35 Burst results for "software developer"

Open source developer and Gitcoin creator Kevin Owocki discusses modern fundraising

Let's Talk Bitcoin!

04:49 min | 5 d ago

Open source developer and Gitcoin creator Kevin Owocki discusses modern fundraising

"To jump right into it in the world, of Crypto, currency money is important depending on your view bitcoin itself is or aspires to be money in a very real way and without question, the craziest time Crypto have surrounded or even just been entirely about fundraising for projects. This has always been positive though in the later stages of the initial coin offering praise it seemed like raising money became the point rather than what it was being raised to accomplish in its aftermath. It's become increasingly obvious that what's being funded matters at least as much as how you get the funding but how you get the funding is important to. A couple of weeks ago Andrey's, and I were talking about an open source project. He'd actually used get coin to fund is, can you tell that story can here? Yeah absolutely. You know every now and then I come across an idea or find a gap in the court system where I think it would be really useful if we had a software gizmo to do X. Y. or Z. and even though I can code myself I don't have the time to embark on these little projects. So as I've done in the past I looks for way to funded developer to do this work and this time I decided to use bitcoin I've been Aware of it and looked at it in the past. But now I had a real project to sink my teeth in. So the projects was to develop a plug in or changing the wizard of the electron import in order to enable it to discover derivation paths, and I'm no monnet craze that has been used in a different wallet where the user doesn't know what the derivation path is and keeps having difficulty recovering funds. This is a problem, a lot of newbies have. And so I put up a he basically and a bounty is a pot of money in this case denominated in the stable coin die so that it's the equivalent value and I put up a one thousand dollar bounty for about forty to sixty hours of work approximately I estimated to develop this capability I wrote a specification as a get hub issue and the I thing. About Bitcoin is that it integrates directly into get hub. So I could take the issue where described the desired feature in detail and then attached the bounty directly to that, and then have developers come and pitch to take on that bounty and executed. It was completed a couple of weeks ago paid out and it's a feature that's being merged into hopefully the next version of Elektra. Now, that tool that you had created actually you and I had a little back and forth about it because turns out that you don't necessarily a Newbie to run into the problems that you were trying to solve their and we actually wound up using it to solve a big problem. I've been working on for a couple of months, but that's going to be another episode. Entirely, today we're talking with Kevin Kevin, can you just kind of take us through the basics of bitcoin was kind of the goal and how is it operating? Let's just start off with the most basic question for people who aren't familiar with the project. Is there a bitcoin or is this something that builds using as Andrea saying die or other types of Tokens as a reward? Yet, that's a great place to start. There is no bitcoin token bitcoin is a place where you can get coins. If you're a software developer in exchange for doing software development tasks, we have unfortunately from a branding perspective gotten swept up with a lot of the projects. Did do ICO's IOS in two thousand seventeen even though we never did in Seo. So. Take us back to the beginning kind of what was the thinking about this project in general what was the problem that you were trying to solve, and then how did you end up solving? So I've been working in web startups for the last thirteen years pretty much ever since I graduated from school and every software project that I've ever worked on has been an open source software projects. So whenever I start a new start up I will use python, which is an open source programming language. I will use an open source database server, I will use an open. Source Web server, and so every time I've built a start up all the stuff that you see in tech crunch are standing on the shoulders of giants of open source software and basically every time I've built a software startup I've been using open source software and open source software crates, billions of dollars of value for the world, but there's good way for software developers to monetize. The work that they do in open source software, and so that was sort of founding reason why I created Bitcoin, which is a double sided market connect software developers to the people want to fund their work in open source software in the sort of insight is that now using the blockchain space, we now have billions of dollars of capital that's going to open source software. Whereas before in the old financial system, all of the money that goes into it goes to some back office on wall. Street. So what if we could build a marketplace where the software developers they can sort of be the routing mechanism for the money going to software developers and have it the blockchain native project? That's what get coin is and that was the genesis of Bitcoin.

Software Developer Developer Andrey Kevin Kevin ICO Andrea
Epic Games files injunction against Apple

Mac OS Ken

04:41 min | Last month

Epic Games files injunction against Apple

"EPIC Games has taken apple to court. I won't say the suits crazy but it does sound crazy. Business insider says the company has filed a temporary restraining order against apple with the intention of getting fortnight back onto apple's APP store. According to the report if granted by Judge Restraining Order would legally stop apple from removing delisting refusing to list or otherwise make unavailable the APP fortnight including any update thereof SOUNDS CRAZY RIGHT Turns out that epics fighting for something more though according to business insider the filing revealed potentially far wider impact of apple and epochs legal fight. EPIC will lose access to Apple's developer program by the twenty eighth. Of August the company said if it's up doesn't comply with APP store guidelines. This would mean that all of epochs APPs in the IOS APPs store would be pulled from listing importantly epoch says getting booted from the program would also mean it can access certain technology for developers. For, more on that bit, we turn to C. Net, which has epoch suit saying not content simply to remove Ford night from the APP store apple is attacking epics entire business in unrelated areas. Venture beat polls another paragraph from the filing that says that the unreal engine can no longer support platforms. The software developers that use it will be forced to use alternatives the damage to epochs ongoing business into its reputation and trust with its customers will be unquantifiable and irreparable. Preliminary. injunctive relief is necessary to prevent apple from crushing epic before this case could ever get to judgement. So how many games are we talking about? I have no idea and a piece from CNBC GIVES US mixed messages. Seriously one piece pushes both the freakout button and one that plays cool and the gang. The CNBC headline says how Apple's battle with epic games could affect hundreds of other games beyond fortnight. Hundreds, but there are only. Millions of APPs in the APP store. This is where the messages start mixing. The same. CNBC. Piece points out that unreal engine is not the only game in town according to the report while the unreal engine is popular on consoles in P., C.'s many mobile games use a competing and JEN unity which has not been affected. Wedbush analyst Michael Packer Tell CNBC unreal is used in some mobile games, but only a small minority. Unity is far more pervasive so hard to quantify the impact on the ban. My problem is well, i. have many including a few around this story. First of all, while epoch may have several valid points. The way they've gone about this whole thing is made them. Difficult to. Trust. When. They said losing their developer license would mean developers could not use unreal engine. I had questions because I'm not a developer and that is my second problem around this story. Reach out to a developer friend of mine but he was too busy to answer my question that sent me the twitter not to complain about my friend though he is a jerk. But to ask the question I tried to ask Mr Ain't got time for you ask. The question, I put to types on twitter is what epica saying true. They say apple revokes developer license they won't be able to update. Unreal. Engine. For. Developers to use. Does unreal engine access come through the APP store or is it that they would lose the ability to test? At Ross kinds was kind enough to respond. According to Ross doesn't go through the APP. Store. But. Certain features require certificates that need an apple developer account if those certificates are invalidated, they won't be able to release builds of the engine through x Coda. And not sure there are actually using any of those features he continued it could simply be a licensing issue can't distribute. Bildt's without a licensing agreement. Not really sure on this one since we exclusively distributed on the APP store. So never had this situation. So. What epic is saying may be true. which brings us. Back to my. First problem. Around the story. It's hard to know whether one can trust epic in this situation.

Apple Developer Cnbc Piece Ross Twitter Bildt Analyst Mr Ai Michael Packer Ford C. Net
Zeroqode - Bubble's certified partners

No Code No Problem

04:40 min | Last month

Zeroqode - Bubble's certified partners

"I'm going to be talking about zero code so Z. E. R.. Hugh Od. I'm sure you've heard about them if you're in the space but if you haven't, they are sort of like an agency slash template builder for bubble and zero code is honestly a great resource to have I. Have Their link on my website. Now have the links in my description, but they're going to be throwing an event as well, and so some of the things that they offer. The. Offer templates plug INS locks native APPS BACK INS courses. And API tolls. So they're pretty encompassing in terms of what you would need for bubble. Or if you're just looking for somebody to build the APP for you, they also do that. So they do offer a a accustomed development service but like if you're looking to build an MVP or build, you know the Uber of this or the Product hunt for this or or something like that. Then definitely go on their website and go under templates and you can find any template. You could ever imagine already made for you where you can easily change the branding. So they have crowdfunding platforms marketplaces like. On a multipurpose pack who delivery like Uber Eats. Anything that you can imagine they have built in bubble and they're all pretty much less than three hundred bucks. So some one hundred summer to fifty summer three hundred but that's not bad at all compared to what you'd pay for traditional software developer to actually out a platform like Insta- cart for you so. They they really do have an awesome thing there and I've purchased myself three different. Pamphlets from them and you know I've used two of them on. Honestly they have some free ones as well. If you were just getting into bubble, I highly recommend if you're struggling learning the logic and how things are set up and like how you structure data in bubble I highly recommend going on finding one of their free templates that has some logic and stuff, and then going in kind of reverse engineering changing things and just playing with it because you will learn so much like. I thought I. Kind of knew it. I was doing in bubble, and then I bought my first template from zero code and went on and I was just like okay. So this is actually how you set up data and then this is actually how this works. So I can't even begin to stress how important it is. If you are just getting started, they'll get a free template from zero code and go play with it for two days and you'll be so much better and so much sharper with with bubble. So yeah, they were featured on on tech and they have an awesome story, their founders of Vlad and I believe it's live on leave on. They founded zero code and they're really doing awesome job if you're looking to start your own bubble agency. The help you set that up. Or they offer courses. So you can learn how to build web and Mobile? APPS without code. Native apps you can seamlessly convert your existing web app into native an Android APPS, and they also offer blocks for bubble. So blocks or ready made components that you can use to build your bubble APP much faster and I. think that is huge on any no platform. It's the have you know your own Component Library of cremated components. So that's awesome and then lastly plug instrumental you can an hands, your bubbles, apps functionality and you I and you x by using one of their plugging. So if you are using one of their templates, there's a decent chance that it comes with a plugin from them. That they've that they've made. So if you're looking for a great agency that's built out plenty of different tolls and stuff in. You want them to build your products for you. You can use their development and customization services, and so you just on their website and you get a quote and then you kind of and everything, and then they'll send you a quote. So like I said a great toll. If you are interested in bubble and you WANNA, be a bubble master, go play with their free templates, go by template for one hundred bucks and just reverse engineer it and start making really that's that's all I have to say but you can get get rentals like Airbnb gigs like fiver events like event bright social media scheduling freelancing like uproar slash fiber online learning like you to me like when I say they have. Everything covered they have everything covered. So great toll great resource go checkout zero code.

Hugh Od MVP Airbnb Vlad Software Developer Engineer
Big Tech CEOs Testimony Before Congress

Techmeme Ride Home

08:41 min | Last month

Big Tech CEOs Testimony Before Congress

"Today was the day as I record these words the big tech CEO's are still testifying before Congress. So I'm going to have to do a summary of what I've seen just in the first couple of hours or so and leave some of the juicier question and answer back and forth for tomorrow. I up a note on the format that we've been seeing. Yes. All of the CEOS were testifying remotely. They were using Cisco Webex as the video conferencing tool and it seemed to work fairly well at least right until this very moment as I turned off the stream to go into the booth to record this, they took a ten minute recess because apparently one of the witnesses. was having an issue with their stream or feed, and I'm wondering if it might have been Jeff Bezos because at least thus far were almost an hour and a half into the testimony and he hadn't been asked a single question. Anyway back to the whole idea of testifying remotely if I were going to do one of those rate, my video call backgrounds reports. Bezos look like he was in some sort of executive boardroom, lots of tasteful Chomsky's behind him. Look like he was in a conference room at a high end law firm I couldn't tell what Zuckerberg was sitting in front of it looked like closed vertical blinds almost like I don't know some sort of like a bunker like if you're battening down your house for a Hurricane Tim, Cook was in front of some sort of tasteful plant trough though he was clearly working off an ipad pro. Let's start off with what the Fab four had to say in their opening statements. Amazon's Jeff bezos underscored Amazon's job creation, its investments in social causes and its role in supporting small and medium-sized businesses. And made the case that Hey Amazon is just a tiny competitor in a huge global market quote. The global retail market we compete in is strikingly large and extraordinarily competitive Amazon accounts for less than one percent of the thousand five, trillion dollar global retail market and less than four percent of retail in the US unlike industries that are winner take all there's room in retail for many winners for example. More than eighty retailers in the US. Alone earn over one billion dollars in annual revenue like any retailer we know that the success of our store depends entirely on customer satisfaction with their experience in our store every day Amazon competes against large established players like target Costco Kroger and of course, Walmart a company more than twice Amazon size, and while we have always focused on producing a great customer experience. For retail sales done primarily online sales initiated online are now in even larger Growth Area for other stores Walmart's online sales grew seventy four percent in the first quarter and customers are increasingly flocking disservices invented by other stores. Amazon still can't match at the scale of other large companies like curbside pickup and in store returns and quote alphabets. Soon, Darpa, Chai, said that Google also operates in a highly competitive. Market and that it's free products benefit the average American quote. A competitive digital ad marketplace gives publishers, advertisers, and therefore consumers an enormous amount of choice pichai stated, for example, competition and ads from twitter instagram comcast and others has helped lower online advertising costs by forty percent over the last ten years with these savings pass down to consumers through lower prices in areas like travel and real estate Google faces strong. For search queries for many businesses that are experts in those areas. Today's competitive landscape looks nothing like I. Did five years ago let alone twenty one years ago when Google launched its first product Google search people have more ways to search for information than ever before and quote. Tim Cook of Apple said that the APP store has opened the gate wider for software developers. Also, apple doesn't have dominant market share quote as much as we believe, the iphone provides the best user experience. We know it is far from the only choice available to consumers Cook said after beginning with five hundred APPs today the APP store hosts more than one point seven, million, only sixty of which are apple software. Clearly, if apple is a gatekeeper, what we have done is open the gate wider we want to get every APP we can on the store, not keep them off and quote. And facebook's mark. Zuckerberg said well, but he said a thousand times before that facebook knows it has more work to do on things like fighting misinformation and that you know companies aren't bad simply because they're big. And he took pains to point out that facebook is an American success story quote although people around the world use our products. FACEBOOK is a proudly American company. He said, we believe in Values Democracy Competition Inclusion and free expression that the American economy was built on many other tech companies share these values, but there's no guarantee our values will win out for example China. Is Building its own version of the Internet focused on very different ideas and they are exporting their vision to other countries as Congress and other stakeholders. Consider how antitrust laws support competition in the US. I believe it's important to maintain the core values of openness and fairness that have made America's digital economy, a force for empowerment and opportunity here and around the world and quote. In his opening remarks, the chairman of the Committee David. Sy-. Selena Rhode. Island. Laid out three areas of inquiry that the was scheduled to delve into at least in questioning from the Democratic Congress folk more on that in A. Quitting CNBC, each platform allegedly serves as a quote bottleneck for a key channel of distribution and quote the platforms allegedly used their control over digital infrastructure to Sir Vail other companies, their growth business activity, and whether they might pose a competitive threat and use that information to maintain their own power and third the platforms allegedly abused their control over current technologies to extend their power through tactics like self referencing their own products. Quote. Prior to the cove nineteen pandemic, these corporations already stood out as titans in our economy. Silly said in the wake of Covid nineteen however, they are likely to emerge stronger and more powerful than ever before, and he concluded by saying quote, our founders would not bow before a king nor should we bow before the emperor's of the online economy and quote? But as I say, while this was labelled as an anticompetitive antitrust inquiry, it seems like the Republican Congress folk were primarily interested in probing alleged bias against conservative users. In fact, Jim Jordan. One of the ranking Republican representatives spent most of his opening remarks railing against. which if that continues would basically be exactly what all of the CEOS in the talking head boxes would be hoping for right lots of distraction and no real spotlight on them. In fact, a lot of the most heated questions directed at a company that's not even present. We'll see if that continues but I have to say straight off Chairman Sicily and was very specific targeted sharp questions. He kept interrupting folks when they started to stray into doublespeak and the very nature of the questions from him and others at least so far. This wasn't like previous congressional hearings we've covered where the congress folk didn't seem to even understand the businesses they were investigating, and maybe that was because I don't know if you saw the woman sitting very prominently very obviously behind Mr. Cecil lean. Let me let the Washington Post fill you in on who that was quote as a twenty eight year old law student Lena Con penned a twenty four thousand word article for Yale Law Journal titled Amazon's antitrust. Paradox. The article described how US antitrust law isn't equipped to deal with tech giants such as Amazon. Even as the company has made itself as essential to commerce in the twenty first century in the way that railroads and telephone systems had in the previous century con now works as counsel for the antitrust subcommittee she has worked with Sylvain to develop his case against the tech giants including Amazon and quote. As I said, the questioning is continuing as I speak these words in fact I just heard that they came back from their recess. The whole thing did kick off hour late only getting started at one PM, eastern? So I don't think it'll be done before for five PM at least. So again, I'll put together a summary of all of the juicy exchanges happening now for tomorrow.

Amazon United States Congress Jeff Bezos Google Apple Facebook Tim Cook Walmart Zuckerberg Chairman Cisco Republican Congress CEO
Walmart shopper charged with pulling gun during mask dispute

Mark Thompson

02:59 min | 2 months ago

Walmart shopper charged with pulling gun during mask dispute

"Manage charged with pulling a gun during a mask dispute at Wal Mart. Are there any other disputes now? At Wal Mart? No, those are the go to disputes. Vincent, who's 28 faces to gun charges. He pointed a gun at another Wal Mart shopper who had told him to wear a mask, according to officials. Charged with aggravated assault with a firearm, improper exhibition of a firearm. He surrendered to the Palm Beach County, Florida sheriff's deputies. He's a software developer. He told investigators he had been wearing a mask. But it got wet in the rain as he pushed his father in a wheelchair through the parking lot. That made it difficult to breathe, so he took it off. The argument started. When the other guy's young daughter almost walked into him. The men agreed in their statements that the Other guy told him he should wear a mask and that this guy who's now In custody and pulled a gun cursed at him. And this is where it took a turn. The other guy, not the guy with a gun, but the other guy. The guy who got cursed at Told him Don't curse in front of my daughter. Well, then I was on like Donkey Kong. They started yelling obscenities at each other. I guess the no cursing thing kind of goes away once Yeah. Once you're about 10 feet away, which is what they say they were. And enough of senators get thrown, I guess then all obscenities. Khun go right. You can just let it go both ways. And then When Vincent raised his middle finger at the other guy. The other guy advanced, pointing his umbrella at him. And then Vincent. 28 year old software developer, pulled a gun from his waistband and pointed it at the other guy. Whose daughter then grabbed him by the hand and tried to pull him away. Of course, the software developer with a gun is Xiang Li Threatened threatened me and my dad. Hit me in the far ahead with his umbrella tip. I mean, you know, there's all of that right? Then he said that he holstered his gun, and he and his father left the store. Now you'll be interested in this. The other guy said he didn't want to press charges. He did want, though, for Vincent. Try not to use people's last names. That's why keep calling invention. The 28 year old software developer He did want him. The other guy did toe lose his concealed weapons permit. But he didn't want to pursue charges.

Software Developer Vincent Wal Mart Palm Beach County Donkey Kong Assault Khun Xiang Li Vincent.
"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 2 months ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry <hes> now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical <hes> I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. <hes> married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses <unk> time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started <hes> because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there <hes> we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting <hes> so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons <hes> you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to <hes> get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical <unk>, Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that <unk> I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And <hes>. There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know <hes>. But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me <hes> so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. <hes> kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and <hes> like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the <unk> thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually <hes> so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that <hes> or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really <hes>. Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. <unk> producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo <hes> albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person <hes>, but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter <hes> asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because <hes> east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency <hes> the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey <hes> his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. <hes> I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months <hes> and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end <hes> no on the back end and <hes> some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects <hes> there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same <unk> employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company <hes> the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey <hes>. I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. <unk> should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and <hes>. It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. <hes> fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and <hes>. We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of <hes> something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that <hes> you've got furloughed related offer a <unk>. Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely <hes> so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers <unk> people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. <hes>. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members <hes> so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes <unk> dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your <hes> you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. <hes> I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software <hes>, I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose <hes> regardless of the industry but <hes>. Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good <hes> a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me <hes>. To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines <unk> Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas <hes> in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that <hes>, but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company <hes> and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people <hes> another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation <hes>. You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or <unk> star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. <hes> also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people <hes> to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately <unk> successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Credit Union lead developer Korb software developer senior engineer
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 2 months ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

06:02 min | 2 months ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"The most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably.

Credit Union lead developer Korb software developer senior engineer
Hiring A Players

voiceFirst careers

05:32 min | 2 months ago

Hiring A Players

"Why do I say voice I space? What does that mean? K. Have. You heard this in called Alexa or Siri or Bixby? These are what some would say. Artificial intelligence devices to help you do a better job of whatever it is you WANNA do. And so if you create voice skills, let's say for Alexa which has over one hundred million devices out there. then. We say you're working in the voice first base. And so, if you're a hiring manager and you're trying to hire talent inada arena arenas. Yes in some regards, it's twenty thirty forty years old, but really. From a acceptance perspective. From demand if you will. It's only three or four years old. So. Had Laugh I saw job posts the other day. They were looking for. Can't remember exactly. WHAT THE TECHNOLOGY WAS IN A. And they wanted twelve years experience, but the technology was only six years old. So. That's what happens when you let hr. Get involved, right? They're going to bump the stats up the specs. If a an associate degree is good than a bachelor's degrees going to be much better right and while we go for a master's. Excellent. K May was Hud. Even masters. Degrees offered. So, as a hiring. The deck is stacked against. You and you already know that I mean if you've been at it more than a few months, you realize. It's. Is? They said when I enlisted. In the marine, corps the theme song was, we never promised you a rose garden and believe me. They deliver on that promise. So as a hiring manager, you're learning or have learned that. It is not as easy as the brochure makes it sound. In hiring one of those most difficult things. I worked on a project a number of years ago, staffing four insurance agencies. and. The thing was. Their business model, this particular company was take successful people with some money in the bank and say well. You ought to have a franchise for our business. And so they see yeah, that makes sense you know. The money looks good, and and as okay now you need to hire these three typical. Positions for your company. The only problem was the people that have been successful in life in different areas. They had no comprehension of what hiring men. Or. How do it effectively and so? I could go on and on your problem is. Your challenge is you've got stuff to get done? And you don't have the right people noth- people to get it done. That's where we come in. Particularly if you're looking for software development. Software developers. That's our. That's our sweet spot, so if you're in that space acid to reach out to me and the best way to do that, pick up your phone and dial pound two, five zero and the prompt say contact ski man. That connect us. Now. Let me know that you need some help. We'll have an old fashioned phone conversation. We can even do a video version one, but we're going to get on the phone. We're GONNA. Talk about what it is. What deadlines you're on what challenges you're facing from personnel perspective. and. I'll tell you how we can help. And if we come together. We're going to want some money to solve this problem. It's only fair, right. You want heat in your building. You have to pay the. The Heat Bill Right. You want the right staff you, WanNa, motivated staff. You want the best of the best. You want a players because if you don't know this if you're new hiring. You may not understand this the minute you hire a be player. You've set your copy on course to the bottom. And you may not recover from it. You need the a player. It's like you can't put something. You know rock and roll was exception right evert especially close enough for rock and roll. You've heard it. Pizzas Pizza. There is no really bad pizza. Might take exception that but. Pizza's good right. Well people are not all good, and not all people are cut out to do the role that you're asking of them, so take advantage of my thirty plus years in recruiting hiring of hard hundreds of employees for myself and for my clients. Only ever had to fire three. You know sometimes people sneak in there, but if you want somebody who's consistently able to deliver for. The A player. Then you want to reach out to me. Is that simple? And, if you've got questions again, call me. We don't really like to email. And by the way we've got a no ghosting policy. You can't ghost me. I won't go S-, you. In the talent that we work with will not ghost. You and you're not allowed to go stem. That's the number one complaint I get from talent. If you didn't know that K- hiring manager now you know. GHOSTING is a thing. In it tries people crazy as it should. It's disrespectful

Alexa HUD Siri Bixby Evert
Becoming a Coder

Command Line Heroes

04:30 min | 2 months ago

Becoming a Coder

"Use spent the last few years fully immersed in the world of coders. You've interviewed over two hundred developers as admins, architects, engineers and programmers for your buck. Yeah I spoke to boy on awful lot of software developers all over the ecosystem. Great you the perfect co-pilot, so glad you could join me be here. Let's start with the most traditional path to becoming a coder going to college to get a computer science degree. I think for what I do as a product manager, it's important to have that technical foundation and glad I did it through a computer science program because I feel like I. Don't understand like. How do I program something to do this? But I also understand like what goes on under the hood. That was venom rot single. She graduated from Stanford University in two thousand sixteen with a computer science degree. She says her education set her up for product manager positions at facebook, Google and other companies. Clive. Voters out there, get CS degrees. If you look at the stack overflow survey, so that's the big gum coating site, and they do a fantastic survey of tens of thousands of their users every year. And their data suggests that about sixty percent of the coders that are on stack overflow that are professional. They have some sort of formal computer, training or something close to it like electrical engineering and and the numbers may be a little higher than that, but let's just say you know two-thirds, so it is still most common route far and away for becoming a coder. Is Go and get a computer, science, degree or something related to it. Is that because s degrees are lucrative. Yes, they are They are what an economist would call a costly signal right? You know they indicate that. Hey, I'm someone who's willing to spend a lot of time learning this stuff so you know I'd be a good person to hire. If you're developer, you're having to constantly learn all the time. New Frameworks new languages new environments. So, so some of the reasons employers would tell me that they like getting people from computer. Science degrees is because those people just spent four years doing nothing, but learning and they're going to need to keep on learning. When you get an undergraduate degree, you're learning, but you're also learning the theoretical math. You're also learning about algorithms, and you're learning about networking and computer systems, and I think all of those just give you very solid foundations so that if you were? Were like you know switch industries or not like? It would just be a lot easier for the Stanford degree helped with being taken seriously honest. You just confidence like that's a big part of it to dealing with imposter syndrome, and then also like People WanNa. Talk to you, even applying to jobs after like you just it's just a lot easier. Because of this big network you have do cs degrees make them better performers than those who come into the industry traditionally. That is a really a really great question. It's a hard one to answer. Because I got completely different answers from different employers I. had some people tell me that? Yeah CS people are just more confident and more self assured and can hit the ground running, then sell trained people bootcamp people, and then I heard exactly the opposite right like I heard you know for example, give it cult. He runs river, which is like a is becoming the dominant e commerce site for selling musical equipment, fantastically growing profitable firm and he's like. You know. I used to say I only wanted CS grads, but they just didn't have all the sort of life skills that you want to be a productive team member and more and more. He stood at hiring bootcamp. People self train, people people who. Are Musicians learned on the side. You also hear praise for the non computer. Science, people I think from a certain class of investor or even old school coder there in the fifties or sixties, and they taught themselves using like a like a commodore sixty four back in the eighties when they see someone who came along and said Yeah I. Just is in job in hospitality and I hate it. I learned. Learned a ton of stuff on Youtube and Code Academy. They're like yeah, I want that person. It is very by model. Shall we say there is a class player? Is? That is really rigorous about only during CS, and there's a whole of the class at actually sometimes regarded as a real mark of pride to be self taught or a scrappy person who change their career and went to a boot camp.

Stanford University Product Manager Developer Clive Youtube Facebook Google Code Academy
How a Passion for Patients turned this Pharmacist into a Software Developer with Newvick Lee

Learn to Code with Me

05:32 min | 2 months ago

How a Passion for Patients turned this Pharmacist into a Software Developer with Newvick Lee

"Went through all this work in effort to become a pharmacist. And then you left pharmacy like you know got a job after you laugh, too. So what led to that like? Regis defined it as fulfilling, or you just were very excited by software, engineering or Yeah! That's a good question. Yeah spent maybe like. Five six years in an industry including education. I think. The more. That's really monroe for me when when I made that program to all the made finding prescription due dates. Preceding that that's program. Bring down the task for like two hours to less than the second. I. I can't tell you how amazing that was. Like it was so painful just looking through every specialty. Bro And finding that but being able to do that in just in just a short program. I thought that this is. This definitely I wanNA. Do in the future. Yeah. That's really cool and. You wrote that I program. What language technology re using some also thinking? Aren't there a lot of? Regulations like in pharmacies like imagine with their computers like things you can and can't do. So Dea it. They have lots of obstruction on the computer, but this was just a local, so I wrote it in Python and there's a local script. It didn't require any. External. dependencies in I didn't look for any other API's so I I just donald a spreadsheet file from our local pharmacy software and plug that into the firm Python program, and the on saw local, and there's nothing to worry about on security side. Gotcha I'm just laughing. Because I'm like imagining like in other jobs or other professions, you could just bring the work home with you, but it's like you can't just bring home like people like I'm sure. It's like sensitive data. Right that you're working with. Other. Same last name address and everything's all there, so you can't really take home, but. You're able to do it at the at the pharmacy while you're working and all that. Yes, keep it to that story, Yeah! Just for context for myself in the listeners. How long ago is this like when you first started coating when you're still working as a pharmacist? How many years ago at this point or pretty recent? Yes Oh. It's Today is the first. One full year that I've been at this company, and then the MRI her I saw been working. suffered the bubble for two years now. Yeah and I think I started just in these in opponent projects. Three years ago. So took me about a year to get. Re Yeah, yeah, exactly like you said about a year when I was working as pharmacists to feel comfortable to looking for a job, and I've been working as a developer for two years gotTa, and then how long were you pharmacist for? Awesome for two years, oaks about the same now right like seeing amount of work experience from pharmacy to announce a software developer torture. Gotcha okay, so we just got your background with the pharmacy in in all of that and your first job. which now you're not there. You're working at a SYNTECH company, right? Cool, so were you planning to work in Fintech? That sort of just come about because I feel like. Some of your experience would be really helpful in like a med tech kind of industry. Yes so that's that's another good question. So the eighty first company went down I. Actually had to go through a job, looking process and actually interested in metallic. How tap that sort of thing because? I thought okay, I do have A. Background there and that interest there, but the thing was when I started the appointees. I met second how companies they required. Either a lot of suffer experience or a lot of research, clinical experience and I had. Neither. So it was difficult to to get into that soul, I started looking into other companies that I thought I had a shot at and this company turned out to be a great fit for me. Go for Culture Wise, and also lies got it. That's interesting about the clinical experience. Research experience at the health. Tech MIDTECH. Quick Sino, could you? Is there a difference between those two things? I love talking about like the different sectors technology. Is There A DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MED? Tech in health tech. Some people police Actually I don't think there really is a difference in my point of view. Yeah, I, mean I. Don't know I. I was asking I was like. Okay. Could be medicine, maybe or to the health could be like me. Look physiotherapy or something. Yeah, yeah, that's a good point. Maybe helps more broad. YEA like. Fitness APP or something, or like the thing I always get commercials for Num num the weight loss. You know talking about Donald State. Have as many on I have Hulu, Hulu live TV, and I swear like. Every break! There's a new commercial which is like I guess it's an APP that uses psychology to help you lose weight, but I feel like that's kind of like I guess it was developed by. Doctors by must be yet like health. More. Health Tech

Donald State Hulu Monroe Regis Fintech Software Developer Developer Sino
How Tech Is Failing The Trans Community

CodeNewbie

05:59 min | 3 months ago

How Tech Is Failing The Trans Community

"So you WanNa Post on Dev titled. Trained in your name is a hard unsolved problem and computer science. Can you tell us what this piece about? The thing is like the title of the Post is is very much like a play on a classic joke. Meam trope, which is kind of like. Is A hot until probe in computer science, which can go like either like the things that genuinely all that things that genuinely on and to me I think. It was a subject that became rapidly extremely important in my life as I went through recently I guess kind of still am in the process of changing my name to better reflect who I am and sort of just like all of the systems I bumped up against that were fighting me in any way to do that and really like being a accomplish sulphur engineer. Feeling like a lot of it should have been much easier than it was and really sort of coming to understand that a lot of it is less to do with software engineering writ lodge in multiple with sort of like how people think about information schemers. What was the impetus for writing this piece? Really? It was sort of my earn frustration more than anything else like sometimes. Sometimes when I'm writing will be a point. I'm trying to get across and it's like I have to really work at it to get the words onto paper. Like doesn't I dare I. Have It's? It's very big in Amorphous and it takes a lot of time, and this post was not like that. The text of this post fell out of me in the space of. Of about a day and a half, and it really was just like writing very quickly and fluently, and it's because I am transgender and I it because changing your name in the way, transgender people do is not such a common use case just like many computer systems I expected to be able to deal with it just one and it's like genuinely frustrating and disheartening to. To me to encounter that and I wanted to write about my experience and what I really saw after I published that really really resonated with a lot of people, and that was really nice to see. Yeah, I can't imagine how difficult that must be. Especially because you're in the position to fully understand what the flaws and decisions, people made to end up where we are. So, you read about your experience in particular restaurant when you made a reservation with your chosen name, and then the restaurant workers actually address you by your dead name shortly after you WanNa talk about that experience to me, this was like a really interesting example of like information systems, getting this wrong and not like the people involved so as best I can piece together from what happened. It's like one of those restaurants where you like a cell number, and then they like text you when your tables ready and then. Then you, come back, and they call out your name. And what had happened is like at left them my number and I'd said like my name is penelope. And then when they texted me, it was like Oh tables ready with no name in it whatsoever and then when I got there and told them I was there, they were like Oh. Do you mean and then they said my dead name to me and so like somewhere in that loop. My dead name had been associated with my phone number in. In such a way that even when I was giving my name to like the people in the place like they were being shown the old name in a few minutes later, right, what I sort of in fall off from that ineffectual is able to later determined to be true is that the system was cashing the name against the phone number and like either they didn't type in the name when I gave them my phone number, or it just overrated what they had said to it, and so like icon determine. Determine exactly what happened, but that is an actual site effective like these to identify as being linked in a way that is like actually like a really shop experience for me to have you know. How much do you think is inherently difficult or more sort of a blind spot with the way? Software is developed in terms of the demographics and what software developers are sort of carrying about most so the thing is we just bad this as an industry like Patrick. McKenzie wrote his fallacies computer program. Believe about. A blog posts several years ago and like most of the advice in it is still relevant today. Mike pursed is like a slightly different take on the same idea, which is the way that we build these information systems inherently make sumptious about ways that the world is that ton out not to be true, and so when I used, put my social engineering hat on, and really look at this icy like that most likely what's happening is people take a very simple view of the world about how people relate to names and include that into that systems, and then like that's just it right I mean for example like the assumption here that a person has a single name holds true for wide swathe. Swathe of the population, but is not true for me and is like for example, not true for lot of women who get married are impressive, changing the legal name or people who get divorced during process of changing legal name, right and other affected groups beyond and so like really to me, it's that we just haven't educated ourselves like as an industry on like many different kinds of human factors that actually we need to encode in our information scheme as even for the simplest of

Engineer Meam Mckenzie Mike Patrick
Ecosystem Engineering

Front End Happy Hour

06:56 min | 4 months ago

Ecosystem Engineering

"Gave a little bit of descriptions early in your intros. But I'm really curious. How do you describe? What IS ECOSYSTEM? Engineering NF flakes. So I've my previous role. I was a manager also and interest netflix's have to do a lot of recruiting and I'd have to answer this question a lot. Like what do you do? And what is this an unusually posted by saying you ever go into a store costco someplace and you see the. Tv's for sale and on the box they have netflix on them. Netflix's already pre install on it or if you could buy a Roku already got netflix on their more comcast box you may or may not get it but if it does get loaded somehow. Netflix's getting on all these devices. How does that happen? What happens is there's a team at net flicks that makes the Netflix's player code and we package it up once a year and we call it the de k a software developers kit for the player and we might give it a name but every year we give it out to these partners in these partners are like Samsung L. G. Roku comcast of the world and they have to take it and make it work on their system. And so if you look at all the TV's out there and all the set top boxes you can see that you know they're different chipsets. There's different hardware. They probably have different compilers and compilers settings. They've God's maybe their own libraries that they have to do they have a different os on their TV. Every device out there. Basically a custom made device. And so how do you get those Netflix's player which looks pretty much the same once you start the APP whether it's on a Roku or a Samsung Smart TV or a cable set top box? How is it ended up at experiences? Pretty much universal. I would say in how that happens is there are other teams that work with these partners to make sure that AAA compiles and be that. It's good that doesn't crash We have a suite of tasks and Trevan helps with that that area. The part and my previous manager job was in area too. We don't let net Netflix. Go out or be sold or pre installed on and device unless we know that device is going to have good quality with it. I said it cheers. Cheers cheers cheers and how that happens. Is these partners. Have to run a whole bunch of tests and pass these tests and there's a a Cloud-based tests service that Netflix's made where they can take their device whether they're working in China or whether they're working in Japan or Korea or the US or anywhere in the world they plug it into Internet. They log into this cloud service and they can run tests and we can see these tests if they pass fail and so on so forth and was passed all these tests then it goes out into the field and people can buy them what people have them in their homes or they sign up for cable service and they get this box and they start net flakes. And if it's working great we can see the metrics remotely from here 'cause all these boxes and TV's are sending this logs all the time and if there's a problem we should be able to detect that and try to get it fixed so long story. Short Netflix's works with a whole bunch of other companies to get these apps working and what's out there are jobs not done. We have to make sure that it keeps working. And so that's where he may be a deluded to like. Qe which maybe you could explain. What the Kiwi Patrick. Is that your your teams looking at sure. So Kua we. Quality of experience cheers. Cheers kind of set. You up for that one. They are metrics that deal with how the APP appears to the user. So this would be. Things like is video smooth. Does it look like high. Bit Rate. So it looks like very high quality not just st but also hd for K. buffering a lot. Which hopefully it's not a re buffer is when you're watching in the middle of playback and there's this kind of spinner that appears on the screen where it's trying to load and it's ten percent twenty percent. Seventy five percent. Ninety nine percent starts playing again. It's probably because there's some interference on the network or there's a bug in the buffering on the device we want to keep all that buffering to a minimum so that when you start watching it smooth. There's no interruptions but it's not just limited to that if you have trouble starting the APP or if you're in the middle of the APP crashes or there's like network fluctuations where it goes high quality low quality too much on. These are all things that could be addressed usually on the device side and try to minimize those as much as possible wherever possible. Even things outside of the network that users network or the service provider's network lately. Yeah that's another one. I forgot about that one. The time it takes for you to press the button versus how long it takes to start the actual playback. Hopefully it's around four or five seconds but on some devices we see. It's as long as twenty seconds thirty seconds. That's something that could be fixed on a device. Hopefully I think that's always been something that I've actually been amazed at is just Michael. You paint the picture of the ecosystem of all the different TV devices. But when I think about it too is the Netflix. App is being built for something like a roku stick. It's a lower powered device. And then you have something lake the playstation four or Xbox at you can also play on. It has a lot bigger assessor. I think is really interesting. How you there's large ecosystem of devices that we are supporting and so I can imagine that becomes a lot more challenging in your world to to support all those different variables are those devices and especially when you think that every one of those devices basically a custom made device very few devices. Look or act exactly the same from the code perspective and so it's it's a challenge to make sure that when you start Netflix's whether on a fifteen dollars stick if you bought it on sale the way up to four hundred dollars playstation or even a three thousand dollar four K. SMART TV that the Netflix's experience is pretty universal. On all of them. You still log in the same. You still have your same catalog. He still are able to see and navigate through the you. I pretty much the same. It's pretty familiar despite that range and I think that's pretty

Netflix Samsung Costco Kiwi Patrick Comcast Trevan Michael United States China Korea Japan
Microsoft’s Quantum-Computing Services Attract New Customers

WSJ Tech News Briefing

00:21 sec | 4 months ago

Microsoft’s Quantum-Computing Services Attract New Customers

"Microsoft is expected to announce new partnerships with two Japanese companies at its virtual developer conference. This week. They'll be working together to try to solve problems. Related to traffic congestion using quantum computing. It's part of Microsoft's. Recent push to make quantum computing services for software developers and part of a broader trend to commercialize emerging technology.

Microsoft Developer
Recipe Sage: An app for storing recipes

Talking Tech

04:00 min | 4 months ago

Recipe Sage: An app for storing recipes

"Offer just for talking tech listeners. We all while we all cook. We all eat and many of us like to have recipes but many of us can't find them because they're scattered all over the place. Jillian PYRO has come up with a new APP called recipe sage. And he's going to tell you all about it on talking Tech Julian how you doing. I'm doing well. How about you great? Tell us what motivated you to get this APP mid well My family has been very Very heavily into cooking we cook all sorts of different foods Growing up by On your mother always had me cook with her in the kitchen. I would cook with my father and we always had trouble keeping track of recipes And we used a couple of different programs. Were documents text you know. We used to write things in text editors and print those out and eventually became problem. Where I I was. I was a software developer. As you know as as a college student in then went on to do suffer development as as my job on I said why don't I write something that we can use for our family Come to find out after talking to neighbors and friends that this might be helpful for more people so I decided to publicize it a decided to make it public free for anybody to use And it's mainly been based off of the functionality that me or my family friends and now users who have picked us up have requested So it's grown from a small set of features functionality That just satisfied our needs to A software that Many people use and I think has a very as broad feature set. Why didn't tell us how works? Basically I want. I want a recipe for Spaghetti and meatballs. Do I look it up in there or do I it from somewhere? And add it so. It's a personal recipe keeper with is. It's intended for keeping your recipes. Not necessarily discovering so. I recognized as I grew my recipe collection. I collect recipes from all over the place right I may development them myself. I'm a discover them on the web. So this is primarily a place to keep your recipes not necessarily to discover them so you may be discovering them on different Different blogs or different websites. You may import those and then keep those inside of this program. One unique feature That I find particularly handy is the automatic import feature Which will grab a recipe from a euro that you insert and will actually pull the recipe fields out of that euro So if you out of your favorite blogs you can grab recipe your l. from that blog and inserted and recipes sage will automatically grab the recipe details instructions ingredients out of that age so my wife is a food blogger. She just wrote a piece today on Mother's Day her favorite memory of what mom used to make. And there's text text text text text text text and then at the bottom. There's a recipe. Would your APP. No how did actually just Yank out that recipe and forget about the rest of the text. It sure does And that part is actually open source. So that's one of the primary components of recipes ages. I'm trying to make as much of it. Open sources possible the the different components and useful tidbits so The recipe import Actually goes through the webpage and figures out what parts are recipe which parts are

Jillian Pyro Software Developer
Apple to hold annual developers event online from June 22

News, Traffic and Weather

00:26 sec | 4 months ago

Apple to hold annual developers event online from June 22

"Apple announcing its upcoming worldwide developers conference will be exclusively held online like many events apple has had to shift as a result of covert nineteen and the company says its annual worldwide developers conference will be a virtual experience this year the conference beginning June twenty second will be held through its apple developers at the conference gives app and software developers a look at where the company's mobile and computer platforms are

Apple
Success While Flying a Desk at Home

AviatorCast: Flight Training

09:40 min | 5 months ago

Success While Flying a Desk at Home

"Let's get into flight simulation so I have a question for you. First and foremost do you want to have infinite meaningful practice that can help most aspects of your flying during this time while you're at home a bit of a rhetorical question of course you would love to have that infinite meaningful practice while you're at home who wouldn't want that in simulation can open up that door for you so the goal through this process of perhaps implementing flight simulation into your at home study. You're at home. Time right now is to build a simple ineffective home simulator. I'm also going to talk about some ways that you can use that home simulator Q. Keep your skills going to refresh you build skills even which is a little bit tricky without an instructor onboard but there still are ways. So let's talk through that a little bit. I think the biggest thing that people have a question about first and foremost is gear. What do you actually need to have a flight simulator to make a flight simulator happen so I'm going to get through that a little bit? Now you can go to my website. Angle OF ATTACK DOT com go to the blog area. And you'll see this particular episode there and I'll also put it on the Youtube episode of the links to some of this gear that I'm recommending and then you can go there and perhaps purchase some of these things. Okay so this is a place that you can go and get started. This is really more of a gift. Started thought for those of you that haven't even Built a simulator yet. I WanNa keep it really simple. I don't think you need to go crazy. I'm talking about low cost high effective Or High Efficiency Simulator. That we can just get right now. Set up some controls and get going so first and foremost you need a simple gaming computer. That term gaining is really important because the video card and some of the other hardware that you need to run. The simulator is more in line with a gaming computer than it is any other type of computer so there are some affordable options out there. You can get some laptops and desktops that are already built You can get them on Amazon. He can get them from. Dell and HP that are fairly affordable reason. Why I start there and just say that you can get them basically off. The shelf is because I feel like most of you pilots aren't going to want to go out there and become these ultra nerdy fight. Simmers that Bill the cockpit in their spare bedroom. I know that you want to get something off the shelf and get started right away in. So that's more the direction. This goes a gaming computer helps. Do that can be a laptop or a desktop. You may already have something like that that works and that's going to be what you're looking for overall. I'd like to keep the cost of all of this below a thousand dollars and I'm talking like the computer. The peripherals and controls was trying to keep everything under a thousand dollars For the entire setup okay is definitely possible you can go above and beyond that. I have a simulator here in my office. That is very very nice That is more in the three thousand dollar range but it is way too nice for the average consumer. I mean this is more of like a show piece for the material that I create Then it is something just to practice at home in half proficiency so ah gaming laptop or desktop then we get into the flight controls. There are many options out there where you buy them. They literally connect up with. Usb They clamp on your desk and and they just plugged right into the simulator essentially the simulator detects those. And then you can get flying right away you can go into the simulator. Pick your airplane and essentially the controls will work. Sometimes there's a little bit of a calibration thing you have to go through but that's fairly straightforward the for the most part these flight controls are plug and play now. I think that you should get all three flight controls if you possibly can talking yoke throttle and pedals. This isn't investment for the future as well where even when we're outside of this pandemic time you can You can use these flight controls for your continued proficiency. So you're going to be talking in the three hundred to four hundred dollar range at the bottom end and you could even go above that if you want to invest in even nicer flight controls. I actually use the cheaper stuff. I think it works just fine. I don't feel like I need Realistic controls like having the airplane because an airplane as an airplane a simulator simulator. And I'd rather you know use that money more effectively somewhere else so they have really nice yolks. You can get recommend one of those again in the description on the blog Rudder pedals are very helpful because I think as a pilot need to connect your mind your feet. So let's not forget about those rudder pedals Somewhat eating suggests that if you have to just use a joystick with the rudder on there and everything else throttle on there that can work to. I don't think that's the end of the world if you just get a joystick. That's that's just fine. I can even recommend one again in the description but I do think that investing in a yoke throttle pedals For those of you that are Are Flying Fixed wing airplanes for training purposes Which is going to be most of you that. That's that's going to be your best setup. The fight controls. I like their logitech. They have both a yoke and a throttle that come in the same package. And then you buy the pedals separately again. You'll see that link the simulator self so the software Mac or PC can run plane. I actually prefer x plane right now because it looks really good just outside the ball out of the box like you loaded up and everything looks nice. And it runs really well Multi types of computers there with Mac and PC and they have just everything you need right out of the box. If you WANNA get crazy and going by a third party airplane then you can do that by going to Going to some of these other software developers that Creator planes that you can install into explain? So there's that whole side market we're not GONNA get too much into but it is interesting that your particular airplane you can get a a model for it and and basically fly what you're flying now in explain so explain is a really good one. Nasa when I recommend right now there is a new one coming out from Microsoft soon is not out yet. I don't know if it's going to be the end of this year with us out. It does look really nice. That's all I really know about it. and then there is prepared. Which is Lockheed Martin? Lockheed Martin actually bought the former rights to the the previous Microsoft simulator and all of its code and they built on top of that they've made a nice simulator but I don't feel it really looks that great and operates that great right outside the box. I X plane is a much better out of the box package And that's definitely the way to go all right so you set up your simulator. You've got a desktop or laptop whether you purchase it or already had one those kind of gaming machine you've got your flight controls you plug those in you. You downloaded the simulator. You can just get get it as a download and you've install it on your machine. So now what? How do you actually work on this in At your home. What should you work on? So one of the biggest things that simulator have an advantage on is instrument work so obviously just being of the stay right there. The instruments that come with the airplane that comes in the simulator and manipulating. The controls is very very helpful for instrument. You can set up the weather and so it's IMC outside the airplane. That will always always always be an effective tool with the simulator that you have purchased so instrument is a fantastic thing to do And a good way to keep proficiency even if legally you can't log the time on your home simulator. It keeps you proficient in that. Craft all right but getting outside the box of instrument. Because I think it's pretty clear to most pilots that a home simulator would be good for that in good for that long term thinking about using this for everything Or every type of flying with things like emergency procedure. So how long has it been since four your airplane? You've taken those emergency procedures and you've really memorized them. So that if something were to come up. You don't even need to look at the checklist. You can just run through those emergency checklists as a memory item. Make sure you've done everything you can. And then you move to the checklist. This is a really good time to get stuff like that down to practice practice practice. You can even simulate engine. Fires you can simulate an engine out and you could ride the airplane all the way down to your your landing spot of choice your best lining spot of choice and that is something that you can't replicate in real airplane so using simulators for Maybe some Reality or virtual reality based things that That they're good at is is pretty

Lockheed Martin Microsoft Instructor Youtube Logitech Dell Nasa Amazon MAC HP
Sony Clarifies PS5 Backward Compatibility

Beyond!

03:56 min | 6 months ago

Sony Clarifies PS5 Backward Compatibility

"Did mention sort of the one substantial actual bit of PS Five News. We got inbetween shows of course covered Mark Sunnis in-depth tech talk about the PS five. From last week that was originally meant to be. Gd Talk so if you didn't check out that episode you go listen to last week's to figure our thoughts on that a very complex discussion but after the fact. Sony updated their playstation blog. Post about this not once but twice to clarify some of the backward compatibility confusion that stemmed from was unclear about mark. Sunni's fifty minute long explanation. What could possibly leave room for clarification? Of course no. It was very buttoned up into the point and nothing uncertain for fans know there was some Scuttlebutt even having Turnley about whether or not cerny was discussing the fact that all of the library would be backward compatible and only one hundred games would be available launch or if only one hundred games would be available in the PS fives boost mood from ps four or some other combination of. Maybe we'll only actually get to play. Twenty Games backward compatible The update that the playstation blog actually put out was with all of the amazing games. Npr's catalog we've devoted significant efforts to enable our fans to play their favorites NPS five. We believe that the Omer overwhelming majority of the four thousand. Ps Four titles will be playable. Ps fought were expecting backward compatible. Titles will run any boosted frequency on. Ps five so that they can benefit from higher or more stable frame rates and potentially higher resolutions were currently evaluating Games on a title by title basis to spot any issues that need adjustment from the original software developers in his presentation. Mark Cerny provided a snapshot into the top one hundred most played ps four titles demonstrating. How well are backward? Compatibility efforts are going. We are have already tested. Hundreds of titles are preparing to thousands more as we move toward launch. We will provide updates on backward compatibility along with much more news in the months ahead. Stay tuned. So that's kind of worrisome. Honestly we dug into it a little bit last week but it it sort of makes me think that That fans are going to be finding problems in these games that weren't caught initially by Sony's in house developers and testers because the if they're going through on a case by case basis. I don't know if that's how the xbox hard works because their message was very clear of just like all the old games work here now whereas playstation they're like what we it seems like they basically prioritized that most played once the most popular ones Which is good. It's a good start Indefinitely better than the complete lack of backwards compatibility. We've had them. Ps Four but It makes it seemed like to me. You're going to play some like you know. Sort of niche game two years from now and find a bunch of technical hiccups in it. And then you're GONNA ask them the patch amount and they're going to say we don't. We can't justify the time and resources to do that. Like I have the playstation now APP. I don't know where I might have stuck that in the folder that might be just like pushed all the way down the train from other games of playing before it Because it's something I don't really use a lot but it's also like they. They've changed up the languaging on that a little bit when it started it was just like a streaming thing and now you can download some games and so I think they really need to scream from the rooftop sue and not just for people like awesome people listen to show but like you know con. Consumer Carl or whatever like the guy walks into a store. Yeah I mean like right now. You can download. Ps Four NPS Games and play them off line. And that's not really the thing that I think they're shouting about enough because I've thought about man. I would love to revisit some. Ps Two games. I don't have the chance to. I can download these re masters of the final fantasy games. When they're on sale but game passes get literally every remastered final fantasy game from the past like two generations. So why wouldn't I just wait to play

PS Mark Cerny Sony Turnley NPR Carl
15 Years to a SaaS Exit (Plus Why Forecasting is Crucial)

Startups For the Rest of Us

06:54 min | 6 months ago

15 Years to a SaaS Exit (Plus Why Forecasting is Crucial)

"Matt wincing. Thanks so much for joining on the show again. Hey thanks for having me on again absolutely man so I talked in the intro about you. Growing risk pulse finding CEO. And selling it and I always ask people who've had these life changing exits. What was it like when you looked at your bank balance? You hit refresh and you see all those Zeros for the first time in your life. Yeah I think I think for me. It was a huge relief. Just because just the sheer number of years that I put into it. It was not a hey. Let's let's bet the summer on this. You know it was. It wasn't quite bet the farm. I didn't go that far like if it hadn't happened. Things would have been okay but you know I was very invested in. It adds it was. It was a huge relief to see that. Definitely as you said life life changing and you know obviously life improving but really just that peace of mind. You know that you don't have for sometimes very long startups indeed. It was a really long journey for you. Right it was was it fifteen years. Yeah I had the idea in two thousand and four side Yeah I. I went from idea. No four drawing little notes on posted on my lunch hour while on break is a software developer thinking. Hey you know steps one through four of starting startup. Let's do this fifteen years later. Congratulations man did you. I know all the listeners are thinking. Did you buy anything? Did you buy a Porsche to buy a house? I yes I did. I did a couple things. We've been postponing a great ski vacation. For a long time it happened in December. And guess what if it was time so it took the kids? Something I've been wanting to do for years was take the kids out of vacation. So we we last minute booked all. That didn't worry as much as you normally would about the last minute rates and went up to Whistler Canada and had had a great time with family invited family to come join us so that was great and I did have a you know inherited a car for my parents few years ago just because they didn't need it anymore and I was like okay. You know an extra commuter cars always helpful especially when it's paid off and was able to get rid of that and get a new vehicle show great very nice. You know. It's funny because when I was there's a podcast called the tropical NBA and Danny and talk about Entrepreneur Mobiles. And it's basically that she pieces that you drive while you're trying to build your company because they're not actually making much money so I drove a salvage title. Two thousand six Buick rendezvous at one point had a bunch of duct tape on the mirror got hit and I so I drove that up until a year after I sold trip. I like that car totally and and then the next car. It's a nice car. It's a Volvo. It's the nicest car I've ever owned. In fact it's I still bought it us though I could not. I couldn't bring myself to buy a new car but yeah that's funny I we. We had the two thousand five Toyota Sienna minivan which we put two hundred and fifteen thousand miles on as as a family and we replaced that with a you know a modest functional SUV. But then I had inherited a car for my parents that was An oath four and it worked. It was fine. It was it was exactly what you described. It was paid off and worked and got me from place to place but I tried it and I did get an off lease vehicles because again I wanNA to pay the depreciation but it's a lot more fun to drive once a scrappy founder always scrappy founder. That's Yup it's hard to change it so I wanna I wanNA ask you about a couple of things. One thing that you did. That was super interesting. Risk Pulse is build the SAS apt multiple seven figures. And then you replace yourself with a CEO and you moved on to start summit. Which will you know? We'll talk about towards the end of the interview that it's very. I say it's unusual. Most people don't go through that experience most people aren't able to find a CEO. It's not even on the radar of a lot of people. What was that process like? And why like why did you? Why did you take that step? Yeah it was. It was a process and I think it was the deciding that he was going to be. Ceo was definitely last step in a mental journey. That started with you know. We need a experienced enterprise sales executive to join the team and I had a recommendation from a board member which is a great example of how board members can be value. Add is helping you find top talents. And in this case he knew him professionally. They'd worked together before and you know with somebody that had significant experience building companies from the few million in revenue to the next phase so kind of the ten employees two hundred employees face which is a great fit for where we were and so. I I initially hired him to be chief strategy officer which is a fancy way of saying not quite sure what your title is going to be but I know that you have a lot of experience and we want to just get you involved in the first things. He did was really focused on sales and overhaul in the sales process is an enterprise. Sales processing had more even though I had more experience in the business of course. Because I've been doing it for years. He brought in that outside experience and revamped. Our sales process professionalized. It and that was kind of the word. It was really going through in professionalising each function in the in the company and after sales it was marketing and customer. Success and Finn OPS and kind of all down the list and then lastly would just kind of got to the point where you know. It wasn't that I didn't want to manage him. It was more you know what's in it for me. Like why? Why do I want to hold onto? Because it was clear that point that he could be. Ceo and that. I didn't need to be so it was kind of an either or and without any forcing from the board. I mean this was completely my idea. I said I'd never intended to run this company forever. That's not my that was not my identity and I think that's that was like the key decoupling that was already true in my mind and heart was like who. I am is not the CEO. Repulse it's the founder of response. Maybe a little bit more but you know the CEO to me was always a always a title. That could be changed at some point tonight. I always intended to change it at some point so it just became a natural transition to say. He's that person now announced to the board. The board was I mean if anything they were a little surprised at my willingness like it was almost like what you said if this doesn't usually happen and it isn't usually peaceful when it does happen but yeah I think that's a that that should be the goal of maybe more of us like a peaceful transition of of leadership and power. I mean that's that's kind of. It's kind of a an important tentative of well-functioned organization so I was happy to do it. And it just immediately freed me up to focus on just the things that I was world-class ads and still wanting to focus on and then ultimately wind myself out of the

CEO Founder Matt NBA Volvo Buick Rendezvous Sales Executive Toyota Sienna Porsche Software Developer Whistler Canada Chief Strategy Officer Danny
Smarter Phones: Journey to the Palm-Sized Computer

Command Line Heroes

04:22 min | 6 months ago

Smarter Phones: Journey to the Palm-Sized Computer

"In the early nineties a Hammy Software. Developer took a stack of wood and carved into small blocks of various sizes. He carefully compared the weight of each walk. And when he found one that felt pocket-sized he takes a printout of a tiny monitor onto it then. He topped the block in his shirt pocket and walked around with it to see how it feel to be attached to a device. He was imagining a not so distant. Future where we'd all be doing the same thing if you think that guy's name was Steve Jobs you're wrong. His name was Jeff Hawkins and he co created the palm pilot when the iphone hit the market in two thousand seven critics and competitors questioned whether smartphone with a decade later. The question is how can a person succeed without one? Smartphones are ubiquitous. They're APPs allow us to do pretty much anything and the hardware running them says a lot about who we are. But as sexual as the IPHONE has been to the RISE OF OUR MOBILE LIVES. It wasn't the catalyst. This is the epic story of how earlier? Hand-held device pave the way for the smartphone. And it's the story of a developed team that stuck with that device for its entire journey. I'm surrounded Barak and this is command line heroes on ritual podcast from red hat. The smartphone concept has been around since star. Trek's try quarter in real life though the concept I translated into cell phones in Nineteen eighty-four bulky things that looked like bricks during the nineties. They got a bit smaller small enough for more to carry on saved by the bell but they were still just used for phone calls. Remember phone calls. Nothing smart was happening on mobile phones. But there was another piece of technology gaining traction. It was called a PD a a personal digital assistant a mobile device that acted as your personal information manager. We'll get to that moment. But at the time the tech industry was way more focused on the personal computer which we learned about an episode. Three when we looked at the al-Tair Eighty eight hundred. Everyone was so caught up in. What a personal computer was. Was this huge big beige box sitting under your desk. They couldn't imagine that you carry this thing around in your pocket Ed Colligan was VP of marketing at a nascent mobile software company called Palm in the early nineties palm was founded by Jeff. Hawkins the guy who walked around with a block of wood in his pocket. It was a big vision. It was that the future of computing personal computing is handheld computing and that there would be more transactions done on handheld computers in the future than on desktop computers. That's dawn to Pinski Palm CEO. At the time I know today when I say that it sounds like whatever that's logical but believe me. It was not logical at the time. We didn't understand why other people didn't understand it. Because you know we're had computing gone. Right it'd gone from. Computers are filled room to mainframe computers too many computers which were kind of misnamed to personal computers desktop computers we saw the inevitable march of. Moore's law and more and more power and smaller smaller packages palm started out developing information management software for PD. Casio was making called the Zimmer. They also made some synchronization. Software for Hewlett Packard's devices but those first GEN PD as weren't taking off and then the whole personal digital assistant dream looked like a lost cause after the high profile failure of apples effort the Newton. They were all too big too heavy and the software was too slow but the palm team wondered whether a new approach could change the

Jeff Hawkins Pinski Palm Palm Steve Jobs Developer Casio Hewlett Packard Zimmer Ed Colligan Barak Trek
"software developer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:51 min | 8 months ago

"software developer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"That was it. Yeah you know We were talking about Grammar Lee Richard. You were talking about it and um I think of all the technologies that have replaced just you know educational aspects that we've learned as we came up through school. All in all of this. You know grammar is one of them spell check before that but how it translates into code you know with Statement completion Russian. And all of that all we have all these technologies that we lean on that make us more productive but yet if you get an email from somebody and and it's grammatically incorrect and you know things are on all caps or they're not capitalized correctly. You know you you do have that. Does give view an opinion of them. Yes like this person didn't take the time to care carefully Present what it is that they're trying to say in a in a manner that reflects well on them. Yeah same as you know people who don't use correct grammar in real life but at at a certain point what what happens happens when you know the the people who know better are gone and you know the the younger generation that has come up with tax sting and all of that stuff language is like a totally different thing for them like they don't really care about spelling because spell checker. Will you know so they don't. I'm making yeah abroad generalization These are things I've noticed in my kids for example like they're less focused on that stuff that we took a lot of care in learning because they can be more productive if they let the technology do some of that for them yeah. I just don't know if they're communicating is wells. The can right. They never times. I get that line you you know what I mean. I don't know do there's a bunch of letters here..

Lee Richard
"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Is definitely a must you need to be able to deal with some basic math skills, but beyond that everything is really learned on learn on the job, and you know, in the logic is improved through coding, I would say if there is a skill that matches programming. It would it would it would actually be writing. If you're if you enjoy writing stories, and and reading stories, that's we we're doing as software developer recreating things were were really writing a lot of writing. That's what it is interesting never heard anyone on make that comparison before. But that makes a lot of sense one thing that I found after interviewing a bunch of folks for the show is that it seems like a lot of people with musical backgrounds will later get into programming. Now, I guess that may be also because there's not a lot job opportunity for them. Like in the music industry. They want higher earning potential on all of that. I'm not musical myself. But just from the little bit that I know about reading and writing music, it always made sense to me that if felt like those things could kind of be connected, you know. The right hemisphere of your brain that's involved with music. I'm actually believe it or not I I like to sing during my free time. So there's a little bit of musician in me. But I think people that you know, that have a music degree there. They can think more creatively that can help offer development, Charlotte. Folks, listening are happy to hear that like how trae tippety is really strong factor in software development, because I think a lot of times we just think about it like, oh, it's really analytical, and it's not super creative. But it's nice to hear otherwise. So I wanted to talk a bit about your program in your courses. You're company called job ready. Programmer, I know you talked about this already. But with love if you could elaborate a bit on what the job ready means that sure so have critter YouTube video on this where I present to people about the two in my opinion, the fastest. Way to become a software developer and one of them is to go into the software development back end side of things like learn a programming language. The other one is becoming a database developer, and these are the two pats. Now, there are other various paths and software development. It's it's a growing field. So you can get into, you know, data science machine learning, and those are obviously more advanced concepts. But I would say that the the reason why have job ready programming as my website is because that's exactly what I'm trying to help students. Do is break into software devolvement by by learning the must know skills. Some of the courses, for example, the Java course, that's a primary course that's going to help someone learn programming. And the other one is on the data side of things I've got a database course, I've actually got multiple database courses, multiple Java courses, and then the third requirement is being. To pass an interview and sometimes interviewers asked while not sometimes a lot of times, they're going to ask data structures and algorithms questions, and those if you haven't gone to college for a computer science degree, you probably didn't get an opportunity to cover that. And so I include that in my curriculum because it it could take time to learn data structures algorithms in that something that is not, you know, it's it's not going to be your day-to-day training. If you're for example, learning to help of mobile app or a website or something like that you kind of actually have to take away time from those creative endeavors, and and actually learn some some hardcore computer science concepts I included that in the curriculum. So this curriculum overall is designed to sort of prepare someone to be a job ready by the time. They're they're they're they're done in what I love about. E o our website. And where he displays information is you have like these two pats data analyst in software development. And then you highlight the courses in like what you get with each in the value that they have for each path..

software developer trae tippety YouTube pats Charlotte developer Programmer analyst
"software developer" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on TechStuff

"He also discontinued the Victoria which came out in nineteen eighty one. The Commodore sixty four was still selling. So he kept that going, the plus slash four and the Commodore sixteen models also were cut. And if you other projects that were for systems that had not yet debuted, but we're in development. Those were of intially axed as well. And a lot of those people most of them were let go. The third round of layoffs was the hardest to make because they're still needed to be cuts in order to get Commodore back to profitability. But now they were cutting into people who are contributing directly to Commodore business. So a lot of. Apple referred to this as cutting into the bone because it was it was beyond the the, the folks that you could more easily say goodbye to because they were not contributing to Commodore's business. So here's where pro programmers and engineers found themselves of job, both at Commodore headquarters in Pennsylvania in Westchester and the folks over in Los Gatos in California, the Amiga folks, they all of them saw cutbacks, but another big change was coming. And that was that the Amiga team was told that their operations were going to move across country and that the team is going to join the Commodore headquarters in Pennsylvania people working for Amiga had to make a decision. They could continue to work for the company, but that would mean they'd have to move across country or they were going to have to quit Jay miner. The guy who had led the design for the meager chipset the co, founder of Amiga the one guy who had been. In a consistent presence at the company from its start, decided he was done. He resigned from Commodore as a fulltime employee. He would continue to act as a consultant for the company for several more years. And ultimately, Jay miner passed away in nineteen ninety four due to kidney failure. One other reason Commodore wanted the Amiga folks to move closer to their headquarters had to do with an embarrassing prank that went a little too far. So the Amiga had a graphical desktop environment that was called workbench. And there was a software developer who was working on an upgrade to work bench the, you know, a later version like one point two. And as far as I can tell, this person's identity has never been revealed. But this software developer hid a message in the code and the only way you would unlock the messages. If you pressed a certain key combination simultaneously. And it wasn't a common one. So it would require you to know about it or to have heard about in order to do it. And if you did do it a message popped up on screen that message read and I'm going to paraphrase a little bit. We made the Amiga. They eft it up. The message did not obvious skate the curse word, they, they actually set it in the message. The head of software over at Amiga was perhaps a mused, but told this developer that the this Easter egg was going to have to go could not stay in the software. And at first it seemed like this engineer had taken that to heart because if you did the key combination after the engineer had made some more changes in Nel, said Amiga born a champion, but this turned out to be a smokescreen because if you held down another set of keys, the message we made, the Amiga would pop up. And then if you were to keep holding those key. As down and then have someone insert a floppy disk into the disk drive a second half of that message would pop up the, they eft it up part, would flash on screen for one sixtieth of a second..

Commodore Commodore business software developer Jay miner engineer Apple Pennsylvania consultant founder Los Gatos Nel Westchester California
"software developer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"David. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. So I'm a software developer and I developed some software for tedious studios. Actually, the young restless show and. Five the case against basically my cousin, which I do not have a contract with is the one that got us the deal and contract is between young and the restless and my cousins company, and I developed the software, and so we should receive licensing fees every year. Okay. For the software and. Four or five years. I was receiving my payments. And then. Last year. Around October when we get and I didn't get my payment and contact with my cousin. I said, hey, what's going on payments? Think long story short. Basically what I found out was he went to his friend, and they were trying to rewrite software copy, my code, basically and give CBS new version of the software, and then basically cut me out of the deal how much money where you're getting a year. So at thirty grand was leasing in my cousin gave me twelve and he'd keep actually I got eleven like eleven thousand eight hundred different. So how did it work that he got more money than you? I was an idiot in. Okay. So there's no good reason for him to get more money than you were just an idiot. Okay. Now in those four years. I I was the one that they always contacted to support the I would go and do the crime. Okay. So here so the bottom line, you get to sue your cousin and your cousins defense is going to be gee, we don't have any signed contract. Your argument is going to be. Yeah. But then why did if we don't have a signed contract? Why did you pay me over four years? What if I did? I I spoke with CVS is the rest of us next plane in situation, unfortunately, they're caught in the middle. But I told them listen, I own the copyrights chef software. Okay. So right now, you're infringing on copyright. Well, actually, not because there was a contract that they have. And it's not CBS at screwing you it's your cousin that screwing you and someone has written contract. And you're saying there's a written contract between your cousin and CBS. Correct. Yes. But in that contract there is nowhere. There's no there's nothing that stays. I'm releasing my copyright you. But the point is that you're allowing him to use it sonic question, releasing the copyright? It's a question of we we have a deal. You can go ahead and use it. A verbal deal you go ahead and use it. So what do you want to do if you can't sue the cousin? What what would you like I want? What I want? CVS to stop using my software. I don't know if you can start you can stop it. Now, you can make a motion to have CBS. And then there's a lawsuit about interference with a contract that they may have. But I tell you you go ahead and sue CBS CBS. You've got a you've got a world of hurt. And what are you gonna do? You're going to send them a deceased and desisting. You can't use the software anymore because I'm being ripped off. And they're going to say, we're not ripping you off you talk to your cousin. But I don't want to sue my cousin. Well, that's too bad. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. Basically, basically, it's I wouldn't you want to sue your cousin? Who's screwing you Dave. Because it's because it's going to cause more family problems. I believe you know. Okay. Idiot across several different levels. Oh, it's going to cause family problems. If someone's stealing stealing from me, and I want to go after the wrongdoer, but I can't because it's gonna cost family problems. Someone they're going to get upset with me not the rip off artists. All right. I mean, it is what it is. This is handle on the law. Okay. Julie Slater what's going on in the world out there. President Trump is calling it a big day for America. As the Senate prepares for a rare Saturday vote on Brett Kavanagh supreme court nomination, a tropical depression or tropical storm will likely formed by early next week in the Gulf of Mexico or western Caribbean. Sea causing a flood threat for Central America. The fourth annual amber rose slut walk is underway to raise awareness of sexual injustice, domestic violence and gender inequality. The walk began at ADM.

CBS software developer Central America Julie Slater Gulf of Mexico President Trump Senate America Caribbean Brett Kavanagh Dave four years five years
"software developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"That's developer t two zero one eight that will give you that twenty dollars worth of credit. There's so many other things that linen provides as part of their service. We're not going to get through them all in today's episode, but owed is a continued sponsor of. Developer t thank you again to Leonard for sponsoring today's episode. So we're talking about kind of the etymology of a software project. All of these things. We probably have some bad and some very good memories that are being vote by talking about his various types of problems that we face in software. Some of these things can make us feel proud. Some of them can make us feel a sense of shame and perhaps the most important feeling for us to pay attention to his fear. Fear is important because fear is often an indicator. The feeling of fear is an indicator of some level of uncertainty. The unknown. This is often causes fear as software developers begin to work on a new project, the fear of the unknown. Specifically the fear of the unknown as it relates to changes things that I might interact with things that I might do. If you give me a task, however you are managing those tasks doesn't really matter. But if you have a task and I take this, this on as a software developer go into this project that has all of these eighty sink receives that we've already discussed in the earlier part of this episode. Then it's very possible if not likely that I'm going to have some level of intrepid nation. I'm going to be uncertain about the changes that I'm getting ready to make. And so understanding that software comes about as the result of human processes that should prompt us to create systems that support that human side of sulphur development. So what is what was it mean to support this? Well, first of all, we have to recognize what of those human traits can cause software to be dangerous. Right? And again, we said on previous episodes of the show, I'm gonna say it again on this episode if you follow the fear. In other words, if you pay attention to what developers are afraid of, you'll often uncover places where your software needs to be refracted needs to be changed or rethought in some way that software is causing a level of uncertainty as some uncertainty is is absolutely attributable to a lack of experience for a given developer in this needs to be kind of brought out as well, but very often, uncertainty and fear come as a result of a developer feeling like. There's something that they should know, but they don't. And perhaps that thing that they should know is not necessarily rudimentary programming knowledge, but instead it some kind of knowledge that's embedded in this project, something in that life cycle that atom apology, something human, some decision that was made along the way or some colloquial language that was adopted along the way. Some vocabulary that is not obvious. Maybe some level of indirection is confusing or maybe even unnecessary. And so as new developers come onto projects, this is a critical point to understand the fear, the uncertainty that those developers have because this is going to point you in the direction of places where your code has the artifacts and perhaps even an damaging way the artifacts..

developer software developer Leonard twenty dollars
"software developer" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Let's hear a debt free scream, three, two one. I. Well, done, man. That is absolutely awesomeness very well played very well played. If you're listening to this right now and you are in the middle. Of the nastiness and the heartbreak and the betrayal of a divorce. God put Molly on here today just for you to hear her story. It's going to be okay. It's going to be, okay, you got this, you got this, but it doesn't hurt to be mad at your grandma's funeral. That's the moral of the story. I am sick and tired of being sick and tired. I'm not gonna live under the thumb. Aban broke any more. I'm going to do something about it. That was our moral. Our motto wasn't a love that story. Great young lady. This is the Dave Ramsey show. Amanda is with us in Washington DC. I, Amanda welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. Hi, thanks for taking my call. Sure what's up. So my question basically a little bit of acts story. My husband works at a software developer here in DC. He was supposed to be getting from ocean this past year, but he was just notified that won't be happening. So he's base the company is cutting corners. Okay, they they love everything about him. They want him to stay. They wanna promote him to manager with the family to pay are struggling. Yeah. Okay. So he's wondering if he just take this opportunity to transfer back to Florida to be near family. That way we have grandparents for our kids. I could possibly go back to school and finish my education and family. Larva. Does does just he does. Where's your family. All over Canada. Okay. All right. And what does he make now. Makes eighty thousand. Can I get a job making that in the city in Florida, we're talking about. He's looking at Tampa area and so far his research has shown them that he could be making ninety k. for his experience in his level, Florida's cheaper than DC live in. Yeah, his parents there and the begging to come down while I'm not talking about that. I'm talking about the money, that'd be wonderful near them. I think that assuming they're nice folk, but but but yeah, that that. So is there any reason not to do this. No. I mean, part of me was like, well, I can't. We just keep looking around here. You'd probably get a better deal here because this is DC and he's a software developer my money everywhere. Yeah, we just have no family. We have nothing here that got that part so, but that's not a reason to stay. That's a reason to leave. But my point is, is that DC's not exactly the mecca for software developers. Right? I don't. I don't think I agree with that as a reason to stay. I think you can make really, really good money as a software developer and most any major metro area some more than others, some have more of a tech corridor than others, but it's a, it's a sought after you know, assault after skill set. Are you working now. Now I'm a stay at home mom to two boys, two and under, and I'm expecting our third. You go to Florida. You get grandma on your backyard, he makes more money. Everybody's happier. Go to Florida. Yes..

Washington DC Florida software developer Dave Ramsey Amanda Molly Canada Aban Tampa assault ninety k
"software developer" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on WDRC

"Now to your calls let me go first to a naysayer because we love naysayers greg welcome to the program you heard my conversation with the fcc chairman what do you think of net neutrality well i am pro net neutrality uh i uh i'm a software developer um i in beaverton um company is internetbased um i mean i i just don't understand how you i mean most of what mr pie bad was just complete fabrication floors no i'd i'd die dane hold on a second if you're gonna he's gonna does broadbrush tell me what he fowler i tell k the fact that he fabricated okay uh so first um good for consumers uh it would raise prices for consumers for some and for others it would drop a depending on what you decide the by correct well i'm trying to figure out what you mean by what we depend what we decide to pile on internet on your a software developer you worked for accompanied you out onto early you worked for a company i worked for a car you don't have to name it but does your company had a giant data pipes that run into it very large lines that supply you with huge amounts of data both in and out right i i wouldn't call it a huge amounts i don't work that huge company but uh eat there are data center about how the compared to the average internet consumer that they would by at home large the average internet consumer does not obviously does not have a at home i do not have a huge pipe coming out of my so you get that has died in the issue lower that you guys are just in it you could to decide which size pipe in which size speed you need some companies clearly need more speed some companies clearly need less for example net flags buys large or buys high speed because they know that for their customers there are more likely to hang on to customers and get more customers if they can supply the video that net flakes stockintrade movies and shows if that could be if that can speed to their customers then they're going to do better at hanging on to customers in getting new customers.

chairman software developer data center fcc beaverton
"software developer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"But first becoming you i superhero with express you i controls in libraries and deliver elegant dot net solutions that address customer needs today and leverage our existing knowledge to build nextgeneration touch enabled solutions for tomorrow whether it's an office inspired application our data centric analytics dashboard debits press universal ships with everything you'll need to build your best without limits or compromise learn more and download your free 30day trial adept expressed dot com slash superhero well all right buddy who is our winner today's winner unbelievably is kirk cameron oh no kidding kurt karen a guy like a family ties went into those shows open house they're open house amy i'd add has two heads it was one of the he was a teen actor was probably not the same i've suspecting not nowmiddle aged software developer who is about to have a you know the you haven't heard from them on tv as early as possible fairly possibly got into software or on the other hand it's probably a different kirk hammered he's really tired for be mistaken for their guy ably right now he didn't have software anymore i guess assist you need to send him a mug knows well juice for confusion i'm sorry correctly here's rob lagged us going to feel bad about it will look you have just make sure you ask well anyway kirk just one the d experience subscription from developer express it's a big pylos him from them just for being a member of the dutton iraq's fan club and if you don't know what that is go to dot net rocks dot com click on the big get free stuff button answer a few questions and joined the fan club we have thousands of members all over the world that every show we'd like to give away stuff from our sponsors and every december we give away five thousand dollar technology shopping spree to one lucky member of the dot in iraq's fan club at you go sign up to win buried seareturn few had five thousand dollars to spend on technology today what would you buy.

kirk cameron kurt karen software developer kirk iraq five thousand dollars five thousand dollar 30day
"software developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Just so many new niches that are gonna come along um that are very hard true to imagine and they seemed we kind of ridiculous to a space as you're saying that most webs designer you know uh mortgage broker these these wouldn't even make sense to the farmers under fifty years ago as jobs have have all gone home until i think we're not going up these new jobs are gonna make sense to us now yeah i think you mentioned the uh the the web designer or or rather a whisper job and i think this is actually going to um the way that this will will affect us earliest you crosschecked me your again you wrote the book on this but uh i think this is going to begin by webb developers in kind of uh the the people hiring by developers her or software developers uh adding new bullet points to that requirements list right and sang okay well uh if you're going to be a software developer here than yes you need to know java ends x winds e but you also need to have experience with machine learning or also need to have experience with this new whatever a platform api thing that that that is out in the wild um i think that's kinda the start of that because you know as we saw with software developer titles in the beginning its software developer because there's really only three languages for enters assembly and see and you know whatever other thing that existed and then it continued to branch continue to grow and expand and as it expanded each of those as individual areas got large enough to justify a person that is solely dedicated to that thing right answer now we have people who are are even subdivided inside of a a given programming language or subdivided inside of a giving tool set that are really focused on one particular aspect of that software development process whereas previously it was really all one title i think this going to continue that direction part of things so too.

web designer software developer programming language software developers software development fifty years
"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Check in some code it automatically gets built it automatically gets tested and then if all the tests pass it automatically gets deployed in production so if you think about how uh you know automated and fasts that process is there is really no time for another team to have a manual process around running some testing tools those testing tools have to be used by the developer and built right into their tool chain so that's really how we're seeing uh security um change um right now sit tight pack asked listeners poor taking a quick break to hear a word from our sponsors does your current job bum you out are you learning to code on your own and find yourself getting staff with launch academies boston a philadelphiabased cutting through camps you'll learn all the skills unique to launch your korean programming and software engineering and just ten weeks with a cutting edge javascript curriculum that evolves every cohort to teach students the most current indemand skills is the quickest route to becoming a software developer thanks to their eightweek program in a lifetime of postgraduates support launch academy makes sure you get the job you want by continuing to teach you job prep skills after he graduate that's why over ninety percent of launch academy graduate jobseeker's secure jobs as software engineers get started by turning an open house of free learn to coat event or scheduling a wild one video interview make sure to ask about special offers for learn to cope with me listeners during your admissions interview find out more at launch academy dot com.

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"software developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"I hear and i forget i see and i remember i do and i understand although the origin of this quote is somewhat unknown the it's a chinese proverb but most of the sources citing that come from the 1960s the underlying concept of this quote is still very strong that's where we're going to be talking about in today's episode by name is jonathan cottrell you're listening to developer t michael on this show is to help you become a better developer you may be listening to this new not a software developer guy you don't right code i don't do maybe anything with computers although fewer and fewer people that category as the years where on in as technology continues to imbue our lives and even if you're a software developer you may not see yourself as a software developer the title of developer is very much so incomplete for most people who work in this job tons of people own businesses and also develop software tens of people who listen to the show are also designers who work with software perhaps you are indeed or writing code in your daytoday work enter code continues to become more and more important so as people start listening to this podcast in those varying categories i went to make sure that we're avoiding mislabelling developers i want to make sure that we're avoiding perpetuating a sense of fear of perpetuating a sense of impostor syndrome but talks about impostors syndrome in the past but part of the way that we do this is by not trying to get into extremely technical details in short podcast and that's one of the reasons why we focus on larger more applicable topics that span of basically your entire life you can listen to this episode and five years from now and hopefully it will still be applicable to what you do so we aren't afraid to talk about specific technology we are avoiding those conversations but a lot of the time the better value the you can get out of this podcast is going to be when we talk about things like what we're talking about today today's episode is focused on learning.

jonathan cottrell developer software developer five years
"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Sit tight podcast listener's were taking a quick break to hear a word from our sponsors does your current job bummed out are you learning to code on your own and find yourself getting stuck with launch academies boston and philadelphia base cutting through camps you'll learn all the skills unique to launch your career in programming and software engineering and just ten weeks with a cutting edge javascript curriculum that valls every cohort to teach students the most current indemand skills is the quickest route to becoming a software developer thanks to their eightweek program in a lifetime of postgraduates support launch academy make sure you get the job you want by continuing to teach you job skills after you graduate best buy over ninety percent of launch academy graduate jobseekers secure jobs as software engineers get started by tiny an open house of free learned dakota vent or scheduling a wound one video interview mixture ask about special offers for learned to cope with me listeners during your admissions interview find out more at launch academy dot com fly on schools online web developer program community powered boot camp and free boot camp prep horses are perfect for anyone interested in a career change and becoming a developer flood iron students come from a range of backgrounds from financial to creative what they all have in common is the passion red and determination to learn to love code flood irons rigorous eight hundred plus our curriculum will teach you the skills you need to land fulfilling career as a software engineer.

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"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Flood irons rigorous eight hundred plus our curriculum will teach you the skills you need to land fulfilling career as a software engineer learn to call me listeners can get awesome five hundred dollars off their first month to get started on that career change just visit flood iron boot camp preps dot com one online flat iron students said he'd learn more in a couple of days of flat iron than a year a computer science classes if you're interested in learning how to think like a real developer while using tools actual developers use checkout flat irons online web developer program at flat iron boot camp prepped dot com and claim your hundred 500dollar discount does your current job bummed out are you learning to code on your own and find yourself getting stuck with launch academies boston philadelphia based coating who camps you'll learn all the skills unique to launch your career in programming and software engineering and just ten weeks with a cutting edge javascript curriculum that evolves every cohort to teach students the most current indemand skills is the quickest route to becoming a software developer thanks to their eightweek program in a lifetime of postgraduates support launch academy makes sure you get the job you want by continuing to teach you job prep skills after you graduate that's why over ninety percent of launch academy graduate jobseekers secure jobs as software engineers get started by turning an open house of free learned to coat event or scheduling a wound one video interview mixture to ask about special offers for learned to cope with me listeners during your admissions interview find out more at launch academy dot com.

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"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Sit tight podcast listener's were taking a quick break to hear word for our sponsors does your current job bummed out are you learning to code on your own and find yourself getting stuck with launch academies boston philadelphiabased coating boot camps you'll learn all the skills unique to launch your career in programming and software engineering and just ten weeks with a cutting edge javascript curriculum that valls every cohort to teach students the most current indemand skills is the quickest route to becoming a software developer thanks to their eightweek program in a lifetime of postgraduate support launch academy makes sure you get the job you want by continuing to teach you job prep skills after you graduate best by over ninety percent of launch academy graduate jobseekers secure jobs as software engineers get started by tiny open house of free learned to coat event or scheduling a wound one video interview make sure to ask about special offers for learn to cope with me listeners during your admissions interview find out more at launch academy dot com yeah no that's that's awesome and i remember taking like so many workshops in such a short time the the at the at the village after i think i took like seven or nine in like two months or something something pretty crazy but for people that are teaching themselves had a code in whether they're you know at home like on the computer like doing classes online or they're doing workshops girl development workshops what are some of the biggest stumbling blocks that he would win that you'd witness and then what is some advice that you have in overcoming those.

software engineers software developer ninety percent two months eightweek ten weeks
"software developer" Discussed on SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

"Yeah i met with the council of that enzyme i did a couple of sessions also read this book color is your parachute a popular book about making career changes and so i did an euwide did a really cool pod prices have gone through during a looks at work sheets from that and and essays and things like that and them i mean as i'm talking about it now the flicked the funny thing is that transitioning into being a software developer and a programme is was such that the obvious choice lake as i am as i value added some of these are the koreas that may be more in line with myself core values like him architecture or something like that it it just didn't really appeal to made but as i started to break it down and look at what is it to be a a software developer and so many of these aspects are so similar about why i love about being composer what are they on i think being so of being in this has been assigned a new agius and think that you know being in touch with kind of fundamental building blocks of them of creation and then you know assembling something from these building blocks all omission slowed down time and then that perceived in in real time so few if he's i mean like when you rugby's music you'll say writing the viola pots and you will kind of listening that new way on that but you've got to have an idea of its in the context and when it's going to be conceived as a piece of music in real time and software developments a lot like that in the you'll looking at small aspects of coyote and damn but you have to keep in mind this big a big goal.

software developer real time rugby