37 Burst results for "soviet union"

Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on BBC Newsday

BBC Newsday

00:53 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on BBC Newsday

"Seen so many fans in the stadium. Panenka scored three goals as the checks topped Group one in qualification for the €1976. He scored again in their final qualifier against the Soviet Union to help book a place in the European Championship finals. They were our main enemy for the fans. It was always a bit more personal. Yeah. €1976 were held in Yugoslavia and only four teams took part. Czechoslovakia would end up facing two of the greatest teams of all time, including a Dutch side, captained by Johan Cruyff. Usually we definitely when there is outsiders, I personally was worried we would just fall apart. The Dutch were probably the best team in the world at that point. The Dutch were dispatched on a rain soaked night in Zagreb, 31. Following extra time. There was also extra time in Belgrade where West Germany beat Yugoslavia persistently. We were just euphoric. We knew that whatever happened in the final even if we lose, we were just huge heroes in the eyes of the people who Four days later. The checks made another fast start. Yansheng Alex. Far post finish put them one nil ahead after just eight minutes of the final 17 minutes later. Harold DBS rifled home to make it to I couldn't stop thinking that the Germans always played until the final minute. They proved this in their match against Yugoslavia. When they're also gone to Newtown, and in the end, they won four to Bernanke's concern was justified. Three minutes after the bases goal to Muller pulled one back. And with 89 minutes on the clock burned, wholesome, binds header from a corner drew West Germany level. 22. We thought we had it in the bag and again. Thank God the Germans did equalise. I wouldn't have become famous if they hadn't with no goals in extra time. The final went to penalties. Hello. Shootouts had been used for many years as a way to settle draws. Euro 76 was the first major international tournament to employ them and the checks were prepared. The trainers had a vision of it anything like this, so we trained for penalties to make it more realistic. To motivate us over the loudspeakers. They played the sound of fans cheering and screaming in the match against Scotland. The first seven penalties were all successful. Then a mess. German forward.

Johan Cruyff Muller Zagreb Belgrade Panenka Euro 76 Yugoslavia European Championship Newtown Bernanke 89 Minutes Scotland Three Goals 31 First Seven Penalties Four Days Later €1976 Eight Minutes Soviet Union West Germany
John Dewey's Persepctive of American Education and Stalin's Education

Mark Levin

01:56 min | 5 d ago

John Dewey's Persepctive of American Education and Stalin's Education

"He came back to the United States and he wrote Uh, in a fairly popular left wing, progressive, so called magazine. Called the New Republic. Then he wrote in the New Republic. How impressive Russia's educational system was how it was unifying the country. How the instruction was the same from one classroom to the other. How the instruction had a purpose, not just to learn language and science and mathematics and so forth. But the support the commune that is the state that was being developed. Of course by Stalin. And he was the man who had the greatest influence in American education to this day. To this day, and journalists like Jay Rosen, who is a professor out of New York and teaches journalism and others. Point to John Dewey is the great hero. John Dewey, who destroyed American Education opened the door wide to what's taking place. Today. He is the founding father of what's taking place today. As people will learn again when they read the book, and so again, your experience in the Soviet Union is very, very important. People need to understand. That we need to listen to people like Tatiana. They lived under the iron fist on the other side of the Iron Curtain. And they see similarities and the reason they see similarities is because there are similarities. And the fact that the American media has let down the American people. For more than a decade, and especially now. Is the sort of thing that always happens because when push comes to shove The media. The American media is weak. Predictable. Ideological Thank you for your call, my friend. Excellent. I'll be right back.

New Republic John Dewey Jay Rosen Stalin Russia American Education United States Tatiana Soviet Union New York
Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on Throughline

Throughline

00:52 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "soviet union" discussed on Throughline

"Pittsburg pennsylvania. And you're listening to through line for npr. This message comes from npr sponsor. Lincoln learning no matter. your goal. Lincoln learning helps you learn the skills to make it happen with courses for the most in demand skills trending lincoln dry free for one month at lincoln learning dot com slash. Free month. This message comes from. Npr sponsor linked in learning no matter. Your goal. lincoln learning helps you learn the skills to make it happen with courses for the most intimate skills trending on linked in dry free for one month at lincoln learning dot com slash free month. Where does the story of american capitalism begin. We start with you vic. Well that's a good question The story of american capitalism you could save begins with the story of america. The colonization of america as so. That's one answer the question but of course when the united states was colonized when the settlers first came and they weren't they didn't initiate a capitalist economy that took some time to get going in the north transition to capitalism. I think comes about earlier than in the south it starts through agriculture which was family farms and family farms producing for the market. Quite early on so that by the seventeen forties and fifties. You're starting to get a quite consistent market economy and certainly by the time of the american revolution. The north i would say is more or less capitalist. The south takes longer in my view. The slave plantations in the early nineteenth century are kind of cabins. They're they're basically market dependent and even though there wasn't formerly a labor market the way in which the owners of slaves were able to change what we might call wage levels and labor allocations on the plantation kind of mimicked labor market. So there's debate on this. But i would say somewhere around seventeen. Eighty to eighteen. Twenty is when we're talking about the united states. Becoming capitalists in the north and the south and that makes the united states and early capitalist economy at that point at the you only outside in the rest of world you have england and you have holland that are basically capitalist. The rest of europe is still not capitalist in nowhere in the global south. Do you have capitalism at that point kristin do you have a degree of either. Yeah i mean. I i the only thing that i would add it. Generally speaking that chronology seems accurate to me. I would just say though that you have to put the beginning of american capitalism with genocide of the native american population and with slavery. I think you have to understand that. The actual capital it comes from a pretty important a long period of expropriation of land and labour from people who were not justly compensated right. So i'm tempted to say meeting this question. Because it's all on a continuum so like at what level on zero to one hundred scale. Do you have to get before you say. You're a capitalist country. If you really twist my arm. I would say after the abolition of slavery so eighteen sixty five that's for capitalism in america starts and i'm kind of tempted to say that ends in one thousand nine hundred four when their permanent regulations on immigration and that ever seen and we had i'm tempted attempted to say that Unfortunately the decision was made back then to say that we don't want people from other countries here and to move in the direction of capitalism but direction or nationalism. It's almost impossible to underestimate how important regulation of immigration is as a deviation from free market principles so you just think about how different our economy would be if anyone on earth could move here and get a job. I say would have been much better. We would be a country of a billion plus people enjoying the highest living standards human history and sharing that with the world and being a model for the rest of the world of what free markets really can accomplish a now of course this doesn't mean that capitalism in some broader sense what was abolished nineteen twenty four but this is an enormous regulation that has turned our economy into something dramatically different from what would otherwise be one. I think that's a very that's a. That's a provocative stance to say that capital in european capitals. Innocence ended in nineteen twenty four. But it also brings us into the twentieth century. And i think there's a lot of forces becoming intertwined in the in the first half of the twentieth century and i think most prominently for this story of capitalism is the rising socialism global socialism. Right and. so. I wanna get your your takes on whether you think that capitalism as we know it today wouldn't exist without socialism as a counterforce particularly as kind of each being developed in that early to mid twentieth century period. Yeah absolutely there's no question Capitalism has been known today but look dramatically different. Were it not for the presence of its socialist throughout the twentieth century. There's no doubt about. I is obvious if you know enough history. So the first thing is without socialism. There's no more to without revolution in the soviet union. The nazis a very likely do not get to power in germany because a large part of their of their of their pitch is. We're going to go and save you from bolshevism right so without the rise of either the communists or the nazis than you probably have a peaceful transition out in terms of like how much the welfare state in the west has been shaped by the rise of socialism others a very popular idea that the only reason why are the main reason why capitalist countries adopted the welfare state worried that people basically needed to go and dissuade people from pushing to full socialism. By saying we'll go and do some moderate steps so that you don't wanna go full soviets. I would just say that. Most people in america no idea what's going on to the soviet union good bad or otherwise so. I don't see how that could have made much difference in terms of us politics while connecticut. Right can i say one thing. I think you're absolutely right. This idea the welfare state comes around as a kind of am palliative To avoid it. Kind of soviet style. Transition here i think that's absolutely right in my view. Had their never been a soviet union. You would have still had the welfare state in the west because of the domestic sources of pressure that led to it. There are two fundamental sources shaped the twentieth century. One is the rise of the labor movement which was an artifact of the growth socialism as.

Germany Twentieth Century Early Nineteenth Century One Month Europe Zero America Eighty First Half Of The Twentieth Ce Seventeen Forties Two Fundamental Sources Twenty Soviet Union England ONE Today Holland Lincoln Earth Each
WSJ Piece Teaches How to Read the Truth in Chinese Propaganda

The Dan Bongino Show

01:07 min | Last week

WSJ Piece Teaches How to Read the Truth in Chinese Propaganda

"With this fantastic piece in the Wall Street Journal showing you how to dig through propaganda. How the Communists How Communist Now the Chinese Communist Party, CCP, How the communist Soviet Union how they work and manipulating the media where there's always an element of truth in his story. You know what it make stuff up out of thin air. You may say, Dan why they're Communists. They do whatever they want. If you don't like it, they kill you. Yeah. But they can't kill everybody at the same time. I mean, seriously, they do have to have some people alive like that's the whole point of having a country. Right. So once in a while you got to feed him a nugget a truth. Little small sliver nugget of truth, and you just manipulate the story. So if you read the story upside down, and you learn to read these propaganda pieces upside down, you will get to the truth. Eventually, they gave a great example. You know, Chinese propaganda say, you know, brave Chinese Communist People's Liberation Army saves eight miners and mining accident Then you find out later the Chinese government caused the accident do faulty safety standards and 150 miners died. Only eight were saying you're like, Well, there was a small nugget of truth in there, but the rest of the story was total bull. You get the rest.

Chinese Communist Party The Wall Street Journal Soviet Union DAN Chinese Communist People's Lib Chinese Government
The Similarity of Chinese Communist Propaganda and Our Lying Media

The Dan Bongino Show

01:59 min | Last week

The Similarity of Chinese Communist Propaganda and Our Lying Media

"And I'm reading this piece in The Wall Street Journal. And it's about Chinese Communist propaganda really applies to propaganda outfits throughout human history, Prov, the Soviet Union or whatever. And it was this fascinating piece by Perry Link called Beijing protests allegedly too much and it talks about how you have to learn to read. Communist propaganda from China and their media outlets. And when you learn to read a quote upside down, the stories make sense and I thought to myself, I'm sitting there. I'm always thinking of. You know what's a good, solid narrative for a show that ties things together today because we've got a lot of material to get to And I thought, Gosh, that said, Like Once we learn how to do what you know the citizens of China have had to do with their own media to read media reports upside down, We can finally start to get to the truth. Let me read you a quote from this Wall Street journal piece because it's very telling. And I want you to tell me something going to ask you up front. What is any different from are the Chinese propaganda from the Chinese Communist Party and state controlled media in China? What's different than our media here? Serious question After you. What's different. You have to employ the same tactic it to get to the truth to our lying media here. Hear from the piece called Beijing Protests allegedly too much quote. Many years ago. A distinguished Chinese writer Woo Zuzang explained to me that there is truth in Communist Party pronouncements, but you have to read them quote upside down. If a newspaper says the party has made great strides against corruption in Hannon And you know that corruptions recently been especially bad in and on. If you read about the heroic rescue of eight miners somewhere, you can guess that a mine collapse may have killed hundreds who aren't even mentioned. Learn to read the story upside down. Read upside down. There's a sense in which the official press never lies. It cannot lie. It has to tell you what the party wants you to believe. And if you can figure out the party's motive, which always exists. Then you have a sense of the

Perry Link Wall Street Journal China Beijing Chinese Communist Party Soviet Union Woo Zuzang Hannon
Russian Parliament Passes Bill Barring Navalny Associates From Running in Elections

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:59 min | 3 weeks ago

Russian Parliament Passes Bill Barring Navalny Associates From Running in Elections

"Upper house of russia's parliament the federation council is not known for its stout defence of constitutional democracy from the ambitions of an overreaching executive even by those standards however the latest measure. They have waived through is an eye-opener. It would ban members and supporters of any organization designated as extremists from being elected to any public office. Possibly not coincidentally moves are already afoot to designate as extremist the anti corruption foundation or fb k. Of imprisoned descended alexey. Navalny von joined with more on this by stephen deal. Russia analyst and regular monocle twenty four contributor. Stephen alert listeners. May already have guessed the answer to this question. But is this basically what it looks like it is it is. I'm afraid sadly. Russia turns more and more into the worst aspects of the soviet union. Your lead in reminded me of an old soviet joke which said that. Last night someone broke into the kremlin. Install next year's election results. And and as you say what they're doing now is preparing for the elections. That are coming up in the autumn of this year for the for the duma the state parliament by making sure that anyone who might win against the preferred kremlin candidate won't have even if standing never mind being voted in isn't the fbi k. Already marginalized enough by dint of having already been declared a foreign agent again this is. This is a very soviet way of doing things that you take very large sledgehammer. And you put it up against a very small nut and you smash smash smash it until only dust is left. The i think there is something something russian about this that it's not a question of just banning people it's a question of of humiliating them and absolutely obliterating can

Upper House Of Russia's Parlia Anti Corruption Foundation Navalny Von Stephen Russia Alexey State Parliament Soviet Union FBI
Chinese Communist Party Is Just Like the Soviet Communist Party

The Dan Bongino Show

00:38 sec | Last month

Chinese Communist Party Is Just Like the Soviet Communist Party

"Chinese Communist Party knows there's no one they could count on more than the American media. The Soviet Communist Party knew that to remember the New York Times back in the day, sending their reporters over there talking about how wonderful the Soviet Union was there like the guy was over there. They're like, Hey, bro. There's about 100 Million coffins and the back of that hotel out there where they killed a bunch of these people dissonance. The guy was like no worries. The hotel's beautiful Let me write an article of great Communism is in the Soviet Union. Award winning journalism prizes were given out for that work. Don't blame bat

Chinese Communist Party Soviet Communist Party Soviet Union New York Times
Putin Tells Red Square Parade That Nazi Ideas Persist

The New Yorker Radio Hour

00:56 sec | Last month

Putin Tells Red Square Parade That Nazi Ideas Persist

"Russia today marks the 76th anniversary of the Soviet Union's victory over Nazi Germany and World War two from Moscow. Charles Maynes reports Rise Nicholas Young, legal buy beer, They're speaking before some 12,000 troops taking part in the military parade on Red Square. Russian President Vladimir Putin paid honor to the Soviet victory, while vowing to defend against what he said were persistent Nazi beliefs in Europe, considered Russia and the other former Soviet Republics most revered holiday in honor of the some 27 million Soviets killed in the fighting. Victory Day has taken on added political weight in Putin's Russia, where the line between historical memory and rising nationalism has often blurred. This year's anniversary comes amid rising tensions with the West, which Putin suggested was trying to rewrite history by ignoring the Soviet sacrifice and the victory over fascism. NPR NEWS. I'm Charles means in Moscow,

Charles Maynes Nicholas Young Russia Soviet Union Red Square Vladimir Putin Moscow Germany Putin Europe Npr News Charles
President Biden Recognizes Massacre of Armenians as Genocide

Dark Secret Place

02:07 min | 2 months ago

President Biden Recognizes Massacre of Armenians as Genocide

"Talking about international reaction from From around the world has specifically from from turkey about prisoner biden statement earlier today the hundred six anniversary in what's known as genocide day. The president said quote each year on this day. We remember the lives of all those who died in the ottoman era armenian genocide and recommit ourselves to preventing such an atrocity from ever occurring again beginning on april twenty four nine hundred fifteen with the arrest of armenian intellectuals and community leaders in constantinople by ottoman authorities. One million armenians were deported massacred remarks to their deaths campaign to extermination than he. He goes on important thing. Is he says armenian genocide and the turks almost immediately. The turkish foreign ministry almost immediately reacted. The president actually had a phone call with president earlier. This week. I don't recall the readout of it. But the g word wasn't in there and it really has gotten to the point for the turks. The are the last people in the room stomping around and that it. It really doesn't matter what they do. They're not the reason we tread softly for the last sixty years with. Because turkey was a key cornerstone there in the balkans in nato. We pre position nuclear weapons on on turkey. We had our first generation of ballistic missile nuclear nuclear missiles in turkey at the time the cuban missile crisis. They were key and they were they were key goud right up until the dissolving of the soviet union and then we. We've seen this rise in turkish nationalism. And here's sort of the problem. Is that the. Turks are fiercely fiercely fiercely proud of their own history and they're turkishness but but denying that. This actually was a campaign that the turks portrays ono no no. It was a civil war. And you know things happen. It was

Turkey Turkish Foreign Ministry Biden Goud Balkans Nato Soviet Union ONO
MLB Moves 2021 All-Star Game Out of Atlanta In Response To Georgia Voting Restrictions

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:01 min | 2 months ago

MLB Moves 2021 All-Star Game Out of Atlanta In Response To Georgia Voting Restrictions

"Me. But this says reason magazine says but the fact that the pandemic shutdowns have corresponded to rising violent crime rates in many other. Us cities cast out on their power to explain baltimore's decrease in both Nonviolent and violent offenses in any event baltimore authorities are keen to continue the experiment. We leave behind the era of tough on crime. Crop prosecution zero tolerance policing and no longer default to this To the status quo to criminalise mostly people of color for addiction said most be in a statement. We will develop sustainable solutions in a lower public health partners to do their part to address mental health and substance use disorder. Well that's that's good. I guess i. I still don't think that someone who uses drugs or sells drugs or whatever necessarily has a substance abuse problem and it certainly is going to be true if every prostitute out there. Yeah it definitely seems like it's a bit of a stretch. Maybe maybe some of the prosecutors not there just want to do that line of work because they enjoy it at high end prostitutes man. That's certainly seems like a smart business. Move for me. If you enjoy having sex and you enjoy making money it does seem like a smart business. Move to combine those two things together. Yeah there's people who have sex addictions and if you're into that line of work and your hot you know but you can't because it's illegal for some reason and of course the next sentence is about You know an outreach program. They have for prostitutes. You like you guys are saying they're trying to say that it's like automatically a problem if you're doing prostitution in those office will be partying with the baltimore crisis response inc and other community groups including the sex workers outreach project. South provide a range of services to those who need them. I can see why they think that prostitution being illegal there is more sex trafficking either would be if prostitution was totally legal. What do you think zero. Three two eight three sixty one sixty. What if the united states and the soviet union had fallen landis see air and the plane struggled for dominion across parallel dimensions or on the surface of the moon. What wonders would have been unveiled what terry's would have haunted. Mankind most dark and dismal dimensions come closer peer through a glass darkly and discover the horrifying visions of world war three from some of today's greatest minds in science fiction. Fantasy and horror weird world war three available. Now from bain books at bain books dot com. Are you tired of governments around the world. Killing innocent people stop using their money. There is an alternative. Bitcoin is a stateless free market. Non political currency. Bitcoin is money. That cannot be inflated or controlled by any state by continuing to use their money. You're perpetuating the killing stop doing it. You have an incredible alternative available to you now learn it use. It spread get started with bitcoin at bitcoin dot com. It's bitcoin dot com looking for a great real estate investments. Consider new hampshire which is ground zero for liberty movement. Your first call should be to mark worden from porcupine real estate. He's more than just a real estate agent. Easier new hampshire concierge. Where are the best places to live. Do you want farm city the burbs or forest. Do you want a duplex multifamily buildings. So that renter's pay your mortgage their homes in all price ranges in new hampshire and mark and help with financing to invest in liberty and property mark warden can help keep on real estate dot com. What if you want to hear the latest episode of free talk live but all you have is your phone. You forgot to download our archive and you have no data connection. You can call our listen line at six four one seven nine three zero one ninety one. That's a long distance number so you may incur charges if not listen as long as you want six four one seven nine three zero one ninety one the freetalklive listen line. Six four one seven nine three zero one nine one where the rubber always meets the road. Actually i'm not even sure what that means. Speed radio network live at heart news. Feed dot com. This stream is supported by advertisers and contributions by follow us on facebook. Twitter and instagram's sending heartfelt condolences. Timely silla lacerra fox news. President biden has issued a statement after the death of a capital police officer during this afternoon's attack as capital police identified the officer capital. Police officer billy evans died of his injuries sustained during the capital attack noting he was a cop there for eighteen years president biden said he and the first lady are heartbroken over the loss of officer. Evans biden incentive statement that he is receiving ongoing briefings about this from a homeland security adviser capital. Police in dc police say the suspect was after ramming his car into a capital barricade exiting the car and then lunging at the two officers while holding a knife law enforcement says the suspect was not known to them before this incident and it does not appear. The attack was related to terrorism or a specific member of congress. Jessica rosenthal fox news. The president has issued a proclamation ordering all us flags lowered to have staff and honor of officer evans capitol police. The other officer involved is in stable condition to law enforcement officers say the suspect identified as twenty five year. Old noah green who died in the attacks stabbed one of the officers and they say his background in digital footprint are being closely examined especially to see if there were any mental health issues. Major league baseball. Commissioner rob manfred has announced this year's all-star game will not be played in atlanta in response to georgia's overhauled voting law saying major league. Baseball fundamentally supports voting rights for all americans and oppose restrictions to the ballot box adding fair access to voting continues to have our games unwavering support. Sox's matt napolitano georgia governor. Brian campus. David accused major league baseball. As he put it of caving to fear political opportunism and liberal lies the centers for disease control and prevention says people who are fully vaccinated against kofi nineteen can travel within the us without getting tested. America's is listening to fox news. Join over twenty. Four thousand of some of the fastest growing companies in the world who rely on net sweet. Just ask sean nelson founder of love sack. We started as a beanbag company. My parents basement and the next thing. I knew we were one of the fastest growing furniture companies in the world only problem. We still have multiple systems for everything. That's what gives you visibility and control over your financial inventory ecommerce. Hr and more love. Cirque furniture is built to last infinitely adaptable just like nets. We find out how we can help your company with a free product tour at netflix dot com slash relax. Christians around the world are marking the most somber day on the religious colander. Good friday in jerusalem. Hundreds of christians retraced. What the hell does jesus final steps before his crucifixion among the crowd. Alejandro gonzales precisely because of the situation. We're going through. We have to pray for those who can't be here last good friday. Jerusalem was under a strict corona virus lockdown but the rules are being relaxed after a rapid out of back scenes. That's not the case. In many predominantly christian countries prompting the vatican to hold the pope's traditional way of the cross procession in a nearly empty saint peter's

Bitcoin Baltimore Crisis Response Inc Sex Workers Outreach Project Baltimore New Hampshire Bain Mark Worden Porcupine Real Estate Mark Warden United States President Biden Billy Evans Landis Evans Biden Jessica Rosenthal Soviet Union Major League Evans Capitol Police Noah Green
WHO investigators deeply sceptical of China’s Covid origin theory

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | 3 months ago

WHO investigators deeply sceptical of China’s Covid origin theory

"An inquiry, led by the World Health Organization into the origins of the Koven 19 virus has created more questions and controversy than answers. Jamie Mezzo, a member of the Wh So Advisory committee tells 60 minutes Leslie stall that the Chinese did not allow the W. H O lead team to carry out a full investigation into the origin of the outbreak. You're saying that China did the investigation and showed the results to the committee and that was it pretty much that was it. Not entirely, but pretty much that was it. Imagine if we had asked the Soviet Union to do a co investigation of Chernobyl, it doesn't really make

Jamie Mezzo Wh So Advisory Committee World Health Organization Leslie China Soviet Union
The Problem With Track & Field World Records

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:45 min | 3 months ago

The Problem With Track & Field World Records

"What goes into a world record. Obviously it has to be an incredible performance. Everything has to come together just right. They don't happen very often. When bob beamon broke the world's record in the long jump in nineteen sixty eight. See my previous episode about that. The conditions were perfect. He had the maximum allowable. Tailwind it was at a high altitude in mexico city. He had perfect form and he put together his best jump ever at just the right time since the advent of competitive athletics nine thousand nine hundred twelve. The international association of athletic federation's has been keeping world records in every event. There's been a progression of world records. As people of incrementally bested previous performances. Most world records are only broken by less than one percent. The greatest single increase in a world record was the aforementioned bob beamon jump which beat the previous world record by six point five percent so that is sort of the world record of world records. Each event has a very different progression in how frequent and how recent world records get set. And this gets into the real heart of what i wanna talk about. You should expect to see world records being broken at a slower and slower rate over time as humans. Approach the limit of human performance should become harder and harder to break records. Records will require more luck and more people who have the perfect physique in the very peak of their careers. But this isn't quite what happened in some events there hasn't been a new world record set in over thirty years. You're shulte set the world record in the men's discus in one thousand nine hundred eighty six at seventy four point zero eight meters to put that into perspective. The gold medalist in the two thousand nineteen world championships had a distance of sixty seven point. Five nine meters a full six point five meters or twenty one feet short of the world record the men's hammer throw was also said in nineteen eighty-six yuri set up of the soviet union through the hammer. Eighty six point seven meters. The two thousand nineteen world champion through it. Only eighty point five meters that six point two meters less than the world record. The oldest existing world record in track and field is the women's eight hundred meters. Your meal acrostic viola of czechoslovakia set a world's record finishing the eight hundred in one minute. Fifty three point two eight seconds. That's almost five seconds. Faster than the two thousand nineteen world champion. You might have noticed something that all these really old records have in common. They're all held by athletes from former communist countries. If you're thinking that these records might be tainted by performance enhancing drugs. You aren't alone.

Bob Beamon International Association Of A Mexico City Athletics Yuri Soviet Union Czechoslovakia
The Formation of the Nazi Party

Let's Start A Cult

01:08 min | 3 months ago

The Formation of the Nazi Party

"When the nazi party was founded in one thousand nine hundred twenty the world side of germany was increasingly moving toward socialism and communism only three years before the imperial romanov dynasty had of russia had been overthrown i by the provisional government and then by the bolshevik party which was led by vladimir lenin these events would pave the way for the creation of the soviet union in one thousand nine hundred twenty two so a little bit of that bonus little bit of the soviet union in this episode throughout the early nineteen twenties the ideologies of the soviet union slowly spread across the region including its neighbouring mongolia. Communism was also becoming quite popular in the european continent with a number of uprisings in germany. One of them managed to form the bavarian soviet republic in one thousand nine hundred nineteen although this was short lived. Thanks to the country's parliamentary forces. This was the climate that the nazi party found itself in when it was created only year after the bavarian soviet republic was decimated it initially targeted the german working class attempting to draw them away from communism and socialism towards antisemitic and anti marxist

Romanov Dynasty Soviet Union Nazi Party Bolshevik Party Vladimir Lenin Provisional Government Germany Russia Mongolia Soviet Republic
The Nazi Hunter: Eli Rosenbaum on Tracking Down the World's Most Wanted Criminals

People of the Pod

05:55 min | 3 months ago

The Nazi Hunter: Eli Rosenbaum on Tracking Down the World's Most Wanted Criminals

"Newly appointed attorney. General merrick garland has said he will renew the justice. Department's focus on the threat of white supremacists. Eli rosenbaum knows a thing or two about ideology for forty years. He has helped the department track down and hold former nazis accountable for their world war. Two crimes a law enforcement role that has earned him. The moniker of nazi hunter. Mr rosenbaum with us now. To talk about that moniker. And that mission mr rosenbaum. Welcome to people love the pod. Thank you great to be waiting. So yes you have been called the nazi hunter. I've seen the show on amazon prime. But what does that term mean in real life. Well it's not an expression. I'm particularly fond of because it suggests that this mission is something other than what it is which is professional law enforcement. We are not engaged in on or anything sort but we have been for four decades now simply investigating and taking legal action against participants in nazi crimes against humanity. Your father escaped nazi germany in nineteen thirty eight. I believe. can you share a little bit. About how your family history inspired this work. Y'all my dad. Got out of germany lived in dresden. His brother and his parents and they managed to get visas to this great country and were able to escape in nineteen thirty eight and the attorney. General merrick garland said in his recent testimony. I think all the time about how the united states saved my family my father graduated high school in newark new jersey and then started paying back the united states by going into the united states army and he was sent to north africa and to europe and served in the third infantry division and then when they realized that they actually needed german speakers they transferred to a psychological warfare branch unit in the us. Army the incident that changed my father's life and had a big impact on the shooter was when he was sent to a concentration camp by his commanding officer to go there in a jeep with two other men to see what the army had found the previous day when they liberated dot com word spread quickly in the region that something terrible was there and my dad's co wanted. Know what it was so my father went when i was fourteen years old and we were driving on the new york state through a blizzard heading north and there was nothing left to listen to the radio. We were talking. And i love hearing. My dad's were stories especially the funny ones. Anybody who serves the military s funny stories about food or whatever and then suddenly you said you know. I was sent dot com the day after its liberation and i though fourteen was a time when there wasn't much said really about the holocaust i knew what it was and i said what did you see and i'm like my father staring out the front window because it's pretty treacherous driving and i don't hear anything from my father and i look over to the driver seat and there i see dad with his eyes glistening their welled with tears in his mouth is open and he's trying to tell me and he couldn't speak and it was the first time i ever saw my cry men of that generation didn't want anyone to see them cry usually and we never did speak about it so my beloved father lived you know into this new century and so many many decades and we did speak about work with frequency when i was home but we never returned to the subject of you say you talked about your work with your father. How did that conversation or the job evolve over. The course of forty years work has changed quite a bit. When i started actually as a summer intern back in nineteen seventy nine. Never imagining that. This would become my life's work. We were overwhelmed with investigations. We had inherited the responsibility from the former immigration and naturalization service after the attorney general took it away from them because they had not succeeded and he's had up this new office the office of special investigations in the justice department criminal division and we had more work than could really keep up with and it turned out in the first few years that the we had inherited that actually had the most merit were ones that were based on tips received directly or indirectly from foreign governments. Which at that time was to say. Mostly the soviet union occasionally another government but generally the the soviet union which had mixed motives in these cases. We started being very proactive within a few years and by the five year point and they're after nearly all of the cases that we could develop to the point of prosecution. We're wants dan. We had initiated on our own and the methodology for that was to task our staff historians. We were the only law enforcement entity in the entire hemisphere that had its own complement of historians. They were the people who could dig for the needles and haystacks and we tasks them with responsibility for keeping an eye open for the surviving remnant of personnel records and other documents that identified perpetrators or perpetrators this. They did with great success. And ultimately we assembled more than seventy thousand names of suspects mostly european also some japanese and we ran each of those names one by one against us immigration records and sometimes other records in an effort to see if we could determine whether any of those people came here assuming they hadn't changed their names

Merrick Garland Eli Rosenbaum Mr Rosenbaum Germany United States Army Dresden United States Army North Africa Newark Amazon New Jersey Europe Office Of Special Investigatio Soviet Union New York Justice Department DAN
What Happened To Berlin After the Second World War?

Your Brain on Facts

06:19 min | 3 months ago

What Happened To Berlin After the Second World War?

"The end of world war two signaled and unsure future for the defeated germany. Between the alta and potsdam peace conferences it was decided to split germany into four allied zones the eastern part of the country going to the soviet union to control and the western parts going to the united states britain and eventually france west germany was technically the boondocks republik deutschland or federal republic of germany and east germany was the jewish democratic republic german democratic republic or gd are despite berlin sitting entirely in the eastern part of the country. And i constantly have to remind myself. That berlin was nowhere near the east west divide. The city was also divided into similar zones. The mere existence of west berlin a conspicuously capital city deep within the communist east germany quote stuck like a bone in the soviet throat according to soviet leader nikita khrushchev so tenuous where the relations between the east and west that russia began plotting to drive the us britain and france out of berlin for good in nineteen forty eight. A soviet blockade of west berlin was set up blocking off all rail and road access in an effort to starve the western allies out of the city. In one of the most dramatic standoffs in the history of the cold war the berlin blockade saw the us and its allies supplying their sectors of the city from the air known as the berlin airlift. The allied nations flew in more than two point. Three million tons of food fuel and other supplies over the course of a year until the soviets finally gave up an the blockade things. Were relatively calm for a while. But in the late nineteen fifties. The soviets noticed a trend. Developing people saw how life on the capitalist side was recovering faster than life on the communist side. Not to mention there were a lot fewer spies keeping tabs on regular folks on the western side and people began to emigrate. This was especially true of doctors. Scientists and skilled professionals resulting in a serious brain drain in the east got worse year. Over year khrushchev ordered the east german government to stop the flow of emigrants for good on the night of the twelfth nineteen sixty one in one night barbed wire barriers blockade and even some sections of brick and mortar wall were constructed. It was later reinforced multiple times to become an impenetrable twelve footer. Three point seven meter high concrete wall. Roughly one hundred miles or one hundred and sixty one kilometer. Long complete with no-man's-land. Landmines guard dogs guard towers and checkpoints the relatively fluid border which had until that point allowed some sixty thousand east germans to commute daily to good paying jobs in the west visit. Family and friends attend soccer games and so on was gone with no warning. Whatever side of the border you went to sleep on on august twelve. That was where you stayed for the next twenty eight years. This opposing structure didn't stop people from trying to make a great escape to the west. Roughly one hundred and seventy one people. Some of them defecting soviet soldiers lost their lives trying to cross the border but over five thousand more succeeded and some of them got really creative with it but the first person to cross that foreboding line just hopped over it when the wall was three days old much of it was not actually a wall at all but sections of barb wire fence though with soldiers and police to enforce it one of those was eighteen year old. Conrad shuman stationed at the corner of bernauer. Stresa and opener stresa. He might have been young but he could tell which way the wind was blowing. He wanted out of the gdr like now he pays his feet nervously while chain smoking and occasionally pushing down the barbed wire coil. It was only two feet high. While the other guards were distracted by a gathering crowd shuman swapped out his loaded. Submachine gun for an unloaded and therefore lighter one at four. Pm shoe inflict away. His cigarette took a running start and deathly leapt over the barrier dropping. His gun and just leaving it. As he was whisked into a waiting west german police car a west german journalist captured the leap to freedom in what would become one of the most famous images of the wall until nineteen eighty nine. The west loves shuman but many of the people he left behind considered him to be a lowly traitor even after he was reunited with his family after the fall of the wall a generation later many people still shunned him as a deserter. Shuman was the first soldier from the national people's army to escape. But it's estimated that twenty seven hundred east. German soldiers and policemen followed his example. If someone had turned your home into a prison then you should treat it like a prison and start digging a tunnel in nineteen sixty four thirty students from west berlin spent several months digging a four hundred and seventy six foot or one hundred and forty five meter long tunnel tell people in the east escape one assumes they had to crawl to freedom because the tunnel was only about three feet high less than forty eight hours after it was finished the stasi the german border patrol discovered it but not before fifty seven men women and children had managed to escape. Which i assume is why. It's referred to as tunnel fifty seven

East Germany Berlin West Berlin Britain East German Government France Nikita Khrushchev Potsdam Federal Republic United States Soviet Union Khrushchev Conrad Shuman Stresa Russia Shuman
The Invisible Issue: Understanding Statelessness

Immigrantly

08:18 min | 3 months ago

The Invisible Issue: Understanding Statelessness

"Could not cloth and it got to rina are both stateless. Carina has a said if a kid with autism as the birthplace aboard ones under the ussr. Rena immigrated to the us on a soviet possible cash twenty two in all their forms of identification rented them as belonging to the soviet union. A nation that no longer exists. There is so much wrong with this situation. It seems to be this this perfect storm of unfortunate diamond place but is my take on this story. I think it points to something more implicated of things. We can control from upholding. Basic human rights to adopting accessible fair bats to citizenship as countries societies individuals. Be are failing to do that now. I am not an expert on this matter. I cannot even re-lead to the experiences of these two guests but this interview was undoubtedly a teaching moment. And i am in awe of carina and he got to rina's resilience weakness wonder ability fear. I think all those emotions are important to own. And it's stories like these becky peak going. And i hope i really hope it touches you wear blue are disputed food incredible moving strong story and i hope that in a way you feel more creches and cognisant so let's get started. Welcome corinna and it got reena to immigrants. I am extremely excited to have both of you here. Thank you so much saudi to pleasure to be here and having us so normally. I know how to begin the interview or way to start but i'll be honest today. I'm struggling a bit because what we are going to talk about is so critical to the basic idea of human dignity and yet the issue itself is invisible. We don't hear about it I have worked in the human rights. Space for a long john hayman. Unfortunately statelessness was never bought of my consciousness. Which is sad. Because i've worked with refugees. I worked with asylum-seekers. I worked with persecuted populations but this is something. That is an invisible problem. So i want to start with the basics. Can you explain what it legally means to be stateless and shared how one can become stateless weather here in the. Us art abroad without question. Still snus is often referred to as a kind of an invisible issue steals mrs global human rights problem that affects people in nearly every country on the planet a stateless person but definition is someone who is not considered a national by any state under the operation of its law in other words. Steelers person is someone who has no country. No nationality in every country in the planet would consider and treat them as a foreigner. Imagine that estimated fifteen million people worldwide are in fact st louis in terms of how it happens. I'd say that most people would agree. The cases of statelessness occur as a result of a discrimination of one type or another so laws and practices that are discriminatory whether it's gender-based religion-based ethnicity or race. Based are the main drivers of statelessness. Of course additional factors such as shifting borders or when whole countries dissolve and become replaced with other countries and this is called state succession as well as lack of proper birth. Registration practices can all be major factors. sometimes nationality laws of countries can be a conflict with one another so how nationalities obtained for example in the united states. People can be born into being an american. Or if they're born to american citizens is two pathways that us employees But in other countries sometimes they can conflict and the result in statelessness on but it is important to remember that we are talking about human beings right and well on the surface. This may sound is such a technical term in a complicated situation. What we're talking about is human beings who find themselves living their lives without protection of any country with no legal entity and there's quite often no way out of the situation because many countries don't have protective mechanisms to allow stateless person to get their nationality. Back i wanted to add that in the united states statelessness appears in so many different ways. But you know we are a huge diversity between different experiences and wishes and backgrounds and just last year a groundbreaking report came out by these senator for migration studies and that report estimated there over two hundred thousand stateless people and at risk people that are at risk of statelessness in the united states. You know on a diversity speaks four Data where we are in the us represent from over thirty different countries and territories of the world. This looks really different than what appears and other areas of the world where there's a specific ethnicity specific race or sex that is targeted You know in further and there's multiple ways person a stateless person appears in the us or comes to the us you know we are asylum seekers that were denied the claim some of us came on visa tourist or student. Some of us are refugees. Some of us have temporary. Protective status says were victims of trafficking a one point our lives we unaccompanied minors. Statelessness does at the center of the displacement in the us and there is no legal framework to acknowledge the issue so united nations has to conventions d nineteen fifty four convention on start of st louis and then the nineteen sixty one convention which aims to prevent statelessness and reduce it over tying and it does require states to establish safeguards in their nationality laws to prevent statelessness at birth and later in life. But sometimes i feel like despite having these conventions and hoping that countries will ratify them and be signatures. Do these conventions. I don't see many countries working towards that goal. Why do you think it is so inconvenient. For different nation states to solve this issue if we think about the human rights framework the global human rights framework and we think about united nations. I mean even the term united nations. It's representative of united nations right so the interests of countries will be always superseding those than interests of non-countries right and in case of statelessness. We're talking about human beings who are literally left without the protection of countries. They're not linked or bonded to any state so as a consequence i mean that could be definitely. I believe considered as one of the contributing causes. You know so until very recently there has been very little advocacy on behalf of stateless persons. But this is starting to change so there. Definitely global initiatives including of course unhcr who are mandated by the united nations to protect stateless persons. But the work is definitely a starting to pick up

Rina Becky Peak United States John Hayman Carina Rena Reena Corinna Soviet Union St Louis Autism Steelers United Nations Unhcr
Entrepreneur Masha Malka on Her One Minute Coach System

Women Worldwide

03:40 min | 3 months ago

Entrepreneur Masha Malka on Her One Minute Coach System

"Joining us show. Is masha malka. Masha is an entrepreneur and she is the founder of the one minute coach system. She's also been on the forbes council for over ten years she's a mother. She teaches on the university level on mindfulness and leadership and she has been coaching clients internationally for over eighteen years. She's developed unique original programs. Such as clarity hats or motion hacks to clarity. Mommy's gonna crack me on that. One and also manifest with russia could go on and on about masha but i think it's time that she shares her journey and advice with you. Masha welcome welcome to win. Worldwide thank you dr wonderful introduction. Thank you so much app. You can finally connected. I know me too. So it's i wanna get the program name correct. It's emotion hacks to clarity Actually it said. The woman had coached the mastering emotions. So it's my book are my second book But yeah. I have a how different broken clarity. So it's all connected x-l-e-a-r dive into all that. I always want to find out though. I you have this one minute system. You've been coaching internationally for over eighteen years. I mentioned in the university where you're teaching mindfulness in leadership. How did you get on this path. What made you choose your career path Well it's one of those stories is false It finds me. I didn't find it Anything does that the best gun impacts where you just allow things fall into place. Which was it initially. Because i wasn't as wise as i am now and that was Really stressing about what i wanna do. Wasn't one of those people who knew exactly or wanted to do in life. I to all kinds of classes actually made the maths enhance. But i ended up being a writer and the coach which has nothing to do as much. And it's just wolf On something that they naturally love doing I always slept learning. And i love to Aspect learning to others so teaching which he did not exist. When there wasn't interested. So when actually i found out the research thing of a completely fell in love with and the as attracting my programs i math. Nationalism eucation. my have a master's degree in higher education. And i'm all about changing educational system by my thing. And so i like to design my courses using my knowledge in accelerated learning techniques. This whole brain learning. And how my. I will actually skull discovery in virginia's and in some the topic of learning how to learn And my first book is based on my experience being a refugee from the soviet union. America and my last book one which the mastering motions. This one It's actually based on my divorce. So is eight goes life and they learn things near research things on how to overcome fears. Obstacles can find it works for me than with my clients and then it just would have

Masha Masha Malka Russia Virginia Soviet Union America
Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author, Scientist, and Renowned Polymath Jared Diamond Discusses the Derisive Term 'Finlandization'

Kickass News

03:22 min | 4 months ago

Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author, Scientist, and Renowned Polymath Jared Diamond Discusses the Derisive Term 'Finlandization'

"Is the first country that you discuss in the book. Outsiders uses derisive term called finlandisation to describe the nation's relationship with the soviet union. Now russia you confess to being a little bit guilty of this yourself during. I think it was one of your earlier first visits to that country. Why defense take offense at the term finlandisation. And what is it. That non-finn seem to misunderstand. Sure finlandisation is a a nasty word. It's a blaming word that non-finns particularly germans and other europeans and americans applied to finland after world war tooth in world war. Two finland got attacked by the soviet union whose population is about forty times that of finland. The finns fought fiercely. Lots of them got killed. But finland managed to retain its independence but finns learned a lesson from the war against russia. Which is. let's make sure we're not going to get into that mess again. And what we'll do is. We'll talk constantly with the russians at every level from the president downwards so that the russians are not suspicious of us. will they'll know what we're thinking The russians will know that the anoc can be surprised by making an alliance with some other country attacking finland by the back door. Finland's learned learned and they were very careful not to offend the soviet union when the soviet union vade hungry. The finns kept their mouth shot. Okay germans and american set that is that's a lack of courage should speak out against the soviet invasion of hungary and finish. His response was if we speak out. That's gonna have no effect on the soviet union but we learned that we cannot offend the soviet union. Because hundred thousand dollars got killed from making that mistake. That's finlandisation namely a small country being very careful about large country when i first went to finland. I'm embarrassed to say that that one my my best friend in finland who was a veteran of the winter war. I told him so. Why being so careful about russia because if you get into trouble the united states and britain france will protect you. Oh god there's nothing worse i could say. Because the finns had been deserted by all their allies and the finns learned that awesome viable is going to depend upon ourselves. That's finlandisation it worked finland. It's not gonna work for the united states and so there was a sense that they couldn't afford to be brave and speak out against the soviet union as much as others would have liked because they were realistic and they knew that no one else may come to our aid. If we do. Why do we want to get one. Hundred thousand people killed again. Eighty thousand about children driven into exile. No big and be. We're not gonna be stupid again. We can be careful. We will talk constantly with the russians will remain a liberal. Democracy will remain a rich country investing heavily in education. All the we're going to do differently is we're going to talk constantly with the russians. So that they will trust arson and interestingly the united states after the fall of the soviet union sadly in the nineteen nineties while the soviet union was there in a big threat. The united states was talking constantly with the soviet union but with the fall of the soviet union we began to take russia less

Finland Soviet Union Russia Anoc Finn Hungary United States Britain France
Israel and the International Criminal Court

People of the Pod

05:29 min | 4 months ago

Israel and the International Criminal Court

"Last weekend there was a major decision at the international criminal court in the hague that made it more likely that the body will try to prosecute israelis for alleged warcrimes. There's a lot to unpack here about the body itself. The charges against israel the players involved. And what it all means for the jewish state joining us now to help make sense of all. This is barack reviewed a correspondent for axios and the diplomatic correspondent at israel's while news barack. Thank you for joining us. Thank you thank you for having me. So first of all. I feel like the terms of the international criminal court. The is the hague they get tossed around as though everyone knows what they are. But i'm not sure that that's the case. The sec is part of the un is at a different international body. What exactly is its purpose. What is the i can tell you. For a fact that the vast majority of people have no clue and by the way. I don't blame. Anybody is not even for foreign policy. Wonks for international law wong's that's really a small sect in the world so it's not surprising that most of the people really don't know what to talk about. Let's explain the international criminal. Court was supposed to be established more or less after world war. Two as part of the lessons learned from that war but at the time the cold war was just starting and the tensions between the soviet union and the united states is not allowed to get a consensus to form such an international criminal court so instead they decided to form the international court of justice. Also in the hague. Many people get confused and mix up the to the international court of justice deals with more. Let's say principled cases between different countries while the international criminal court is like any criminal court. We know okay which means that it has suspicions. There are suspicions against a certain person for alleged war crimes and this person if he's indicted he's tried by the international criminal court. The international criminal court was only established in two thousand two. As part of the drafting of what is known as the rome statute the rome statute basically said what the international criminal court should investigate. What are the crimes that the food try people for and all the countries that negotiated destroyed at the end of the day had to sign it and approve it in order to be members of the international criminal court re in the us and you and israel have something in common probably many things in common in that neither of our countries signed the rome statute. So what explains that opposition. Why was the. Us opposed to joining the i c c so the irony is that israel was very involved in the negotiations leading up to the drafting of the rome statute and the establishment of the international criminal court. The reason the end of the day that israel did not join the icy and did not sign their own statute was because one of the things that several arab countries pressed very hard to include in the statute as grimes should be investigated by the international criminal. Court were issues that have to do with transferring population into an occupied territory. And as you know when israel built settlements in the west bank it moved its citizens into an occupied territory and for many many years. This was a main issue that israel did not see for example as a breach for geneva convention article. Forty nine in the fourth year neva convention is an article that israel decided that it doesn't agree with so israel. Basically defacto implements the fourth geneva convention other than in the west bank and gaza other than article forty nine because it has to do with settlements. Let me just ask this so one of the things that is illegal quote unquote under the rome. Statute is transferring members of population into occupied territory. And the reason that it's illegal is because like countries wanted to target israel for doing just that no the geneva convention okay from the late nineteen forties already at designated transferring of population into unoccupied territory. As something which is illegal okay. What happened here. was that at the end. You need to decide. You can't just decided okay. The icy sea will investigate any crime that we think at specific moment. It should investigate. No they wanted to Designate certain crimes that are. Let's say more serious. In order for the i c to be able to focus on the really most obscene acts of war crimes crimes against humanity crimes of those kind of things and when they negotiated the rome statute arab countries decided to press for adding this issue of of a population into an occupied territory as one of the things that constitute a crime that can be investigated by the court

International Criminal Court Israel Axios Rome International Court Of Justice Barack Wong SEC United States UN Soviet Union Geneva West Bank Grimes Gaza
Carmen's Immigration Story

teikirisi

05:45 min | 7 months ago

Carmen's Immigration Story

"Your favorite cuban dynamic deal is back at it again and this time we have immigration story. I'm carmen and i'm freda and welcome to take it easy carmen. I know you're going to be sharing a lot with us today. Where do you wanna start carmen. If my story. Oh god over the course of my life. I've told the story countless times and every single time tell. Everyone is always so appalled end. It's remarkable it is remarkable story end yet for me. It doesn't really feel that way because it feels like just another thing in my life and on top of that. It's something that happened so long ago. I immigrated when. I was only three years old and so a lot of the details of the story are the recollection of a three year old. And there's also the fact that as i said it is a pretty remarkable story. There's a lot it's not just a lot emotionally but it's a lot politically. It's a lot economically and natural that my parents have really wanted to dive into the subject. Too much over the years at this point it's been over twenty years and only now away really starting to feel like my mom specifically is opening up about any of this but it's been really hard so that's why i wanted to open up and also i just wanna say i'm really excited to share my story because i think the stories are important to conceptualize where we're coming from in the grand scheme of this podcast to just give you a little bit more insight into who we are freed as story is coming at some point soon so we hope that you will tune in for that as well yeah carmen. I think it would be great to hear a little bit more. About what got you to this point. You've been able to have any conversations with your family around your story in terms of asking just to ask my family over. The years hasn't been very open. I i often will approach the conversation and say. Hey mom. can you tell me about the time of time we spent in guantanamo and my mom would say what do you want to know. You already know everything. I already told you everything. And that's kind of dismissive way of going about it. But in a sense. I understand where she's coming from to. She just want to talk about it and the same with my dad and my brother will. He was only eight so he remembers a lot more. He's a lot more open. Now that i have this podcast. I'm able to sort of approach it from a more structured way and say. Hey look for the podcast. I want to know xyz and so they'll start to open up able to ask more pointed questions. But in the past. When i've asked in a more open ended way it's not been something they wanna get into which i think anyone can understand once we go into the story so let's begin yet. So the year is nineteen ninety four and it's august and i'm three years old in nineteen ninety. Four cuba was going through. What is known as the video espec- and this is a special period of time in history when it followed the fall of the soviet union which was a big support to cuba and cuba started experiencing severe shortages of resources from things. Mom has told me that she would go to the store and there would be no food on the shelves to buy. It was difficult to come across basic necessities like soap. Medicine was difficult to find simple medicine. You would need to go to a hospital or have like a hookup to get simple. Things like aspirin and so life became increasingly difficult. I don't remember any of this. My life is for all intents and purposes pretty happy. I'm just a little kid running around the neighborhood and looking forward to starting school my parents at this time new or my dad knew someone who owned the boat fishermen and he had been planning to leave the country with his family on. This book and my dad was a pediatrician. He knew this man from seeing his kids as patients and also from their childhood they grew up together in this really comment like cuba is a very small place uneven. Cuban communities are pretty small in the sense that everybody knows each other in some way. And so this man emi. My dad agreed that my dad and my mom my brother and i this boat with them it was not a raft or anything that he and his family had built over years buying parts. You know it's your first time. Bring up the word raft. And i know that some of you might have heard of the cuban rafter crisis which happened in nineteen ninety four so we know that a lot of cubans like tens of thousands of cubans came over trying to get to the us or at least trying to escape cuba and a lot of them were on makeshift. Rafts put together from pieces of equipment that they found so. It's really helpful that you carmen. You're able to find someone with a boat that was meant to be about let it started the bolt right yes vote. It didn't start off as bad or as a tra- bobby kerman quick aside. Did you ever hear this story. I think it happened later on way. After the nineties there was a scoop of cubans who came over to the us in a truck. No no. I've never seen her but it didn't surprise me. Actually yeah in. This was an actual pickup truck. That floated okay. So it's ridiculous. That's amazing that is as please look this up. You need to see photos of this. It's amazing they made it over to the. Us and a lot of people were following the story because of how ridiculous it was so yeah. I just wanted to take a moment to add color to the variety of transportation methods. That were used at this time. But you know back to little carmen and her boat and this is a common theme in a lot of cuban stories like the sheer amount of absurdity. A lot of things anyway so we left in the wee hours of the morning before it was even light outside. We got on this boat and we left from this river. Called shielded santo

Carmen Cuba Freda Guantanamo Soviet Union Bobby Kerman EMI United States
"soviet union" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Bookworm

"Think one the things that fascinates me about your book young. Heroes of the Soviet Union it's an memo R- and reckoning the subtitles The You Come. To consciousness. After the death of what I was taught growing up was the great solve fullness of Russia. The Soviet Union. With the secret police and the thongs. parentally, your grandfather was a murderous thug. he certainly was. Who was himself. Murdering Jews and the other so headed your family. Your mother's side was Jewish. Yes, yes, so what happens then to the Russians so? The Russian soul. Well, you know it's funny. A part of writing this book was kind of trying to reckon a I think it's subtitled reckoning because. It was an attempt to reckon with what that country means. WHOA, how Howard was formed, and it's also a nation of readers, a nation of people who? Love jokes anecdotes, and you know they are indeed a very soulful. People, but also simultaneously it is a country that has an uninterrupted history of despotism of cruelty of. Secret Police of. The government that treats its people essentially as vassals, and you know so it is, it is a very. Confusing and ambivalent legacy, you know it is at once a place I. Really Love to visit a place. That also makes me continually very sad. I'm talking to Alex Halberstadt. He's the author of young. Of the Soviet Union. It's published by random. House. I founded a fascinating book If you have. Any interest in how? A. Very young person was stands the separations and the recurrences that involve leaving the Soviet Union and wishing to revisited. Because you've barely senior father except in phonecalls, you've only heard him. You've never seen your grandfather..

Soviet Union Secret Police Alex Halberstadt Russia Howard
"soviet union" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

06:31 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Bookworm

"In the course of my reading. I found a recently published book by a writer who frequently appears in The New Yorker New York magazine in many of the glossies. He's a wonderful writer. His name is Alex. how number stat? He was born in the Soviet Union when it was the Soviet Union and he's written. A cross between memoir and history called Young Heroes of the Soviet Union. Since I, am myself of Russian descent and I know some little about what it was like to grow. Walk in the Soviet Union. I found the book. Fascinating. When learned. In its first stone ten pages. Than Alex Humber stance grandfather was one of Stalin's personal bodyguards. That he in this book would travel to the Soviet Union. To meet this previously, UNMET! This grandfather once combed his hair and gave him a bath. How old were you? Then I was three months old Michael. and. You had barely spent time with your biological father because he stayed in the Soviet Union while you and your mother and your mother's parents came to America. Yes, that's right, Michael? How old were you then? I was nine years old. And where did you lands? How did it go? Well we left Moscow in the fall of nineteen, seventy nine, and after about six months Austria in Italy. We ended up in Queens County New York. In addition to all the other things. I have in common with the writer of the spoke Alex. Halberstadt I grew up in Queens to not the same part of Queens and you grew up in the projects. Yes, I did I grew up in the ravens, wood houses, which were part of New York City public housing. Your family was helped to America by an agency. Whose what would you call it? Specialties central issue was helping Russian Jews to leave Russia. Yes, that's correct. It was called highest the Hebrew International Aid Society, and it's still it's still going strong and actually doing a lot of activism right now, behalf of immigrants and refugees now. Wake my audience up. What is it like for? Alex Halberstadt to wake up and find himself in America having grown up near to Moscow. was. It was wonderful. I'M NOT GONNA lie, you know as as a nine and ten year old I thought America was amazing. It was every every kid's dream. You know unlimited consumer goods <hes> based. Professional wrestling on television now it was really it was. It was a wonderland. You grew up. In Russia what did the Russian novel mean to you control? It was a huge. Influence on my life does go ski in particular but Tolstoy, so tell me about your relation to the Great Russian literature. I think my relationship was a little ambivalent <hes> I tried to read. And I think, I have read most of tolstoy industy upscale entered. In, Russia which took. Eventually started to take a lot longer than it did in English and I loved reading those books. But it kind of you know. I found that also a little confusing because it kind of. I think in some ways overlapped with my experience of having grown up in Russia and kind of taught me about kind of the version of Russia that I was that I only got to know through books. I lived there in the nineteen seventies during the heyday of Soviet Union. You know surrounded by. Socialist realism and this was kind of a rush that I was only getting to know through books innocent I? Think one the things that fascinates me about your book young. Heroes of the Soviet Union it's an memo R- and reckoning the subtitles <hes>. The You Come. To consciousness. After the death of what I was taught growing up was the great solve fullness of Russia. The Soviet Union. With the secret police and the thongs. parentally, your grandfather was a murderous thug. <hes> he certainly was. Who was himself. Murdering Jews and the other so headed your family. Your mother's side was Jewish. Yes, yes, so what happens then to the Russians so? The Russian soul. Well, you know it's funny. A part of writing this book was kind of trying to reckon a I think it's subtitled reckoning because. It was an attempt to reckon with what that country means. WHOA, how Howard was formed, and it's also a nation of readers, a nation of people who? Love jokes anecdotes, and you know they are indeed a very soulful. People, but also simultaneously it is a country that has an uninterrupted history of despotism of cruelty of. Secret Police of. The government that treats its people essentially as vassals, and you know <hes>, so it is, it is a very. Confusing and ambivalent legacy, you

Soviet Union Russia writer America Michael Silver Blat Alex Halberstadt Tolstoy The New Yorker New York magazi KCRW Queens Queens County New York Alex Humber Moscow Stalin Alex New York City Land Foundation Alex. wrestling Hebrew International Aid Socie
"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> for listening to dictators <Speech_Music_Male> next <Speech_Male> week. We'll turn <Speech_Male> our focus to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our third and final <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> world war a <Speech_Music_Male> two dictator <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> Adolf Hitler. <Speech_Female> You can find <Speech_Female> all episodes of <Speech_Female> dictators <Speech_Female> other podcast <Speech_Female> originals <SpeakerChange> for free <Speech_Female> on spotify <Speech_Music_Male> mentally to <Speech_Male> spotify already. We <Speech_Male> have all of your favorite <Speech_Male> music but <Speech_Male> now spotify is <Speech_Male> making it easy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for you to enjoy <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> all of your favorite <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> artist. Originals <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> like dictators <Speech_Music_Male> for free <Speech_Male> from your phone <Speech_Male> desktop <SpeakerChange> or <Speech_Female> smart speaker to <Speech_Female> stream dictators <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> on spotify. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Just open the APP <Speech_Music_Female> and type <SpeakerChange> dictators <Speech_Music_Male> in the search bar <Speech_Music_Male> and don't forget <Speech_Male> to follow us on facebook <Speech_Male> and Instagram Ram <Speech_Music_Male> at park asked <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and twitter <Speech_Male> at podcast network. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> We'll <Speech_Female> see you next time. <Speech_Female> Dictators <Speech_Female> was created by Max <Speech_Female> Cutler and is <Speech_Female> a podcast studios <Speech_Female> original <Speech_Female> it executive <Speech_Female> produced by Max <Speech_Female> Cutler sound <Speech_Female> design by Russell <Speech_Female> Nash With <Speech_Female> Production Assistance <Speech_Female> by Ron Shapiro <Speech_Female> Carly Madden <Speech_Music_Female> and Travis Clark <Speech_Music_Female> this. This <Speech_Female> episode of dictators <Speech_Female> was written by Joe <Speech_Female> Gara- with writing <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> assistance by <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Kate. Gallagher <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> and stars <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Kate Leonard <SpeakerChange> and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Richard Rosner <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thanks <Speech_Music_Male> to our sponsor better <Speech_Music_Male> for it a new <Speech_Music_Male> podcast from ADP <Speech_Music_Male> each episode features. <Speech_Male> Visionaries talking <Speech_Male> candidly about mistakes. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They've made in their businesses businesses. <Speech_Music_Male> How <Speech_Music_Male> they worked their way through them <Speech_Music_Male> and came out <Speech_Music_Male> better for it? <Speech_Music_Male> Listen on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts.

"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

11:04 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

"Welcome to dictators. Apar- cast original. I'm Richard and I'm kate on this show. We're going deep into the minds of some of history's most hated despots. For our our first six episodes were exploring the lives of World War. Two's major dictators Benito Mussolini Joseph Stalin and Adolf Hitler. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other podcast originals for free on spotify to stream dictators for free on spotify. Just open the YEP and type dictators in the search bar at podcast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at park cast and twitter at podcast network. And if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help. This is our second and final episode. On Joseph Stalin. Last week we explored Lord Stalin's rise from Marxist revolutionary to leader of the Soviet Union. This week we'll explore how he ruthlessly suppressed dissent at home to maintained his control and miraculously emerged from World War. Two as one of the most powerful men in the world by the beginning of nineteen twenty eight forty nine year old Joseph Stalin de facto leader of the Soviet Union at squashed his political political rivals. Common yet Zinoviev and most importantly Trotsky were either exiled from the Soviet Union or had their voices dropped to only a whisper. Spur within the government. The route from Georgia who rose up the ranks within the Bolshevik cause was now ruling with an iron fist. Now that he he was in power. Stalin began crafting. The Soviet political ideology Marxism Leninism. This specific philosophy wasn't technically around. During Ring Lennon's time he simply called himself a Marxist. It was Stalin who shape the notion of marxism-leninism though we could spend hours discussing dissing the particulars. This philosophy can be summed up in four key aspects. I A one party system. In this case the communist Communist Party would be the only political party in Russia second continued class warfare. Stalin believed that bourgeois ideals could seep seep into the cracks of Russian society. At any moment it was important to stamp it out before any problems began third dialectical materialism awesome in essence. This means pudding science logic and materialism above religion. Soviet policy was to enforce state. Atheism Awesome and root out any religion and forth an economy that is entirely run by the state. Stalin knew that the Soviet Union was way behind the times when it came to industrialization as leader. He was determined to catch up with the rest of the world. What he proposed was the first of many five five year plans and it was through these policies that are brutal off? Shoot of Marxism. Leninism would rise Stalinism. A few years before his death Lennon had enacted the new economic policy as a way to jumpstart the Soviet. Economy me it temporarily brought back free trade. In Agriculture and gave peasants private ownership of their farms with Stalin fully at the helm helm. It was time to do away with the N. E. P. in its place was the first five year plan which lasted from nineteen twenty eight to nineteen thirty to the key. Goals were rapid industrialization and agricultural collectivisation the industrialization aspect got off to a slow start art. The Soviet Union barely produced more steel or iron in nineteen twenty nine than it had in the early nineteen ten's but as time progressed first manufacturing in all areas increased exponentially the second area was collectivisation basically farms weren't operated needed by individual farmers but in groups there were two types of collective call who's which were like co-ops and soft who's which were state run like the industrial policies. This move was meant to increase production at the beginning of nineteen thirty. Three Stalin declare that the first five five year plan was a success. Oil production had nearly doubled. Steel output went from four million tons to six million tons a year. Whole cities were erected from nothing? The Turks Siberian railway had been constructed in its entirety and millions flocked walked from the countryside into urban dwellings. It's widely believed that. These numbers were inflated but Stalin had still made good on his promise he was. He's on his way to turning the USSR into a modern nation. But with the good comes the bad one of the effects acts of Lenin's new economic policy was the creation of a new class known as kulaks. These were basically peasants who owned property. The and employed one or two workers in Stalin's eyes they were essentially small. Scale capitalists and an enemy of the Soviets the collectivisation of farms was meant to end the Kulak class. kulaks were violently forced to hand over their land to the government. They weren't even allowed to participate in the new co ops instead they were either executed exiled or forced into gulags Kalinin had originally created the Gulags as labor camps for political enemies during the civil war but under Stalin's reign they were greatly expanded to to include anyone deemed an enemy of the state a term. That was liberally applied. Thanks to Stalin's collectivisation. Millions of farmers were killed in the gulags or by execution and millions more died in one of the worst famines in Russian history nineteen thirty two and one thousand nine hundred thirty three the Russian countryside of Ukraine Kazakhstan the Volga region and northern caucuses saw tidal wave of food food shortages as flocks of people made their way into the newly industrialized cities. The government demanded a higher quota of food and the remaining farmers had had a difficult time meeting it. The government had also sold off agricultural products like grain to foreign markets to help pay for Stalin's Industrial Austria projects. There was also the fact that many farmers didn't want to join a collective in Ukraine. The farmers revolted others simply drop up there plow and walked away creating a lack of labor. My nineteen thirty to the food supply ran out while grain was being held in guarded silos lows for urban consumption. The countryside was left to fend for themselves. The catastrophic result was the death of an estimated seven Million people some have claimed that Stalin purposely initiated the famine but historians. Stephen Kotkin argues that Stalin simply miscalculated aided the outcome of forced collectivisation he envisioned enormous farms producing an abundance of food. What he didn't count on was the high demand in the cities were the pushback from farmers who didn't want to collectivize Stalin's initial reaction to the famine was to blame the workers? He claimed that farmers immersed ditching their land were lazy and therefore enemies of the people and enemies of the people were either sent to Gulags or found a bullet in the back of their head behind the scenes. Stalin desperately made trade deals with other countries for aid. He returned over five five million tons of grain held in storage back to farmers but the damage was already done however despite the millions of casualties he's Stalin's still saw the first five year plan as a success. He accomplished his goals. The kulaks were virtually no more and the Soviet. LVN Union had made strides toward modernization from his foreign hideouts. Trotsky observes Stalin's rule in horror in his opinion Stalinism. Zimmer wasn't even socialism it was state run capitalism Stalin operated not with the working class but over the working class exploiting employing them like any other bourgeois leader and Trotsky made sure the world knew what he thought drodskie's inflammatory writings angered Stalin. To no end he hated that his old rival was still alive and still good with a pen even if he was in exile Trotsky still well had the power to persuade. It wasn't long before Stalin convinced himself that Trotsky was plotting a coup and that the so-called conspiracy had had members within the ranks of the Russian Communist Party this paranoia culminated in the great purge which began with the assassination of Sergei Kirov on December First Nineteen thirty four cure of was a high ranking member of the Polish bureau. As well as Chairman Woman of the Communist Party in Leningrad formerly known as Petrograd. He was an ally of Stalin's but he was gaining allies of his own on Stalin. Saw Him as a threat. It's widely believed that cure O's death was orchestrated by Stalin however Stalin blamed the opposition in for the murder response instructed the N. K. V. The Soviet secret police to round up all suspected enemies of the state this included his former allies Nikolai Bukharin. Love common you have and Grigory Zinoviev as well as anyone. Anyone who considered themselves a follower of Trotsky in August nineteen thirty six the first of the Moscow show trials began these is trials had predetermined verdicts but gave off the appearance of being fair. The first to be tried were common. You have and Zinoviev along with fourteen in others. Even though there was no actual evidence of the elaborate plot both men confessed to conspiring with Trotsky to kill L. Stalin on August twenty fifth.

Benito Mussolini Joseph Stalin Soviet Union Joseph Stalin collectivize Stalin Trotsky Grigory Zinoviev Ring Lennon communist Communist Party spotify Russian Communist Party Apar Richard Communist Party Adolf Hitler Zinoviev facebook twitter Georgia Russia
"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

10:46 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

"This Scott Lennon's attention. It's believed that during their second meeting in April nineteen six six lennon gave so so his blessing to continue with the bank robberies as historian. Simon Siebert Montefiore notes. This was the first time that linen observed Stalin's value as a ruthless underground operator. It isn't hard to imagine a sense of pride in getting such an order from his political. The hero returning to Georgia so so amped up his bank robberies within a few short months he added piracy on the Black Sea to his roster of activities as he understood it his role was to help fund the Marxist Revolution by whatever means necessary between the violence violence that came with the nineteen o five revolution and dangerous robberies that followed Sosas outlook on human life and death seems to have darkened so when he heard about the death of one of his men he allegedly said what can we do. One can't pick a rose without pricking oneself on a thorn born leaves fall from the tree and autumn but fresh ones grow in spring. When he'd converted to Marxism he knew the proletarian revolution was going going to be bloody as someone who had grown up surrounded by violence? He had no problem being the man to Dole it out. That was just the way it had to be in May one thousand nine hundred seven so attended the fifth. RSD LP Congress in London at one point during the conference he saw a man walking to the podium whom he'd never seen before he had a wild poof of hair and he walked with an arrogance that made so so immediately hate him he turned to a comrade and asked who the man was. It was Lev Bronstein better known as Leon Trotsky and I didn't no time at all he would become so so's sworn enemy. I mean up. So so Lenin. And Trotsky jeep put an end to a three hundred year old dynasty now back to the story in May Nineteen O Seven twenty-eight-year-old eight-year-old Yosef Ju- casually known to his friends as so so was in London for the fifth congress of the Russian Social Democratic Labour Party. For nearly a decade he had dedicated his life to the Russian Marxist cause of taking down the ruling class his modus operandi was was terrorism bank robbery and extortion but the star of the fifth. Congress wasn't so so far from it. That honor belonged to another Leon. Trotsky Comrade Trotsky was at the time as well known as Lenin Markov undoubtedly the most gifted the writer of the 'cause the mensheviks citing Trotsky relished his celebrity during the nineteen o five revolution Trotsky made a name for himself by championing pinning an aspect of Marxism. That would one day bear his name permanent revolution. He didn't just want Marxism in Russia. He wanted it around the globe. Russia was only the first domino for the rest of his life. Trotsky would advocate for constant revolution making enemies among his fellow revolutionaries in the process. Stalin hated him the moment he saw him. The feeling wasn't quite reciprocated. Trotsky claims he doesn't remember meeting Stalin at the conference at all. This may be because even though so so attended the congress. He didn't speak at it. His head was back in Georgia. Planning more robberies from nine hundred ninety eight to nineteen eleven socio so so continued to play the role of Lennon's gangster robbing and extorting oil tycoons around Georgia at one point. He robbed the TIFF Lewis Bank which yielded ended him the equivalent of four million dollars today and the ire of the more moderate mensheviks who vehemently opposed his violent tactics despite eight not being as well known as Lenin. Marta the Trotsky so so was making a name for himself among the Bolsheviks his banditry and his ability to escape escaped police custody gave him a romantic allure more importantly it proved that he was more than just a faceless party member his his work was rewarded in September. Nineteen eleven when he was invited to join the Central Committee the Executive Council of the RSD LP his opportunities wbur -tunities grew at the beginning of nineteen twelve when the Bolsheviks gained control of the entire Party. One of the first things Lennon did was turned the popular periodical Pravda into a mouthpiece for the Bolshevik movement so so was given the job of editor. He quickly took to writing articles news and seemed to enjoy the new role he played for the movement. But historian Simon Seebeck Montefiore notes that in much of his writing so-so reveals his cynical view of diplomacy and his belief in doublespeak long before or will coined the term for example so so wrote when bourgeoisie diplomats. Prepare for war. They shout loudly about peace. A diplomats words must contradict his deeds. Otherwise what sort the diplomat is he. Fine words are a mask to conceal shady deeds. A sincere diplomat is like dry water or wooded iron of course not everyone was enthralled with his writings Trotsky famously called them the language of tiff Lewis Seminary Hamels six but the only audience member he really cared about appeasing was of course Lennon around this time Lennon was struggling. To develop the Bolshevik view on nationalities in a country as diverse as Russia he feared that ethnic divides could undermine class warfare knowing that so so came from a diverse region. Lennon asked if he would be willing to write a treatise on the subject so so instantly said yes a few months later he published one of his most important important works Marxism and the national question. In so SOS view the key word in defining a nation one is territory. Ethnic Russians born and raised in America or Canada weren't rushing by nationality. But American or Canadian they would have much more in common with their neighbors their than with say someone living in Moscow. What this means in practice? It doesn't matter if if you're Georgian Armenian or Jewish if you live in Russia you're a Russian first and foremost while Marxism and the national question would prove moved to be a seminal work in Marxist theory it is most remembered for being the first major publication in which so used his nom diplom- Stalin dolon taken from the Russian word for man of steel. The positive reaction to the pamphlet convinced so-so to take Stalin as his permanent cerny. Unfortunately the success would be short lived on February twenty third nineteen thirteen Stalin attended a Bolshevik masquerade party. An event that he had no desire to attend he was only convinced to go by a friend and fellow. Central Committee member Roman Malinowski at around midnight. The party was suddenly crashed by the Krahn. The Russian secret police. They were looking for Stalin. He attempted to escape wearing women's clothing but he didn't get very far now in custody. Stalin was sentenced to four years of exile in an area of Siberia known says to ask the location was chosen specifically because it was near the Arctic circle the rough tunder like terrain would make it impossible. Oh for even Stalin to escape the whole mess grade party had been a setup. Roman Malinowski was actually a double agent for the Oh chronic. Uh for three years. He not only spied on his comrades but climbed the ranks with the Bolsheviks while doing it he was even elected to the State Duma. According to historian Simon Seabed Monta fury the Malinowski case played its role in making Stalin and his comrades obsessively paranoid paranoid. Like Banquo's ghost. He haunted Soviet history. Stalin would never forget that someone. He trusted a brother in the fight against the bourgeoisie was a traitor. While the other leaders of the revolution continued to work both at home and abroad. Stalin survived vives in Siberia. Ironically these years would provide him with some of his happiest memories later in life he would tell stories of his time as a rugged rugged hunter like a lone gunman in the West or Ronin in the east in time. Almost all of the major revolutionaries were exiled missile during the outbreak of World War. One Stalin was in the north. Lenin was in Switzerland and Trotsky bounced around Europe World War One was wildly unpopular with the Russian people for three years. They suffered heavily against the Germans. Antiwar Fervor was growing and in one thousand nine hundred seventeen the powder keg was let on March second. A telegram arrived declaring that all exiles were to be freed need a few hours later. Stalin found out why after mass protests in Petrograd czar nicholas the second had abdicated the throne thrown Romanov dynasty was over the revolution. Nineteen seventeen was arguably the most chaotic year in Russian history. From February to October confusion reigned about the future of the country's leadership tip a provisional government was established but it was immediately doomed because of the various political factions vying for power the Bolsheviks always. He's had an uphill battle because they were in the minority they not only had to contend with the mensheviks but also various other liberal conservative and less radical socialist groups..

Stalin Comrade Trotsky Scott Lennon Lenin Markov Russia Congress Georgia Simon Siebert Montefiore Central Committee Russian Social Democratic Labo Roman Malinowski Black Sea Lev Bronstein Simon Seebeck Montefiore Dole Moscow entire Party London robbery
"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

Dictators

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Dictators

"January Twenty First Nineteen twenty four Moscow at the Grand Bolshoi theatre the eleventh all. Russia congress of Soviets was well underway. All the most important government leaders were in attendance Gregori Zinoviev live Kanye of Nikolai Bukharin. And the imposing man from Georgia General Secretary Joseph Stalin Ellen. The conference was in the thick of discussion when they were interrupted by an urgent phone. Call it was for Stalin. He took the receiver and spoke quietly. The other leaders didn't know what the call was about but from the look on his face. It was serious when he hung up he turn to the theater of over sixteen hundred men and announced Ladimir. Lenin was dead. The crowd broke into tears and shock. Doc Stalin was STOIC but his mind was racing in the last few years. He'd made sure to position himself as Lennon's natural successor assessor. He was already the leader of the Soviet Union in all but name and soon it would be official. No one was going to stand hand in his way and if they tried. Welcome to dictators apar- cast original. I'm Richard and I'm kate on this show. Were going deep into the minds. Of some of history's freeze most hated despots. For our first six episodes were exploring the lives of World War. Two's major dictators Benito Mussolini Joseph Assists Stalin and Adolf Hitler. You can find all episodes of dictators and all other podcast originals for free on spotify to stream dictators as for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type dictators in the search bar at park cast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast and twitter at podcast network. And if you enjoyed today's episode the best way to help us is to leave a five star review. Wherever you're listening? It really does help today. Were diving into the rise of Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin from his humble yet consequential beginnings in Georgia to his rise in the ranks of the Bolshevik party. Finally we'll explore his feud with Leon Trotsky Trotsky the rival who stood between him and total power next week. We'll explore Stalin's time incomplete control how his policies led to the deaths of millions how his paranoia resulted in the murder of any and all political enemies and how victory in World War Two who established a decades long Cold War with the United States.

Benito Mussolini Joseph Assist General Secretary Joseph Stali Leon Trotsky Trotsky Nikolai Bukharin Georgia Grand Bolshoi theatre Gregori Zinoviev Moscow Soviet Union Russia Kanye Bolshevik party spotify Lenin Adolf Hitler facebook twitter Richard
"soviet union" Discussed on The Classicist

The Classicist

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on The Classicist

"The courts and so there was a very small a number of decision makers and when you look at operation barbarossa the idea that the soviet union could be invaded on a sixteen hundred mile front even though it was the largest invasion in history three and a half million people but the soviet union was so vast and there were no german reserves and there were been there had been voices cases of dissent gentle dairy and said you know they have something called the t thirty four tank. That's better than anything that we have anything that we have on the drawing boards and he he was dismissed as sort of a wigner alarmist and so there was an by the same token people had gone to stalin and said richard sergey our plant plant in the tokyo embassy has has outlined this whole invasion and we know what hitler's doing he's going to invade us along this huge european front and stolen had people shot because he thought that they were agents from britain or the united states trying to stir up oh civil war but of what he would call internet's in war between two authoritarian powers first and then more importantly they sort of mirror image themselves because they were not only both suspicious of one another but they both employed the same means earnings and by that i mean it was once asked what would he do stall on if he won and he said well i'll give i'd give them a nice retirement doc under lock and key but of when i get a hold of roosevelt and churchill i'll hang both of them because stolen as a genius. He was not afraid to kill twenty million people so they had a very very sick admiration for one another because they were although their ideologies were dissimilar. Their methodologies were almost identical in the final question that i'll put you world war two occupies a fundamentally different place in the american psyche other modern wars it still valorize in popular culture. It's really the only war within living memory that is almost always thought of as a source of national pride in a lot of that probably goes to the extremity. How many of the war how sharp the moral contract was between the combatants how dramatic the stakes were the holocaust how implausible any of the alternatives to war really seem but moose wars. Don't come quite to that level of clarity. I mean if you think of almost everything that followed korea vietnam. The first gulf war was maybe a little less ambiguous but it almost most kind of seems forgotten now <hes> afghanistan iraq so my question for you. Is it a mistake for americans to judge edged the value of a war by how it compares to world war two given that it was such an outlier. Is that setting the bar too high or is that sort of precisely why it's valuable well. It's a war that played uniquely american strengths of industrial production firepower <hes> logistics and so there there were no restraints on it once we were attacked then we've had the moral high ground hitler declared war against us. We didn't claire war against hitler. Same is true against against mussalini so we had moral clarity as you point out but then there was no idea that anybody had nuclear weapons except eventually aas and there was going to be the this was a nation that was butchering thousands and tens of thousands and millions of people that were innocent. Civilians of the sixty five million dead world war two seventy percent of them rant civilians so this chang was true of japan that was butchering fifteen million in china so the american public thought thought we were attacked there are no restraints on our response and our response even if it turns out to be quite punitive and quite deadly is is going to be a moral act because it's going to prevent these awful regimes from killing more people so the more germans japanese that we kill the more innocence live live and that was unique because we've never had a war before where the united states was attacked <hes> first and then second where where there was no nuclear restraint on the logical expression of american firepower and then three this isn't a war to be fought in the jungles tells of yet nam or right along the chinese border <hes> korea or out in afghanistan. It was a conventional war where we had easily easily. <hes> supplied areas north africa or the solomons are the philippines or europe and we could use conventional firepower so it wasn't a war where you know we saw iraq or as what donald trump said the other day about afghanistan i could i could blow up and kill ten million people but we can't do that. So then we fight these wars on the terms of our enemies in that usually means it's asymmetrical uninvolved civilians and press coverage and the entire masks asks that we've seen in the last seventy five years afterward to you've been listening to the classes this podcast with victor davis hanson remember you can read victor's work get defining ideas at hoover dot org as well as victor hansen dot com and if you enjoy classes is please.

soviet union hitler afghanistan richard sergey korea united states victor davis hanson victor hansen tokyo stalin donald trump roosevelt hoover dot europe philippines britain victor
"soviet union" Discussed on The Classicist

The Classicist

12:07 min | 1 year ago

"soviet union" Discussed on The Classicist

"Victor. We are recording this on the eve of the eightieth anniversary of the molotovribbentrop pack. This was the nonaggression shen treaty between germany and the soviet union in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine which huge influence on the eventual shape of world war two both because of what it allowed hitler to to accomplish in the short run as he swept through western europe and then of course later on for how it came back to bite stalin and the soviets a couple years later <hes>. You wrote a column about this recently gently. It's also discussed a bid a new or recent book the second world wars ab. There's a lot here. I i want to start with the context around this packed at at the time. This agreement was almost incomprehensible to shock the rest of the world. This was a thing that people thought could not happen. Why was that well because the international communist movement the comintern had assured the world that the soviet union was <hes> the the moral and and legal opponent or impediment to fascism in italy and japan and germany and then suddenly in august twenty third nineteen thirty nine and it cut a deal a non-aggression track that said that neither side would join in a war against each other or aid other <hes> their own allies to attack one another and it just it just made everybody in the communist movement worldwide panicked because they had bragged so much about stalling the resistance a hitler and now he was a partner of hitler and then the same token british and french foreign policy had been sort of reliant on the soviet union sometimes in a cynical way. They thought you know what's really protecting us. From hitler is not so much the democracies on the continent belgium denmark <hes> the netherlands france etc but the fear of this huge soviet union to the rich of germany and the memories of world war one in which germany fought at two funt worn exhausted itself once that was that that assurance was dissipated there. It was just a panic throughout the western world as well as the communist world. Joe stalin is no babe in the woods. This is a man who is totally at home with with conning with deception within humanity. How is it that he so badly misreads hitler well he. He wasn't so much misreading this reading hitler as he understood what hitler was about but he thought that hitler could a massage and other words once they sign that pat he rightly expected that when he invaded poland on the seventeenth of september and they carved up poland then hitler would turn west and he had remembered world war one on with four years of just awful trench warfare that had taken over two million <hes> casualties on infringement and britain and in france and britain so he was thinking that <hes> these capitalist democracies will fight this fascist germany and italy will join in and they'll be a total bloodbath and it will destroy both the axis and the democracies and then i can come in and clean up in the west or at least i won't be threatened and then of course he had <hes> grievances against poland since the nineteen twenties war in which poland did pretty well to establish its independence. That's from the new soviet union so he wanted to get territory back from poland. He wanted hitler to turn west he wanted france and britain and the continental democracies to be exhausted and he wanted them also to weaken germany and then there was one other <hes> consideration consideration that was just as important at that time he was had been fighting a pretty bloody war along the maturity and mongolian border with japan and japan pan was sort of not doing all that well because they were very good with air power naval but not so good with traditional armor and artillery and where the russians nations were pretty strong but the japanese had figured that the soviet union would never be able to bring troops across the siberian railroad railroad and reinforce martial sukhov because they were worried about germany suddenly when japan's erstwhile partner in the pack act which was the pact of steel when they betrayed japan then japan just collapsed and said you know what i'm not gonna fight here anymore. In withdrew russo stalin for stalin it was a win win situation he he got rid of japanese war and got part of poland and then he got the assurance that germany would waste itself destroying his enemies in the capital's world and western europe to the point that you just made especially as regards ars japan you say in the piece you wrote that you can draw a line from molotovribbentrop and in subsequent violation almost all the way through the war that a tremendous mendes amount of how world war two eventually played out owed to this agreement and what happened afterwards including the fact that it became a global war rather rather than something that was limited to europe so explain how these decisions ended up shaping so much of what came afterwards were once they've made that partnership there was no longer any naive idealism among socialists and communists in the west they had tried to tell these elected governments in europe and great britain that the soviet union was a friend and now they knew that it was not a friend so when hitler when thought that he had got a stalin's guard down through this year and a half of nonaggression pacts he would eventually of invade and when he invaded although the allies would supply about a quarter of the military needs of the soviet union they were perfectly happy for germany and russia to exhaust themselves on the eastern front run in the way that stalin had assumed would happen to them and when stolen kept complaining. We want a second front. We want a second front churchill on more than one occasion occasions had looked when we were being bombed. You were supplying wheat and oil and coal and steel to the country that was using those materials to destroy us us and so we're going to help you but we don't have any sympathy and you have no position to fall off because you were an ally of our enemy and so it kind you've made the allies cynical but more mmediately wants. His pact was signed than hitler saw. There was no impediment at all going to war. There was no downside onside so he invaded seven days later. Poland was attacked within three weeks by russia and it was easily carved served up hungary romania capitulated or capitulate in the sense that they're fascist governments now joined hitler and everybody the assumed that he would turn west and when he did turn west he had no worries about an eastern front so we could do so with three invaded france with nearly only two million people and there was nothing stopping him and the same token <hes> it it sort of preempted wanted <hes> explains the preemption edge at pearl harbor because the japanese army was sort of discredited now and there was a big argument among the japanese foreign minister and <hes> what would become the japanese military government and eventually under tow joe and the argument was you said that you would be successful in <hes> attacking the soviet union from the west with the expectation that germany would join you and we we could carve it up but look what's happened to betrayed you and so there was a radical shift in the early nineteen forty. One with japanese signed their own nonaggression pact. I think it was on april thirteenth of nineteen forty one at that moment two things happen. There would never be an attack on russia from two sides or hitler. I i thought that that was okay. He didn't want to share the spoils of an easy victory but he would come to rule that very quickly and thought my gosh had we had not had the molotovribbentrop packed. Act japan might have stayed on the manchurian border. Now we would be squeezing them that didn't happen but it also had deleterious effect on britain and the united states spike turning <hes> the attention to a naval and air war and in this case adam modo said look in terms of tanks and trucks and artillery are vastly outclass by western powers in terms of aircraft carriers fighter aircraft battleships ups we are <hes> we have achieved parody so we're going to shift over from <hes> fighting the soviet union and we're gonna fight the united states and britain and it's going to be easier because in ironic way there is no more colonial presence by april nineteen forty one in the pacific. The japanese were i in the results of the molotovribbentrop. Pacman said you know what colonial france doesn't exist. Colonial denmark does not exist post colonial. <hes> belgium does not exist at the colonial dutch do not exist so all of a sudden indonesia was wide open and they thought ought french indochina especially cambodia vietnam rich and erase indochina the dutch indies were rich and oil and they looked at britain being under the blitz and they thought you know what singapore and burma's open and they only made one mistake in that was instead of tiptoeing around pearl harbor and the philippines they got greedy and tried to you get it all at once whereas they just taken the oil in the duchy cindy's and the rice and south east asia and the rubber and burma they could have handled without getting the war with the united states there was one other weird oddity about this pact and that was for the next four years you would see liberty indian freedom ships leaving west coast ports and portland seattle and checkland and they would be loaded with lend lease materials deteriorate to russia and when they got out in the pacific they would fly russian flags or they'd have russian crews sometimes and they would go right by areas where the japanese not only controlled <hes> territorial waters but they were fighting the americans and they were unharmed so think about that the japanese opne submarines and carriers were attacking u._s. <hes> transport vessels in the pacific and yet when a russian flag vessel went by they had a free hand all the way to vladislav iq in the western port of russia so eastern puerto russia so it was it was surreal how this pact packed led to a lot of other quirky taxes well when we're thinking of these two leaders of of hitler and stalin that to what degree did ideology eiji play a role in their decision making i'm thinking here of your book carnage and culture where you talk about how cultural values can feed military success or failure as the case may be so apart apart from the nefarious of their ends are there ways in which nazi ideology in germany or communist ideology in the soviet union actually impeded their ability to effectively. If we prosecute the war there was in both cases because <hes> they were not part of a constitutional consensual consensual dialectic and by that i mean there wasn't a joint chiefs that argued with an elected senate or had an oversight committee looking at corruption are are there was a there wasn't a pentagon where it was intern funded by a legislative branch overlooked by.

hitler soviet union germany russo stalin poland japan europe britain russia belgium italy partner Victor. comintern burma east asia denmark dutch indies
"soviet union" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:39 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Had in the Soviet Union but I think all well I think that's where we get if memory serves me right the concept of the memory hole from nineteen eighty four this is hold inconvenient facts it just dropped in to to be forgotten including inconvenient people that practice they had in the Soviet Union there was a whole specialization there were people who were trained in how to airbrush people out of photographs how to remove remove them when when Trotsky became de classe when he became an enemy of the regime he has to be brushed out he had to be removed from all those photographs next to Stalin next to land in the why am I not surprised Elizabeth Warren is clearly very adept at deep six sing things into the memory hole this is a report from shop cross we like Chuck Rossi's at the daily Cola Elizabeth Warren has scrubbed her website of her native American DNA results why would that be if you go to her campaign website now they've all been removed as if they never could now let's just remind ourselves who this woman is in nineteen eighty six Elizabeth Warren listed herself on the Texas state bar registration form as native American Harvard Law School referred to her as the schools only native American professor as recently as nineteen ninety six Elizabeth Warren also listed herself in the association of American law schools directory as a minority member from nineteen eighty six to nineteen ninety four then she took a test and actually filled this is the stunning thing she filmed the conversation she had with the company with the person who did the test which revealed that she was zero point one percent of native American ancestry which led the Cherokee Nation to issue a statement last year that said her claim this for being native American were quote on quote in the appropriate all of the sections that referred to this heritage of Elizabeth Warren's have disappeared from her website as of this weekend how does she get away with it she gets away with it with a compliant media collaborates is in the fake news industrial complex let's look let's look at her colleagues and what they said recently to turning point U. S. Hey turning point USA was at the I will fare it took a camera in the US given the recent violent events in Portland given the attack on and the note given the and T. for of tack on an ice facility by a man who was trying to blow it up with an industrial sized propane tank who was killed as he tried to initiate that explosion a reasonable question was asked by turning point USA what do you think of and T. for and are you prepared to disavow them as a left wing organization that the audio isn't the best because it is the Iowa fan but it's important to listen to the reactions about a lease to the names in order the reactions are from Jenna brand the blouse CEO who will we will mention momentarily Bernie Saunders who then Castro he's the one who laughs at the question Cory Booker crystal magic crystal Williamson and then in sleep by the Yang and delaying the whole refused to denounce anti for but just listen to the audio yourself Cup for I was wondering if you could take.

Soviet Union one percent
"soviet union" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

13:55 min | 2 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The paranormal desk at the FBI in his investigations helped inspire the very successful television show, the x files and this led to his nickname, the X man, of course, Jon desouza back on coast to coast. John. Welcome back. My friend. George. Thank you so much merry Christmas YouTube here with how was your Christmas. It was terrific traveling around on these conferences trying to spread the word people on Wala JI and paranormal Exo politics things of that sort. Tell me you were in China. John, george. Yeah. What's going on out there? I'll tell you a lot going on. Apparently, this is like for those who are who are more mature this is like a purse troika during the Soviet Union Soviet Union when Gorbachev decided to open up the new openness is what I recommend during the I think it eighty late eighties. When she did that. And apparently, the Chinese government has decided to approve these follow and consciousness conferences to go forward everywhere in China, and it is an amazing opening that is going on. I mean, this is the first time that I know of that we've had a general conference on policy and consciousness topics in China from Beijing Shanghai. And it is opening up a whole new world for these people in China over a billion people, and they are. Are starving and hungry for this sort of thing, and it is going to be opening up many. More conferences, like the one that I was able to do just recently for a few weeks with Dr Michael Saleh had Laura Eisenhower, which was called the galactic exploration conference. And it was amazing time. It was an amazing opening of these topics for the Chinese are locals, and they were astounded they were astounded, and they were so receptive. The population they're in China, and the and the government was very very open very open to letting us go through these topics and share these topics with the highest levels of Chinese society. It was amazing John isn't that unusual for a country that is shrouded in secrecy, a communist nation to be so open about the cases. Yes. It is something completely new and astounding because they because they remain a very secure. I'll just say the word secure in many ways society, they're very protected in many, ways and political ways. So for the decision to have gone forward at the highest levels to allow these channel followed conferences is really a huge huge development for China. And it is something that is going to be paying for the Chinese populace for many many years to come. And it's just getting started. It was a very exciting news for all of us in the consciousness in the UFO studies community because it will continue to open up new worlds of people to awaken in these areas. I wanna talk more about this, John. But for a lot of new people who are joining the program. Tell us a little bit more about you. And this FBI desk that you man. And how that all came about. Oh, well, it was the paranormal desk at the FBI was basically just me, and my partner just answering police cooperation requests from different places that were at their wit's end with what to do on some of these paranormal cases and that went on for many years. And it was it was something that was very intensive for us. And it was something that was very that's a very. Meal. Unknown territory for us at the time and covered the spectrum of topics from UFO's to wanted taunted facilities, too, many others to missing persons that were missing in ways that could not be explained in the physical world. So that was something that was really came about very gradually when I first entered the FBI many many years ago were you surprised to begin that assignment? I mean, you entered the FBI your crimefighter at all that. And all of a sudden, they give you, hey, you're gonna handle our paranormal desk, we was it. Something you welcomed or did you did you resist it for a while? Well, tell you what it came about soon as I went into the FBI, and I can tell you exactly exactly what happened because when I was actually recruited to go into the FBI way back way back in the late eighties. It was what occurred was I went through FBI academy. And we had a case we had a very famous case that went on right about that time. It was cold case of Madison plot these were two Bank robbers that were that showed up at a Bank robbery site where they were about to go forward with another Bank robbery was serial Bank robbers, and they were met there by a squad of FBI and police officers who knew exactly what they were doing and proceeded to gunned them down 'cause they wouldn't they wouldn't they didn't give up when they were told to give up and so they. Basically they gunned them down. However, it was like a Terminator movie day simply got up and kept going and like nothing had happened. They had both severe gunshot wounds to the point that they had a couple of them had several fatal wounds. One of them had a separate in order to the heart and they had several other fatal won't harbor. They just got up and started and got their own guns and just started shooting, and he did a circuit around this. This happened to Miami Florida, and they did a circuit around this parking lot. We're all the police that setup waiting for them. And they executed several police officers and FBI agents, and they simply got into their car. And this this occurred in nineteen eighty-five, actually, and they got into their car and they were starting to drive away. And one of the FBI agents actually been shot a couple of times actually popped up with a shotgun. And finally was able to shoot them through the connection from the from the skull to the spinal cord just separate that that connection right there with a shotgun. And that was the way that was the only way they were both finally stopped killed. So it became it became a huge scandal in the FBI after that. Wow. These guys did what they did. There were several searches were done on their apartments. To find the number. One theory was at the time popular drug was. It's supposedly gave people superhuman strength and power to do crazy things. And so they're toxicology things because people are demanding to know how these guys were shot full of holes and still Waigel to execute several FBI agents and police officers was huge push on the toxicology of their blood, examinations of all kinds and searches on their partners. And what was found was that? They had not even. They had not even drunk beer or smoked a cigarette there, they were completely clean of any sorts of substances. And there was no explanation for that. So the case was basically used by the FBI for several years as an example of, you know, never giving up and and the importance of fighting criminals who are determined and what they're doing and so forth. So they try to kind of use it as a positive in later years. However, when I was going through the academy, I was able to get together with a couple of the deputies that had done the searches on their apartment, and I asked him several questions question on several things they said they were under instructions to find any sorts of drugs, and they found nothing nothing at all all they found. And this was the interesting part the all that they found was a little altar to the north Scott's a little sort of. Apparently, they were openness. And just before they went out preach Bank property. They did a little sacrifice incense thing to the God LOKI is. Okay. And when they told me that I said, that's it. That's how they did what they did. Because I knew that loci was the trickster trickster God, the Norse pantheon. And I said this was what it was. And I told the deputy says that this was the only explanation that there was even though it was a paranormal explanation because it was no other physical explanation for what how they did what they did. Anyway, I graduated from the academy. Got assigned to my well, even well before I graduated from the academy. The brass bosses. They're found out. I had been asking questions about case. Okay. They were very upset. And they accused me of being a New York Times reporter undercover in their great way to start your FBI career. They were very very touchy about these sorts of things, especially these cases that they kind of have up on the mantle has sacred sort of things. And so I was giving a severe dressing-down. I was told that I would never graduate the academy, which I still graduated. I was given a lot of difficulties in the academy. But then when I did graduate and go to my first office, the the bosses at my new office were alerted that and the conversation. I was told was they were told this guy likes to do paranormal cases. So let's get them. A lotta those too busy with those. And that was how it first occurred that I got assigned paranormal cases when it went to me. And I bet you saw all kinds of things John when they crossed your desk. Just signed all kinds of things, and I was a science even what's called old control. What we call it old control files, which are kinda like administrative cases that you just have to keep an eye on that has paranormal instances in them. And one of those one of those cases what's from nineteen forty seven. And it's available to one that I always show people wherever I go because now declassified at least one document from it is declassified the smoking gun document that is dated July eighth nineteen forty seven. That is the document that shows on. FBI at fault FBI tough to win that shows the FBI agent who had informant that he said was alien visitor who told him all the different truths about alien visitors who they are and what they're doing here. Now back in one thousand nine hundred three Chris Carter developed a X files a lot of that based on these files. How did he find out about it? I mean, did the FBI called somebody at Hollywood and say, you're not gonna believe this stuff. I mean what happened? How did how did this actually after I did actually do that they called Chris Carter directly? And that happens more often than people think what happened was the first out in nineteen ninety three the first season of a new show called the X files was put out and several of my bosses found out. They they saw several similarities in my cases to that first season of the x files in several of the episodes. And so they actually ended up calling. Chris Carter, the creator of the x halls and the question on the source for some of the information for some of the cases that he was able to put up there on his on. His show, and he was questioned what he didn't. I was I was also at the other end of that conference. Call also being questioned and being targeted as to whether I provided information Chris Carter. And of course, I was able for my part. I was able to say that I did not at all provide information directly to Chris Carter. However, I did have a book we call it the TV book the off the books notebook where we keep details of cases and things are we don't put in regular FBI files. Mike OT book was taken from me. Previously. And I believe it was taken by FBI agents who became consultants to TV shows. And I believe they provided my my al-tv book to Chris Carter. But that was just my opinion. That's what I believe happened. But Chris Carter for his part. He just told our bosses our bosses at the FBI that he had talked with retired FBI agents about procedures and had consultants that's perfectly fine..

FBI China Chris Carter John Wala JI Soviet Union Soviet Union partner UFO Jon desouza George Gorbachev Chinese government New York Times Miami Beijing Shanghai robbery Dr Michael Saleh Mike OT
"soviet union" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

04:36 min | 3 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on EconTalk

"Knocks doctors Vago was not permitted to be published in the Soviet Union. Everyone virtually head read that novel as well along with many, many other officially unpublished Russian writers, the Russian novel, Russian writing is something very, very different than what it is in the west and certainly very different than what we perceived to be say, fictional literature here in the United States. I would say I would say that. Social needs since the nature social needs. Since writings have become for what? Twenty five and thirty five year old Russian people to ethical to moral too deep. Fickle to philosophical, they're much more interested in. Getting the kinds or beginning the kinds of careers that are going to make them money. Rushing people were very, very unprepared for this new world of capitalism, which was opened up to them in nineteen Ninety-one throughout the nineteen nineties. While the Russians never really came to practice capitalism as we understand it in the west, it did nonetheless enable them to essentially establish a real different kind of life for themselves life different from what they had in the Soviet Union. I'm not sure that I'm not sure American raiders that different in terms of wanting to grapple with ethical and pulse. Officle big picture questions. I think without a doubt, particularly, let's say young and whatever that me in the United States today, younger readers today. Are not into what we would call deep literature anymore either they want to read the kinds of things, of course that are most popular with young readers. But the same thing is definitely going on in in the in Russia after the collapse of the Soviet Union. And so we have a an irony here while in two thousand six time magazine proclaims social needs in the most important writer of the twentieth century while Russian citizens throughout to the end of the twentieth century, and now to the I v of the twenty first century in their minds, social needs in was the single most important individual leading to the collapse of the Soviet Union. Now whether or not this is accurate. One can. I would certainly say that he was an important factor. And the irony is finally is that it's Putin who in two thousand nine dictates rules that all Soviet high school students have to read social needs in in their schools. So in the seventies and for that matter, yeah, in the late sixties and the seventies and eighties when I would be strip searched when I would go into the Soviet Union people that is the thirties, looking either for a copy of the bible or of playboy or anything written by Solta needs by two thousand and nine and to the present day. By the way people have that is Soviet high school. Students have to read social, its considerable irony there. So I just want to make a couple reactions to that. I, I recently read for the first time the brothers karamazov. And breaded about. Maybe a month or two. Before I read in the for circle, I was struck by their similarities in the sense that both books essentially grapple with the biggest philosophical questions that there are y y, they're suffering. What is the good life? What? What? What should a person do faced with ethical dilemmas? And I would just encourage besides occur to readers to read the brother's car mounts up a beer, nine hundred page book to to ring. I would also just mention that there's just also happened to read David foster Wallace's essay, reviewing biography of dossier Eski by Frank, Frank, and David foster Wallace says, Americans can't write books like this, like Dostiev skis and if they do, they have to do it in in sort of cutesy ways with iron.

Soviet Union Soviet high school United States Russia David foster Wallace Vago Putin writer Frank Dostiev Solta thirty five year
"soviet union" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

05:31 min | 3 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on EconTalk

"So to need some who is sending them out, he was very much opposed to these works being published. Broad before they could be published within the Soviet Union. But at any rate, copies did manage to get out and indeed a publishing house in Italy, and then in the United States were translating and then publishing these Russian novels. And so works like the first circle cancer word were becoming wilder both published a say in the west as early as nineteen sixty eight. And so social needs receives the Nobel prize for literature, not only on the merits of one day in the life of Yvonne Denisa vich, but his non published in the Soviet Union novels works publish only in the west cancer ward an end for circle. And he's afraid committed the timing on this. He's afraid to leave the country to accept the prize at first because he's afraid is it hard to believe for most of us? But he won't be let back in. He's he's certain heat, learned the experience of bodies pus to knock the author of doctors Vago who received the Nobel prize for literature in nineteen fifty eight. And there are many who feel that the hell that pasta knock was put through by the Soviet authorities, how he was ripped apart by Pravda and other Soviet news media eventually led to pasta knocks, death source needs and didn't want to to repeat pasta knocks experience. And so he knew that we're, he deleted Soviet Union. He definitely would not be permitted to return to the Soviet Union. Russian writers have learned over the centuries for. Nineteenth and twentieth centuries that they can only write or at least rightly or wrongly. They hold opinion that they need to write in Russia in the country of Russia with Russian people, not abroad and the the irony is that with social, these since receiving the Nobel prize for literature, he now becomes too dangerous for the Soviet authorities to arrest or to execute because he's become basically a martyr in the west. And so the Soviets find themselves in grave, deep problems about what to do with social needs. He was too much thorn in the side of the Soviet authorities. They couldn't manage to send him to an insane asylum which they had been doing by the thousands or to execute him or to arrest him. And it's only going to be. Of course in nineteen seventy three were indeed they expelled him from the Soviet Union, something that he's Trung -ly resists and he leaves. He leaves against his will and minor stand is he? He additionally comes to institution at Stanford where I work. And is in somebody told me slept on a couch there for a while. I don't know if that's true, but you know, he's he doesn't have any money. Obviously, it doesn't have a job. He's just he's a loan as by the way, remarries his wife at some point. Well, that's another question. Let's correct something Soviet Union. So the genie social needs. Some excuse me was well on the way to becoming a multimillionaire by this time, in other words, to get us money out when he was expelled. Could he get access to had royalties in the west, maybe in the west, he was not making money in the in the Soviet Union. Writer? Well, all kinds of problems with that money at that time didn't mean anything in Soviet Union. One could only really purchase things through connections. The source of social since money of course, were the publications in western publishing houses. But he anyway, he comes here and he starts off in California, and then he ends up in Vermont because I assume he liked the climate. It reminded him of home and something credibly pointed about that. And he eventually of goes back to Russia after the falls aren't curtain, correct. Yes. A bit misleading eventually would be eighteen years later. Yeah, he lives here in Vermont for for that eighteen year period. And what he had declared very early on is that he refused to return to his homeland to his home country, the Soviet Union, unless and or until the Soviet Union would publish all social needs since writings within within the country. And that looked as though certainly in the seventies and most of the eighties as though would never ever have was even a question, but with the arrival of gutter chills, we have in the latter part of the nineteen eighties eventually by nineteen eighty eight..

Soviet Union Nobel prize Yvonne Denisa vich Vermont Russia United States Italy Pravda Trung -ly Writer California eighteen years eighteen year one day
"soviet union" Discussed on Fake the Nation

Fake the Nation

03:19 min | 3 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on Fake the Nation

"A generation that grew up looking at the depredations of soviet union that is and socialism in my mind that's failed to communism communism cherian communists got a lot of dirty dark money sloshing around our system not just the cokes but you lines and others mercer's who could have taken that term and i think just what bernie sanders i hate to say that because i think he ran a brilliant campaign he didn't even know what was going to hit him but he touched a nerve and he was brave enough a lot of these candidates were talking about are independent but come out of that surge and that soldiers are going away i remember there was a time i just wonder if like you know the term it seems sort of like medic because medicare for all so many democrats are in that's very mainstream democratic position like it is now right a was support you know supporting unions maintaining union's a living wage again a very popular position for mainstream democrats so a lot of the positions of democratic special just completely overlap with mainstream democrats just is just a term many more popular than the two party system i mean i i like socialism because i like the us armed forces and roads and libraries and sanitation collection and cops and firemen and that's all socialism the thing that no one on the capitalism or the socialist sign over one with mitt is that we're blended economy we're both were already both and we thrived in the fifties because both of those beasts were well fed the socialism under eisenhower is what made america great at it built the middle class whether it was the gi bill the interstate highway plan progressive taxation or massive union support from both political parties that's what built the middle class we now lament i don't like the term to democratic socialism for the same reasons as katrina i prefer to say capitalism with empathy because you know what's good for capitalism a living wage workforce that can afford to buy shit it's really i mean when bernie sanders ran i thought of him as an unreconstructed new dealer yes the twentyfirst century he added the climate catastrophe right but so he was campaigning a lot talking about denmark and kind of social democracy of democratic socialism and denmark and one of our great contributors editorial board members eric phone are wonderful historian of reconstruction civil war called me one night and said nation have some context to the bernie campaign sidya so he's writes an open letter to bernie sanders which we get to sanders and it's about hey senator retrieve america's own radical history because we have this great the brian we've actually been there too yeah the heartland populace abolitionists the feminists of seneca falls i mean there's such a great tradition in our country that you know these model radical democrat democracy and the history of this country sadly in the thirties forties and fifties you know the communist party did play a role in civil rights and labor rights but it got smeared because it was of foreign power central i mean it had you know so the red baiting which doesn't mean anything to a new generation i sat with my intern the other day they said read what yeah read them dead i can't just mentioned something that i think is interesting about the idea of that this could form a rift and you know we've we've done some reading on people that are just like this term is just.

soviet union
"soviet union" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on The Daily

"To nato after the soviet union falls rather than disband michael it actually expanded many of the former soviet republics who were suddenly finding themselves independent poland hungary the czech republic all the countries that made up or many of the countries that made up the old warsaw pact or suddenly thinking themselves they didn't wanna be alone they wanted to be part of the west and so they applied for membership nato and the big question was should nato let them in even if that risked making russia paranoid and how does nato and the us it's lead sponsor respond to their desire to join there were debates about individual countries and there were some debates with basically said if the russians came and knocked off this tiny little country like estonia or lafayette or with the wanian would we really go to war would we really invoke article five to come to their defense but in the end people decided that the symbolism of having old members of the warsaw pact changed teams and come over to nato was worth it even if they're military contribution was pretty tiny and what does russia do in response to this expansion of nato a group that existed originally to rebuff the old sova at union will initially not much intil what putin became president and he viewed it as a humiliation he viewed it as an effort to go steal from russia the core of the old soviet union and he was looking for an opportunity to get even putin realized that article five was something that would get invoked if he did a full military attack but he's not the money or really the forces to sustain such an attack so he had to come up with a really targeted kind of disruption some way of harassing these countries some way of undercutting their institutions some way of making people no longer confident in their governments without actually bringing about an invocation of article five i he started rebuilding his nuclear forces and then he started in with the cyber attacks a very big one against estonia stony faced a major crisis in two thousand seven when it became the first country to experience a massive cyber attack which took down estonia's email bank and newspaper servers another very big one against georgia in two thousand eight paving the way for military action russia attack georgia's computer infrastructure crippling the country to countries that of course have been all part of the soviet union he did a series of attacks on ukraine not a nato member but he realized that the fact that they weren't in nato member meant that nato was not going to be tempted to come to their defense and he used it as his petri dish the place where he could test out a number of ways of disrupting society the russians are fully aware that microsoft products like all software can be used as weapons in cyber warfare he brought down the electric power grid in ukraine twice and of course he meddled a bit in their elections as well look at what russia has done so far there accused of having interfered or having tried to interfere in german french british and us elections there's some evidence that he tried to meddle in the brexit vote in britain he attempted and failed to medal in the last french election he's been trying this in germany and of course michael he made his strongest effort to meddle in elections here in the united states in twenty sixteen using many of the techniques that he had perfected against nato and other eastern european countries and former soviet states.

soviet union michael nato
"soviet union" Discussed on The Daily

The Daily

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on The Daily

"To nato after the soviet union falls rather than disband michael it actually expanded many of the former soviet republics who were suddenly finding themselves independent poland hungary the czech republic all the countries that made up or many of the countries that made up the old warsaw pact or suddenly thinking themselves they didn't wanna be alone they wanted to be part of the west and so they applied for membership nato and the big question was should nato let them in even if that risked making russia paranoid and how does nato and the us it's lead sponsor respond to their desire to join there were debates about individual countries and there were some debates with basically said if the russians came and knocked off this tiny little country like estonia or lafayette or with the wanian would we really go to war would we really invoke article five to come to their defense but in the end people decided that the symbolism of having old members of the warsaw pact changed teams and come over to nato was worth it even if they're military contribution was pretty tiny and what does russia do in response to this expansion of nato a group that existed originally to rebuff the old sova at union will initially not much intil what putin became president and he viewed it as a humiliation he viewed it as an effort to go steal from russia the core of the old soviet union and he was looking for an opportunity to get even putin realized that article five was something that would get invoked if he did a full military attack but he's not the money or really the forces to sustain such an attack so he had to come up with a really targeted kind of disruption some way of harassing these countries some way of undercutting their institutions some way of making people no longer confident in their governments without actually bringing about an invocation of article five i he started rebuilding his nuclear forces and then he started in with the cyber attacks a very big one against estonia stony faced a major crisis in two thousand seven when it became the first country to experience a massive cyber attack which took down estonia's email bank and newspaper servers another very big one against georgia in two thousand eight paving the way for military action russia attack georgia's computer infrastructure crippling the country to countries that of course have been all part of the soviet union he did a series of attacks on ukraine not a nato member but he realized that the fact that they weren't in nato member meant that nato was not going to be tempted to come to their defense and he used it as his petri dish the place where he could test out a number of ways of disrupting society the russians are fully aware that microsoft products like all software can be used as weapons in cyber warfare he brought down the electric power grid in ukraine twice and of course he meddled a bit in their elections as well look at what russia has done so far there accused of having interfered or having tried to interfere in german french british and us elections there's some evidence that he tried to meddle in the brexit vote in britain he attempted and failed to medal in the last french election he's been trying this in germany and of course michael he made his strongest effort to meddle in elections here in the united states in twenty sixteen using many of the techniques that he had perfected against nato and other eastern european countries and former soviet states.

soviet union michael nato
"soviet union" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

KBOI 670AM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on KBOI 670AM

"That all men were brothers and yet that that whole wave came apart fairly quickly and we see all universalistic movements becoming either corrupted or returning to their parochial roots fairly quickly and nowhere was that more true than in the young soviet union and if you look at the young soviet union right after the revolution under lenin it had a vision of letting revolution sweep over the falling empires of europe after the first world war and you know what countries stopped the soviet union from achieving and he was right here in poland and the poles remember it and they remember it very well because although the russians meaning the soviets who were mostly russian at that time were fully engaged in bringing the fruits of communist liberation to the rest of humanity that that that altruism did not extend to the poll in the polls knew it and they fought tenaciously and beat back the bolsheviks and the big problem here is that you know when the soviet union was led by men like trotsky who is jewish and there was this more globalist vision in the soviet union it could appeal to the rest of the world but with stalin who is an old style worth the docs parochial man everything devolved ultimately into narrower a russian interests and as a result the this much more hard edged us versus them vision took over the soviet union and and so by nineteen forty five in a landscape dominated by stalin the soviet union was a mockery of everything that it's rhetoric pretended to be and this doomed the soviet union in other words stalin who brought the soviet union such success by conquering half of europe also ensured the soviet union would fall very quickly because he.

young soviet union lenin soviet union poland trotsky stalin europe
"soviet union" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"soviet union" Discussed on KGO 810

"Invest which is why the stock market is worth about six trillion dollars more than it was when donald trump became president i like the fact that we may get a comprehensive immigration reform uh i like the fact that uh donald trump recognize jerusalem as israel's capital today and by the way i thought i mentioned earlier i think a lot of that is also aimed at china and north korea when you have an american president who is willing to lead and do the right thing erase backed ib of what some of the other leaders in the world thank that's good for peace in the world so makes sense to antagonize in genuine even more well you know we're not antagonizing look the fact of the matter is bill clinton cut a deal with north korea we gave a lot of aid for their promise that they wouldn't build nuclear weapons they broke they broke it um talk is cheap um and you know we this is a regime where we definitely cannot allow to have nuclear weapons it's it's a rogue regime uh it's a risk to people not only in the region but now people across the world and um you know at some point hopefully uh we'll be able to put more pressure on it the president is leading on that i would love that the happened but i have my doubts and they've they've with they've got nuclear capability they're not gonna give it up the the best you can hope for my world is virtually assured destruction like we had with the with the former soviet union while we won't have mutually assured destruction with north korea um they'll be b is potential for destruction but they'll be destroyed we may have a little bit of a problem not to underestimate what that problem would be but this is not this is not the soviet union in the soviet union leadership seemed to be a lot more rational than kim jongun they i can't disagree uh the other thing is now the president of the united states is emphatically back for more in alabama does that embarrass you look i think the people of alabama have to elect i'm whoever they want and uh i have to tell you no political party has a monopoly on virtue nobody i made the end and you know the people of alabama are going to have to uh.

stock market donald trump president comprehensive immigration refo jerusalem israel china north korea nuclear weapons soviet union kim jongun united states alabama bill clinton six trillion dollars