah. It's awesome to have you. I mean, I know every time we've talked or I've I've just more and more intrigued by what you do. Because I, know you're not like you're not all over social media. You know you're not. You're but entire, I've just like I am. So I wish before I left. California could've stop by and really excited that chat about your. Your your insight into your system and how before we get into that I'm curious to like and I like getting into this for especially for people who have who see things in such an expansive way. But what was your gateway into coaching like what got you interested in it, and then what were some really big milestones in changing the way that you thought about your process? Yeah I, you know quick Reader's Digest version is. A pretty good athlete grown up back East right and had scholarship offers and was fortunate enough when I was in. Eighth Grade. To walk in the YMCA, fine little dungeon part where all the tough guys athletes working out in in. There was a level five Olympic lifting coach, and saw me with my little fitness books working out and said Hey kid Chimera. I WANNA teach you how to really train and while I was in eighth grade I started training with. Professional, athletes Olympic, athletes learning how to snatch clean squad sprint hurdles. Everything. So was a amazing experience for young kid be pulled into that kind of culture right away. Top properly. And then after. Know went into finance world business world is kinda miserable, but I was always getting fathers and guys played college football with call me when Scotty? Knew so much about this stuff. Helped me, I got a contract or my kids to a scholarship, teach him and I was doing it on the side and just fell in love with it and started growing in saw business opportunity, and then got called sportsmed guy in Toronto like the work I was doing and went up there and started running its clinic work with NHL guys in Canadian Olympians and stuff like that. It just grew from there kind of an organic way of. Loving it as a young young kid. Being, lucky to have someone mentor me and saw how it changed my life, and then fell into coaching. I feel like you're not the. For, some reason the finance and I didn't like it, and then again, the sports perform I. I've heard that story before I. Don't Mac Shakers on here had that too, and I feel like I've heard others. Maybe I do feel like that that like systems kinda thinking or do you think there's any thinking and finance that is helpful for sports is just make quincy dental you are. I think it's I think it's for competitors. We'll always WANNA look at measures of success. And that's kind of a natural thing. Until you realize I work, I work hard to get something and I realized I. Don't like it when I get here, that might not be success but I think finance is a challenging. Competitive. And and you know with detail and all these little nuances you can take and I think that attracts people to feel they wanna feel successful right, and then you realize you're sit in front of a computer all day long. Yeah. I. Can totally see that. Makes that makes sense I. You're speaking of success to ask the first thing. It's official question. I had and I just I guess, I, felt like starting with this rather than jumping right into the six lanes but. What is success in sport mean to you or? Yeah. So. What it used to meet. Right. So we all have these objectives and goals right, and we think that success when we meet that, we're going to be successful when feel successful yet, what happens when you need it? How long does they last for me? It lasts maybe five minutes and then I'm spending the next stuff in saying, okay. GotTa, start grinding now for the school and realizing that my daily experience wasn't great. So, success for me sport or any endeavor is your daily optimize experience that's sustainable over time. So if you're an athlete of Your Business Guy, whatever it is, if you're living your dream, you're loving your days, you're making a contribution feeling fulfilled. Ben. That's success to me. And so that's how I look at it when I get an athlete that. Wants to scholarship, but he's loving the training loving where he isn't high school having great teammates. Great relationships performing on the field. Every day is not future. You know obsessed all the time that successful to me. That makes sense with the process, right? Like. So often we just look at this. What's the goal? Win The Akron serve get the scholarship, but then, but then what I mean. Eventually it just. Eventually. There's think an emptiness. I mean, it's Nice Scholarships for sure. But at some point you get to the top and. Maybe realize you're on the wrong ladder something, but it's Where I've dealt with the most Olympic athletes after an Olympic year while they struggle. Mightily, they struggle with purpose with focus with what it all means. Up the disappointment of even if they got a medal, did feel as good as they thought. But the daily optimal experience their love in their life in the training or joining, they're enjoying the relationships are building that seems to be sustainable

Olympic Banks. Mac Shakers NHL Toronto California Quincy Scotty Official Football Akron
Judge Salas: 'We are living every parent's worst nightmare'

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:30 min | Last week

Judge Salas: 'We are living every parent's worst nightmare'

"New Jersey Federal judge Esther Solace is going public for the first time since her son was killed and her husband was shot at their home last month. A madman Who I believe was targeting me because of my position as a federal judge came to my house. The federal judge who lost her son in ambush attack is demanding change. We're living Every parent's worst nightmare. Making preparations to Barrett Bury our only child. No. Judge Salas said the family was cleaning up after hosting a birthday celebration for 20 year old Daniel and Daniel said, Mom, Let's keep talking. I love talking to you, Mom. It was at that exact moment that the doorbell rang. And before I could say a word. He sprinted upstairs. Within seconds. I heard the sound of bullets and someone scream. No, police say the alleged gunman, self described anti feminist attorney Roy den Hollander killed himself the next day in my case. The monster knew where I lived. And where and what church we attended. And had a complete dossier on me and my family. At the moment, there is nothing We can do to stop it and that Is

Judge Salas Esther Solace Daniel Roy Den Hollander New Jersey Barrett Attorney
Federal judge speaks out after gunman killed son and wounded husband

NBC Nightly News

02:07 min | Last week

Federal judge speaks out after gunman killed son and wounded husband

"Weeks after a gunman shot and killed the son of a federal judge in new. Jersey wounded her husband that judge is now speaking out of the powerful and heartbreaking video statement and Thompson has her story. The weekend was glorious when. It was filled with love and laughter and smiles. Painfully angrily federal. Judge. Esther. Salis describes the weekend she and her husband Mark Andrew celebrated their son Daniel's twentieth birthday and lost him. and. Daniel. Said Mom, let's keep talking I. Love Talking to you. and. It was that exact moment. At the doorbell rang. And then looked at me and said Chris that. And before I could say a word. Sprinted upstairs. Within seconds. I heard the sound of bullets. And someone screaming no. Daniel Being Daniel. Protected his father. And he took tutors. First Bullet Directly to. The. Test. The monster than turns attention to my husband. And began to shoot at my husband. One, shot after another. Mark was shot three times. Salis. Reveals the Shooter Attorney Roy. Den Hollander who appeared in her court had a dossier on her family from where they live to where they worship personal information about judges she says should be private while my husband is still in the hospital recovering from his multiple surgeries. We are living every parent's worst nightmare. Making preparations. To Berry Berry. Our only child? A, plea to prevent a repeat of the tragedy that's broken her heart. This is a matter of life and death.

Salis Daniel Berry Berry Mark Andrew Thompson Den Hollander Chris Attorney ROY
Austin Jochum on Bringing the Training Session to Life

Just Fly Performance Podcast

04:29 min | Last week

Austin Jochum on Bringing the Training Session to Life

"So why? Want to say this. So how it was there a better way to spell your last name then or would there be like Italic so I can have people pronounce it correctly when they read the headline here. Yeah everybody thinks like it's A. Job looks like Josh right here. But if you have really gonNA spell, we probably with a Y Y Y. Que you or something like that since last name just totally jacked up. The I I'm not GonNa lie when saw I think maybe it was when you asked me to. Be On your podcast dry your podcast before I thought it was Josh. So I apologize I just wrote in my little notes I put. Okay You M. so hopefully that eleven maybe that'll resolve things a little bit. So just for everyone out there that'll. Thousand my that was my iteration. And that's where we just have to get to a point as a coach and a company where people in the not to say. That's one of our goals. People say Yoga the right way yeah. Yeah. That'd be good. Creative Project Austin. So I know one of the things that I really like about looking at your work is I. Know that want to know you're really creative coach always love I know this is GonNa be an awesome talk and I was curious you did football I think track a you're into strengthening conditioning. What what was your formation in your years as a college athlete and then your choice to become the type of coach that you are now? Yeah and I think it's funny that you say I'm a creative coach because as a player I was anti creative like from from the very day one. Started lifting in high school with Olympic lifts like straight. Olympic. Style. Monday Wednesday Friday, all we did was clean and jerk clean snatch, and then maybe some bench presents watts and just the differ variation of that and. I mastered swore by those for so many years. That's literally the only thing I ever did. If. We sprinted if we did anything maybe some ladders we did but. The entire program was Olympic lifts swear by it was awesome in highschool got really strong at that. Thought that was the answer. When into my first year college at Saint Thomas Football Kaikan on the field first day we actually lifted before we went on the field we lifted and I was like smoking these guys like smoking on cleaner jerk like doing. More than a lot of seniors on their all I'm here I arrived I'm sweet a freshman. Football, we go to the practice that day and I I my mind was blown I had no idea was happening speed the game was different. Everything was different I'm move to like a robot out on the field and just moved terribly and I started the. To all right, what's happening in the weight room is not what's happening on the field and I need to find a way to bridge that gap and that started the full journey and I think it is a journey because then it was west side stuff on my. All right not the Olympic stuff. Now it's west side. Now it's the powerlifting. Now it's some box. Johnson plow metrics advance to my are still stuck in that weight reminds set of. Bands the bar now GonNa be faster and it helped a little bit I moved just a little bit better. But I think we're just because I was destroying my body a little bit less than the weight room and I still a little bit slower on the field and it was just this journey than it was bilateral to single lateral. Then it was traffic training and this this full hodgepodge of things but never fully breaking out of the weight room mindset never breaking into the movement onset and by the time graduated. At Saint Thomas I had some athletic success on the field and. But it was in a way of I forced myself into a mold of athletic success. I plays Nose Guard and my movement options were very small and I was watching other players and I was doing a job that was required to do doing his thing. I'm field that is required to do but the game move fast for me everything move fast for me I had. Very little movement options I had one may maybe one pass rush move and I was good at the pass rush move. But I didn't have a lot of options people next left and right and me that works out in quotation worked out a lot less than me that they had way more options and that's really where I started to dive into how can I get more movement options for myself? How can I move better? How can I give my athletes the ability to? Now that you have a huge output, you're able to lift a bunch of weight. You're able to sprint really really fast to do all these things. How can we give you options to do this? How can we give you? Can we slow the game down a little bit for you and that's Kind of a little bit of where we started the journey of where Rats Day and hopefully the journey continues for the next ten to fifteen years I can look back at this podcast. About Austin but that's kind of the

Josh Football Saint Thomas Football Kaikan Olympic Powerlifting Austin Saint Thomas Johnson
Miami Marlins suit up for Opening Day against Philadelphia Phillies

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:30 sec | 2 weeks ago

Miami Marlins suit up for Opening Day against Philadelphia Phillies

"The 60 games sprint to the playoffs begins tonight for the Marlins. It can't come soon enough for starting Hurler Sandy L Contra. I can't wait to get outside beyond the miles you know, and leaving 100% after two rounds of spring training manager Don Mattingly says. His guys are are ready ready to to go go at at some some point point that that gate gate comes comes open open and and it's it's it's it's time time for for the the Iran. Iran. The The first first chapter chapter begins begins in in Philadelphia Philadelphia before before this this book. book. Right. Right. We We don't don't know know where where it's it's going going to to go go in in on on chaps look like Hopefully it's ah, straight from start to finish. Miami's home opener is Monday against the

Iran Don Mattingly Philadelphia Marlins Miami
Opening Day Arrives For The Los Angeles Dodgers

Get Up!

02:05 min | 2 weeks ago

Opening Day Arrives For The Los Angeles Dodgers

"We've got the Yankees and the dodgers in separate games in a doubleheader tonight, and they are the Vegas Co favorites this year for those who haven't seen it. What is your world series prediction at the end of this unprecedented sprint of a baseball season? Will Greenie everyone's talking about the Yankees and dodgers and look at their rosters and their stars in the Yankees Got Garrett Cole this off season. The dodgers got bets so I'm going Yankees dodgers and they're just so stacked greeny and Sprint with sixteen games. I'm not sure what's going to happen. There's a lot of crazy things that could happen in two thousand twenty. At those two teams on paper, you have to say they're the world series favorites and you mentioned bets here. Let's get back to him. I don't know that anyone was really expecting on the day before the season began for mookie Betts to sign a three hundred sixty five million dollar contract extension. What was your reaction? First of all good for mookie Betts he's one of the top players in the game at a historically great player, and he's getting to play for the LA dodgers one of the top teams when the top franchises in all of baseball and so men good for Mookie Betts and I. Think a lot of fans are gonNA. Say Oh, well, look you know. Baseball's going to be fine. Players were getting paid, but you really look at why the players were so upset. This off season, and in all these negotiations with the owners is that salaries have not been really increasing with the state of play in Major League Baseball. You look at revenues have pretty much triple. Since Alex Rodriguez's huge contract twenty years ago, franchise values are up seven x in the last twenty years, but yet our top players are still just kind of making a round the same. They've been making for decades, so mookie Betts got a great contract, but I think what you've seen is a lot of teams are spreading these deals out. He's got twelve years right there. Spreading these deals out to stay under the luxury tax. This luxury tax is a problem for major. League baseball players and MOOKIE got his, but a lot of players won't get. There's this off season.

Mookie Betts Dodgers Yankees Baseball Major League Baseball Garrett Cole Alex Rodriguez LA
David Grey on Barefoot Dynamics

Just Fly Performance Podcast

06:47 min | 2 weeks ago

David Grey on Barefoot Dynamics

"You're listening to another episode of just fly performance podcasts. It's awesome to have you guys here. I hope you're having a great week and thanks for tuning in. So, one of the ways I've been evolving in my journey as a coach has been in really getting into more of a joint base model over a muscle based model on not just in Rehab but also in performance. And I've learned this from several coaches, the I was was in the performance, Roman, that was working with the dairy embar, and then I got into it on the Rehab End with Gary Ward at the end of the day. And I'm sure you've seen this. As this podcast has gone along, but but starting with bio mechanics, starting with the model, by which the body organically and naturally moves and going there I, and if it's that's broken than fixing that I rather than. Working jumping to exercises and muscles I and it's the body is a beautiful thing. We learned so much from it in Moi's excited to dig into it and more of what it does. I'm thrilled to have David Gray back on the show David was our guest for episode one sixty. We talked a lot about the link between pro nation the. gluts, incomplete knee extension, sprinting and running and whole lot more. David is a Guy David is a bit of A. A conduit for me in the sense of he was my first exposure to get rewards Wedge System David I have been corresponding the last year on topics of the foot and pro nation. We oftentimes end up working with the same athletes in the online space together me of the performance end him on the Rehab and and bio mechanics, and it's really been an amazing learning experience for me so I wanted to get him back on the show this time. Flip initially flipping the script. We talked a lot about pro nation last time. And I wanted to start off the show actually addressing super nation, just because I think pro nation can prone as the big thing, but we. We don't just focus on one thing like it's not. The human body is not just about one thing or one side of the equation. If you listen to my podcast with Rocky Snyder recently, I had an experience where reducing the sensation of super. Nation in my foot had me feeling a little bit more like. Like my old, my springy high school self, the way that my feet were popping off the ground, and anyway I just wanted to get into that element of the foot, and we also get into a lot of ideas on on barefoot, and why actually we always say barefoot awesome, and it is, but for some athletes and some clients it actually may not be all. It's cracked up to be based on some pre existing factors, so we're start off with a lot of great talk on the foot and super nation pro nation barefoot. And they we're GONNA get into David's thoughts on a joint base model on addressing knee pain, Achilles Pain in David's go to's in making sure that kinetic chain. The integrity of the kinetic chain is there when we're looking at does an athlete. How would it takes to stabilize joins properly to move properly and to have this baseline by which all other strike strength interventions can be effective, so whether you are looking to get out of pain or years looking for a fuller understanding of the human body, and that joint base model by which we move and operate. This is an awesome. Awesome Show David. He's such a wealth of Knowledge David Guy. WHO's learned from the best of the Best Gary Ward Pasta? Restoration Institute the Martial Arts. The list goes on every time I talked to David. I always learned something I'm always so impressed with such the wide lens that he takes on athletics and the human body, so that all being said let's get onto episode to twelve of the podcast here we go. David Mandate. It's good to have you back on the show. Hey thanks very much for me. always great to. Actually saw I checked before I came on its nearly a year since we last on a podcast and we've chatted quite a beating. In that year, but I'm going to go to catch up for sure. Yeah, a lot of lot's happened since our last I guess. There's a lot of chatting and and cool exercises and things we've. We've shared in the virtual space with that in the time that we've talked so. It'll be great to get to a lot of that today and. Last time, the topic was pro nation. And then this is some of the stuff we covered since our last show, but. Super Nation right like I. Mean it's like you have to be appropriate, but I think I'd like to cover the opposite end of that spectrum if we're always looking at the the interrelationship so. Crew start off a little bit. By what is the? We need to be functional and and and build a work well athletically, but what is the importance? Maybe I describe it to, but what's the description, the importance of being able to superstate the foot in human movement. Yeah? I guess, yeah, we did talk about pro nation quite a lot last I'm I'm quite detailed. The forties quite detailed Bush. If you if you want to call it, pro nation, just kind of the flattening the actors of the flush. than super nation will be the opposite. It's kind of the lifting the actions of the Ford in the foot sex. Alaskan coma. A more rigid lever and people would typically say pro nation is a bad thing and super nation is a good thing, and in reality one doesn't exist without the other. There is no down. There is no left without Roy. On deeper. Are Stalking one of these shootings tend to be the people who have a problem so would see that people who are. On, it's not necessarily about Harrier. showed are any part of your body how it looks. It's it moves and we had this conversation. A little bit recently is why. It's very much about how your foot moves, so if if you look like you have a more pro-native flush. All you would be much happier with you. Having more prone naked are slack force that can actually. Experienced some super nation on some pro nation than someone who looks like they have reading noise neutral looking. For actually can't experience either and so it's not that Pro Nation Gordon Super Nation is bad. Our voice farsight so that we need boats. It's like saying it's like saying the people who say that pro nation is bad. It's like. You shouldn't your spine to the left because you're splitting, should go left and Royce on your foot should go less than Roy on opened their own an in and out, and all these different ways, and that's where moves and if you're going to. If you're going to walk through, should woods you think of where we came from in forest or something like that and your photos is landing on a different tweet in different rock. Rock on every single footstep. Ken, in Footsteps Day Probably Double Dash at our ancestors than your foot, better habitat variability on better be able to react to the surface that you're that you're moving on, and that kind of reaction to this office is a pro nation. Not kind of push off is more of a super

Guy David Gary Ward David Gray David Guy ROY David Mandate Gary Ward Pasta Knee Pain MOI Rocky Snyder Stalking Royce KEN Bush Restoration Institute The Mart
Recipe edition, Joshua Owens-Baigler

Monocle 24: The Menu

03:32 min | 3 weeks ago

Recipe edition, Joshua Owens-Baigler

"Name's Josh Aaron Spangler. Iraq founder of Angelina restaurant and Tilson. And today I'm going to show about signature dishes temporary tomatoes with actually pester. It's a super simple recipe to make it. Takes a little bit of time, but it's something that you can. Join and go back to go along the ingredients a quite flexible, so feel free to use whatever you having a Lotta what I'm going to start with start with the tomatoes. So, we're going to dry tomatoes very slowly. Low, temper off, so we're going to start a hundred degrees. Stop Prohibiting. For the tomatoes look for good quality heritage tomato with thick skin. We're GONNA look for about five to seven cents meters across GonNa. CUT THEM IN HALF WITH AIN'T GONNA. Drizzle a little bit of sugar. That salt time secret ingredient in the restaurant news does she granules? Get those that's amazing, little bit of time in the spice, splendor and then they. As well, just a little bit like seasoning. One sprint coo over the tomatoes, and we placed them at a preheated of two hundred degrees as I, said previously. We leave those for an hour. And then offer an hour. We turned down to about seventy five degrees, and we leave that for four or five hours. I'm going to move on to how you make the Pesto so again. This is super flexible. Don't panic! There's one ingredient missing substitutive something similar. It's really from thing to make so we start with some newly put capers then add salted anchovies. We add a big handful of parsley when I mentioned, these ingredients are like to go by large handful all in equal parts and keep tasting as you go along together to how you like him a handful of. A handful of activities, a big handful of Parsley, big handful of mint. If you have a couple of she leaves, if not comply with any green hub to nine suppliers, colic, some salt and pepper, a little touch of olive oil and the show chef secret. If outs, ice keeps you keep a beautiful green color. Now I recommend trying to keep your Pesto as dry as possible, so you're gonNA have to have a spatula to have this going to be quite difficult to get going in the blender, but the hard work has really really worth it once you've made that. I would put aside at the Fridge and get your favorite book out rate for three hours white for those to cook. About half an hour before you're ready, we're GONNA. Make ourselves a really simple type per. And, that's with two hundred and fifty grams off cornflour or Either a walk just the same five hundred grams preferably of zero zero pasta flour. If no plane flying will work, and then lead of Soda Walter Secret Hair has gotten. As cold as you can't put it in the fridge for a couple of hours, we'll put it in the freeze of ten minutes, and the code is the better result you're going to get in. A Pan on the side can have a source preferably with a thick bottom and we're going to start. Some flour oil to fry that's. Where aiming for about one sixty five degrees, which means that if you're doing a small source panel I recommend taking the oil two hundred ninety degrees that way when you drop the tomatoes and the temperature of the oil withdraw. They're gonNA cook really nicely when she reached about hundred and eighty degrees. You've gotta work quite quickly so you the oil we're going to take those beautiful Tamalpais dry out the other. We're GONNA dipped in the batter, and then straight into the oil and we're GONNA flip them. I would say often about ten seconds. Every now and again. I should be ready in about two minutes. If you touch the players, a pair of metal tongues, you'll see that he starts to get crispy outside on. That signifies that they're ready to think cooked already, so don't worry about it. Smells is just worry about how crispy batter as

Parsley Josh Aaron Spangler Iraq Soda Walter Secret Hair Tilson Founder COO
Dan Kiernan interview

The Functional Tennis Podcast

04:40 min | 3 weeks ago

Dan Kiernan interview

"Welcomed episode fifty six of the functional tennis podcast I'm Fabio. Malate your host this week. I speak Don Kiernan a former pro who sit up a great academy in Sodo Grand The in Spain this episode we split into two shows this week. We'll talk about how don got into tennis winning around the Wimbledon and his road to open the Soda Tennis Academy as well as an in depth. Look into life at the academy next week. Week we'll be back with Don. Thomas how used the covert pandemic as an opportunity grow worldwide, and we also took deeply mental health issues in tennis, it or podcast sponsors head on. If you're on twitter, please give us a follow over at Funk tennis. That's F.. U.. N. C. Tennis. We have restarted our twitter account on. Want to be more active over there, and it's a great way to connect witter listeners. Okay, that's get started. Hi Don Williams Functional Tennis Podcast Bobbio. Thanks. Thanks for having me. It's been a while I've been wanting to get you on. For various reasons, one being of no from Soda Tenths Academy Long Before I started functional tennis true. My pile and you're in another lsu alumni like yourself. James Clusky did a bit of training. What you over there at the lots right I mean not not going back. Somebody's Fabio but. Yet James would come out. You know every now and then and actually back in the day. Liam broady and I'm sure James Old. Thank me for this story. He actually beat tweeted a physical testing and he beat Liam broady in the sprints. And he's ever let Liam from at down. You know so the the good old days and Diaries players over the as well the connection speed strong I. Don't believe I don't believe Clusky WanNa Erase. We have a video someone. The archives I think it was potentially down to Liam Brody's lack of effort a little bit, but but hey, at the end of the day still. On the day And Liam GonNa have time for it ever. Since that's for sure, you find that you got to send that to me to. Also we have a top academies, a list on functional tennis and we just don't WanNa ride. A best top academies are Sotos entered. That will enter that list. When this podcast is live, you'll be on that list, so it's great to speak to the founder onto the main man who's who said up the academy, and that's why I want to this podcast as As well, we've done it with a few of their economies on. It's great, and it just gives listeners a better insight into the Academy Rotterdam. Some information you send me how far from the airport all that SORTA stuff so to speak and get your values on C.. Bit More in depth had the academy Ron's I I really appreciate that Fabio naught, and any you know any supports categories like ourselves can get from from platforms like yourself is is is massively appreciated. You know and. On. All questions on on any topic as honestly as possible. So anything you want to know about the academy we can, we can. We can get into the detail Shuba Great. That's fantastic and. Is a no German covert has been tougher. All academies coaches players for everybody every line of business, but I think you've handled it really well. You've been really progressive. and. You've been really busy I heard. You say you haven't been off. Have Not Day off and fourteen weeks like that since went is covert, really started and I want to hear more Beth data. What worked for you? What didn't work about you and how I fade? You'RE GONNA commander. This stronger than you did going into it, which is not the case for everybody, so be great to get some insight into that the obsolete. It's been a fina testing challenge. Challenge in time I think the everybody globally in offset it on a couple of our podcasts. It's almost that I think that's helped us all little bit that everybody's in the same boat you know. I think is been a there's been a connection that people have made through this pandemic and I always a big believer. The adversity says a lot you know, says a lot about tennis. Pledges says a lot about people I have to admit I had a brilliant. Brilliant team over the last few weeks you know. I sometimes get some of the praise for the initiatives, but there's a law. Grad people behind me that doing the work and work and extremely hard, while so feel very fortunate and feel feel very connected to my team and brought us closer together, and you know like like you said I. Hope a law because things will come out of this as well.

Tennis Soda Tennis Academy Liam Broady Fabio Liam Brody N. C. Tennis James Clusky Soda Tenths Academy Funk Tennis DON James Old Twitter Don Kiernan Liam Academy Rotterdam Don Williams Shuba Great Spain LSU Thomas
Streaks and records that will be cut short by MLB's 60-game season

830 WCCO 24 Hour News

02:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Streaks and records that will be cut short by MLB's 60-game season

"Is supposed to start. Uh late next week, the twins will open up against the White Sox in Chicago. It's a 60 game sprint. And it's going to be unlike anything we've seen, isn't it? Always. Definitely it's going to be exciting because every game very important, obviously, even in 162 games scheduled, but there's no room for area for three or four game losing streak. It could wipe you out in a 50 game season. Yeah, and to expound on your point. I saw this a couple of weeks ago. Every win is like 2.5 wins in a regular 162 game season. Every losses like 2.5 defeats. So if you win three straight games that's essentially like 7.5 wins. Basically, you lose 45 in a row. That could be a big setback in it. Oh, most definitely, and the mindset of your ball club. You know if there is pressure during this season, and you know what he what I like is getting prepared for the season some of their young talent. Having an opportunity to show their skills in there. We'll hit a slot games you're playing. I know I saw Perloff last year and I thought, you know he did enough to spring training last year to make the team but you know he was behind the extra al pewter. You know that between Cary because they have more talent will not more talent but more experience. So I'm good to see Karloff doing well and he'll be available for us this year. Any concerns about Louise Arise, Byron Bucks and some of the guys getting banged up in this spring training 2.0, Well, you know me personally, I believe, bustin. If you get him, he's a bonus. It just seems like if it could happen, it happened to him. Some people would say, Well, he plays hard, which he does. But you know he's not on the field enough for me. We've got a plan for somebody to take his place if he's ready to go Yeah, no question. Look, the pandemic has been a bummer when it comes to sports, But maybe it's been a good thing for the twins in the sense that Rich Hill should be ready to go. And some of these veteran pitchers like Homer Bailey Kenta Maeda that they W maybe fresher longer than they would be in a typical longer season. Almost definitely of I. You know, If there's some good to come out of this situation, Mr Hill will be ready to go for the Minnesota Twins, an important acquisition or, you know, that's a fun office picked up so I'm really excited not only just to be able to watch some baseball whether their fans or not, but I think this team has enough talent, and Rocco has prepared him in such a way. I'm sure that they'll be ready when the bell wing

Byron Bucks White Sox Bailey Kenta Maeda Minnesota Twins Rich Hill Perloff Chicago Karloff Cary Rocco Louise
Woodbine Revised 2020 Stakes Schedule Starts Tomorrow

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

03:24 min | 3 weeks ago

Woodbine Revised 2020 Stakes Schedule Starts Tomorrow

"Colony. What's being? Was Our industry starved the week presented by Stuart. Morris Equine Forum tomorrow morning, eight to ten am eastern time serious to nineteen excellent to a one stream it live horse racing radio. Dot. Net all right up at woodbine couple of stakes, races, tomorrow, Mile, and a sixteenth greed, three trillium on the all weather up there We. Get a field of eight phillies and mass. To Go The eight and a half furlongs. This was a tough one. I thought body. There's a lot of wage going here. Yeah I'M GONNA take a little bit of stab here. I'm I'm wondering. If number one super escape can steal this race. To me. It looks like she's the only true speed in the field. Maybe number seven another time WHO's shown. Very moderate speed at times, but I think if they break evenly. Super Escape is faster. She's been sprinting. Relax too I think she's better routing than she is sprinting. In fact, she's two for two on non turf surfaces. Atta Mile and a sixteenth including one for one on the all weather at Woodbine. She's got the inside post I think she's going to get out and go and her good racers good as anyone else. She's ten to one on the morning line one. I'd be most afraid of is number. Three art of almost Herat Field Emma Jayne Wilson Mason last time out. On the turf at Woodbine and She's run well on turf, or on the all weather axes been in the money, all four starts on the all weather at Woodbine, so I would expect art of almost to be the one who's closing most at super escape. I'm an both of them, but super escape at ten to one interesting. Nice price is price even better prices being at home The Keep in mind by the way the seven another time cross entered in the royal north, so we'll see where trainer Barbara minshull decides to run her daughter of money. She's cross entered in the very next race. That will talk about a minute or so here Like you I wanted to go a little bit of a different direction here I'm GonNa take the six painting for Josie Carroll. Who stretching out of for the first time old for races have been sprints. She's closed nicely. And all those Frenchies by distorted humor out of an AP in the mayor can't imagine a stretch out. It's GonNa hurt her 'cause probably bring her into the race a little earlier as well I I I thought she was a little interesting in he I. Don't know why she hasn't been lot that bugs me. All know why she hasn't been long yet in her career, but I will I'll try and get painting turns Josie. Carroll trains dollar store. Store, Jim, the six painting from me in the trillium race number nine grade to royal north six furlongs. On the turf, the outer EP Taylor Turf Course. Again. We'll see what another time does she to one in the trillium? She's five one of the morning line in this royal north we had a field of nine depending on graduates. And I leaned a number five sister peacock once again thought she might be the speed of the speed. She's got a win. Third Place Finisher tour credit in two tries on the turf at Woodbine.

Josie Carroll Woodbine Atta Mile Phillies Emma Jayne Wilson Mason Morris Equine Forum DOT Herat Field Stuart Barbara Minshull JIM
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | Last month

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
Training Topics of Speed and Power Development in American Football and Field Sports

Just Fly Performance Podcast

06:43 min | Last month

Training Topics of Speed and Power Development in American Football and Field Sports

"Hey everybody welcome to another show, so this one is a little different and instead of me, interviewing someone or instead of throwing out a Q. and A. and answering your questions I'm actually being guest interviewed by a guy who has an absolute stud resume in the field, and that is Josh hingst. I will say so. Josh I I meant to interview him for a long time now, but Josh flip the script on me and asked if he could interview me on a speed and power in related training topics for American football. When I say football really no matter what sport you work with it, it's this is really applying concepts of of speed bio mechanics for team sports so so American football team. Sport and really translating sprinting speed, and by a mechanic topics really into that environment the. Josh has a superstar resume. He's the head strength coach of the two thousand eighteen super bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles. He's had past experience with the Jacksonville Jaguars the University of Nebraska the Atlanta Falcons as well as Florida State University. Josh multi talented, not only is he a strength coach and Ex Anna successful. When at that doing? A lot of work particularly with the Eagles in integration of Sports, science, and really being on the cutting edge there, he also is a sports nutritionist and has done a lot of work in the past in the realms of sports nutrition at some of his previous stops in twenty thirteen, he co-authored Athletes Guide to sports supplements out when he was at the University of Nebraska. I I met Josh back in two thousand four in Barcelona Spain, and it's been phenomenal to be able to stay in touch with him. Since then I'm super humbled. He wanted to interview me. This is like a it was a great opportunity to share my thoughts and put some thoughts together on these topics, but again just super humbling to be interviewed by a person with such awesome resume who I've been trying to get as a typical interview. Guests for this show so anyways we'll. We'll get onto it here just a couple of quick topics that we are. are going to run through is sprint a sprint, development and sprint mechanic development and speed drills particularly as it pertains to team sport. We're GONNA get into concepts on training foot. some particular concepts that I've that really stuck with me from a dairy bar that I've learned from him and how that Pertain Sport? We're GONNA. Talk about is metric, hamstring, injury, prevention and more. This was a really fun talking. I, hope you guys enjoy it so so let's get onto it episode to ten guest interviewer. Josh, thinks, and I have any conversation on speed and power topics. All I. I wanted to start off by Sharon. You know just the thank you for You know it's not often that you know people. Like me. Get a chance to thank people like you that you know that you're learning from that. You're progressing from. N. A just appreciated that. You know it's been a really good thing. I that there's others in the field like Mike in my shoes. That want to say that and. Yeah so I. Just I mean a lot of different thoughts. I mean. I think probably for me. You know I think you know a lot of the questions that you of have chewed on and and some of your interests. It's fun because I think we can all see where your brains at sometimes based on some of the people that you're bringing on the podcast with. Health or Of different things like that, but I think it's all really good good stuff, but I guess the first question I had is is probably one that you've answered a lot I think it's just more or less your take on some speed mechanics and running drills, and those application teams or seen I. Think a lot of people in my view. Shoes are like. Like well. We're not going to change that now. You know we're getting twenty three year old athletes in you know. Are we wasting our time in those types of things, or are you feel what you would do? You think that we can make make change. In how much time and energy do we devote to these things? Yeah, so that's a good question. I would say just in my time working with team sports in the running situation and thinking about it, and watching and observing as well I, think the I'll start with the good, actually because I think that it's in my nature to sometimes be a little contrarian as I was mentioning before we start recording I try to stay balanced. Try to really still like both sides of the equation, so with the common sprint drills as the bees, and whatever else there isn't all the marching type stuff 'cause I guess if we think of Sprint Joe. We think of a march. It's not going to fast horizontally. You're slowing the horizontal component down so there's some things in the vertical plane that. You can work on. It's all start with the positives I i. do think that there's always a bandwidth I mentioned this and speed strength, but I think that even if there's a disconnect between the actual mechanics in a marching bass drill for an athlete who might be a very muscular type athlete like they're very muscle driven they they tend to really squat deep in their movements, which isn't a bad for being a football player and Rennick Selah Rating. That's really important. But for someone who may not be in touch with their feet so much I think it gives a good opportunity to give them exposure for some of the vertical contacts ply metric in some ways so I I think that's okay. I don't have a problem with that I. Think it's the poll, the pole or was it dried mock or I think he's Polish when he came up with that stuff. It was really because they couldn't run I. don't know how many indoor tracks they had, and they just had to come up with a creative way to maintain. Muscle specific conditioning for sprinters, so if we think of if I'm a football player, a basketball player, and most of my movement is with a lower center of mass, and it's a little more specific to half the change. Directions quickly which I. wouldn't if I was a football player, I wouldn't WanNa really run like a sprinter because that's sometimes I think about if I'm spending more time in the air by nature, I need to the the the time for me to make a decision is is more or less are basically it's going to if it takes me longer to put my foot down. Now I can't change directions as quickly and I will say and I don't WanNa deviate from the question of sprint because I'm going to get there, but me and a dairy bar have been talking just in attract context about strategies to athletes run the four hundred and a lot of these athletes who are dying at the end of the race die because they don't. They can't switch strategies like they run one way. Way Whereas Wade. Van Niekerk does different things with his arms and legs on the Ben. The key switches strategy so this makes out I do think it is valuable for a football player or team sport athlete to be able to have different strategies, but I wouldn't I would never watch a football player, run and think man. You need to run as long as you're not running away. It's GonNa. Get you hurt. Excessive anterior till and the backside mechanics, poor backside macaques that come with the anterior till I. Get that we want to minimize those, but I don't necessarily need to see. Run same

Josh Hingst Football Philadelphia Eagles Jacksonville Jaguars Eagles Barcelona Spain University Of Nebraska Van Niekerk Sharon Wade Mike Florida State University Atlanta Falcons Basketball
Weekend Stakes Preview Presented by NYRA Bets

The Horse Racing Radio Network Podcast

03:48 min | Last month

Weekend Stakes Preview Presented by NYRA Bets

"The victory ride kicks off the stakes action here at Belmont Park tomorrow afternoon grade three early in the caught has just the feel of five phillies. GOING TO GO Six and a half furlongs as for the three year old's warning line favors one francs. Rock Cat Hall of Famer Bill Will Give Fellow Hall of Famer John Velazquez a leg up and this phillies done very little wrong on her career. She's three for seven. With four second-place finishes ran second in a couple of graded stakes, including the grade one spin away up at Saratoga last year last seen winning a third level allowance optional claimer. She uses stakes. Winner took the any limit kick off three year old season three starts back. and. Probably the only reason that this race isn't later in the card is that it's a five Horsfield and Franks? Rakhat is three to five on the morning line, and she may be the the loan speed in race, so she's going to be tough to beat at three to five, but that's a pretty short price, considering there some pretty good up and coming phillies near now I think number four center. I'll I'm going to give her another shot for. For Chad Brown and Joel Rosario Sheila Great Getting Her Maiden Win Gulfstream Park, when bet down to three to five at the end of March then came back in a tough allowance race at Churchill downs where she was really over bet, she was three to five that day against another very impressive maiden winner of this one for Steve Asmussen in casual casual ran a great race that day center I'll had all sorts of problems. She didn't break that well. She had trouble during the race, and she was just really never in at any point. I think it's a racy can kind of draw a line through? If she runs closer to the way she did and her debut. I think she's the one that could give Franks rock cat. The biggest problem Franks rocket will probably get the lead I would think Rosario would have center I'll sitting justin behind her and seeing if they can outgun into the line going six and a half furlongs. With you I'm going to take a shot with center. Rile planner. If? When I plan! Early took five tomorrow I will use both Franks rocket and center, but I'll tell you what I think. You can make a case also for up in smoke was undefeated and sprints. She's four five and a career. Lone blemish came when George Weaver tries to stretch her out Hollywood wildcat. Go at Gulfstream Park. She's raced exclusively of Gulfstream, in fact, steady diet once. Once a month February march April may June now. She gets a race in July. Here over Big Sandy, she wanted the game face overboard last time out for weaver Rod Ortiz Junior. Who wrote her in her debut against fellow Florida breads down at Gulfstream Park's in the climb back aboard for the first time. Since that day looks, you'll need a little help up front if Franks, rockets able to set an easy pace I. She's going to be very very tough. I think Senator I'll be the first one to come calling. Those are the two up in smoke. If you're looking to three deep, I don't think you need to center for Bobby and I race number three goes as the great three six and a half for a long victory ride go to the end of the card. Eleven race card like I said earlier, and the final four races make up an all stakes pick four, and it starts in reasoning with the greed three poker. Flat Mile on the turf for many years. This was the fourth of July staple. On the naira calendar here it is now as part of a super five stakes card. In, the poker though. On the widener, so they come out of that shoot. On the clubhouse turn we get a field of eight entered for the turf as a main track. Only it's all relevant with the way. The weather's been here. I would imagine you know there's supposed to be some rain. We're recording the show Friday afternoon supposed to be some rains rather day on Friday and into the evening. I can't imagine it enough to take this off the turf, so let's say it will be a field of eight.

Franks Gulfstream Park Phillies Joel Rosario Belmont Park Rock Cat Hall John Velazquez Bill Will Rod Ortiz Junior George Weaver Steve Asmussen Rakhat Churchill Downs Senator Chad Brown Florida Hollywood Bobby Sheila Great
Dish now owns Boost Mobile, following sale from T-Mobile

Daily Tech News Show

00:25 sec | Last month

Dish now owns Boost Mobile, following sale from T-Mobile

"Announced Wednesday it has completed its purchase of boost mobile from sprint dishes. Acquisition of boost mobile was one of the conditions required for the approval of the merger of. Sprint. Current boost customers will keep their service which is run on sprint's. However new users phones will be activated using the t mobile seven area which dish rents and existing users can take their phones to abuse store if they WANNA, get switched over to that wider service network to.

Sprint
Yanks optimistic Judge, Paxton, Hicks, Stanton healthy

Baseball Tonight with Buster Olney

00:22 sec | Last month

Yanks optimistic Judge, Paxton, Hicks, Stanton healthy

"The Yankees are optimistic, concerning the health of Aaron Judge and other star players given an extra three and a half for their brittle stars to heal. The Yankees will closely monitor the condition. Condition of judge James Paxton Aaron Hicks and Giancarlo Stanton ahead of the season general manager Brian Cashman said. We want these players to withstand a sixty game sprint over a sixty six game schedule,

Yankees Aaron Judge Brian Cashman Aaron Hicks Giancarlo Stanton James Paxton General Manager
Your Present is Soon Your Past

Developer Tea

05:59 min | Last month

Your Present is Soon Your Past

"Your perspective is centered on now. You see everything as something that is either happening in this moment or something that will be categorized as the future. Or categorized as past. But. It's very hard to imagine that the now. Will soon be considered the past, but what's even harder to imagine is that the now was once the future. And that at some point in the past you imagined. The now you imagined whatever was happening today. And likely. You imagined it differently. That's what we're talking about in today's episode. My name is Jonathan Control. You're listening to velvety, and my goal on the show is to help driven developers like you find clarity, perspective and purpose in their careers. So if you think about this for a second, there's a lot of insightful thoughts that can come from. Kind of lingering on this thought the idea that your perspective. You can imagine that you have kind of like a camera and the camera can look at time, and they can see it in these three distinct formats. Into the future into the now we'll talk a little bit more about what that means a second and then into the past. And in both directions in future, and into the past the further away it gets the more fuzzy it seems to be. And at some point. Incomprehensible, there's no picture that you can imagine at some point into the future. That is even close to accurate. And though we have some record of things that have happened in the past, even looking back on those things, there is some level of distortion that is inevitably going to happen because you are distanced from that event, the certainly happens as a result of simply non existing if we look far enough back into the past. We weren't alive. And so everything that we know of events that happened before we were alive. Are regurgitation. They're things that we learned that believed from someone else. Perhaps we have evidence of those things actually occurring, but the end of the day those are not memories are not things that we actually experienced ourselves. Now. Believe it as an exercise to the listener to go and. Do some research on the faulty nece of memory. Suffice it to say that memory is not an incredibly reliable mechanism. We can substitute memories for example things that we've heard from other people. We can imagine that we did them. If we've heard them enough and so our memories, even when we recall them are changing, but nevertheless this system of looking into the future, looking into the past is based on this somewhat faulty recording mechanism. But when we think about nine now. When we think about what's happening now. We'd like to exclude now from any of our critical thinking. So. How does this happen exactly well? When we look into the future, we make plans. We think with intention about what we want to happen. Or even if we don't necessarily think about what we want to happen, we think about what is likely to happen. This is a fundamental human attribute to imagine the future to play out different scenarios, even if only because of our own survivals were doing this even involuntarily. The more distant we go once again. Of course it gets fuzzy, but the further out we go, the more human those thoughts are. For example we can imagine unlike any other animal what the world might be like. We are no longer here. Additionally. We can imagine what the world was like before we existed. But as we look into the future, we imagine. And we create plans. We have intentions. We think critically about cause and effect. Similarly, we can look into the past and we can easily critique our previous actions. This idea that hindsight is twenty twenty. Shows us that we can easily look into the past with an eye of critique. Now. Why is it that we can look into the future with an eye for planning? We can look into the past with an eye. Four critique part of the reason is because we are not experiencing either of those things where imagining them. And, so when we think back, even though we were a part of that, maybe we did experience it. We're still having to imagine it. We're not imagining in the same way that we might construct something that never happened where imagining what it was like when it did happen. When we imagine things, we put ourselves a fairly low stakes environment. This means that we can be critical past cells because. We're sitting here now. Are Opportunities of being better. Are Abundant. And if we think into the future, we can be overly optimistic rather than realistic. We can imagine that even though we've never stuck to diet plan, but this is the year on the first of January. We're going to stick to it. More to the point of Software Engineering, we can imagine that even though we've never been able to estimate the amount of time necessary to complete a given sprint. Suddenly. This sprint will be different. And we can do this because we're separated. We're not experiencing the sprint. That's in front of us where imagining it.

Jonathan Control Software Engineering
"sprint" Discussed on The Everyday Innovator Podcast

The Everyday Innovator Podcast

02:42 min | Last month

"sprint" Discussed on The Everyday Innovator Podcast

"They have to be burning the midnight oil staying up late answering emails or whatever? It's kind of Nice to have that pressure release valve of saying you know we're GONNA we're. GonNa we're GONNA start the sprint on Tuesday on Monday. We want you to kind of clear the decks and take care of anything big. That's going to pop up. And then you're free to focus the rest of the week I think that's a for a lot of teams sort of in the in the real world. That's a really good use of that. Astro v Day. Suggestion and as you said right. If you get to the end of the at maybe the way you had envisioned the outcome being that still incredible learning, we may have saved ourselves months of going down the wrong path right? Yeah, well. Yeah, even a failed sprint quote unquote failed. Sprint is is not really a failure. Because like you, said you. You undoubtedly learned a ton of stuff. So, take us through the recipe. If we have the five day spree in mind, where do we start was the key things here? Sure the most important thing is that you have a big problem or opportunity, so design sprints don't make sense when you work on a little thing a little feature. Sort of a nice to have project or you know kind of conceptual. Maybe this kind of this interesting thing. We're thinking about because you're asking. A lot of people are asking for a lot of time. A lot of focus and we find that sprints work best when they're focused on something. That's really important. The type of thing that's keeping people up at night. The type of thing that you've been having meetings about for weeks or mom and you can't quite seem to to get any traction, so that's important thing is. A big problem. Need to gather a team. You WanNa have sort of a team that that reflects represents the real team who's responsible for designing this product or moving this metric or reaching this type of customer or whatever your your problem is. And then of course, the time, and so within the five day framework. Assuming that you you've kind of blocked off of a five day WORKWEEK, Monday to Friday week. There is basically one big goal per day. And again it's all in pursuit of that realistic prototype, and that customer test on Friday, but the there's sort of a series of of activities they all roll up to one big goal per day, and then all those big goals roll up to that that big moment at the end of the week. Monday is all about problem framing so Monday. We call that the mapping day, so you're basically creating a shared map of the problem that you're working on. And this is. This is kind of feels weird to people. Sometimes because you're, you're slow, you're you're going slow so that you can go fast..

Sprint Astro
"sprint" Discussed on The Everyday Innovator Podcast

The Everyday Innovator Podcast

03:34 min | 6 months ago

"sprint" Discussed on The Everyday Innovator Podcast

"To just build it but you describe this afterwards as designed sprint slump. So what do you mean by slump? That kind of scenario where. It's the design. Sprinter anything really. You talked about experiences with design thinking sessions and whatnot Have you ever been in a situation where you know? You're kind of sitting doing Irregular Work and you know the sticky notes are still on the walls. It's GONNA mocking. You say we haven't done anything with this or maybe they're even starting to like slowly fall off the walls like you know little leaves like really frustrating and There's there's a few few reasons why this is the case Often these kinds of will It will discover new opportunities sometimes especially in big companies. We might discover opportunity that has no because the current org structures. Don't support this idea. That the cross cutting or you know. Just it's just so new and so different that We don't even know what what. Vp This would fall under for instance even if there is a clear home for a if we haven't had a discussion upfront around resources and set expectations that this work is going to result in more work. And we're not fun this opportunity that we we We uncover a refine If we don't have that conversation up front than we can't You know dog air funds or set stuff aside or or even put things in motion that will Be Mean we have budget etc so that means that once we find the discovery then we had to wait around for all that stuff to happen and often if we start those processes in parallel. They can they can. They can short in that time. We might have to wait if at all and so ultimately you know there's a whole host of reasons why this can be but as SMS since it's the fact that these these types of workshops can lead to a lot of momentum a lot of progress on a short amount of time and often. It's much shorter than what would happen if you did not take these approaches so it happened that creates a vacuum right it. You just also compress time. And if you didn't if you didn't think about the stuff that needs to come atra and pull in compressed that and pull it forward as well that void still gonNA be there. And and you're GONNA Digress You'RE GONNA go back to normal habits and doing the things that you way you've always done them and And it's going to be harder to get that momentum back Especially if people look at it from the perspective of like what we already invested in Zion. Sprint didn't work out and so it's really important to make sure that to to harness that momentum and ends An kind to nurture it so that you can maintain cap so we need to dive into that part just hit rate way said this applies to any kind of innovation effort right for invasion retreat or some kind of idea management system where a bunch of ideas all of a sudden the design thinking design sprint. Same problem if we end up with something that we want to pursue and we can have this issue of how would find the resources into the organization like I love these insights the Douglas's sharing about design.

Sprint Vp Zion Douglas
"sprint" Discussed on WSJ What's News

WSJ What's News

04:42 min | 9 months ago

"sprint" Discussed on WSJ What's News

"A federally subsidized program. Sprint is now facing potential settlement with the Federal Communications Commission the regulator said in September that sprint improperly collected tens of millions of dollars in federal subsidies for eight hundred eighty five thousand customers. who weren't using the service as part of lifeline? Joining joining me now with more on this Wall Street Journal exclusive is reporter Sara Krause. So let's start by talking about lifeline program. This is a federal program that was created back in the nineteen eighty s for low income users and the idea was to give them access to emergency services. Tell us how it worked then. Sure so what this program is meant to do is almost like like the snap. Food benefits is to provide lower income Americans with some sort of cell phone service that allows them to either reach nine one one or stay in contact with family or a potential employer at a discounted rate and so carriers receive a government subsidy for providing this service and customers either get free service or at a discount it depends is on their income. Requirements are met and you found that throughout the program's history. It's already been revamped several times. Yes this is a fairly contentious program that the FCC under different administrations has debated what to do about it. How to overhaul it how to make sure that there is less fraud or abuse in it? It's a program that has struggled with troubles. Verifying customers. Initially customers would sell verify one. Change put that onus on carriers it's been subject to abuses from from aggressive sales tactics and sales incentives that you weren't within the spirit of the program so this is a this is a program that has been revamped several times in the past fast. So let's talk about your recent reporting and this was a Wall Street Journal exclusive that sprint over counted the active users in this program. What it sprint tell you and what did you hear from the FCC sprint currently faces a potential of regulatory settlement with the FCC four collecting tens of millions of dollars in subsidies for about eight hundred eighty five thousand lines that were improperly counted? What I discovered was that the problem actually dates back further than that so there were sort of two issues of not properly counting usage edge? The one that the FCC has disclosed has to do with sprint counting. Incoming calls that went to voicemails outgoing calls which kept lines that we're supposed to be dormant went active. What I discovered was back in two thousand thirteen and two thousand fourteen? There was another usage counting issue in which incoming text messages kept align active improperly and so that the company was never find for they shed some subscribers in Oregon but told organ officials at the time according to documents that I saw that it it was a a more widespread problem than just that state and so the Oregon Public Utility Commission which discovered both the two thousand thirteen two thousand fourteen problem as well as the most recent issue found found that in one case for example a woman who had died months earlier her line was still counted as active even though she obviously was not using the device and that was because incoming text messages were counted as usage. So what are the implications for sprint. It's unclear what happens next to the FCC is currently investigating the issue that they had already identified in in terms of the voicemail issue and sprint said that the most recent issue was caused by an inadvertent coating issue in two thousand seventeen. So there were lifeline. Rule changes in two thousand sixteen eighteen carriers who provide the service then sort of adjusted their filters in IT systems to react to those changes and sprint has said it was a coding issue. At the time that caused the most recent problem there was also in response to Oregon officials in the documents that I saw back in two thousand thirteen in two thousand fourteen sprint. Said you know this is also filtering issue you. We thought that the the definition of keeping align active might evolve to include tax messages. And we you know. Accidentally put that into motion now and didn't realize is it until Oregon brought it to their attention and the thing I wanted to mention is what we're talking about when we talk about line. Usage is the lifeline program has a requirement that the customers that are receiving in the service. Actually use it. They don't WanNa keep lying open and the carrier shouldn't receive a subsidy if the consumer is not using it so there's various standards for what counts as usage. A lot of that has to do with outgoing calls. And data usage something that suggests that the consumer is actively using their device. So are there implications for other wireless carriers that use the lifeline program program and receive federal subsidies. I would say that this is perhaps a reminder of the burden of making sure that you are measuring usage accurately because you are collecting in a government subsidy and the Process Wall Street Journal reporter Sara Krause joining me in our studio in New York. Thank you so much thank you garage..

Sprint FCC Wall Street Journal Sara Krause Oregon Federal Communications Commiss Process Wall Street Journal Oregon Public Utility Commissi fraud New York
"sprint" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

03:29 min | 9 months ago

"sprint" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"Marketplace podcast is supported by personal capital offering online financial tools to give you a three hundred sixty degree view of all your accounts in one place I wanNA talk. Personal capital has registered advisors. Who can help you invest smarter and plan for retirement? Download the personal capital APP or start today at personal capital Dot Com personal capital invest with logic plan with heart. All right back to T. mobile and sprint. They have been talking about merging for a year and a half. It's been signed off on on by two federal agencies but it is still taking forever and now it might take a little longer T. Mobile CEO. John Legere who is supposed to still be in charge after the two companies merge is reportedly in talks to move to we work. We work the very troubled shared office space company marketplace hub reporter. Peggy low of Casey you you are reports. It was in ninety five degree day in June and employees were having a party on Sprint's campus in Kansas City. Suburb of Overland Park. Yeah they were celebrating remodel of sprints headquarters which went from marble and Mahogany to we work style open spaces sofas and cool phone phone booth. I would like to to use these day. I to celebrate our new building. Ill Michel come. Didn't point out was sprints Prince Missing logo the number four wireless provider has been working on a merger with number three t mobile in what analysts say is the longest approval process. Yes in memory Blair Levin of the Brookings Institution used to work for the Federal Communications Commission at every step. This process is involved. Things have never happened before eleven. Says there are several reasons for that the FCC chairman early signal that he'd approved the plan despite questions the Department of Justice sending the Plan Dan back to the company to rework and a coalition of state attorneys general stepping up with a lawsuit to block the merger and usually the FCC the DOJ Ajay and the states are all on the same side. In this case you actually have three different groups and really three different opinions. So it's pretty weird while lobbying for the deal in Washington t mobile executives reported spending nearly two hundred thousand dollars at the trump international hotel. Monica Ullivan is an editor at fierce wireless. There are very some very unorthodox some unusual happenings in this particular Taylor proceeding so there's certainly politics involved in this still pending. It's a lawsuit filed by fifteen state attorneys general. It argues that the merger sure would raise prices for all consumers but hit low income customers especially hard in Kansas City. I'm hello for marketplace in New York. I'm sorry benefits with the marketplace morning report. APM American public media this this marketplace podcast is supported by Zappia. When you're at work you can waste hours every day on things you do over and over again now you can handle them? Automatically with Zap Year Zap here is the easiest way to automate practically any task because appier connects over fifteen hundred business applications. To handle work for you so you can focus on what matters join join over four and a half million people already using Zappia. Now through the end of the month tries appier for free at ziprecruiter dot com slash marketplace spelled Z. A. P. E. R. dot com slash marketplace..

Federal Communications Commiss Blair Levin Kansas City T. Mobile CEO T. mobile Department of Justice John Legere Overland Park Sprint Peggy low Brookings Institution reporter Michel Monica Ullivan New York Washington Taylor A. P. E. Ajay
"sprint" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

04:06 min | 9 months ago

"sprint" Discussed on Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio

"This marketplace podcast is supported by indeed. Are you hiring with indeed. You can post a job in minutes. Set up screener questions than zero in on your shortlist qualified candidates using an online dashboard. You'd get started today and indeed dot com slash marketplace. That's indeed dot com slash marketplace an acoustic as a marketer you've dealt with your share of mediocre the Oak Technology now. There's a better way. Introducing Acoustic the marketing cloud designed specifically for Marketers Acoustics. Ai powered solutions and open platform approach. Connect your data so you can create more personal connections with your customers for marketing automation to mobile analytics. They have the tools you need to unleash marketing brilliance visit acoustic dot co slash marketplace to learn more that's acoustic dot co slash marketplace. Acoustic Unleash Brilliance. Here that that's the sound of the T.. See Mobile and sprint merger can hear anything. Oh maybe that's because there's nothing to hear because it's moving so slowly from marketplace in New York. I'm Sabrina short in for David Brancaccio. We will get to T. mobile and sprint in a minute. But first couple developments White House economic adviser Larry Cudlow says the. US and China are close to wrapping up the first phase of a trade deal L.. We've also got some interesting retail sales numbers. Let's bring in Chris Lowe chief economist at efdn Financial New York Hey Chris Good Morning Good Morning Sherie so learn kudlow says. US and China are close to a deal. I feel like we've heard that so many times before. What do you think markets make of that if anything everyone at? This point is highly skeptical. We heard just yesterday that the odds of a deal were very low. Because the Chinese don't WanNa make numerical promises on on agriculture imports. Let's just say we're hopeful all right. We'll moving to something more concrete. The Commerce Department said retail sales sales increased point three percent last month which is good compared to September which had two point three percent drop is this good news? the thing is that at that point three dropping September. You pointed out was a revision and those downward revisions meant. It was a little weaker than expected. I think I think the critical thing about retail sales is that for the last two quarters consumers have pretty much carried the economy single-handed like there's just no contribution that all from business spending. It's good that we still have growth but I it is now looking back at the last. It's three months a little less growth than we thought. We had some keep an eye on Chris Lowe chief economist at efdn financial in New York. Thanks as always thank you sir. Colin Kaepernick has a shot at making it back on an NFL team with a private tryout. Tomorrow Kapernick hasn't played in three years. I after he began kneeling during the national anthem to protest police brutality he claimed teams colluded to keep him out but he settled with league earlier. This year marketplace's replaces Andy Euler has more on what some team owners may be thinking. Why this drought is happening in week? Eleven of the seventeen week in L. Season has a lot of folks scratching their heads. Ed's It's unclear what's going on here. Dan Kaplan covers the NFL for the sports website. The athletic he says coaches have long had the opportunity to sign cabernet. But we're worried about fall. All of from the League and from franchise owners the fact is he was a mid cheery quarterback and that's not the type of player. A team is willing. Take a lot of public heat for Laurie. Latrice Martin is a professor of African American Studies at Louisiana State University. She says for all the backlash the League got in two thousand sixteen. There's is a large group of fans who might watch more. Football cabinet comes back and asks how can benefit from the support. That Catholic is showed in community. But some warning about the league's motivation cavernous former teammate. Eric Reed told reporters the move is PR stunt normally. These tryouts are during the workweek week when it's easier for team representatives to attend. I made dealer for marketplace.

China League chief economist US Dan Kaplan Chris Lowe Kapernick NFL New York David Brancaccio Marketers Acoustics Latrice Martin Colin Kaepernick Commerce Department White House Eric Reed Football
"sprint" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

Slate's Hang Up and Listen

04:08 min | 10 months ago

"sprint" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

"Only one way to run twenty six point two miles and and I just got a note from the TV produces with colling the rice saying it's got two hundred countries it's possible that five hundred Liam paypal so some of these run I mean the numbers just on Youtube extraordinary and look at any major marathon not many people are watching and that really was touching more than anything else it was one of the most moving pieces of store I've ever seen and I was not perhaps to be moved you don't get them very often in sports and I think that's what Matt Central Vets Olympic champion the engebretsen brothers huge stars in Norway of what like a ton of really sort of garlanded Kenyan and Ethiopian Japanese run as they were responding to this guy who is wanted this for for a hell of a long time I'm guessing I'm watching him say his name and set into the history books I think that was really really special that Moment Ed Caesar writes for The New Yorker will link to his stories about Elliott Kip Shoghi and the two sub two hour marathon he's also the author of two hours the quest to run the impossible episode of Hang Up and listen is brought to you.

Youtube Norway Ed Caesar The New Yorker Elliott Kip Shoghi Liam two hours two hour
"sprint" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

Slate's Hang Up and Listen

21:23 min | 10 months ago

"sprint" Discussed on Slate's Hang Up and Listen

"The athletic will join us to talk about side of it being a good thing from to say then he won't say that doesn't mean that the things that he does say aren't the right things to say most of the time or our brave a lot of the time but they are not allowed to talk about politics and and Hong Kong China and you don't tell the people that you're reporting this to you don't tell your audience that like it is a dereliction of duty perhaps it is it is a complicated situation the quotes for when got ten set involves very complicated but if I'm looking at the perspective of the people that started all the Stephanus said with the NBA I do think that the people who got involved old in doing business in China could have rationalized it to themselves I mean it was about the money that was the primary motivation but the moral compromises there's this other thing to wear I mean they kind of want to abandon the US in some ways for China because perhaps the economy in the world the one with the bloating middle class I mean that's not happening in the United States in China people are joining the middle class in getting wealthier within the middle class every day and so they look around they see this country perhaps and they say hey there's no growth potential year but over here in China all mad there's so much growth potential issue is it comes with a lot of moral compromises and apparently a lot of strings attached because it doesn't function like our economy functions government can effectively wipe out and nationalist group we know when he had no way of knowing that that was even an issue and they're just completely bending to the whims of the regime so I don't let's stay in potentially a strategic mistake but I could at least understand what they told themselves to get into this mess I guess I would say in stress right through the athletic team a little different but new technology always seems weird at first even podcasts seemed weird when I came out in the early two thousands there were called audio blogs and downloaded onto MP three players but now people all over the world listen to podcasts like this one all the time just like podcast electric cars are normal now they have longer ranges meaning they're not just for work commutes you can take an electric vehicle dear weekend getaway even on long road trips they have faster reached charging time so you don't have to wait around all day for a charge they're.

Hong Kong China Stephanus NBA United States bloating China MP
"sprint" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

04:21 min | 1 year ago

"sprint" Discussed on The Tech Blog Writer Podcast - Inspired Tech Startup Stories

"More quickly identify areas for design changes that for them or previously difficult to prove do you get him? And if you'll customers in the end, they off you any feedback on the kind of insights that I've actually gained. And now they've managed to turn inside somebody to really valuable, and and like big differences will big joins us to what I did shape. Or I think at this point. So we did recently launched leave in about a month and a half. We did have a beta program that ran for. I think about six months prior to the launch where we were working with partners to give us feedback. Not only on the improvements that they were able to make. But also. On the platform itself. So we worked very closely with a lot of our now clients paying clients that wanted to help us improve the platform, but also we're using it regularly. So some of the changes might be more general where for instance, we have a client called Ivanka they're the largest online Bank in Sweden, these it for all sorts of different customer testing. But they are using it every time they do customer testing. And they're using it in a live setting. So you can actually with Toby pro sprint see while. The participant is now beginning in this case bonzes website and platform where they're looking in that moment. So if you have stakeholders and decision makers in that session, they can actually see while the session is happening. What areas are challenging for the participants. Are they having trouble finding the form to submit to the Bank to actually open up an account? These are the types of things that again with interviews and other focus group type method. Dhs. They might not be able to have seen because that hidden layer of insights that implicit subconscious data that we're getting or that output that we're getting from Toby pro sprint. You're not able to get from those other methods. So the the findings are tend to be more general these these are, you know, relatively new client. So I think the more we work within the more will get more concrete examples, but I think ultimately they recognize that that hidden layer of insights is so valuable they need to be using Toby pro sprint for all of their user testing. Obsessions height UNM. He's just one example that we've mentioned today, so how can similar on trucking's to these us say online banking pool whose music video streaming services would portal's really pretty much any digital pro. I think that you say it perfectly that any digital service or product website anything that's on a screen can benefit from using Toby pro sprint. So for instance, if you're any type of ecommerce website. We've done some studies on Amazon with specific products where we can understand is it is there a specific product image. That captures people attention more effectively than others. Is there a certain amount of text that overwhelms a participant when they're reading a product description that has them drop off in and move on from the product or they don't capture or they're not reading the most essential elements of or product features in that first few sentences were able to see with the output that we're getting from Toby sprint when that happens in actually have a physical representation of when the participant loses interest or can't find a product on any commerce environment, which is hugely valuable when you're trying to compete with so many other competitor products like to talk about the attention economy. It's more important than ever for altered all sorts of companies across all verticals, and you know, industries to make their digital services and webs. Sites as officiant as ideal for the user as possible and by implementing Toby pro sprint into their agile way of working they're able to better understand than ever how they're navigating these products and NC where these incremental improvements can be made in when there's so many different places that people can be shopping and people have their phones, and their TV's, etc. So many distracting elements people expect a good user experience and ideal your experience every second that is spent trying to find something and every second that they're struggling to do something is an opportunity for them to leave a website to decide to go somewhere else. So it's more important than ever to be implementing I tracking and using Toby pro sprint and other technologies in user testing regularly. Will we all living in a mobile?.

Toby sprint Amazon Dhs Ivanka Sweden NC six months
"sprint" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"sprint" Discussed on Acquired

"They were not doing what t mobile is doing now which we'll get into discussion there were kind of deal they they abandoned it sprints like okay we gotta be cool to be an ankerium what can we do they look at around like we're going to make an investment in a really hip cool new company i was hoping you it's going to be my oh yes yes part of the whole episode we're going to be so cool january twenty seventeen they by thirty three percent minority stake in the hottest the hottest streaming music company around that's right you guessed it as covered on acquired title jay z yeah david do they still they still own thirty three percent of title right off does does that really yet i think they do i don't know like presumably if this goes through then like t mobile owns some of title i would love to see title with t mobile anyway clearly that doesn't work so now that was january twenty seventeen by mid twenty seventeen fake mosser just like literally fist pumping will hear her face bombing maybe fifth by maybe literally betting themselves in the head like this is an hour sprint sucks how are we going to rationalize all this like okay if we can acquire t mobile maybe we'll sell sprint to you by the way as an aside yeah you can you can stream jaylo featuring dj collared and cardi b right now on title oh actually sounds me definitely that.

t mobile sprint thirty three percent
"sprint" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"sprint" Discussed on Acquired

"This is late two thousand twelve early two thousand thirteen there emerges another figure in the industry here one we've talked about in this season and quite a force unto himself and that is masayoshi sun and softbank so this prevision fund this is soft bank itself and masa through company remember softbank is the largest mobile carrier in japan and has investments all around the world in immobile carriers they decided they want to enter the us market and they wanna by sprint and so they ended up getting into a bidding war with dish network the satellite television provider because all this is converging like always has been it's the broadcasting and cable and telephone and wireless it's all the same or it's all the same business dynamics the end up winning the bidding war with dish network they by seventy eight percent of sprint in july twenty thirteen for twenty one point six billion and the best part about this this bidding war with the is that softbank makes the offer to acquire sprint dish network than announce a higher offer to acquire sprint nextel at that point which they then decide to retract so that they can focus on buying none other than clear wire which they also retract and then clear wire gets bought by sprint as well the dramas just too much i can't handle all the drums i thought telecom was gonna be the most boring thing there's so much drama it's boring i think it's boring because like i just can't handle this drama like it's too much when quick aside because we would be remiss to cover all this without covering this fund but a history sprint back before next hell when it acquired craig mccaw second act and and became the wireless company sprint was a landline telephone operator they were third behind believe third by eighteen of course and the bills being one and then mci and sprint sprint the landline company started as the brown telephone company in eighteen ninety nine in abilene kansas.

softbank japan dish network sprint dish network sprint kansas us nextel craig mccaw mci abilene seventy eight percent
"sprint" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"sprint" Discussed on Acquired

"Today's the next hell direct connect walkie talkie on your cell phone oh yeah credit gets involved in nextel starts buying up shares by nine hundred ninety five just a year later he is controls majority of the equity in the company is the controlling shareholder nextel was not doing very well at this point in time he completely turns them around they end up introducing direct connect the become the grow hugely become much larger they ended up then he sells nextel in his second transaction to an old legacy telephone company in two thousand five ten years later to sprint he sells nextel for thirty five billion dollars sprint becomes sprint nextel and that is the core of sprint's wireless business so this from one guy from craig mccaw comes both at and t and sprint that we know and probably don't love today yeah but david that transaction happens in two thousand five i was going to your transition for you something happens a year before two thousand five and two thousand and four craig mccaw d one more thing dill not done exactly he's still not done he does one more thing he's like these the steve jobs of telecom really one more thing in two thousand four he starts a company called clear wire and craig is starting to see i don't know that he necessarily sees smartphones coming in the iphone but he does see the data over cellular telephone networks is going to be a big thing smartphones exist to palm there's microsoft windows mobile or whatever they call it back in the day blackberry all those things so he founds clear wire and clear wire is essentially a wireless company but instead of focusing on boys that focuses on data so they end up doing in in november two thousand eight they do a huge deal with sprint who just a couple of years earlier cricket sold next to and sprint buys half of the company and clear wire essentially becomes the data part of sprint's network what would become their lt network at the time it was using technology called wimax which we're not even gonna go down that rabbit hole.

nextel sprint craig mccaw david thirty five billion dollars two thousand five ten years
"sprint" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"sprint" Discussed on KOMO

"Sprint and t mobile t mobile stock up by five and a half percent today t mobile of course in the bellevue factoria area sprint's stock rose by seventeen percent day although it's only worth six dollars a share so you don't have to earn that much money for it to go up that high as far as the major markets though the dow nasdaq and s and p five hundred all higher the dow up by four hundred and twenty eight points at the close to twenty four thousand four hundred eight the nasdaq up by one hundred and forty four to seven thousand nine hundred four and the s and p five hundred up by forty three closing at two thousand six fifty six your next money update coming up in thirty minutes aaa traffic in two minutes a new poll shows young voters are energized for the midterms in a way not seen for several elections abc's mark remillard reports poll of more than two thousand eighteen to twenty nine year olds harvard's institute of politics says overall thirtyseven percent of eligible voters under thirty will quote definitely be voting in this year's midterms fourteen thousand fourteen points higher than the last wave election was on two thousand and ten polling director john della volpe says young democrats are driving most of the enthusiasm fifty one percent of them say they will definitely vote compared to the thirty six percent of republicans who say the same mark remillard abc news netflix worth logging onto see this story with your own eyes the handwriting of some dead rock legends has been turned into computer funds.

Sprint mark remillard john della volpe netflix bellevue factoria dow institute of politics director thirtyseven percent thirty six percent fifty one percent seventeen percent twenty nine year thirty minutes six dollars two minutes
"sprint" Discussed on Deal of the Week

Deal of the Week

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"sprint" Discussed on Deal of the Week

"Push the narrative i mean this one man story that said i don't know if a two hundred billion dollar deal for charter with a huge debt load is actually a good idea therefore even if a huge prices thrown out there for charter i dunno of charter says yes to that so in other still a lot of other questions that might as well the road out it's a possibility i suppose that all tvs could be the cable company in not charter that that sprint ends up doing a deal with right jerry y'all tease has actually i think said publicly that they feel like they're too small at this point to do any kind of wireless steel and the us i think they would um you know i think they're looking more at some of the smaller cable companies i mean cox is is family owned and insist that it's not for sale but i think that would be all tesis highest priority right now um alty spot cablevision and suddenly in the us a couple of years ago for those not familiar with all tc made no those names elti says no the owner of those us cable companies right an a french company right i mean one person we we actually didn't mention in this conversation is warren buffett and there was no reports and i would have loved to have been a fly on the wall win warren buffett and john malone met with the chairmen of softbank in sun valley a few weeks ago and just what sort of possible deals that they were floating around in that conversation would be it would have been very very interesting to um you know just his name alone warren buffett i mean having him and john malone doing anything in the cable wireless base would be very very interesting and lasting before we go here i will say that if softbank does in fact move forward with an offer for charter.

sprint jerry cox us warren buffett john malone softbank sun valley elti two hundred billion dollar
"sprint" Discussed on Deal of the Week

Deal of the Week

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"sprint" Discussed on Deal of the Week

"As you for reported uh the structure of any kind of deal is still seems complicated there and seemed to be one clear uh partner or were solution to this obviously t mobile and sprint make the most sense but when you don't have a willing buyer were in in if a seller that's been trying to sell a for several years uh you you continue to have questions about whether done so i think a your for now we're gonna have a deal the week still talking about sprint what's going to happen that's pretty interesting to me that you eat there is no question from a sense of optimism when i speak with people on the sprint side of things i get a completely different story that when i speak to people on who ever the buyer side of things army obey the view of spread to very much depends on what glasses you're looking into because uh did the sprint people feel like sprint is the key to a 5 g world the buyers i think feel like sprint is this moneylosing struggling company that has no end in sight and why would i buy it now at a fifty a share when a less than two years ago was at three dollars a share and the company if you even look at the estimates it's gonna be several years more before they'll start even turning a profit so the feeling is is no rush from the buyer perspective where sprint seems to say you know look were were were this great asset and we hold the cards here so that i think does lend some credence to what scott as saying which is it seems like there's no real reason a deal needs to happen now other than masayoshi sons will so if a deal does get done you have to sort of tip your cap i think to him in order to two.

partner scott three dollars two years 5 g
"sprint" Discussed on Deal of the Week

Deal of the Week

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"sprint" Discussed on Deal of the Week

"And by the way s earlier in twenty sixteen was not long ago spurt was trading at three dollars a share spread is now trading at about eight fifty some of that may be due to better performance of it obviously has to do with this theoretical consolidation very that may happen why is he so confident he can get something done does it have to do with what sprint would look like in a new combined company in other words does he feel like either tmobile or charter or some other option like there's enough bullishness on a 5 g wireless sprint and that's why it's something done or is this just bluster wrote a combination of both probably it stood the notion that everything's moving to mobile by a that's kind of the wind in his sales in a way you might have the worst sailboat out there but that works in his hair he also probably knows the price that he has to get two with dr to toe com or and charter and he probably feels you'd have now that everything's on the table including him taking a minority stake in the combined businesses if if he asked to sink in that sense he knows that okay i said in his maya ceo sale could happen or a deal could happen is just going to be a matter of price so t mobile fairly straightforward two companies do the same thing they would combine there are obvious regulatory issues here from an antitrust perspective people may remember sprint tried to buy tmobile several years ago and administrators regulators in the us in the obama administration told masayoshi son don't even bother because there's no way we're going to let you get this through that is still an open question of the trump administration i think many people looking at this feel like a deal still wouldn't go through but the general idea here is you put to companies together there is massive synergies billions and billions of dollars of synergies if they can get together on a valuation on price jerry what do we know about the charter deal how would that be structured and why might charter.

tmobile sprint us obama administration masayoshi ceo three dollars 5 g
"sprint" Discussed on Deal of the Week

Deal of the Week

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"sprint" Discussed on Deal of the Week

"Sprint which didn't have the twoway radio or the walkietalkie function that next to leverage liked anyway that's little history behind what's going on with a network any with at that those years of neglect carried on to the new ownership this is prior to son muscles on being involved um in they had some difficulties upgrading their networks they they went off in one direction cold wimax which turned out to be obsolete before it was even finished uh than these restarted towards l t e which is the forge that we owe use now to go a long time they had numerous problems in numerous areas getting the network up the speed and they were losing millions of customers every year so i think masa inherited that didn't quite realise had how hard it would be to turn around that network each just now realising that take a lot more work and i think that's why throwing his hands up a little bit although he is deeply involved with a network process and he's done some major things to help get it improved to the point where can kind of stan some some ground against the better rock rivals so why is he so theoretically confident because it is so softic announced earnings earlier this week masayoshi son on the soft bank conference call and others at softbank basically said we could have an answer here a consolidation answer sooner rather than later of course later the colleagues of hedged on that but for a company that is in such rough shape.

Sprint wimax masa stan softbank
"sprint" Discussed on Deal of the Week

Deal of the Week

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"sprint" Discussed on Deal of the Week

"Of their units similarly softbank owns eighty four percent of sprint softbank qsa masayoshi sons and a price based in tokyo softbank under the business uh by acquiring a the third number three telco in japan oddly when some decided in the u s he bought the number three toko sprint the time in the us uh but they do have the controlling shares if there is a combination there it's still going to remain at of foreignowned corn held company presumably and what we've reported on their is that deutsche telekom wants to consolidate the new company's ownership meaning that deutsche telekom would be the controlling shareholder of a combined sprint team out at least as far as we know this is what my sourcing has indicated for months rather than softbank so this is important because it a t most sprint deal softbank is in essence the seller they're selling sprint it would still own a large portion of that company but they would not be be controlling shareholder so by our definition it would be the seller that's not the case in a sprint charter deal jerry reminded us about charter whose charters majority owner so charter communications is the second largest cable provider in the us and its largest shareholder is john malone right i shouldn't say majority owner because not to be jordi arrese just their largest cheer he's our largest shareholder and you know for listeners who don't know john malone me he's basically a pioneer of the cable industry dating back to when he ran a cable company called tci um and then sold at the eighteen t in 1999 so he is you know he has a lot of sway in charters big strategic outlook he's talked recently um about the idea that cable companies could potentially by a wireless company uh right now the cable industry in the wireless industry are sort of.

softbank deutsche telekom jerry us jordi arrese john malone wireless industry tokyo japan toko sprint eighty four percent