35 Burst results for "software engineer"

The End of IP Address Targeting

The Big Story

01:44 min | Last week

The End of IP Address Targeting

"Joining me. Today is our resident apple identity and privacy expert alison schiff who tuned into the event. Hi i'm blushing and joining. Us is senior editor james hersher. Who was doing a follow up story about apple's changes obfuscating email information as part of its privacy. Updates is there to fund one. Alson you tune dan. So how did apple reveal that. It was pulling ip addresses. Okay so i'll set the scene. Craig federici it's apples. Svp of software engineering. He's in a a well lit section of apple park in cupertino. The sun is shining brightly and pouring in through floor to ceiling curved windows. He's got this big smile on his face because he's talking about ipad. Os and all the cool things you can do. And then all of a sudden his whole demeanor changes he says next. Let's get into privacy. And then he steps on what looks like a button embedded in the floor that opens up into like a man hole in the floor that he jumps into. And then all of a sudden he's in the dark windowless chamber with a black screen behind him and the only word written on it is privacy and then it is very serious tone. He goes into the whole like at apple. We believe privacy is a fundamental human right. You that whole spiel. And then to privacy engineers step out from the darkness from behind the screen and get into some of the details about apple's specific privacy announcements. It was a little telegraphed. He jumped into dark bunker to talk about the evils of ad. Tech data brokers

Apple Alison Schiff James Hersher Alson Craig Federici Cupertino DAN United States
Darts Library for Time

Data Skeptic

01:25 min | 2 weeks ago

Darts Library for Time

"Name is gina tan. And i worked for unit date. She's a she's doesn't serve button. I had invited you on primarily to talk about a python library that i've been working with a little bit that you were one of the maintainers and i think original author of and that's darts. What's the high level pitch for darts. What is it in. Why do people like it so darts is like you said. He's a biden library. Which was primary goal is really to make it easy and straightforward to forecast time series but also we have a vision for eighth we want to do more than forecasting so we want to just make it easy to work with time series and all sorts of stuff like also anomaly detection etc but for the timing darts really time series forecasting library from. Let's say a software engineers point of view someone who has a time series problem. But maybe not the academic background in arena. And this sort of thing can they use this tool. Yeah that's actually the goal. One of the goals to really make it easy to lower the barrier of entry for building and using forecasting models and also testing these models comparing different models experimenting with different forecasting approaches. Hopefully tizzy enough. We are really trying hard to make the libraries as easy as possible to use without compromising to much on the functionalities which is the challenge in itself. I would say but ease of use is really the main thing we're trying to optimize for.

Gina Tan
Returning to Work After A Break with Software Engineer Curran Schiefelbein

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

02:13 min | Last month

Returning to Work After A Break with Software Engineer Curran Schiefelbein

"I am back here with curran. We're talking about managing time out of the workforce and and getting back in so then when you did decide that you were looking for time work or at least to ramp up eventually to that take more career oriented thing. Have back into your your field. How did you go about doing that. Short so yards thinking about it years before. I knew i'd be going back because you got a lot of time to think when you have small children and you're just making sure that they don't eat the thing they shouldn't eat et cetera. So some of the things that i did were just sorta lucky meeting. The right people being asked to do something that i was qualified for but felt like a stretch for me. One of those things was taking volunteer chairperson role in the family network. That i mentioned earlier. Good friend was the chair the time she said you can do this. And i need your help. And i said i'm not sure but i'll try and it turned out to be the right thing at the right time for me to to build some built some of my softer skills with team leadership and project management and then. I also decided to apply for the chairperson role at the cooperative preschool. Which from the irs is point of view employed position because we were getting a tuition credit and at the person at that. School is jointly responsible with the director for the day to day operations of school. So for me. It was not a full-time job but it didn't ball things that were relevant to resume anywhere any kind of job. We were doing budgeting. I was helping with hiring and writing contracts. We were doing fundraising Looking for sponsors for the school auction you know they say. Don't put anything that says mother apparent on your resume. But i chose. I thought about it pretty hard. And i chose to put that right there in the employment section on parallel with my technical work. I took my job there seriously. And the message that i wanted to send Two people were looking at my resume. Was i took this work seriously. You should take it seriously to this is a job

Curran IRS
What Its Like to Break Into Tech as a Mother

CodeNewbie

02:06 min | Last month

What Its Like to Break Into Tech as a Mother

"Things are being here thank you. I'm so thrilled to be here. This is like surreal very cool so you recently got a promotion from associate software engineer to software engineer at forms. Congratulations very exciting. So let's start from the very beginning and talk about how you got into tech. How did you break in. My father was a sales engineer. So i was surrounded by technology so in many ways i've kind of always been in tech but i guess officially my journey breaking in started in two thousand eighteen. So what happened then. What got you interested in. What got you introduced. So before. I started pursuing a career in ek i was a freelancer. It allowed me to stay home with my children. At first my son and then my daughter and i implemented wordpress websites for small business owners solar entrepreneurs that level and by implementing. I mean that. I found a theme installed a theme and then found different plug ins. That did what my clients needed done or what. They needed their websites to do. But i never got into the code. And so at some point in my freelancing i started getting clients with more complex requests that couldn't find the right combination of plug ins to make happen and so i then started to feel 'cause then i you know maybe search on the internet stack overflow or other sites and i would hear about php. And how if i edit the functions. Php filed than. I could get this to happen and that to happened. And that was when i started to feel the disadvantage of not being able to code. And i felt like i was coming up against a roadblock in my freelancing career so to speak so that was when the first occurred to me that i could learn to code.

Making Spark Cloud Native at Data Mechanics

Data Engineering Podcast

02:07 min | Last month

Making Spark Cloud Native at Data Mechanics

"Your host is tobias. Macy inch today maneuvering giannis. Stefan about data mechanics cloud native spark platform for data engineers. So giannis can you start by introducing yourself to be here. So yeah. I'm john eve i am. I'm the co founder of mechanics. Priority mechanics was a software engineer auditor. Bricks lead their spark infrastructure team. Sanal being working. We spark cousin infrastructure provider for quite a few. But i'm pretty passionate about it. So i hope i have some interesting stories to share with your audience and do you remember how you first got. Involved in the area of data management. Yes so. i studied engineering. In france then went to the. Us stanford at the time machine learning was. Everyone's obsession. I remember the pretty popular machine. Learning class by andrew hang had one hundred thousand students registered but it was actually a separate class that interests me mining massive data sets at which was like my introduction to distributed computing and. I find that this area was a great mix of really software. Engineering problems algorithms architecture problems. And then i had the opportunity to join. Data breaks as a pretty early software engineer just out of college and that was an amazing experience. And that's how. I go all in that area. And so you mentioned that you had that experience of running spark at data bricks and now you're running it for other people in your company data mechanics. I'm wondering if you can start by giving a bit more of an overview about what it is that you're building their data mechanics and some of the story behind. What made you decide to set out on your own and run your own business to help provide this service to more people. Yeah of course. Sedate mechanics is a cloud. Native spark platform for data engineers. Our platform is deployed on kuban cluster. That we create and manage for our customers inside their cloud accounts so the contract with our users. Our users develops barcode. They submit it and then we take care of scaling infrastructure tuning the configurations collecting logs and making them available enough friendly user interface.

Giannis Sanal Andrew Hang Tobias Macy Stefan Stanford John France United States
How Capital Invents Staffing Crises to Bust Unions and Depress Wages

Citations Needed

02:00 min | Last month

How Capital Invents Staffing Crises to Bust Unions and Depress Wages

"Every few weeks it seems we hear about some essential industry suffering from a critical quote unquote labor shortage. Nurses truck drivers software engineer teacher. Construction according to corporate trae groups and their media mouthpieces these industries simply can't find trained workers to fill their ranks but a closer examination of claims of worker shortages reveals that there's very rarely an actual labor shortage at all what there is however time and again is a pay shortage. Industry is not wanting to provide adequate compensation or safe work conditions for the available labor force. That is perfectly willing and ready to work instead of a worker shortage. There's a not hyper liquidity in the labor market problem for capital the perfectly capable and trained workers that industries do have easily replaceable. Potentially or already unionized and making demands of capital that those industries simply don't like in an effort to increase the labor pool and thus give capital more leverage over existing workers corporate lobbying groups constantly whine about labor shortages knowing the media. Will mindlessly repeat. These claims without any skepticism are evidence to increase recruiting of new potential employees promote legislation that loosens licensing or health and safety standards and reinforces media. Ready means that. American workers are lazy and greedy. Pr extra capital routinely evoked the spectacle of worker shortages knowing full weather claims will be unquestionably repeated by american media. Who never bothered. Ask why they're reporting on the same suppose labor shortages every year for the past thirty years later on the episode we'll be joined by kevin cashman senior associate at the center for economic and policy research. It's a lot easier denies people and say well you know you should be taking this job instead of taking unemployment you know. We should have unemployment amount. That's adequate for everybody. And then we should have employers that are paying wages that incorporate all the requirements of the

Kevin Cashman Center For Economic And Policy
Apple to Build New Campus in North Carolina

Fresh Air

00:25 sec | Last month

Apple to Build New Campus in North Carolina

"DEVICE maker Apple has announced a major investment in North Carolina's research Triangle area, the company's saying will open its first East Coast campus, in move expected to bring at least 3000 new jobs to the region. Apples pledged to significantly boosted spending in the U. S and hard thousands of new workers. Apple says it will invest around a billion dollars in Raleigh Durham Mary facility, which will do work in machine learning, artificial intelligence, software, engineering

Apple North Carolina East Coast Raleigh Durham Mary Facility U.
Facebook Introduces a New Miniplayer That Streams Spotify

Daily Tech News Show

01:58 min | Last month

Facebook Introduces a New Miniplayer That Streams Spotify

"The short film co. let from facebook's oculus studios and e as respond entertainment game studio won an academy award for documentary short subject the first project from the game industry to win an oscar. The film was created for the video game medal of honor above and beyond and is available to stream on youtube oculus tv and the guardians website the new york times reports that the indian government ordered roughly one hundred posts critical of the country's covid nineteen response to be removed from twitter facebook and instagram india claim the posts were misleading and could incite panic. The platforms complied with the order with twitter blocking the tweets in india but leaving them available outside the country on monday apple detailed its plans for. Us development over the next five years including investing four hundred and thirty billion dollars building a new campus in north carolina and adding twenty thousand jobs in the us apple also pledged tens of billions of dollars for the development of next-generation silicon and five g. Technology apple says the north carolina campus will support at least three thousand jobs in machine. Learning artificial intelligence software engineering and other fields. Facebook rolled out support for a new spotify. Many player in the news feed which will continue to play content as a user continues to grow their feed part of a partnership that the companies announced last week the features available to free in premiums spotify users. who will now see facebook and facebook newsfeed option when selecting the share option from within the spotify app and a separate blog post. The company also confirmed its building. Its own app. Podcast player was shows having to opt into the service and expected to roll out in the next few months and macrumors confirmed that the revival ransomware group removed all references related to an extortion attempt against apple which previously included images and schematics. Stolen from the odium quanta. The group had pledged additional information through. May i if not paid a fifty million dollar ransom and it's not clear why the information was removed

Facebook Apple Academy Award Twitter Indian Government India North Carolina Oscar The New York Times Youtube United States
Apple Commits $430 Billion in U.S. Investments Over Five Years

Morning Edition

01:01 min | Last month

Apple Commits $430 Billion in U.S. Investments Over Five Years

"Tech giant Apple announced this morning plans to invest more than $430 billion and add 20,000 new jobs across the country over the next five years from member station W. U. N. C. Jason to brew in reports on what that investment will look like. In North Carolina. Almost 3000 jobs will come to research Triangle Park commonly called RTP the tech and form a hob near Rollie. Those jobs will focus primarily on machine learning artificial intelligence and software engineering. Apple plans to build a one million square foot innovation hub in RTP for a total investment of more than a billion dollars. The area is surrounded by Duke UNC Chapel Hill, North Carolina state, seen by many tech and pharma companies as a rich talent pool, the Republican led North Carolina Legislature in 2016 past the infamous bathroom bill, which led progressive companies to curtail investment in the state. Law was fully repealed last year, and LGBT Q rights advocates credit the repeal for helping to attract the Apple investment.

W. U. N. C. Jason Apple North Carolina Triangle Park Duke Unc Chapel Hill Republican Led North Carolina
Amazon Hiring for Alexa Guard in Canada

Voice in Canada

01:32 min | 2 months ago

Amazon Hiring for Alexa Guard in Canada

"I wanna tell you about a job. They came across recently. This is actually post linked in among other places and this is for a software development engineer for lexi guard specifically so in addition to this job being available so first of all. If you're interested in that job. I encourage you to look it up on the amazon jobs and apply for it but What i find more interesting is that they are specifically advertising for someone to work on the lexi guard Technology and this is something that is not available in canada. Now this jaw. Their advertising is specifically in vancouver. And so i have to assume that they're looking at developing this technology for us canadians. That would be great. We'd hopefully would have that feature come sooner rather than later. the little blurb about it just so that you know it says the lexi smart security team is focused on bringing lexi customers peace of mind safety insecurity about their households and loved ones. We will lexi feature such as lexi guard and integration. With smart devices such as contact and motion sensors cameras security systems et cetera. So i find this very interesting like i said. Could this mean that lexi guard is going to be coming to canada. I hope so. I guess there's no guarantee there but I find this quite encouraging and of course if you are interested in this type of and you are a software engineer then definitely check it out and maybe it could be part of the team that brings this particular feature to

Lexi Amazon Canada Vancouver
Canadas Vaccine Hunters Have Tips for Booking Shots

The Big Story

01:49 min | 2 months ago

Canadas Vaccine Hunters Have Tips for Booking Shots

"On jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Josh calvin is a software engineer. But that's not why you know him. He is one of the people who developed the vaccine hunters twitter account and discord server and anything else. Josh facebook page facebook page. Where did this all start. Why and when and how. Yeah so vaccine hunters candidate started our creator. His name is andrew and originally he was just looking for to get his parents like a vaccine appointment and he was able to eventually do that but he realized that like this was really challenging to do and he's pretty computer savvy being a software developer so he found vaccine hunter dot org which is a website in the states and was doing a lot of vaccine awareness. They did a lot of like leftover vaccine things but he he founded. That would probably be something. We could use in canada regardless of how or vaccine rolex going or anything like that so he created vaccine hunters dot ca and also created the twitter account back centers can and created a discord servers. Well which is for those. That don't know what that is. It's kind of like a chatting tool similar to like an instant messenger. You might have at work with different chatrooms and things like that and that's how it really got started In the focus was on real time information Mainly around vaccine awareness where people could book appointments how they could book appointments and helping people book appointments. We do not hang around outside vaccine clinics or s health workers. We have zero tolerance for any of that behavior Looking for leftovers. Were trying to just help. Fill every possible slot with a vaccine. How long ago was that. That andrew started this He started at church so it hasn't really been that long. It's only been really maybe a month. Maybe just over a month at this point.

Jordan Heath Rawlings Josh Calvin Josh Facebook Twitter Andrew Facebook Canada
Lack of Paid Sick Time Could Be a Barrier to Vaccination

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Lack of Paid Sick Time Could Be a Barrier to Vaccination

"Of today everyone sixteen and older is now eligible to receive a covid vaccine in every single state more than two hundred million shots have already been given in the us so far about half of all adults have received at least one dose. The vaccine is free whether you have health insurance or not but even minus the massive logistics of distributing the vaccine there are logistics involved in getting it and some workers are having trouble getting paid time off to get their shots or to deal with side effects from the workplace culture desk. Marketplace's megan mccarthy carino has the story when washington dc software engineer lori. Barth got the vaccine last month Kind of kicked her but headache chills. brain fog. I don't think i could have read taxed on screen comfortably. Loan sit up in a chair. Barth didn't have to worry about working through the pain because she got her vaccine on a weekend and she has plenty of paid sick time. She could've used but not all workers do says vicki shavuot a senior fellow with new america. And you could very easily see how it would be financially impossible and potentially job risking for a worker to be able to get a vaccine. There is no national requirement that employers offer any sick leave much less a couple of days to get vaccinated and low wage. Essential workers are among the least likely to have paid time off says elite schools with the economic policy institute. They may not have a lot of power negotiate for when the best time is to have the vaccines that they make sure. They don't have to work the next day. In case there's side effects said that impact them thirteen states and several dozen cities do mandate some form of paid sick leave and many employers like mcdonald's starbucks and wal mart have offered paid time off for employees to get vaccinated doric rice a law professor at uc hastings. Says it's important. That workers have vaccine time off on top of their usual sick leave.

Megan Mccarthy Carino Barth Headache Chills Vicki Shavuot Lori New America Washington Economic Policy Institute United States Wal Mart Doric Rice Uc Hastings Mcdonald Starbucks
C# And .NET For Beginners With Vijesh Salian

The .NET Core Podcast

01:51 min | 2 months ago

C# And .NET For Beginners With Vijesh Salian

"So first thing i'd like to say vichy's thank you ever so much for spending your afternoon with me talking about what we're about to talk about. Usually so little bit of insider baseball we usually we have a topic and provide as we talk about. But you know it's an easy going show. We can go off in a different direction so at the moment akron idea of what we're going to talk about what we may end up talking about something else. I don't know as as a saturday afternoon. We're having some chill out time. You know we both saddens. Children is brilliant wherever just time to chill. It's a thank you for spending time with me. Cool thank you for having me pleasure. You're very very welcome. Very welcome so i was wondering before we get into the the topic that we're going to tackle today. I was wondering. Could you let listeners know a little bit about yourself. Give us a brief introduction in Sort of technical background the places. You've worked projects working on if you can talk about them kind of a minute And i'm a software engineer primarily in the talknet ecosystem. And i started my career coding in delphi and then moved on to see shop and i like to mentor big nurse and upcoming as well. So that's like You know. I've learned a lot from my pearson. It looks like giving back to people who want to learn more as well and I worked in bangalore in india. And currently i'm working in another lund's and i've been here for about three years now and i'm working for healthcare company which is vital images sparta cannon group and Yeah and i've been part of healthcare company before as well so i like the domain and it gives a sense of purpose of to what i'm doing

Baseball Delphi Pearson Bangalore Lund India
Automate the Boring Stuff with Python,

Embedded

01:59 min | 2 months ago

Automate the Boring Stuff with Python,

"Today we'll be talking about python. No not the snakes with al swaggart hail. Thanks joining us. Thanks for having me. Could you tell us about yourself as though we met on the first day of pie con at lunch. Yeah hey i'm al. I'm mostly known for writing python books The most well known is automate. The boring stuff with python and by a fifteen second description of that book is. It's sort of a programming book for complete beginners who may or may not want to become software engineers. But they're just office workers who are dealing with excel a lot but they'd like to learn how to program so they could write little scripts to automate all the little boring tasks that they have to do day to day. Excellence so i wanna talk more about finding the books you've written but i wanna do lightning round where we ask you short questions in. We want short answers. Are you ready. Yes favorite python module. I auto gooey which is also my own module but the more i've worked on it the more i've come to really love it. What python module doesn't exist that you wish did something that can vary intelligently scan for people's resumes and then converted to a standardized electronic format virtual cova dock to the virtual con can't con- to after virtual and no one can virtual end kanda docker or other and to use virtual end. Especially with the pip. M module i think pip m was finally the the module that made virtual environments easy enough for me to actually use day to day shade python. Be the first programming language that someone learns

Al Swaggart
Applying RL to Real-World Robotics with Abhishek Gupta

The TWIML AI Podcast

04:35 min | 3 months ago

Applying RL to Real-World Robotics with Abhishek Gupta

"Gupta aspect is a phd student at uc berkeley. Where he works with folks. Like peter l. and sergei levin who've had on the show before abstract. Welcome to the terminal podcasts. Thanks forward to digging in and learning more about your work and your background. What got you interested in. Studying our al and robotics. Yes so so. I think my first experience with robotics was actually This first lego league that bump additions where we would like make these lego robots than they would like do these challenges and when we first did it we made the robots just by heart goading all the different primitives and programs to do everything and that works to some extent but i think when i came to berkeley it was really exciting to see that people had more sophisticated techniques to control. Robots was also the only thing that had ever done before then in terms of project experience and so i reached out to a number of professors I called the projects cool and beater specifically had a lot of research at that time on folding laundry and flying helicopters and i was like wow this is this is really amazing so at least to him as a freshman and and then he you know. He hired me as an assistant in his lab to kind of help out with some software engineering projects in some research projects. And kinda got started on research from there and so then like the first set of experiences that i had there. Were kind of like helping grad students and post docs on their research projects which were largely related to folding laundry in dying noughts and folding thousand things that peter was excited about at the dime and from there i think click grad school my research and interest under a lot more towards enforcement learning and learning based ideas. Oh cool so within that of of our and our alpha robotics. And i guess maybe that's broad from a tomato perspectives. Since we've had a bunch of conversations on your where do you focus like what are what are your research interest within those fields. Yeah so i guess. Since i am a person who was really excited about robotics and i wanna get robots to work because i think they have a lot of impact and i see. Rls a great dual to enable robotics more so than exploring rl for the sake of water. And so what i specifically think about a lot is like what are the things that prevent us from applying reinforcement learning robotics problems in the real word. So for instance if we want a robot the like operating kitchen and being up your kitchen or make a meal what is it. That's preventing the algorithms at work on. I'll go out for star. Whatever for being applied to these types of systems. And so i specifically think about like. There's a mismatch assumptions between what these algorithms typically assume and what's actually available in the real world. It's like i think about. How do we bridge these mismatched assumptions. So specifically what i mean by that is for instance in a game or in a in a video game or a board game. You'd assume that the score is provided so that award function it's daily easily available but in the vale where there's no score. Which tells you what you're doing. That are for instance in video game. You can collect millions of samples but in a physical robot if you do that with random expiration. You're gone either. Break yourself for the environment and then also just like. There's a lot of assumptions that we make where we can hide are gertie laundry in simulation. So we can like reset the wherever we want or we can like magically set the state of the world in some ways and a lot of our algorithms are critically reliant on these assumptions but in the real world. You just can't do that and so kind of been thinking about. How do we bitch mismatched assumptions. In that way and the problems. That are most interesting to the one that you mentioned earlier that you can cut your teeth on with peter in saturday like folding laundry and not tying and that kind of thing or you have some other When you think about your work. Do you have some set of canonical problems. That come to mind. Yeah that's a great question. So i think it'd be great if we could fold our laundry at byron ought to do the things that we used to do but i don't think we're quite there yet so i think we're still getting objects to be pushed at on and picked out and more basic skills before we can get to the more complex ones that so there's like more averages paradox which would which indicates that like learning low level skills can often be harder than learning the higher level ones and. I think we're kind of stuck in battery him but we're making a lot of progress. I think

Gupta Aspect Uc Berkeley Peter L Sergei Levin Berkeley Peter Byron
Interview With Gideon Mendels, CEO Of Comet

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

04:26 min | 3 months ago

Interview With Gideon Mendels, CEO Of Comet

"We're so excited to have with us today given mendel. Who's the ceo and co founder of comet so high gideon and thank you so much for joining us today jeff million. Hey you're on. Thank you so much for having me. I'm super excited to today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. And tell them a little bit about your background and your current role at comment definitely so as you mentioned. I'm the ceo and co founder of comment For the listeners. Who don't know comet provides a self hosted in college based missionary platform essentially on data science teams to track impair explain and optimize experiments models company support some of the biggest and best enterprise machinery teams in healthcare attack media financial services and other industries Her son who actually started maker of software engineer but she sixteen years ago. And i shifted do working on an applied machine learning about seven years ago. I was a grad student whilst work work on speech processing natural language processing after that i had my own start up again in. Nlp space. And after that. I was google Where i was working on deep learning research specifically we were working on detecting hate speech on youtube comments using the malls. Yeah that's that's really a great application. In general for automated systems is very hard for for humans to just manage the mountains of tasks that are needed for moderation. So great use of of a and a great applied use of ai. It's cool that you bring into that so let's sort of bring us into now. I know what you're doing with commented lot of it's helping people make these better models and and iterative battle and manages models so maybe you could tell us a little bit in our listeners. About what are some of the challenges that organizations face today when they're trying to build machine learning models into production That's a great question. And i liked it. Use the word build rather than deploy because from our view comments in working with these like very business focused engineering teams the biggest challenge in getting them. All production isn't the actual deployment or devops problem behind. It's really a building model. That's good enough to justify deployment right so when we think about machine learning it's actually buried their friends. Offer engineering both from a process perspective. The dodgy the tools everything about different machine learning iterative process tres many pitfalls in the way and now whether it's your optimizing for the wrong metric or you're leaking your target or you're just working on a data set. That doesn't have enough signal so eventually it's really comes down to building a model that meets the business. Kpi in most of the teams out there are really struggling with that point Like i mentioned. There's a lot of things that can contribute to that but a big part of it is the lack of processes and tools of doing these things in a safe and a predictable way. you know. it's it's great that you gave that explanation. I know that a lot of companies are now starting to bring their starting to build models and think about how they can incorporate machine learning into their their company. So why is it. Important to have a tool for data scientists and teams to track explain in optimize experiments in models. That's an excellent question. And i think a lot of companies learned that the hard way but really impossible to run a team successfully without a system of record of your work. I mean that's true for most job functions. Not just machine learning. You know whether it's gets hub for after themes or salesforce for cell students hub spot for marketing and so on you really need a central system of records manage these processes and and again like other system records. Another jobs luncheon. Once you have that like. In our case on experiment and a model management platform it provides value to anyone was in walden engineer. Works so whether it's data scientists that's looking to track their experiments compare and understand. Why one models being better than the other is bias or issues with a model through the software engineer that's needs actual binary defer deployment all the way to the manager that wants to track and have visibility of a team progression and eventually maintaining all that institutional knowledge about research experimentation metrics and models within the organization and non people's personal notes for example.

Jeff Million Mendel Youtube Google Salesforce Walden
How the pandemic is affecting states unequally

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

04:21 min | 3 months ago

How the pandemic is affecting states unequally

"Of the characteristics of this virus economy as we have said on this program. I cannot tell you how many times is how uneven its effects have been on people black and brown and low income. Americans do in way worse in health and jobs and just getting by than whiter and wealthier populations are uncomfortable. As to how they're doing depends on what industry they're in and on states some of which have been really hit by this pandemic less revenue from income and sales taxes and higher virus expenses and some of which states that is doing all right so as the senate takes up. President biden's relief bill this week. And it's three hundred and fifty billion dollars in aid to state and local governments marketplace's mitchell hartman starts us off with a tale of several states. The pandemic recession has delta significant blow to tax collections. State revenues were down by nearly two percent from december. Last year overall. All but according to the urban brookings tax policy center tax revenues actually increased in twenty two states. This disparity has a lot to do with the mix of jobs in layoffs in a state. Says carl davis at the institute on taxation and economic policy so many lower income people have been laid off higher income. People have been much more likely to keep their jobs so tax. Revenues are down by double digits in states with lots of low-wage tourism jobs in hotels bars and restaurants florida and but states with more jobs that can be done from home at higher wages. Like in high tech and professional services are faring better. Washington's one example thinks in part to folks like darby megan of spokane he's a manager for tech startup. his wife's an accountant for an architecture firm. They're both working from home. We've maintained our salaries and that's been huge blessing. Haven't had to take a step back hours or anything. Like that with the stimulus checks. That was a nice little bonus. The couple owns a home. That's gone up in value. So they're paying more property tax but they've improved their overall balance sheet. We've been able to save significantly more right. We're not eating out as much and they made one really big purchase. A new van built into an rv. So we've sort of taken some of our vacation money that you budget and instead may domestic vacation mobile now not every high earner has come through the pandemic recession unscathed. Fiona greek at the g. P. morgan chase institute has been tracking household checking balances. There are some high income families that have seen cuts in their income cuts in their salaries but most of seeing their bank balances and assets grow and she says one reason is the booming stock market the broader trend. There's the growth and wealth. We see a lot of families transferring money into brokerage accounts to take advantage of those games but some states are missing out on taxing. Those income gains at the top. Says carl davis at the institute on taxation and economic policy. He points to nevada heavily dependent on tourism dollars revenue down about twelve percent where there is no broad based income tax. You're leaning a lot on sales taxes. Regressive taxes in general. Your revenues aren't going to do quite as well as progressive taxes at a time. Like this of just soaring income inequality contrast that with california that's opted for a more progressive mix leaning a bit more on the income tax most states do with higher top income tax rates on top earners. Especially that's staring a whole lot. Better with revenues up around two percent since the pandemic started. That's helped a good bit by silicon valley which attracted v and his family from texas. So i'm a software engineer. I was in iran for about four and a half years. And then during the pandemic My wife connor fulltime opportunity and bay area so we moved. He says silicon valley employers are hiring. Like there's no tomorrow. There were plenty of opportunities in the to offers in my hand. Some states are now considering hiking taxes on top earners to boost revenues and fund recovery from the pandemic including new york. Minnesota connecticut rhode island and

Institute On Taxation And Econ President Biden Mitchell Hartman Urban Brookings Tax Policy Cen Carl Davis Darby Megan Fiona Greek P. Morgan Chase Institute Senate Spokane Florida Washington Nevada California Connor Iran Texas
Interview With Quincy Larson, Founder Of freeCodeCamp

Developer Tea

04:10 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Quincy Larson, Founder Of freeCodeCamp

"Do you feel like you're not learning enough quickly enough as a software engineer. That is the feeling that i talk about amongst other things with today's guest quincy larsen and if you missed out on the first part of my interview with quincy i suggest you go back and listen to that part first quincy is of course the founder and creator of rico camp Which is something that many of you probably either came to this show as a result of you actually heard about developer because of free co camp or you are going through it right now. Three co dot org in of course free co camp dot org slash donate if you want to support other engineers who are going through the beginning of their career by the way Quincy just to be clear. Did not pay us in any way to plug that Here on the show. Thank you so much to quincy for joining me. Let's get straight into the interview with quincy larsen and that feeling something. I'd love to hear your thoughts on the feeling of inadequacy because you're dealing with a lot of people who are probably invulnerable points in their lives especially people who are changing careers or there at the beginning of their career. They have a lot of uncertainty. And there's a mountain of learning in front of them curious you know. Do you see a lot of people who are in that vulnerable place. In what advice do you have for them when you encounter them while empathy is very important. And it's one of the things that i perceived lack of i was learning to code and keep in mind. I'm you know a middle class white male who has a graduate degree right like. Imagine if you're somebody who's been working as a cashier whose job just evaporated or or a restaurant and you don't have all those benefits of The those layers of privilege right in those layers of just general like oh. Yeah i see how this works. I understand the system so not afraid of it right. I understand how higher education works for example. A lot of people don't have that benefit so for them. It could be even more daunting and one of the things that we do. Is we just try to frame is realistically possible. We start from the premise. Coating is hard in fact when you create a new free co game account I added this blurb at the top when you first get into free co cabinet it basically tells you like this is going to be hard anybody who tells you that learning code is easy is trying to sell you something right. Because it's going to take years and you're going to be daunted in. You're going to be baffled. You're going to have tests telling you failed failed failed you're going to have you know your interpreter telling you air and you need to be able to power through that and the most important thing is to know that everybody goes through this process. A lot of people don't remember it. They don't remember what it was like learning to code because it's so long ago maybe they were one of the lucky people who got a computer when their kid in there. The parents Encourage them to learn programming. Or maybe they just had a natural inclination toward early on if they have years and years of extra experience that accounts i mean that definitely speeds up the rate at which they can learn new things so i would tell people you know. I learned when i was thirty. I didn't have a lot of experience with programming. Was undaunted essentially. And i think that more people if they can remain undaunted and if they can just power through the doubt than they can learn to so the community aspect is really important. Just having a support network in a lot of people can find that on twitter. They can find that through like separatists. They can find that through. Different forums and dischord groups. They can find it on the free cocaine form. There are lots of ways that you can find kind of your tribe and have them have your back in help push you forward and i think that that is absolutely key but but the most important thing again just know. This is hard now that anybody who says program is easy has just forgotten how hard it was when they were first. Starting

Quincy Larsen Quincy Rico Camp Twitter
"software engineer" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

03:50 min | 7 months ago

"software engineer" Discussed on The Changelog

"In those phase. I know you've written a couple of books. You know one. We'll talk about one. That's coming out next year. Could talk about where you're at and both of those phases in terms of promotion of the current one out or the material for the future one and then may be the startup ideas and you'd mentioned at the end the the show you know backstage in some of these side conversations as a result of that conversation we had around it but where you had i guess on the latter front versus the the the former front so not a your books. But you're sorta by dea re there so the way think about startups. What i entered the industry. I have a brother and we have two very different paths. He's younger brother. A he always a startup. so out of unique he had a startup. We collaborate very briefly historic took off. The star was of agency initially got acquired later by sky scanner and there was a brief time where worked at the same company which was really interesting. Conversations is company just got acquired by sky scanner for a great exit for for him. And his co founders. And the very next day. I get a phone call from a recruiter who i knew telling me. Oh we just acquired this company by scanner and we wanna hire you to to head of mobile development. There i'm like no what well like the you as my younger brother. And i'm not gonna reported. I guy and then they called me back saying hold on. We actually acquired a different company. And we want you there and so in my contract ever had that. But i had it written there that i will not report derek. Darkly to my brother who was now at a higher level executive and i was a principal engineer so he was meyer So but the point is he always startups. And i saw firsthand. How stressful and difficult it is at. He had a great exit but there was three or four years of extreme stress along nights and he told me that sometimes it was relief when he got acquired because he no longer had to worry about paying wages and taking care of the admonition and he could actually just focus on on building so for a long time. I said i'm never going to start up but working uber gave me the confidence. And i i talked with a couple of people who to before for a couple of years when i joined seem pretty small and i just saw the inside of of how things were built. I saw some ideas that turned into billion dollar businesses and we were building it and it wasn't as much rocket science. I thought it would be. It was just like good execution but it was nothing special. So as i reflected on where i wanna go there was an option to keep growing professionally becoming a manager. One day maybe a director and dopp pat probably would have been feasible. But i realized that i really enjoyed doing stuff small. I felt that. I i kind of house done so i figured it's time to take a risk and it was nice timing because i really wanted to get this book out of the way so it gives an excuse to have something to do for the next few months as opposed to interleaving engines getting ideas or not leading uber on the side doing ideas in raising some fund. I have some people who do that. It's also very unusual. Very few people do it. And i'm also kind of thinking i'm at the point where i realize it takes like took many years to realize that i don't need to follow. What other sue. I just figured out this is this will feels right for me. I'm taking a on myself and a bit of the environment around me. Look let's see what happens so far. I'm really happy i did. I'm having interest conversations with founders or other people. I get to come on on podcast like this just to talk and it's been great i feel i've during covert i'm connecting with people on the other side of the world and some of these connections will be just really useful. I think for your succumb so too. Do we just followed the fall. Path into whether it's Presupposed or impressed upon us. Or i dunno i e one of your one of your heroes is going down certain paths land. That's my path. And because i'm a fan of them and.

sky scanner dea dopp pat meyer derek
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Software engineering daily the cid welcome back software engineer daily yeah thanks for having me get lab has highlighted something called the tool chain crisis basis described the tool chain crisis as you see it i think what happened is that over time we got more and more tools in the devops process it started wages ages some version control some CI but over time there are so many best practices we implementing true tools and for example you can see this in progressive delivery feature feature flags they're happening we have sometimes chaos monkeys we got incremental rollouts automated rollbacks all these things are supported the tools and what happened is it every practice kind of got its own tool now what's happening is if you wanna go from planning something to getting it out there you have to go go to ten twenty tools to do so in between all these tools are handoffs there's no visibility like some days one tool some is in and other people don't have equal equal access the i mean some tools but not hundred tools and that's slowing p pulled out these handouts are taking longer and that's the crisis like we have too many tools calls every customer we meet every user we meet it's like devops tools are great and we were using all the best ones but our problem isn't the individual jio tools they can do what we need our problems integrating all of that our problem is transferring people between teams are problem is visibility and that's the tool chain crisis there are a number number of case studies of get lab usage within large enterprises so goldman sachs is an example coming goldman sachs they've had software infrastructure structure that they've been building on for decades so it's like an archaeological dig they have all these different strata of old tools and these things are all plugged into mission mission critical workflows so win they start integrating get lab into.

goldman sachs software engineer
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Videos play a key role in the continuing education of a software engineer video can capture many different types of content that might be useful for an engineer engineer conference talks to to`real videos and podcasts style interviews are all popular formats in online video youtube has become become the predominant source for video content about software engineering. The open nature of Youtube format allows for a tremendous range of content. No matter what your preference is for how you like to learn and be entertained youtube has something for you. Tech Primers is a media channel that is dedicated to sharing technical technical knowledge in the form of videos get hub repositories and a thriving community tech primers has over three hundred videos on youtube and more than forty eight thousand subscribers who regularly watch content about subjects like A._W._s.. Spring and Coober Netease Tech Primers was founded by Ajay Kumar a software engineer and vice president at j.p Morgan Adjei has been in the software industry for fifteen years and he has been working in banking technology technology for seven years. He has deep experience in modern technologies and engineering practices. J. Joins the show to discuss the modern world of software for engineering and his experience building a media platform. He also talks about the technology. Culture of India. Ajay is based in Bingo Loro and it was exciting to learn how much are different societies have in common. Thanks to Technology Ajay also had me on his Youtube Channel for an interview which was a lot of fun. That link is in the show notes. Find Collapse is the company I'm working on. It's a place to find collaborators and build projects and we recently launched get hub integrations. It's easier than ever to find collaborators for your open source projects and if you're looking for someone to start a project with find collapsed has topic topic chat rooms that allow you to find other people who are interested in a particular technology you can find people who are curious about react or crypto currencies or Coober netties or whatever you want to build with also we recently launched pod sheets an open source podcast hosting platform we are building pod sheets with the learnings innings of software engineering daily and our goal is to be the best place to host and monetize your podcast. If you've been thinking about starting a podcast checkout pods sheets dot com song you probably do not enjoy.

youtube software engineer Morgan Adjei Ajay Kumar Technology Ajay engineer Coober netties Ajay Bingo Loro India vice president fifteen years seven years
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Limited by or enabled by the nature of this day store like literally as described this in a dependency graph performance issue. We had to have a database that would work really, really. Well. For for the needs that we expected our end users to have and also because I think we were basically a vertically integrated product right as in if you were going out and designing your own developer database like volt or rethink or salon. You know, the challenges, you know, you have to support a wide range of different developer use cases on top of it. Right. For us. We have to support a wide range of end user use cases. But you know, we only have to support one developer on top of our own database engine, right? Which is effectively we create the only front end that's allowed to talk to directly to our data storage engine. Like, we're building that kind of end user interface. And so I think we can actually make a lot more kind of vertically integrated decisions around what types of behavior that database engine cannon can't support and where we make trade offs. And so on. When I was working fulltime. As software engineer. I was always trying to start projects within the companies that I was working and those projects were often crazy they were sometimes unrelated to the core business of the company, I was working at, but I assume this would be desirable for the companies because this is how companies disrupt themselves, this is how companies develop new products, and it always struck me that that was so hard to do in any of these organizations. It was really hard to get projects started. And it was really hard to find other people to work on those projects with me. I have been thinking about that problem ever since I left the software industry to start software engineering daily. And now I have a product that I'm working on to solve that problem, which is fine collapse. Find collapses a place to find collaborators and to build. Projects. Find collides has an open network, and it also has a closed enterprise system in the open network. You can find collaborators to work on your projects with from all across the world and in the closed network enterprise offering you can just create closed projects for people within your company to collaborate on with and all of it is free right now, you can sign up for the enterprise offering by just logging in with your corporate Email address your corporate Google, Email address Bleich if it's at software engineering daily.

developer software engineer Google
"software engineer" Discussed on Photography Tips From the Top Floor

Photography Tips From the Top Floor

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Photography Tips From the Top Floor

"If not now when so. Now Frank you also have a unique skill set. And that is the engineering background. If you wanna combine engineering photography. I believe this is the right time. And as a software engineer you have an incredible skill set to get started in that field. There's a ton of machine learning related activities in photography right now. So a computer science background is probably one of the best things you can have at this point. Also, no cameras are becoming more computational every day. Where are we we are at the brink of several paradigm shifts and photography that all have to do with computing? A are for example, will be an integral part of our lives sooner than you think. Mark my words, and it'll be even more pervasive than our smartphones. All right now, and that plus computation that together with computation will change photography and fundamental ways. In in what ways I don't really know yet. But maybe. That's for you to find out. Try many things explore and do them while you still have a regular income through a day job in software engineering. And when the opportunity comes you will be ready and prepared. Wow. This episode is getting re long. Anyway, I can only do these shows wave your health with your questions your input. That's what.

software engineer Frank Mark
"software engineer" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Reveal

"And that was really really surprising to me because it was really different from what I had been doing before. I would say a lot of people in the software world looked at front engineering something that like you didn't need degree to do. This is an important distinction in software engineering front and coding, which Kelly was assigned to focuses on what the consumer sees in their browser back in coding interacts with the plumbing like servers and databases, and that's what Kelly had done before she came to Google, and I very quickly noticed that that was where all of my women calling working was in front of engineering. So I was like that's kind of annoying. But at the same time, I was still like well Google though, you know, at Google everyone has a level starting at level one for interns and hourly workers up to level ten or higher for top executives the higher. You are the more you tend to get paid and Kelly started to suspect that she was hired at the wrong level. I had had another software engineer. Join my same team the week after I did. And he and I both graduated in the same year, but he was level for when I was a little three on top of that. There was a whole group of new grads straight out of college who joined a couple months after Kelly. They were all starting at the same level that I was at and that was when I was like this feels wrong. But when I would ask people about it. They would say, well, you know, we sometimes down slot people. And then we'll just correct it come promotion time Kelly applied for promotion. She says the committee reviewing her application. Agreed. She was doing the work of a level four, but they didn't promote her because she hadn't been Google long enough to show an upward trajectory, and that was when I realized like that I was always going to be playing catch up because like by the time that I was going for promotion from four to five like the people who were forward already at level five. So I was frustrated, but I was still like, well, it's still Google, you know. I don't think I considered quick..

Google software engineer
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

04:09 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Marcus Cranston you are the director of engineering at Clark. Welcome to software engineer daily. Thank you. Thanks for having me. I want to start with a high level description of what Clark is. I think there's probably some people listening who are unfamiliar with it. So the core klaren product is a payment solution. It's at checkout solution, for example, for shoppers on the internet, and it allows them to do things like pay later or slice up a payment. Can you describe what the core Clark product does? Sure, absolutely. So if we start from the merchants point of view, we basically have to set the products that we offer to our much either wheel for a full blown checkout to where we do credit card Directa pretty much any payment options you can can think of. And then of course, our own credit products, which is the pay late around slice it, which is what we when we offer. So you can pay off the often deliberately or can slice up your payment over ins installments. So are based accounts or different? Depends on markets of bit. We also done know for what we call the payments where we sell individual payment methods, which we usually do for larger enterprises where they have their own credit card integration for instance on, yes, while credit options soda, yes, won't direct of it so we can. We can either do the full thing or or small smaller packages up that there was this period of time in maybe the last two to eight years where there was this revolution of online payment solutions and fintech companies. Klina was certainly in that wave of companies. Why was there such a revolution in the way that online payments occurred in? Why hadn't that problem been solved in the first ten or fifteen years of the internet. Now, I think that's one when e commerce really took off and the when people who. Are perhaps tech savvy started using the internet more in my in my mind, at least though if we talk about the history of call night, basically started with the providing away to pay with invoice in in Sweden when you both online because people were afraid of handing out there credit card and stuff like that. That's how conic started. And for us done, grew from there out to new markets out to new payment methods, stuff like that. And I think people will different solution than they're sort of a regular credit card, which is not as strong in Europe. Listen, for instance, in the US credit card has a has such large rippled market so corn as a way for paying without a credit card. Is that what you're saying? That is what I'm saying. So we basically, for instance, infield for pay late. There was just something that's very successful in, for instance, fashion retail would would buy clothes that you want to be the try out before you before you actually commit the pay for them. You can pay with our pay later product. Your your stuff, for instance, on Acis in the. The UK in US and then yet through stuff ship Thome try thout the fifth grade, and then you get get a payment instruction from us how to how to settle your your feet towards towards Florida because we have ordered to paid the sort of guaranteed their their income than it said, you have a have a debt towards Quanta. Right? And here we start to see some of the complexities of the payment system from Clarence pointed. He obviously simplify it for the user because they don't have to pay immediately. They get their clothes, they can try it on. But from Clarence point of view, then that CT you with all kinds of interesting problems like you've now got a debt on your books, the the consumer owes you money. You know, you have to have some information about the consumer in order to evaluate whether the consumer's credit worthy and order. You know, should you even give the consumer the right to buy these shoes? Got to figure out, you know, how long should we give the consumer to pay us back? What's the interest rate that we should charge, etc. So there's all kinds of technical complexities that stem from that simple user experience in then that gives rise to, I would assume lots of engineering problems challenges. Absolutely..

Clark Marcus Cranston Clarence director of engineering software engineer US Europe UK Klina Sweden Thome Florida fifteen years eight years
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Whatever kind of games get developed and put together the best teams on earth for those games people seem to age out of the east sports business quite rapidly are there any eastport games you've seen where older players tend to do better magic the other thing i don't know i don't know why that for the pure strategic games i mean i don't know why that would be nor would i count on that being the case forever right i mean there's probably something to be said for hand eye coordination and dexterity being a gift of younger people right in the same way that it is in anything for this pure strategic games for hearth stone if you will as long as you're willing to adapt or die then i see no reason for that trend to continue magic versus hearths down which one do you prefer how should i answer that question we have a har stone team we don't have a magic team so heart stone it is faster it is indeed faster bryan singer and thanks for coming on software engineer daily it's been great talking to you all right thanks if you are building a product for software engineers or you are hiring software engineers software engineering daily is accepting sponsorships for twenty eighteen send me an email jeff at software engineering daily dot com if you're interested with twenty three thousand people listening monday through friday and the content being fairly selective for technical listener software engineering daily is a great way to reach top engineers and i know that the listeners of software engineering daily are great engineers because i talked to them all the time i hear from cto's ceo's directors of engineering who listen to the show regularly i also hear about many newer hungry software engineers who are looking to level up quickly improve themselves and to find out more about sponsoring the show you can send me an email or tell your marketing director to send me an email.

software engineer cto ceo marketing director bryan singer
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Moore's law states that the number of transistors in dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years moore's laws less like a law and more like an observation or prediction moore's law is ending we can no longer fit an increasing amount of transistors in the same amount of space with a highly predictable rate dennard scaling is also coming to an end dennard scaling is the observation that as transistors get smaller the power density stays constant these changes in hardware trends have downstream effects for software engineers most importantly power consumption becomes much more important as a software engineer how power consumption affect you it means that inefficient software will either run more slowly or cost more money relative to our expectations in the past whereas software engineers writing code fifteen years ago might have been comfortably able to project that they're code would get significantly cheaper to run over time due to hardware advances the story is more complicated today why is moore's law ending and what kinds of predictable advances in technology can we still expect john hennessy is the chairman of alphabet in two thousand seventeen he won a touring award along with david paterson for their work on risk which is the reduced instruction set compiler architecture from two thousand to twenty sixteen he was the president of stanford university john joins the show to explore the future of computing while we may not have predictable benefits in moore's law or dennard scaling we now have machine learning it's hard to plot the advances of machine learning on any one chart which we discussed in a recent episode with open ai but we can say empirically that machine learning is working quite well in production if machine learning offers us such strong advances in computing how can we change our hardware design process to make machine learning more efficient as machine.

Moore software engineer john hennessy chairman david paterson president stanford university fifteen years two years
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Have people on the conversation who can both provide the technical expertise and then on the other hand you have people who can act as listener surrogates and ask those kind of obvious questions that actually help to illustrate it a lot and they even help the more advanced listeners to because they reinforce effectively the understanding by analogize it in a different way so the stuff is challenging but for technical audiences especially like yourself a like yours you know i think that what you say about your about page is pretty apt which is that you know you should expect to understand programming like one percent better developing one percent better after each episode and that's kind of how i feel about let's talk bitcoin too is it's like it's not like they're any episodes that are you know so important that they constitute most of the understanding it really is just a gradual conversation and really it's been a way for people to learn along with me and as my opinions continue to help and other hosts too of course you know so it's all perspective right nobody knows kind of what the elephant actually looks like we're all just feeling around with our own effective and then sharing those results and that's why i kind of look at everything as an experiment to is because lacking best practices all we have our first practices and first practices or quite often wrong but they still work better than you know for spices that don't work at all i now i doubt that people are tuning in to hear about building a podcast network but i personally am curious because software engineer daily for me was we're not just my first serious for a into podcasting but i was thinking of it as here's a way to learn a little bit about business firsthand like how do i build a little podcast business let's see where this takes me and there is a fork in the road that you reach is a podcast or and there are many podcasts out there that that reached this fork in the road where you get to a point where it's the question is how do i scale this because you you end up being a personality business or you end up being a business that is limited in scope to a single podcast.

software engineer one percent
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"It works really well for engineers whip providing really great value in helping people build really reliable systems based on what i've learned in the past but it's definitely very different experience because like you said chaos engineering it is very new system people who've been doing this type of work for the loss few years but the hide your chaos engineering wits continuous chaos it's automated you know really you should be injecting failure constantly end actually it shouldn't be causing an issue because you're infrastructures able to handle it it should be actually more rare that the chaos closes in issue in actually pages you and you need to fix something that's a really new area and i think it's exciting that we ought to be the pioneers in space i'm i've really enjoyed working with early customers who have come on bullish that doing really exciting things in space of chaos engineering and yeah like to me wanting to small company it's you know it's really like the startup stall have a very small office is not many of us i spent my first few weeks working remotely from stralia but i just think it's an exciting opportunity and i'm really glad to be on board okay dubuque oh thanks for coming out software engineer dale it's been great talking thank you very much thanks jeff live ramp is one of the fastest growing companies in data connectivity in the bay area and they're looking for senior level talent to join their team live ramp helps the world's largest brands activate their data to improve customer interactions on any channel or device the infrastructure is at a tremendous scale a five hundred billion node identity graph generated from over a thousand data sources running a eightyfive pedal bike bite duke cluster and application servers that

software engineer
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Yes that's correct so basically when you're dealing with many many many different systems which can be distributed across many locations around the world having automation in tooling and writing software to manage all that is the only way could attain basically survive eh series don't scale linearly was nation so s we rely alternately has been what's been mentioned before for smoke players are up by relying on tooling software in order to make their kid expanded capabilities and make himself be able to do more and be responsible for more and what's the interaction between software engineers and sra's so isn't software engineer should be very very tight especially in the environments where i worked at a software engineers in ece res of effectively functioned as as team members just basically obviously have a slightly different focus on stock but a purposes they they regard themselves as being you know here's team members so the interactions very tight and you're the head of s aria atlassian what are your responsibilities as the head of 'sorry right so i oversee the overall direction and piety of the organization so i take what the company parties are do a little bit of ti the readings you leave spent a lot of meetings to in discussions i facilitate the contribution of the esa reorganization towards those goals by no that's probably a kind of very big but basically look up what the company's doing with the needs are by look at what our capabilities are necessary that i worked towards providing our support towards meeting those goals in alava is basically in delivery service reliability are the 'sorry practices so atlassian has a bunch of different products are the 'sorry practices standardized across those different teams and across those different products.

software engineer alava esa atlassian
"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Yes that's correct so basically when you're dealing with many many many different systems which can be distributed across many locations around the world having automation in tooling and writing software to manage all that is the only way could attain basically survive eh series don't scale linearly was nation so s we rely alternately has been what's been mentioned before for smoke players are up by relying on tooling software in order to make their kid expanded capabilities and make himself be able to do more and be responsible for more and what's the interaction between software engineers and sra's so isn't software engineer should be very very tight especially in the environments where i worked at a software engineers in ece res of effectively functioned as as team members just basically obviously have a slightly different focus on stock but a purposes they they regard themselves as being you know here's team members so the interactions very tight and you're the head of s aria atlassian what are your responsibilities as the head of 'sorry right so i oversee the overall direction and piety of the organization so i take what the company parties are do a little bit of ti the readings you leave spent a lot of meetings to in discussions i facilitate the contribution of the esa reorganization towards those goals by no that's probably a kind of very big but basically look up what the company's doing with the needs are by look at what our capabilities are necessary that i worked towards providing our support towards meeting those goals in alava is basically in delivery service reliability are the 'sorry practices so atlassian has a bunch of different products are the 'sorry practices standardized across those different teams and across those different products.

software engineer alava esa atlassian
"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"You were able to build this and you don't having a software engineering experience and then he he so look i'm pretty sure that if he really wanted to fire and find a job as a software engineer you can very easily find find one so he he gave me a lot of advice and i also got the sense that it is not just that i wanted to work with him i i got the sense that he also wanted to work with me on some level as may be more junior dev and i think that that was very helpful because you don't really want to push someone who may not have the time were energy or where human interest to network with your war or or help you right uh so you definitely want to test the waters but once you have sort of some indication that you can have a very fulfilling relationship that's win win on both ends you should definitely go forward by and you are able to show him that you could provide value on and that was a big big step forward that's right yeah okay so you start working at this startup company your software engineer does hard echo it's it's very very hard i think when when you hack away on things on your own you don't really think about some of the things are required in a in a in a professional software engineering environment where you have their ship called to production so things like.

software engineer
"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"They can also tell you about their experience there because sometimes from douse i accompany may look really promising but from from the inside there are a number of problems they may want to avoid so so i i wanted to build this network with the software engineer in crowd here so i i went to a hacker thon put up by google and i met a guy there his name is charles and charles turn out to be one in the original four engineers who build the entire i tuned stack for apple backing the '90s after apple bought sun jam so he is a more a older engineer a very senior engineer and he is a very very good technical architect and i i work with him on the heck with on i knew that i wanted to work with him at some point so i stayed in touch with him over almost two years i i keep asking him as head why are you working on like i evolved to work with you on something like let me know what can i do and eventually he went through a startup called montage studio which is a sort of founded by the team of folks who came out of apple when next so he went there and he's like hey i i'm i'm here i'm working on some kusov issue com and that went there and there was my very first software engineering gig that's really cool so can you give people would like tell them exactly how you call the beta that relationship with him like you met him at this event and then like where do they were did it go over the next how long it took you to get this job you have coffee once a month you sent an email of interesting articles how'd you keep their relationship going yeah so i i tried to do both so trough actually lived in texas and he he was doing consulting gigs of the time so he would travel back and forth and i i would just paying him out say okay wearing towel next and i knew that he'd love to go to meet ups too so i was okay okay let's go check out this meet up together and then won't go and then we'll we'll listen to some tech talk which had the bear and they i.

software engineer google apple technical architect texas two years
"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"Yeah absolutely say you had to san francisco you're about to get married you have no job you will you identified which is a huge step you've identified that you'd like to build things in so you're starting to check things off your list of what you want to do things you don't wanna do so what happens how do you find your next gaik sure so i i really wanted a job as a professional software engineer i i've ridden code for a long time and i have contributed to some of the largest opensource software packages in in the world but i knew that if i worked on the quote unquote professional software engineering team you will be a very different learning experience than me hacking way on opensource project online with folks from all round the world so in order to do that my my strategy was basically to golden meet up and me as many people as possible i think one of the uttar themes i have about building my career path over the past twelve years or so is as you get more a senior more experienced the the kind of rolls that that really are promising for you we've actually turn out to be the ones through your connections so nowadays when i'm looking for for jobs i no longer apply online i no longer look for jobs on linked anyone not i always check with my network to see okay i want to war cassi airbnb who do i know or food i know we know someone who can introduce me as someone airbnb i think that that both gets you into the door more easily and also.

software engineer software packages san francisco twelve years
"software engineer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"software engineer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Also if he liked the show make sure subscribe on which ever podcast player you listed on and if you're feeling particularly generous a review in rating would be great to enjoy the interview hey laura thank you so much for coming on the show higher there thank you for having me yes i am so excited to talk to you today i've been following you on instagram for a while and were definitely going to talk about that towards the end of the interview but really quick could you introduce yourself to the audience yes of course so um alarm italia and um i am a software engineer i work at a health care health tech start up in new york city um and an avid instagram user with me gas awesome so before the show i was doing some social media stocking namely unhurriedly namely interlinked in which took me to find but i found it and ice notice that you didn't study computer science or related um while you were in college so i'm curious how would you i get into tack and how did you begin learning how to code that's a great question yeah so it is true i was not a computer science major arm at graduated as an english major with a creative writing emphasis actually um but i had taken my first computer science costs back in high school it was ap computer science course um and i loves did to really naturally with me on a did really well on it and just like enjoyed it on but i never really thought of computer science are software engineering is a career i had never thought of it as an option i didn't owe a startup was so just kind of took it as.

software engineer social media computer science new york instagram