35 Burst results for "software developer"

Supreme Court Sides With Google in Copyright Fight With Oracle

WSJ What's News

01:10 min | 5 d ago

Supreme Court Sides With Google in Copyright Fight With Oracle

"The supreme court has sided with google a multibillion dollar copyright battle with oracle throwing out a lower court ruling. The case revolves around google's use of the popular programming language java to build its operating system oracle acquired the language in two thousand ten and alleged that google's actions amounted to an infringement of oracle's copyright by the supreme court said today that google's use of some java code fell under fair use the decade-old case is drawing attention from companies that rely heavily on copyright. Protection's here's our legal affairs reporter brent kendall with more if you're copyright owner. You're not terribly happy with today's decision. I mean even outside of software. The movie industry the music industry publishing industry. Everybody that has copyrights and depends on the strong value of their copyright supported oracle in this case because they all want rules they give copyright is a value as possible and the other side all the people that want do build on programs other software developers. I mean even microsoft Internet companies that create apps and platforms. That are interoperable and and build off other programs. They all supported google in this case so there are going to be a lot happier with the outcome today.

Oracle Google Supreme Court Brent Kendall Microsoft
Hospital price disclosure is the law not happening

Clark Howard Show

02:20 min | Last week

Hospital price disclosure is the law not happening

"Today's episode i wanna talk about hospital pricing. You know this is an area that is the probably the biggest problem in healthcare costs hospitals have conspired to prevent people to comparison shop. And if you look at where. the cost. medical care has skyrocketed in the last twenty years. It's all on the hospitals doctors not at all nurses not at all pharmaceuticals well. They're somewhat a problem but the whole ballgame has been the hospitals and the hospitals have fought every possible. Way doing what they're supposed to do which is give you the ability to comparison shop. They are required by law to allow you to know the price of a procedure based on your individual health care coverage you have insurance or what. It costs if you don't but do you know. An investigation exclusive investigation by the wall. Street journal found that hospitals are using code. Software developers have come up with to hide their pricing. So they're complying with the letter of the law. The pricing is there on the hospital websites but then they use coding to hide the prices. So when you go to comparison shop you can't this is disgusting. People have been fighting about obamacare since. What two thousand nine. twenty ten. Whatever and before obamacare during obamacare. Whatever comes after obamacare. The problem is not how we ensure people. The problem is all on the cost side. And it's all with these hospitals. They conspire against the best interests of our country.

Street Journal
Fortnite for beginners

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

08:29 min | 2 weeks ago

Fortnite for beginners

"Fortnight is a massive multiplayer online video. Game developed by epic games released in two thousand seventeen is available in three distinct game mode versions so they otherwise share the same general game. Play in game engine But these three distinct versions are fortnight. Colon save the world. Okay fortnight no colon battle royale fortnite battle royale and fortnight creative. Oh there's three of them. So the objectives vary depending on which mode you're playing but the broad goal of fortnight is to survive against a prolonged force antagonist who will attempt to eliminate you okay so for night begin from an internal game jamat epoch game so there in american video game and software developer and publisher based out of north carolina So they did this internal game jam around twenty eleven after they published the game gears of war so a game jam which i only recently learned at work a game. Jam is a contest where participants try to a video game from scratch with a specific deadline. So it's usually like twenty four hours or you know maybe maybe seventy two hours to work to come up with this so it's kind of like a like a creativity burst. I'll shut the the bowl of that is to work with other people and create a game from scratch so depending on the format again your participants might be in teams maybe you are working independently. Who knows but epic games is also the developer of the unreal engine which is an open source in advanced real time. Three d creation tool. And you'll hear a lot of Video games and special effects and even like some film stuff runs off of this unreal engine. So the unreal engine. Original purpose was as a state of the art game engine. But it's now used across industries so it's for cutting edge content interactive experiences in immersive virtual worlds Unreal engine is a real time engine. An editor that features photo realistic rendering dynamic physics and effects robust data translation and also lifelike animation. So it's kind of a big thing whenever somebody is using the unreal engine. You know you're going to get really could effects from it so that that's all out of epic games which which founded in the savage that engine so for me was not initially one of the games that was actually developed during that game jim but the concept of merging the construction game genre so games like sim city or minecraft with shooter games came together and it led to the foundation affording. So you probably know. It sim city is if you're our age but a refresher on minecraft so in minecraft which was first released in two thousand nine actually players. Explorer blackie procedurally generated three d world with infinite terrain and they may discover an extract raw materials craft tools and items and build structures or works so game modes in minecraft include a survival mode in which players must acquire resources to build the world and maintain health and creative mode where players have unlimited resources. So players can modify or maud game to create new gameplay mechanics items and assets and minecraft has a very distinctive like visual s. That like you can recognize if somebody showing you a screenshot of minecraft. So what epic did is they prepared to release fortnight as a paid early access title in july twenty seventeen and they had plans to release it as free to play some time in twenty nine thousand nine after gaining feedback from players to improve the game so originally titled fortnight and lear renamed to fortnight colon. Save the world. This original base module is a player versus environment cooperative game. So you have four players collaborating toward a common objective on various missions. The game is set after a fluke. Storm appears across earth causing about ninety eight percent of the population to disappear and the survivors are attacked by zombie. Like husks so the player takes the role of commanders of home. Shelters collecting resources saving survivors and defending equipment. That helps to either collect date on the storm or push back the storm. In from missions players are awarded a number of in game items including hero characters. Weapons trap schematics and survivors all of which can be leveled up through gained experience to improve their attributes. Also you're working together with people against this common enemy player versus environment cooperative game. In around the same time the epic released fortnight into early access pub g had become a worldwide phenomenon selling millions of copies and drawing strong interest in the battle royale genre so a battle royale game is an online multiplayer video game that blends the survival exploration and scavenging elements of a survival game with kind of the last man standing game. Play so the name. The genre is taken from two thousand japanese film titled battle royale which was based on a novel of the same name and presents a similar theme of a last man standing competition in a shrinking play zone. So you've heard people. My brother plays this one. You've heard people's mentioned before what the heck is pub- g it's an abbreviation for player unknowns battlegrounds so that's an online multiplayer battle royale game and in this game one hundred players parachute onto an island and scavenge for weapons and equipment to kill others while avoiding getting killed themselves So there's an available safe area. The games map which decreases in size over time and it ends directing surviving players into tighter areas to force encounters with other players. And the last player or team standing wins the round The game's concept and design was led by brendan green. Who's better known by his online handle player known and he'd previously created mods for other battle rail type games pudgy was the top selling premium game of two thousand seventeen selling thirty million copies worldwide and grossing. About nine hundred million dollars. I have can. I tell you never heard of this game in my whole life. You know you are. You aren't really doing a lot of player games. How it's absolutely right. You know what i. It's funny i feel like there's been a couple of questions and learn a league in maybe the last five seasons or so that like the answer will be some video game or something that we that when we see the answer. We've never heard of this popular selling thing in all of the world and it sold got julian copies and everybody except you plays it. What's the so this is why we're absolutely. Yeah so you know. Epochs saw what pudgy had been doing and they were like maybe we could also do a battery. Yeah so what. Epic did was rapidly develop their own version atop their original fortnight in about two months so by september two thousand seventeen at was about to release this as a second mode from save the world in the paid for earlier access but then later decided to release this as a free game that would be supported with microtransactions. Microtransactions are the business model where users can purchase virtual goods with micro payments and make your transactions are often used in free to play games to provide a revenue source for the developers and there are a staple of the mobile app market so in game currency in fort night is called v books to them. You might see this icon happens sometimes. The you see llamas pop up and fortnight okay. So llamas also known as lama pinatas are the main loop boxes in fortnight and they are also fortnight's primary mascot so the vendor tech store is where players can purchase lama pinatas to break open for rewards in llamas can be produced using view bucks or event specific currency and they contain various helpful. Items like heroes schematics. Weapons and there are also different types of llamas in the game including basic llamas daily llamas and event llamas so For an has a very distinctive aesthetic. It's very cartoony. there's a very distinct color palette. I mean it's it's actually pretty visually pleasing see this distinctive looking lama. You know that that is for

Colon North Carolina Brendan Green Lear JIM Lama Pinatas Julian Llamas Fort Lama
One Year Later: Indicators On The Pandemic Economy

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:41 min | Last month

One Year Later: Indicators On The Pandemic Economy

"One of the clearest lessons that we've learned about the pandemic economy is that there are huge gaps between the experiences of different groups of people and he is specific gap that we have been focusing on people who had low wage jobs before the pandemic have been much much more likely to lose their jobs. Then people with high wage jobs the data on this come from a new study by the new york fan and it is quite stark. Yeah by the end of last year there were actually more jobs for people who make high wages than there were before the pandemic this is people who make typically more than about eighty five thousand dollars a year so these include jobs like software developers engineers lawyers corporate executives and these jobs have completely returned not too many of them were ever even lost in the first place even in those terrible months right after the pandemic started now compare that to people who work jobs that typically pay less than thirty thousand dollars a year. Those jobs include things like food servers cashiers home health aides childcare workers and there were still fourteen percent fewer of those jobs at the end of last year that is a staggering gap. We haven't seen anything like this gap between highway jobs and low wage jobs in any of the recessions going back at least three decades and the gap exists now for a kind of obvious reason the unique nature of the pandemic recession. Yes a lot of these. low wage. Jobs are in restaurants bars hotels jobs acquiring a lot of direct human interaction and so a lot of these places had to close or their customers just stopped spending money on them and there is a reason that we're focusing so much on this disparity between low wage and high wage workers it feeds into the other disparities in the economy. A lot of those lower wage jobs are disproportionately done by young workers by workers without college degrees and by black and hispanic workers. And that's a big part of the reason. Why each of these groups also suffered a disproportionate share of the jobs. Lost our second group of indicators is about the economic policy lessons we've learned in the pandemic and here's the i almost impossible to believe indicator as terrible as the economy has been for the past year. There is almost no difference between the sheriff people who are in poverty now versus before the pandemic not only that but this year. The number of people in poverty is expected to fall by more than a third. So that by the end of twenty twenty one there will be more than thirteen million fewer people in poverty than there are right now. The main reason why the. Us government has now passed. Three huge aid and stimulus bill since the start of the pandemic to support the economy and the third bill. Which is president. Joe biden's american rescue plan was just passed by congress yesterday so of course the effects have not yet kicked in but we do know what was in that bill and most importantly we know what it has in common with the to bill signed by president. Donald trump last year which passed with bipartisan support in congress specifically when you look at the money that's being spent by the bills combined by far the biggest chunk of it is the cash that's being sent directly to individuals and families mainly in the form of stimulus checks and unemployment benefits for people who have lost their jobs and the combined scale of the bills is enormous about five trillion dollars in aid for the economy. That is at least three times as much the stimulus money. The government spent to fight the great recession of two thousand eight two thousand nine and just an offer a sense of how much extra money is reaching families because of these bills. Here's what a washington post analysis found. Take a family of four people two parents and two young kids and they live say in massachusetts now soon that one of the two parents lost their job at the beginning of the pandemic and still has not found work. That family in total will end up receiving more than fifty thousand dollars in support from the government that it would not have received without these three bills and the government is paying for all three of these bills by simply borrowing more money and for the most part politicians from both parties. Haven't really made a deal about this. And these are some big changes from how the government has responded to previous recessions like take the great recession of two thousand and eight. When there were extremely loud worries from politicians on both sides about the government barring lots of money to fight the downturn and also a much smaller share of the money back then was used for directly sending cash to people more of the money then we spent on other things like aid to state and local governments infrastructure projects and other investments. Yeah back then. The government was also still more reliant on the federal reserve to respond to recessions but the fed can't directly. Send money to people that they do not have to pay back. It can boost the economy by lending money to financial institutions and certain businesses it can also lower interest rates to convince people and businesses to borrow more money and by the way the fed was still a big part of responding to the covid recession but the us government by using its unique power to send cash directly to people cash. That they don't have to pay back was willing to accept a much bigger role this time. Does this mean that as the economy reopened this year it will bounce back way faster than it did after the two thousand eight recession when the recovery was sluggish until years. We'll find out. Most economists expect it will. They are forecasting that this year the us economy will grow at its fastest pace since nineteen eighty three. And if they're right than the. Us government operating under two different presidents from opposing parties. May well have established a new way to respond to the terrible recessions of the future.

Congress Joe Biden New York Donald Trump Government Jobs FED Washington Post Massachusetts United States Us Government
Filling the archives with stories from Black Silicon Valley

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:02 min | Last month

Filling the archives with stories from Black Silicon Valley

"We talked last week about how the stories of lack inventors were literally left out of the history books. Documenting the early internet now. A story about preserving that history in late twenty nineteen archivists from stanford university met in fremont california with over a dozen black engineers and entrepreneurs who had been working in the tech industry for decades. One of them was. Danny allan also been first engineering. Professors say some people in this class. That don't belong five of us thirty so actually wound up hating engineering. While to become an engineer. Alan worked as an engineer for bank of america and the electric power research institute in palo alto. He's now the vice president of global diversity and inclusion at sap labs stanford was interviewing allan and others for a new archive dedicated to the history of black people. Working in silicon valley henry low would helped build stanford silicon valley archive as a curator at the university. And he had realize that the stories of allen and others at that meeting were missing from the university's records to realize that there are substantial communities successful people who've not been fully represented. The archive is a. You know a bit of a shock. It's kind of sad disappointing. That that were at this position. But you very grateful to be be in a situation where i can try to respond to it though it had been inspired by kathy cotton. A longtime silicon valley recruiter turned archivist. She saw that. No one was telling the stories of the many black engineers and software developers. She knew were important to. The tech. industry's success. So

Danny Allan Sap Labs Stanford Silicon Valley Henry Stanford Silicon Valley Archiv Stanford University Fremont Electric Power Research Instit Bank Of America Palo Alto California Alan Allan Allen Kathy Cotton Silicon Valley
Dissecting Webflow With Digital Marketing Specialist Lachlan Kirkwood

The Fractal Marketing Podcast - with Gerard Doyle

08:53 min | 2 months ago

Dissecting Webflow With Digital Marketing Specialist Lachlan Kirkwood

"So this episode armed joined by kirkwood luck is a digital marketing specialists based knee may in brisbane and much like may as background working across tech startups and digital agencies. He's responsible for utilizing the latest digital marketing strategies to enhance conversion outcomes. Luck also runs. Click truro platform to help digital marketers. Connect with jobs they love. I love the idea of that because there is much quake out there but it's not always loved doing so i love that idea lachlan. Welcome to the episode. Thank you very exotic jumping boom crite. Sorry laughlin has the company web flow. And we're gonna pull apart web flow from the outside from a market his point of view we look at what we love what we hate what we're curious about. We don't understand what we think to better and we're going to see if we can work basically web flow from the outside what marketing is doing it. Also a little bit about the that whole space about web design and non code and everything behind that and that movement so lachlan for those people playing along at high. Can you tell us a little bit about web. Fly before we dig into it. Yeah absolutely so. We're pretty ubiquitous right now in the tech industry. It's pretty much interrupting the whole no code. Move it on over the past couple of years and it really has been in the past twelve months that no codes taken. The wolves stolman essentially. What occurred is just tools that allow you to build products without having to actually see kurt itself. So it's almost like visual programming and this certainly being tools out there for years. Things like wordpress that it'd been able to do that full people but the tools a getting won't powerful these days or you can create user accounts and just like dynamic content across websites and being around for a very very long time. Actually it's been through many iterations. I think it was in two thousand and nine found. Start working on it. But the reason. I guess it's gotten so big is because the whole creator right now is booming especially throughout covert wherever almost starting to explore what it could be to build their own businesses and people without technical experience. More in pal emba build anything in the space of a couple of weeks and the other big reason is that the tackles better so you can scale things much better on no code these days much easier to design things with custody. Assess without even having to know how to write. Css and two boys strengths. That's what they specialize in the most. And the reason i chose web flows. Because i'm actually contracting for a company called bubble and they one of the other leaders in the no code base is actually one of our competitors is that i for years have worshipped his marketing strategy. I think what they're doing is absolutely fantastic. So i always take inspiration from one day doing and try to add a little fight onto it if bobble great so this space that i love when something like no code is invented because like you said it already existed my people already using. He said wordpress. Maybe they had weeks or squarespace. And you know he wasn't given a name and then marketers and advertising and branding type people were always brilliant at taking something and then it already existed to a certain degree and then creating a little definition around creating a movement was wet flow. Did you say they jumped onto the nike. Instead of position cells around that or would you think will instrumental of really pushing the whole non code movement hit by the found. That bubble actually didn't prefer or didn't like the cut because they thought it was like another blockchain kind of hardwood before using so they prefer visual program because that is descriptive. As to what it is way floor didn't coined the term. I think the community just started giving it that night because they wanted names for like who they would not software developers but there will so people who can build software so what you call them so they just started calling himself. No code is and where floor really saw about as an offer changes to kinda mold that identity within the industry and they started using that pretty commonly throughout debris raining. They'll using i know they have no code. Which is like yield conference the no code space which the first people to coin so yeah definitely been writing that way and trying to push that as much as they can now and even a problem. Now we're really starting to embrace the whole code movement and use that within content that we share. So let's let's get a little bit into that besides just heads completely around it so people who in one sense no code is in the fact that they they built a website on wakes card but actually the designer of code starts to feel to me like somebody who has an appreciation of code all the need for bespoke but doesn't actually code the base back end. Because when i look at web flood look at their interface. It's a bit more complex. It's not it's not week there is card. You can just go in there and you can adjust by the pixel you can change something from sixteen pixels. Seventeen pixels you can. Actually edit the actual definitions is not just drag and drop is that. Is that how carter defines themselves. It's it's more than just not cutting with no card. That's almost like a simple version. This is much more. It's a bit like being vegan. Not just about not eating animal products. It's about the movement of veganism. No code is basically the vegan so the coding world further point. Do they then shout about. I don't like vikings yes. Yes and yes absolutely on the avid note of myself. And the reason. I contract bob because i was using bubble for year and eventually ended up just out the founders and often producing more full them so i guess i fit quite nicely into the digital market out. My background in tech sought ups. I can read some strings of code. But i definitely can't write anything. Hdl's probably the furtherest. My knowledge goes to. But i certainly have an appreciation for it. I know how important it is and yet there is definitely staple learning cove to tools like web particularly bubble because bubble. You're actually writing logic. You just don't see the java script that you're writing it just visually for you. But it certainly does take quite a bit on the senate and the one of the reasons that i love web blow it so much and i'm happy to dive into the sun is just the amount of content created around education for even just like on boarding people to that product is phenomenal. I think that's one of the reasons why eighty so while you let's trump strains that so what i always do. My first love of marketing was seo. That's the first discipline i got gotten. So my depot position is eight sticker dominion and have a look and look at it and kind of guys. Sixty three thousand referring domains. Thirty five million back lanes but whatever that's worth but five hundred and ten thousand six hundred eighty seven organic monthly traffic. So i'm looking at. Nih risk worth one point six million dollars worth of sea traffic right so good start but to your point you know that half a million organic keywords. That comes from amazing content and that content that goes beyond sort of someone searching for no code web design till this is about understanding the pain points of a persona and giving first and then sort of building from matt can you. You've obviously looked more at the may what what do you feel like. They content strategy is for this particular persona so it wasn't a casa Previously in haas about the found is all web flow and when they initially started a business the actual personas that they created and it was two of them that they just laser focused on. That was all. They focused on building for and the main one was a an existing software. Developer knows how to write code. He knows how sorry they know. How to build custom websites or prox- but they just want a streamline that time so they might be a freelance that might have an agency and they can only just. I'd sell that time for money. And you know the time it takes to build a custom. Product is just much longer than it is to build it on web play with have existing templates or you can just drag and drop elements so that was one of the main problems that we're going to solve the thing you'll notice on that blog is suddenly post a low content around like the industry but then may educational content. Is things like a series where they actually educate those uses. All those personas on how to better themselves. So they've got like a blog series for building Agency oil building a website with good. Seo or even if you're building a costume e stole just how to build that still but how did you first customers how to build your attention with customers how to create a u x so that way you know your conversion rate increases so they really want that cost us to succeed and i think that's why we're succeed so

Lachlan Kirkwood Luck Laughlin Brisbane Kurt Nike Vikings Carter BOB Senate SUN Matt SEO
Widening the IT Talent Pool

Status Go

04:24 min | 2 months ago

Widening the IT Talent Pool

"Explored some of the issues surrounding diversity. In tech or better stated lack of diversity in tech an area we have not dug into yet is the talent pipeline and the role it plays in building diversities in our teams and our companies. This is your host jeff ton in this episode. We're going to speak with nicole crane. Nicole is the ceo of tectonic a software development company that is a certified b. corp and which has diversity as part of its core mission. Tectonic is the creator of the first software development apprenticeship recognized by the department of labor. Welcome to the show nicole. Hi jeff thanks so much for having me super exciting yes. I'm really excited to dig into this. Because when i learned of tectonic in the role you were playing as having that apprenticeship. I just couldn't wait to dig in and understand more about how that works but before we do that. I'd love to know about your journey. What brought you to tectonic. And then we'll get into what tectonic does in itself. But i'd love to start with your journey turn so i actually started my career in silicon valley in I actually work for very large cable operator back in the day but i quickly moved into the startup world and you know all things technology back in the day regardless of industry and as i progressed through my career you know certainly started facing the same challenges that most companies did in that we couldn't find good talent or we were constantly competing for the same pool. People in about four years ago. I moved to boulder colorado for an opportunity with sas company and again the same thing. We're competing with talent especially when google moved into town and then You know. I was in the market again in looking and i came across tectonic and i was like what genius idea And having lived the side of trying to find talent fast enough in qualified enough of like. Wow i now have an opportunity to go from the other end and help others. That are facing the same challenge by extending the offering that tectonic head. So i was. I was super excited. By 'cause i was like i can't believe somebody hadn't thought about this sooner. So tell me about tectonic itself first of all. What do you do Tectonic do and give me a little bit of the background on the company. How came to to have such an important role in diversity cheer so tectonic is in outsourced custom development shop so we are All onshore here in the us and then we do everything from quick projects to staff augmentation technology teams and then the more interesting piece of that is the apprenticeship program that we run to effectively develop software developers so when heather terenzi started the company. Geez about fourteen years ago it was really just a development shop and she ran into the same problem. Everybody else has which is. Where do you find. Good talent that you can bring on. And she had this notion of well. Why don't i just teach people to do the job. Hence the apprenticeship was born about four years ago for three and a half four years ago and the idea was to bring folks in give them classroom training and then migrate them into the development teams where they can have the on the job learning portion that would allow them that real world experience and then progress through says where it started and then she also they ran into some situations where clients ra like. These folks are fantastic. Can we hire them and in the notion usually in most companies is non compete non solicitation. Because you want to find good people you don't wanna lose them but in my experience if people are going to leave they're going to leave regardless of what agreement you have with your client so why not enable that journey for somebody and that's really

Jeff Ton Nicole Crane Department Of Labor Corp Nicole Silicon Valley Jeff Heather Terenzi SAS Boulder Colorado Google United States
Why Todays Career Changers with Service Skills Can Find Opportunities Working in Tech

Technologist Talk

06:06 min | 2 months ago

Why Todays Career Changers with Service Skills Can Find Opportunities Working in Tech

"What are some of the biggest tectonic shifts in the jobs landscape during those past two decades. Where are the opportunities for people now. Just starting to get into tech for twenty twenty one will over the next. Let's say ten years twenty twenty two twenty thirty. There's much faster than average growth expected for. It jobs overall in some of the greatest growth areas are still in the self development cyber security analyst spectrum girl by twenty eight percent over those ten years it support. Thirteen percent sa- last year in twenty twenty there were over eighty two thousand job postings for. It support specialists the number of job postings for it support specialist actually grew by a greater percentage when compared to software developers for example from twenty ten to twenty twenty it support. Specialist job ed's grew by one hundred twenty four percent a lot and compared to software developers. They still grew a lot to quite significantly They grew ninety eight percent ola to period but that was ninety eight percent for software developers versus hundred twenty four percent for support. Are any of those jobs. You think it'd be working from home in the newmarket is most of. It staff guam back into the office. Before i didn't even notice burning glass with track remote work at home opportunities at all in the job ads. And now i noticed they're always tracking it and we're always publicizing those type of numbers. So is that like a new phenomenon. Cova are we really tracking those numbers. Well we started looking at a few years ago and burning glaze his his at data going back to two thousand ten so we saw it trending up a little bit in prior years for example in twenty ten five percent of all. It job postings cited that either remote or work from home compared to last year in twenty twenty jumped to twenty two percent but it was already trending up like grow by one percent from twenty ten twenty seventeen two thousand eighteen eight percent of it. Job postings were remote work from home twenty nineteen there is a pretty big jump even from two thousand eighteen to twenty nineteen to fifteen percent but it was a significant drone from twenty nineteen at twenty twenty. After the pandemic i started it went from fifteen percent to twenty two percent so pretty considerable portion of it job types being worked from home or remote and from member bowls that we've run looks like the majority are considering even going forward still more employees to work remotely. I think that's fairly significant. If more than one out of every five. It jobs a rope from home right now. That's it the the ones being advertised. I should clarify that. Not just the ones in the market but also the ones being advertised that are open for people to get major changes l. Go back to how employees work and access. It wherever it may be from 'cause with that through cyber security concerns Data management in the skills that the. It employees intern need to be able to support all employees because of the effects of the pandemic last year we did see a majority of our member firms. Most of them are technology companies. They were going to continue to invest in technical training for their employees. In some of the top areas there were cybersecurity that was a top area. Sixty four percent of our own member companies. We're going to focus training efforts and cyber security cloud infrastructure and cloud locations technical. It support were the top areas. Were they can expect to see training support for employees. That's good to hear from the members especially because we do our own custom training program with amazon so they do a really good Career program for their own employees where they help pay for the tuition for them to get trained by. Come to you so that they can move from maybe the warehouse floor into. It jobs either. Four amazon or for other companies. Whichever works best for them. We always tell our graduates allowed him to be start on the help desk. You're gonna learn a lot of places where to go with intact but at that point then alive the more forward thinking employers and especially i would hope. It employers would be in that list. They'll help you get the certifications and the training you need in order to keep growing in your career. So it's good to see a lot of our own member. Companies are taking that same philosophy. Yes definitely a lot of different areas to grow into depending on your interest especially Various emerging technologies or save working for a different type of industry. You can really go after what you're interested. In business. intelligence data analysis networking there are gray salary opportunities for someone working in tech or wanting to move into a tuck position for example. The median salary for all occupations as the overall media and mrs according to the us bureau of labor statistics for twenty nineteen they Number was thirty nine thousand eight hundred and ten in so we're looking at just the tick patients. It's much greater median. Salary eighty eight thousand two hundred forty salaries range depending on location of course or companies as irs. Maybe someone's years of experience or The job role if we're looking for example at it support to decisions. The median salary for an it support specialists is fifty two thousand. Two hundred and seventy and that is thirty. One percent greater than the average for all occupations combined

Cova ED Amazon Us Bureau Of Labor Statistics IRS
Software is eating the world, and it could eat your business

BTV Simulcast

02:16 min | 2 months ago

Software is eating the world, and it could eat your business

"Its mark on this year's 50 companies to watch announced in the latest issue of Bloomberg Business Week, the year head Ah guided 2021 1 company on the list. Cloud communications platform TWILIO, having gained over $40 billion in market value since January of last year, with high profile customers like Nike Lift and the American Red Cross. Giulio, co founder and CEO Jeff Lawson is hoping to teach other businesses in Silicon Valley. How to navigate digital competition by embracing the role of software in his new book, Ask your Developer. Jeff joins us Now, Jeff, the pandemic has been a reckoning for a lot of companies. And you think Cos who could get software right? Win those who can't Will become obsolete. What do you mean? I think the pandemic made even more apparent a trend that was already happening 15 years ago, Mark Andriessen said. Software is eating the world and now here we are the companies that are able to delight their customers in digital using Phone, APS and mobile app send the Web like those of the company's when we do business with them when they do really well when they build great software that differentiates themselves in the eyes of their customers. Those of the companies that are winning the heart, the minds and the wallets of customers, and those aren't just start ups. It's every industry that is getting challenged. The power of software to upgrade itself and to build these better customer experiences and the companies who unleashed their technical talent. There's software developers. Those of the companies were actually able to do a great job of it, and it's sort of interesting. I've talked to so many business executives through the years and they always seem like it. Z magically don't really know how developers work, how they think there's this divide. They don't really know what goes on over there in the in the technical land and as a CEO myself, also software developer coming out. 1 ft in each world, and I thought I've got this unique perspective to help business executives understand what their saw software developers are doing help with how they think how they work toe ultimately build a bridge. Achieve the common goal, which is to build amazing digital products and digital experiences that delight customers that have millions or billions of customers and that ultimately make the company money because that's what everybody wants to do.

Bloomberg Business Week Giulio, Co Jeff Lawson Jeff Joins Mark Andriessen American Red Cross Silicon Valley Nike Jeff
In a pandemic, health care positions top "Best Jobs" list

Rush Limbaugh

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

In a pandemic, health care positions top "Best Jobs" list

"Report is releasing the rankings for the best jobs in America. In 2021 health care jobs ruled the 25 spot list. The number one spot is a physician assistant, not far behind. Number three, is a nurse practitioner. Number two, is a software developer with a projected 21.5% increase in jobs by 2029. Their positions on the list includes surgeons, therapist, dentists, engineers and financial advisors or managers. That is Madeleine McCormick reporting mega

America Madeleine Mccormick
AGs' Lawsuit Accuses Facebook Of Gobbling Up Competitive Threats

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:49 min | 4 months ago

AGs' Lawsuit Accuses Facebook Of Gobbling Up Competitive Threats

"Facebook crushes the competition. That's one of those cliches. We used to talk about. Big successful. Companies is facebook crushing the competition. Legally or illegally. That's something the courts will decide. The federal trade commission and attorneys general from across the country are suing facebook. They say the company eliminated competition by either buying other companies or making it impossible for them to succeed connecticut. Attorney general william. Tong is one of the forty eight eight involved in the suit. Thank you sir for being here. Good morning oil. Facebook has been a dominant company. Four years now. Why filing this lawsuit right now. you don't facebook has expensive and power and what is done without our and its market dominance is. It's it's engaged in a program of what we call by in berry where they either by their competitors or if they don't play ball and sell they crushed their competitors and what they've done is they've crushed any threat to their business and their market domination. They've eliminated choice for consumers and they beat third party app developers and software developers into submission. And your argument is that's illegal. That's not just being smart competitive business. No it's not just being smart when you're a business like facebook and you essentially dominate an entire field that means so much to people today particularly in a global pandemic in public health when we rely so much on technology to stay in touch with our friends. Our family to do business to sell products to advertise Social media's become central really in our lives and when you're the dominant market player You have an obligation not to abuse that power and what a facebook has done. It's it has abused. Its market power to keep competitors out of the marketplace and the leverage that market power to prejudice. Anybody who doesn't play by facebook's rules okay but how have users been hurt by what you're alleging. Facebook has done the ordinary people of connecticut. How are they getting hurt here. So they really don't have any choice. They because facebook not only is the dominant player in its own right through facebook but because they bought instagram Which targets a younger generation including my kids and whatsapp. Widely globally used social messaging And also a direct peer to peer messaging app. Because they've done that. You really have very limited options and so you don't have a choice on where you go to For social media number one or two by products for example on on facebook facebook marketplace. And if you're a small business in connecticut Or even a bigger business and you want advertisers sell products. You really have to use facebook or one of its companion products so you don't have any choice because of their facebook argues that there is competition and i will tell you the young people in my life that the teens the tweens. They don't care about facebook at all. They're all on tiktok. Is it possible that in five ten years facebook will be kind of irrelevant or at least not the behemoth is now and that this is just sort of panicking over something that companies become dominant for a few years and they tend to fade know. Our view is Unless we do something. That won't be the case because facebook has frankly so much money and so much market power and that's why they're buyer berry strategy so successful because they can go and pay outside prices for instagram and whatsapp and essentially stifled competition. That way so no. We think that Unless the court takes action and unless the forty eight states plus the ftc are successful. Facebook will continue to dominate. The space facebook's general counsel makes an interesting argument noting that facebook bought instagram in two thousand and twelve and bought whatsapp a few years later and federal regulators said that was fine and now basically. They're going back on what they said. What do you think about that argument. Well we certainly weren't part of that determination and we look forward over the next two years to more robust antitrust enforcement enforcement of our nations and our states antitrust laws and the states the forty eight of us have done our own investigation and now in concert with the federal trade commission have determined that facebook is acting illegally. Okay connecticut attorney general william tom. Thanks so much for your time today. We appreciate it. Thank you well.

Facebook Attorney General William Connecticut Federal Trade Commission Tong Berry Social Media Instagram Attorney General William Tom
FTC sues to break up Facebook, sell off assets like Instagram and WhatsApp

Daily Tech News Show

08:11 min | 4 months ago

FTC sues to break up Facebook, sell off assets like Instagram and WhatsApp

"Let's talk a little more about this. Big lawsuits got all right. The us federal trade commission filed a lawsuit on wednesday allegedly that facebook illegally maintains quote. It's personal social networking monopoly though Excuse me through a years long course of competitive conduct. That's a direct quote. Evidence was gathered in cooperation with the attorneys general of forty six states. The district of columbia and guam specifically called out as anticompetitive practices or as those practices are the acquisition of instagram and whatsapp an api restrictions on software developers Ftc is asking the court to order facebook to sell off. What's app and instagram. Cheese prohibit anti-competitive conditions envelope burs and require notice and prior approval of future mergers and acquisitions similar lawsuit was filed by new york attorney. General lati- let Excuse me latifah james. I believe i said joined by the same states and territories. That is a hardcore lawsuit. Tom merritt gigantic. Yes it is i. Let's just say up front. The chances of them actually getting a court even if this went all the way to the supreme court to agree to make facebook divest itself of instagram. And what's up very low not impossible but it's low so you know. Don't don't get too excited if you if you want instagram and whatsapp to be spun out. It's doubtful that will happen What they'll probably is some kind of reparations. Kind of fine. Maybe a change in business practices. I imagine they could have a good chance of getting facebook to have to agree to the notice and approval of future mergers and acquisitions. That part does seem likely but it will be interesting to follow this case and see where it goes because it was. It's a long shot to get this and so a lot of people weren't sure if the ftc would even bring this kind of charge that they might go after a smaller remedy but they're basically accusing facebook of buying instagram to neutralize a direct threat in instagram and make it more difficult for other social networks to compete. Kind of the same thing with what's up. They they wanted to neutralize. Whatsapp is a threat to facebook and make it harder for other messaging apps to get in there that was gonna be real hard to to prove though because we have a lot of competitive messaging apps out there so it doesn't seem like they've really suppressed the the market for that and then the the i think where i think you have the most fertile ground to get a court to agree which is the restrictions they put on third party developers on on what they can and can't do not only on facebook but if they use the api for example. The ftc uses this in their press. Release in two thousand thirteen twitter launched vine which let users shooting share short video segments and in response facebook shutdown the api that would have allowed vine to access friends through facebook. That is an anticompetitive practice whether they're abusing their monopoly to do it or not. We'll be the question. The court will decide the big story and the kind of happen mid day today. We were all sort of scrambling around like okay. This this is actually a big story. You know a lot of people are like this is a really big deal because look the. Us is going to dismantle facebook. Instagram and whatsapp arguably being. You know the you know the the prized possessions facebook. Besides its own news feed itself and like you said tom. It's highly unlikely that that's going to happen. Is going to be tied up in court for another few years probably But does it set a standard for how facebook and any company that would dare to get his anywhere as big as facebook in the future to not be able to gobble up. you know. i don't know. What did they pay one billion for instagram back in the day when thirteen people working at instagram. Kind of thing because instagram was big and facebook has a history of replicating kinda cool trendy stuff that that works. I mean look at real on instagram right. Now it's tiktok competitors you know it's all it's all kind of the same thing just to see what sticks and has had a oftentimes not a lot of success. Buying the company works for facebook a lot better than trying to replicate some sort of cool feature that then people have to learn to use now. You could argue. That is why the big weather big targets on this because what's app and instagram are notably gigantic runaway successes than. They were already heading that way when they were acquired. And you could also argue that. Got him at a bargain basement price. But maybe that's why they're being targeted decide with facebook. And i'm not really doing that. But for devil. Devil's advocate reasons. I would say yeah. This is a huge target. They have billions of users on their main service and then these secondary products are huge for them and they would be standalone gigantic companies on their own. That we would talk about individually if there weren't already owned by them so it makes sense that they're the target but the idea of buying up your competition to limit their impact on your business and grow it out. Separately isn't new and they're not the only ones doing this but maybe they're doing it. The most successfully and the question isn't just as a monopoly. It's not enough to save face because of anomaly you have to say it is a monopoly and it abused its position as a monopoly to reduce competition. Sometimes of an -opoly is perfectly legal. It's not illegal in the united states and most countries to be a monopoly. It's usually illegal to cause harm because you are a monopoly. And that's where. I think they're gonna have a problem showing harm yes. There isn't another few. No flicker is not doing well. And when they bought instagram that sort of dominated the image market. But to your point. Sarah the reason they keep adding stories and then reels is instagram is trying to fend off competition from snapchat and tick tick tock so there is competition. There is competition pushing instagram to change. And i think facebook can demonstrate that. Yeah maybe maybe zuckerberg said something unwise in an email once but there is competition out there. Same what's up there's telegram and signal and we chat and and how many other messaging services out there so i think it's hard to show that they are reducing competition in the marketplaces for those two. That's why i'm less bullish on the idea of them winning over a court to make them get rid of them on the other hand the developers stuff like they essentially killed vine. And i think they're they might have a better chance of getting facebook on that one do you do you think the Slack is worth twenty. Seven instagram's just to put it in numbers slack. Yes this lack. Twenty seven billion dollars as opposed to a billion. That's what i'm saying. Everything's billions and billions of dollars now. Yeah five star wars. Anyway i would love for there to be some sort of okay. Let's say we go forward and maybe facebook is find which is likely And is it sort of said going forward. He can't just gobble up companies that That you deem as a future competitor mall and then make it your own and then you reap the reward. So what what do we get to is if you have this x. amount of users you can't buy a company that has x. amount of users that is on the up and up or it has to be for not too much of a certain price so that the company doesn't willingly to you there so many factors in play i i i do wonder how this goes. There are laws. These laws will be tested in court. Now which is you can't buy a thing when the only reason you're buying it is to put the competitor out of business. It you there has to be a valid business reason for buying it and i think facebook can show that i you know. I look back at the microsoft case where they wanted to break up microsoft. They never broke up microsoft. They just put in some remedies. And i think yeah. That's courts are very reluctant to break up a company. You have to really show that it caused harm. And i just don't see it there

Facebook Instagram Us Federal Trade Commission Whatsapp General Lati Latifah James Tom Merritt FTC Guam Columbia Supreme Court New York Twitter United States TOM Devil Zuckerberg Sarah
Apple Slashes App Store Fees for Smaller Developers

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

00:17 sec | 5 months ago

Apple Slashes App Store Fees for Smaller Developers

"Apple announced today that as of January 1st, it will cut its APP store commission rate to 15% for software developers with less than $1 million in annual net sales on its platform, down from the current 30% new developers who haven't published on the APP store before we'll also qualified for that lower commission fee.

Apple App Store
Walmart's Commitment to Hiring Veterans

Work In Progress

02:56 min | 5 months ago

Walmart's Commitment to Hiring Veterans

"The right skills obviously is one of the core values that you have there. And the company is a foundational member of a new vet tech employer consortium. That's going to be helping. Provide training for high tech skills for careers in technology for veterans. Tell me about that program. How did it come about in. Who can access it. Well all answer it by by stepping back just a little bit and talking about things from a workforce development and labour market could perspective and even before that when walmart entered into lower the last five years we entered into this period where we really needed to integrate bland. The worlds of in store experience and an online experience for customers and through those efforts in kobe really highlighted the need and importance of us to be able to provide this omni channel or omni experienced for people. That's just a seamless. Shopping experience between the online and the in person domains. And what that has entailed is that we have any number of roles as part of this this leap into digital in leaning into digital where we have product developers and project managers and user experience individuals data scientists obviously the software developers and engineers in the cybersecurity information security individuals and it creates created. This huge demand going back to that workforce prominent so we needed to figure out how we considered our demand. What was the supply opportunities that were out there in. How do we build an opportunity to connect the two and this tech program that was established by the veterans administration or funded by the veterans administration and in partners with the us chamber of commerce accenture and others. We recognize the importance of it right away and so what it does is it helps take military service members. It gives them certain skills like cloud architecture or any number of other areas and with through those skills makes them exactly what we're looking for and we can bring people in who have those foundational skills and then continued to develop them into the people that were looking to grow over time. So we're super excited about that program itself that just one example within the employment heller that we're very interested in it. Aligned with our workforce demand and lets us tap into the veteran talent pipeline in a way that is that skill bridging activity in puts all that together in a really interesting and fun public private partnership example a model that we hope to see happen. Not just in the technologies but other areas over time how veteran access program through the va. It's just a simple google to the vet tech program. B. e. t. t. e. c. And the us chamber of commerce or the veterans administration. You can follow the path to that father clicks to that and check it out and we hope to see you through the program. How important is for a company

Veterans Administration Us Chamber Of Commerce Accentu Walmart Kobe Us Chamber Of Commerce Google
Software developer from Issaquah, SE of Seattle, pleads guilty to COVID-19 fraud scheme

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:48 sec | 5 months ago

Software developer from Issaquah, SE of Seattle, pleads guilty to COVID-19 fraud scheme

"Guilty coronavirus plea related study out to Now that pandemic. these Here's are your world headlines almost Ryan from Calvert, ABC PAOK's News saying levels has of now protective admitted antibodies he filled and out people four full, different quite applications Rapidly to after get being his infected hands on with some Corona of that federal virus, paycheck According protection to new research. money from earlier The team this year. at Imperial College The total London of his applications. in England found that immunity Nearly $1.6 appear to be fading and million. there is a risk of catching You'd only received the virus five multiple grand times. of that money before the Feds Protests figured have erupted it out. across Italy Theistic over Wall new Man restrictions has pleaded in place guilty to to try one and prevent count of the wire feather fraud rising infections. in federal court. Yet There this was certainly violence isn't between the on police ly fraud and protesters being committed in the northern in the cities name of of Kobe. Milan and Turin The Federal Trade and Commission thousands is gathered out with in a warning Naples. that scammers air targeting At least Facebook, seven people have Twitter, been killed instagram and more than 50, and injured by other a social bomb attack media on a school users in the city offering of Peshawar. to help you claim In Pakistan, a missing stimulus officials payment. say the deadly young young The FTC men men is and and now hoping dozens dozens of of others others when were were you see injured, injured, one including including of these scams four four Children Children Report under under the the it age age to the of of agency's 13. 13. new website And And report. the the bulldozing bulldozing Fraud dot of of a a sacred sacred FTC aboriginal aboriginal tree tree dot gov to to clear clear land land for for

Fraud FTC Calvert Abc Paok Imperial College London Kobe Facebook Ryan Milan Twitter England Italy Pakistan Turin Instagram Naples. Peshawar.
S13E31  - burst 3 - expand 1

Ubuntu Podcast

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

S13E31 - burst 3 - expand 1

"Each other operating system that we can you know, bring over to Linux and show, you know is possible for you to have one code base and very easily have native looking applications on on all of the platforms. So, yeah sure software developer in your interest in creating applications and you know C sharp apps through mono then yeah have a look at you know platform. Great Martin. What have you been to been doing this week? Well, they've been taking a look at the Microsoft edge browser on Linux and I was inspired to do the same. So I have also installed my Chrome. Stage on my new computer is it really really fast? Yes. Unfortunately, I can't tell you how well it performs to the other browsers cuz just everything

Great Martin Microsoft
The Journey from Startup to Sold Again

Duct Tape Marketing

06:58 min | 6 months ago

The Journey from Startup to Sold Again

"Hello and welcome to another episode of the duct tape marketing podcast. This is John My. Guest today is John Hall he is the former founder of great dot US online review tool and current founder and CEO of a company called Switch Bird, which connects your business phone and website to engage voice callers and website visitors via. Text. So we're GONNA talk a little bit about the idea of marketing and using text messaging but I. Welcome the show John. Thanks John could be here. So let's let's do talk about I have a lot of entrepreneurs on here in you know a lot of people who start businesses it's their dream to build something up. And sell it. Seems like there's kind of three schools of thought I. Want to went real fast, sell it make much money. It's kind of this own ability to a certain place and then let somebody else you know take it from there and then there's people that you know basically create a job in. After they're. Too, old to work anymore, the business goes away so. I, think you I. I'm GonNa. Suggest you fit in the second category I mean Grey Dot. US was a labor of love though that you built to a certain point. But I'll let you tell me kind of what you're joining was to to actually selling it and what what, what decision process you went through and just kind of maybe gives sold backroom. Sure sure. Yeah and I I think I did end up in that in that second category not necessarily by design greatest was actually that second company I sold. So the first one was called healthcare dot com and it was a you know a SAS that was providing turnkey websites for wellness practices and medical practices and Dab never really got that one off the ground and you know sort of sold out and kind of an Acura higher deal and then. Later started great us which was really more of a growth company because we happen to catch a tiger by its tail with the reviews and reputation thing. And You know from a a bootstrap start with no funding or anything like that we're able to. Grow into a pretty serious player in space over over the course of I guess was starting in two, thousand, thirteen you know. We were acquired in two thousand eighteen. So. You know. In that big picture I kind of look like you know like a serial entrepreneur. But that is. Not necessarily something something I aspired to be an in fact you know. Talking about what I'm doing now, like I view, it really in that third category is like a a lifestyle business right and that's that's a term that's used as like a pejorative term in Silicon Valley but I, you know I think I'm I'm I'm great enough now that that I i WanNa just you know kind of work with customers like do work that I like and do that every day not as thoroughly. Bill Growth Company but you know with with great us we we just got to a point. where I just you know I thought we'd be better served by. By taking on private equity investors and and really you know I. Both our employees, our customers would be would be better served by that outcome I think they were. Did you feel especially at a growth company when people call the growth in the application is you grew professed did you feel like? was there a moment when you said to yourself kind of over my head here? Yes there were many many moments. But Yeah I mean you know I am at heart a software developer right like I like I like tinkering I think I think it's a quality I share with you. Actually I'm an introvert. I. Like you know kind of hunkering down and building things And Yeah So. When All these employees and customers wanted stuff, right? Exactly, it was a nightmare. So so so yeah I definitely. Felt over my head and then. You know with all the competition in the space. Right. The competition was very well funded. We were going up against you know entities that it raised know double-digit millions of dollars and venture capital to go after the same market that we were. We were going after and so you know. I I didn't want us to kind of die off. Obscurity. Should so what did the courting process look like? Did you go out and start having conversations to people start knocking on your door because they wanted to kind of roll up all of the competition into one service? in. In. Our case. People were knocking at our door and the the outfit that that ultimately acquired us Alpine investors are separate called software group. Really. Didn't didn't have a plan for you know kind of going into the industry of marketing technology and but they they They found us through like a third party broker ghitis reached out as interested in the space. And you know at at the time, you know we just started talking just to see what the process would look like. You know we we had had some some other inbound interests that was a little more. You know more aggressive. These guys were just like you know nice people. who had kind of you know interested in space but you know sort of at an arm's length and so yeah, we started talking started kind of educating them about about the space and about art our business model and. You know the the the deal process went went very smoothly because we all kind of saw a common a common goal which was. To. Keep the company as is but but grow it invest in invest in the technology invest in the team and and what ended up happening is You know we became essentially what they call a platform company for. For going into marketing technology and so from there after the great US acquisition, we acquired three direct competitors. Reputation reputation loop and gather up, and then some other a complimentary marketing technology products and company is and kind of roll them together into waiting is a really formidable your marketing technology suite, and it's really it's focused on your agencies and consultants right so that was that was the marketplace that we found. That was the market that we found and that's that's kind of the the market that the company continues to to cater to today.

United States Founder And Ceo John My Bill Growth Company John John Hall Acura Founder Software Developer
House Lawmakers Condemn Big Tech’s ‘Monopoly Power’ and Urge Their Breakups

CNBC's Fast Money

01:23 min | 6 months ago

House Lawmakers Condemn Big Tech’s ‘Monopoly Power’ and Urge Their Breakups

"House releasing its antitrust probe into big tech Kayla. TASHA's not the detailed. Kayla. Was the House subcommittee on antitrust released. Its long awaited report into Amazon, apple facebook and Google. After sixteen months of investigation, it finds that each company wields a unique type of monopoly power over third party sellers over software developers over social networking competitors, and the advertising market now counsels for the subcommittee said e mails the obtained from executives describing some of these practices were white hot documents that prove their case and. They said that it wasn't just customers that were outraged over some of this behavior, but it was is also who are operating on some of these platforms, calling it a civil war, the Democrats recommend structural separations, breakups, prohibitions on big mergers and running adjacent businesses and regulations that limit some of this data collection but it would take an act of Congress to implement any of this they acknowledge and bipartisan support to. Get. Both Chambers on board CNBC reach out to all of the companies named in this report for comment Amazon. So far is the only one who has posted any sort of response to this four hundred and fifty page report. An Amazon says an blog posts at the subcommittees conclusions based on fallacies and that the presumption that success can only be the result of anti-competitive behaviour is simply wrong. Melissa Kayla. Thank you. Kayla Tau she

Melissa Kayla Amazon Kayla Tau Tasha Congress Cnbc Facebook Chambers Google Apple
"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 9 months ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry <hes> now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical <hes> I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. <hes> married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses <unk> time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started <hes> because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there <hes> we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting <hes> so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons <hes> you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to <hes> get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical <unk>, Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that <unk> I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And <hes>. There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know <hes>. But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me <hes> so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. <hes> kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and <hes> like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the <unk> thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually <hes> so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that <hes> or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really <hes>. Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. <unk> producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo <hes> albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person <hes>, but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter <hes> asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because <hes> east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency <hes> the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey <hes> his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. <hes> I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months <hes> and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end <hes> no on the back end and <hes> some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects <hes> there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same <unk> employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company <hes> the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey <hes>. I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. <unk> should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and <hes>. It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. <hes> fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and <hes>. We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of <hes> something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that <hes> you've got furloughed related offer a <unk>. Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely <hes> so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers <unk> people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. <hes>. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members <hes> so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes <unk> dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your <hes> you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. <hes> I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software <hes>, I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose <hes> regardless of the industry but <hes>. Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good <hes> a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me <hes>. To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines <unk> Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas <hes> in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that <hes>, but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company <hes> and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people <hes> another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation <hes>. You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or <unk> star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. <hes> also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people <hes> to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately <unk> successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Credit Union lead developer Korb software developer senior engineer
"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

06:02 min | 9 months ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"The most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably.

Credit Union lead developer Korb software developer senior engineer
"software developer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"software developer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"That was it. Yeah you know We were talking about Grammar Lee Richard. You were talking about it and um I think of all the technologies that have replaced just you know educational aspects that we've learned as we came up through school. All in all of this. You know grammar is one of them spell check before that but how it translates into code you know with Statement completion Russian. And all of that all we have all these technologies that we lean on that make us more productive but yet if you get an email from somebody and and it's grammatically incorrect and you know things are on all caps or they're not capitalized correctly. You know you you do have that. Does give view an opinion of them. Yes like this person didn't take the time to care carefully Present what it is that they're trying to say in a in a manner that reflects well on them. Yeah same as you know people who don't use correct grammar in real life but at at a certain point what what happens happens when you know the the people who know better are gone and you know the the younger generation that has come up with tax sting and all of that stuff language is like a totally different thing for them like they don't really care about spelling because spell checker. Will you know so they don't. I'm making yeah abroad generalization These are things I've noticed in my kids for example like they're less focused on that stuff that we took a lot of care in learning because they can be more productive if they let the technology do some of that for them yeah. I just don't know if they're communicating is wells. The can right. They never times. I get that line you you know what I mean. I don't know do there's a bunch of letters here..

Lee Richard
"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Is definitely a must you need to be able to deal with some basic math skills, but beyond that everything is really learned on learn on the job, and you know, in the logic is improved through coding, I would say if there is a skill that matches programming. It would it would it would actually be writing. If you're if you enjoy writing stories, and and reading stories, that's we we're doing as software developer recreating things were were really writing a lot of writing. That's what it is interesting never heard anyone on make that comparison before. But that makes a lot of sense one thing that I found after interviewing a bunch of folks for the show is that it seems like a lot of people with musical backgrounds will later get into programming. Now, I guess that may be also because there's not a lot job opportunity for them. Like in the music industry. They want higher earning potential on all of that. I'm not musical myself. But just from the little bit that I know about reading and writing music, it always made sense to me that if felt like those things could kind of be connected, you know. The right hemisphere of your brain that's involved with music. I'm actually believe it or not I I like to sing during my free time. So there's a little bit of musician in me. But I think people that you know, that have a music degree there. They can think more creatively that can help offer development, Charlotte. Folks, listening are happy to hear that like how trae tippety is really strong factor in software development, because I think a lot of times we just think about it like, oh, it's really analytical, and it's not super creative. But it's nice to hear otherwise. So I wanted to talk a bit about your program in your courses. You're company called job ready. Programmer, I know you talked about this already. But with love if you could elaborate a bit on what the job ready means that sure so have critter YouTube video on this where I present to people about the two in my opinion, the fastest. Way to become a software developer and one of them is to go into the software development back end side of things like learn a programming language. The other one is becoming a database developer, and these are the two pats. Now, there are other various paths and software development. It's it's a growing field. So you can get into, you know, data science machine learning, and those are obviously more advanced concepts. But I would say that the the reason why have job ready programming as my website is because that's exactly what I'm trying to help students. Do is break into software devolvement by by learning the must know skills. Some of the courses, for example, the Java course, that's a primary course that's going to help someone learn programming. And the other one is on the data side of things I've got a database course, I've actually got multiple database courses, multiple Java courses, and then the third requirement is being. To pass an interview and sometimes interviewers asked while not sometimes a lot of times, they're going to ask data structures and algorithms questions, and those if you haven't gone to college for a computer science degree, you probably didn't get an opportunity to cover that. And so I include that in my curriculum because it it could take time to learn data structures algorithms in that something that is not, you know, it's it's not going to be your day-to-day training. If you're for example, learning to help of mobile app or a website or something like that you kind of actually have to take away time from those creative endeavors, and and actually learn some some hardcore computer science concepts I included that in the curriculum. So this curriculum overall is designed to sort of prepare someone to be a job ready by the time. They're they're they're they're done in what I love about. E o our website. And where he displays information is you have like these two pats data analyst in software development. And then you highlight the courses in like what you get with each in the value that they have for each path..

software developer trae tippety YouTube pats Charlotte developer Programmer analyst
"software developer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Way we're going to dive into that. And into some of his thoughts here in today's podcast. So they it's a pleasure to have you on today yet. Glad to be here. Thanks for having. Absolutely. So did I miss anything in your intro that you wanna tech talk to the listeners about Noah believe that was good other than eighteen years in healthcare on T of sixteen years electrical Hilter company in on discontinuing Bill solve problems for promoters efficiency in doing their clinical, documentation Lovett brother that, you know, anybody with that amount of time in health IT definitely has the some insight. So I'm excited to dive into those things. But what what is it that got you into the healthcare sector to begin with your will? I guess I got a little luckily Lookie in coming out of college. There was a an electronic health record company that was just starting up in the year two. Thousand so I was able to get an internship. They're riding software as a software developer and just continued to grow within that. And was able to learn about the mini IT or technology challenges in healthcare IT today. And then from there just to continue to absorb that, you know, healthcare as always going to be a need for people and technology could help improve that for sure end. So without a doubt. I think the focus of today is the focus of today is going to be trying to health records in in. You know, the the pain the beauty and the things that we need to improve their. I love the to hear from you. As it relates to that Damon. What what should the focus be for every healthcare leader is a relates to electric medical records? Yeah. I think of from when they when we started building in electrical help. In the early two thousands. You know, it was a really good plan to electron something that was previously a paper big offices of storing paper records in we did a really good job of electronic filing in all that clip documentation. However, all we did was take the paper records in stick it into computer somewhere. We didn't really make it smarter. For a lot of the users using that data, including physicians who are are went to school to take care of patients. So I guess you could say I was a part of building the current problem that we have because today you'll find many positions who are getting burned out having to now use electrical health record. Because some there needs to be intuitive nece added to how they use it because physicians with school to treat patients. They didn't. -sarily go to school to inner date into a system. And that's what we created with building the electric health record. So you know, what are the paint points with physician burnout cross? You know, the entire industry is really the focus of what we're doing here astronaut hills while I think it's a it's a fascinating work in sort of how everything involved right in started from a solution than became a problem. The Genesis being we didn't really make it smarter. We just digitize everything so I love to hear from you Damon. What you guys are doing at your current firm to make this better. Yes. So we are we willing to allow the positions to do what they're used to doing. So we're allowing them we've built a mobile of modern mobile solution that allows them to essentially dictate as there used to. So we've created a mobile application where we. A use artificial intelligence, realtime speech to text speech recognition..

Damon software developer Noah burnout Lovett Bill eighteen years sixteen years
"software developer" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on TechStuff

"He also discontinued the Victoria which came out in nineteen eighty one. The Commodore sixty four was still selling. So he kept that going, the plus slash four and the Commodore sixteen models also were cut. And if you other projects that were for systems that had not yet debuted, but we're in development. Those were of intially axed as well. And a lot of those people most of them were let go. The third round of layoffs was the hardest to make because they're still needed to be cuts in order to get Commodore back to profitability. But now they were cutting into people who are contributing directly to Commodore business. So a lot of. Apple referred to this as cutting into the bone because it was it was beyond the the, the folks that you could more easily say goodbye to because they were not contributing to Commodore's business. So here's where pro programmers and engineers found themselves of job, both at Commodore headquarters in Pennsylvania in Westchester and the folks over in Los Gatos in California, the Amiga folks, they all of them saw cutbacks, but another big change was coming. And that was that the Amiga team was told that their operations were going to move across country and that the team is going to join the Commodore headquarters in Pennsylvania people working for Amiga had to make a decision. They could continue to work for the company, but that would mean they'd have to move across country or they were going to have to quit Jay miner. The guy who had led the design for the meager chipset the co, founder of Amiga the one guy who had been. In a consistent presence at the company from its start, decided he was done. He resigned from Commodore as a fulltime employee. He would continue to act as a consultant for the company for several more years. And ultimately, Jay miner passed away in nineteen ninety four due to kidney failure. One other reason Commodore wanted the Amiga folks to move closer to their headquarters had to do with an embarrassing prank that went a little too far. So the Amiga had a graphical desktop environment that was called workbench. And there was a software developer who was working on an upgrade to work bench the, you know, a later version like one point two. And as far as I can tell, this person's identity has never been revealed. But this software developer hid a message in the code and the only way you would unlock the messages. If you pressed a certain key combination simultaneously. And it wasn't a common one. So it would require you to know about it or to have heard about in order to do it. And if you did do it a message popped up on screen that message read and I'm going to paraphrase a little bit. We made the Amiga. They eft it up. The message did not obvious skate the curse word, they, they actually set it in the message. The head of software over at Amiga was perhaps a mused, but told this developer that the this Easter egg was going to have to go could not stay in the software. And at first it seemed like this engineer had taken that to heart because if you did the key combination after the engineer had made some more changes in Nel, said Amiga born a champion, but this turned out to be a smokescreen because if you held down another set of keys, the message we made, the Amiga would pop up. And then if you were to keep holding those key. As down and then have someone insert a floppy disk into the disk drive a second half of that message would pop up the, they eft it up part, would flash on screen for one sixtieth of a second..

Commodore Commodore business software developer Jay miner engineer Apple Pennsylvania consultant founder Los Gatos Nel Westchester California
"software developer" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

04:51 min | 2 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Let's hear a debt free scream, three, two one. I. Well, done, man. That is absolutely awesomeness very well played very well played. If you're listening to this right now and you are in the middle. Of the nastiness and the heartbreak and the betrayal of a divorce. God put Molly on here today just for you to hear her story. It's going to be okay. It's going to be, okay, you got this, you got this, but it doesn't hurt to be mad at your grandma's funeral. That's the moral of the story. I am sick and tired of being sick and tired. I'm not gonna live under the thumb. Aban broke any more. I'm going to do something about it. That was our moral. Our motto wasn't a love that story. Great young lady. This is the Dave Ramsey show. Amanda is with us in Washington DC. I, Amanda welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. Hi, thanks for taking my call. Sure what's up. So my question basically a little bit of acts story. My husband works at a software developer here in DC. He was supposed to be getting from ocean this past year, but he was just notified that won't be happening. So he's base the company is cutting corners. Okay, they they love everything about him. They want him to stay. They wanna promote him to manager with the family to pay are struggling. Yeah. Okay. So he's wondering if he just take this opportunity to transfer back to Florida to be near family. That way we have grandparents for our kids. I could possibly go back to school and finish my education and family. Larva. Does does just he does. Where's your family. All over Canada. Okay. All right. And what does he make now. Makes eighty thousand. Can I get a job making that in the city in Florida, we're talking about. He's looking at Tampa area and so far his research has shown them that he could be making ninety k. for his experience in his level, Florida's cheaper than DC live in. Yeah, his parents there and the begging to come down while I'm not talking about that. I'm talking about the money, that'd be wonderful near them. I think that assuming they're nice folk, but but but yeah, that that. So is there any reason not to do this. No. I mean, part of me was like, well, I can't. We just keep looking around here. You'd probably get a better deal here because this is DC and he's a software developer my money everywhere. Yeah, we just have no family. We have nothing here that got that part so, but that's not a reason to stay. That's a reason to leave. But my point is, is that DC's not exactly the mecca for software developers. Right? I don't. I don't think I agree with that as a reason to stay. I think you can make really, really good money as a software developer and most any major metro area some more than others, some have more of a tech corridor than others, but it's a, it's a sought after you know, assault after skill set. Are you working now. Now I'm a stay at home mom to two boys, two and under, and I'm expecting our third. You go to Florida. You get grandma on your backyard, he makes more money. Everybody's happier. Go to Florida. Yes..

Washington DC Florida software developer Dave Ramsey Amanda Molly Canada Aban Tampa assault ninety k
"software developer" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on WDRC

"Now to your calls let me go first to a naysayer because we love naysayers greg welcome to the program you heard my conversation with the fcc chairman what do you think of net neutrality well i am pro net neutrality uh i uh i'm a software developer um i in beaverton um company is internetbased um i mean i i just don't understand how you i mean most of what mr pie bad was just complete fabrication floors no i'd i'd die dane hold on a second if you're gonna he's gonna does broadbrush tell me what he fowler i tell k the fact that he fabricated okay uh so first um good for consumers uh it would raise prices for consumers for some and for others it would drop a depending on what you decide the by correct well i'm trying to figure out what you mean by what we depend what we decide to pile on internet on your a software developer you worked for accompanied you out onto early you worked for a company i worked for a car you don't have to name it but does your company had a giant data pipes that run into it very large lines that supply you with huge amounts of data both in and out right i i wouldn't call it a huge amounts i don't work that huge company but uh eat there are data center about how the compared to the average internet consumer that they would by at home large the average internet consumer does not obviously does not have a at home i do not have a huge pipe coming out of my so you get that has died in the issue lower that you guys are just in it you could to decide which size pipe in which size speed you need some companies clearly need more speed some companies clearly need less for example net flags buys large or buys high speed because they know that for their customers there are more likely to hang on to customers and get more customers if they can supply the video that net flakes stockintrade movies and shows if that could be if that can speed to their customers then they're going to do better at hanging on to customers in getting new customers.

chairman software developer data center fcc beaverton
"software developer" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

Google Cloud Platform Podcast

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Google Cloud Platform Podcast

"I am very excited today to welcome brand grimace years senior software developer and technical lead at a smart parking and also owner of six dogs living in new zealand but from oregon hello how're you doing doing wonderful thanks for having me thank you for joining us so before we get started talking about smart barking in how it is to be a developer down there not necessarily be stunned but a new zealand why they did as a debate about yourself what you do who you are yeah so like you said the nato brian i've been a software developer for longtime probably since the beginning of this whole cloud dang so my original beginnings were um with your packard and did some work there and then transition over here to new zealand and i've worked with a couple of companies here and like you said proud owner of a large massive pack of dogs and proud to be a kiwi so that's kind of the shoreline about me cool or why don't you tell us about smart packing are said parking got the mazda smallpox slovak at the next as coming out and what does it do is it all about yes a smart parking the company the developed parking technologies so for most of our clients that in ground centers or what we call camera gateways and we've been developing that for years and years now and we have installations in new zealand australia the uk dubai singapore and a few other places like can ever keep track of all of them it's a we've been working on these for years in the services in the mobile apps and everything to support that and then at the start of this year we began our new endeavor which was to create smart cities platform and with the goal of that is to take all of these different devices and messages that you might get from a city traffic on parking our weather energy grids lighting kinda bring them all together kind of connecting the iot of things together to one platform and then driving meaning off of that who i'd love to dig more into lick would actually the smart pocking stuff is you said you doing analytics.

senior software developer technical lead developer software developer packard uk different devices oregon dubai singapore
"software developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"Just so many new niches that are gonna come along um that are very hard true to imagine and they seemed we kind of ridiculous to a space as you're saying that most webs designer you know uh mortgage broker these these wouldn't even make sense to the farmers under fifty years ago as jobs have have all gone home until i think we're not going up these new jobs are gonna make sense to us now yeah i think you mentioned the uh the the web designer or or rather a whisper job and i think this is actually going to um the way that this will will affect us earliest you crosschecked me your again you wrote the book on this but uh i think this is going to begin by webb developers in kind of uh the the people hiring by developers her or software developers uh adding new bullet points to that requirements list right and sang okay well uh if you're going to be a software developer here than yes you need to know java ends x winds e but you also need to have experience with machine learning or also need to have experience with this new whatever a platform api thing that that that is out in the wild um i think that's kinda the start of that because you know as we saw with software developer titles in the beginning its software developer because there's really only three languages for enters assembly and see and you know whatever other thing that existed and then it continued to branch continue to grow and expand and as it expanded each of those as individual areas got large enough to justify a person that is solely dedicated to that thing right answer now we have people who are are even subdivided inside of a a given programming language or subdivided inside of a giving tool set that are really focused on one particular aspect of that software development process whereas previously it was really all one title i think this going to continue that direction part of things so too.

web designer software developer programming language software developers software development fifty years
"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Check in some code it automatically gets built it automatically gets tested and then if all the tests pass it automatically gets deployed in production so if you think about how uh you know automated and fasts that process is there is really no time for another team to have a manual process around running some testing tools those testing tools have to be used by the developer and built right into their tool chain so that's really how we're seeing uh security um change um right now sit tight pack asked listeners poor taking a quick break to hear a word from our sponsors does your current job bum you out are you learning to code on your own and find yourself getting staff with launch academies boston a philadelphiabased cutting through camps you'll learn all the skills unique to launch your korean programming and software engineering and just ten weeks with a cutting edge javascript curriculum that evolves every cohort to teach students the most current indemand skills is the quickest route to becoming a software developer thanks to their eightweek program in a lifetime of postgraduates support launch academy makes sure you get the job you want by continuing to teach you job prep skills after he graduate that's why over ninety percent of launch academy graduate jobseeker's secure jobs as software engineers get started by turning an open house of free learn to coat event or scheduling a wild one video interview make sure to ask about special offers for learn to cope with me listeners during your admissions interview find out more at launch academy dot com.

developer boston software developer software engineers ninety percent eightweek ten weeks
"software developer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

.NET Rocks!

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on .NET Rocks!

"I'm i'm really fascinated by this just 'cause you know you know how hard the hard parts of that actually is i think it's a logical thing to do is to go it initially over provisioning and then dial it back as you learn more about your consumption i i think so yes kind of unless the throttling so the big deal you're only just going to slow down you're not going to break it depends what exactly it depends upon your use case right and i i i hate to say it depends because the people i have to ask this question before will say it depends right you know it's like you're going to pass but it's like turtles all the way down it's dependence all the way exactly exactly nobody wants to talk about other are that much wait that's the different let me do the jokes this is what this is why he he does the jobs that is just the planet so i will say the other thing that that i even though this was crushed it can be frustrating going to figure this out as a as a as a software developer and as an architect is a guy guy's been doing this for a long time this does in a way kind of get me in a place that that makes me happy because it it's a bit of a forcing function were folks were adopting the database sure understand your application riley asher how many times have you i mean you guys who i know have done maybe still do can tell you guys will do consulting asia and i have two and it's like you walk into the team and let's be honest i mean i i i should i should throw myself under the bus to i've been guilty of this before i you you you're right code you build an app and somebody comes along and says it maybe in the old days it was will how big how know how big database need to be how many iraq's do we need to buy or you know that kind of thing and you go the no no no you got it right and.

riley asher iraq software developer
"software developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

Developer Tea

02:29 min | 4 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Developer Tea

"I hear and i forget i see and i remember i do and i understand although the origin of this quote is somewhat unknown the it's a chinese proverb but most of the sources citing that come from the 1960s the underlying concept of this quote is still very strong that's where we're going to be talking about in today's episode by name is jonathan cottrell you're listening to developer t michael on this show is to help you become a better developer you may be listening to this new not a software developer guy you don't right code i don't do maybe anything with computers although fewer and fewer people that category as the years where on in as technology continues to imbue our lives and even if you're a software developer you may not see yourself as a software developer the title of developer is very much so incomplete for most people who work in this job tons of people own businesses and also develop software tens of people who listen to the show are also designers who work with software perhaps you are indeed or writing code in your daytoday work enter code continues to become more and more important so as people start listening to this podcast in those varying categories i went to make sure that we're avoiding mislabelling developers i want to make sure that we're avoiding perpetuating a sense of fear of perpetuating a sense of impostor syndrome but talks about impostors syndrome in the past but part of the way that we do this is by not trying to get into extremely technical details in short podcast and that's one of the reasons why we focus on larger more applicable topics that span of basically your entire life you can listen to this episode and five years from now and hopefully it will still be applicable to what you do so we aren't afraid to talk about specific technology we are avoiding those conversations but a lot of the time the better value the you can get out of this podcast is going to be when we talk about things like what we're talking about today today's episode is focused on learning.

jonathan cottrell developer software developer five years
"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

Learn to Code with Me

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Learn to Code with Me

"Sit tight podcast listener's were taking a quick break to hear word for our sponsors does your current job bummed out are you learning to code on your own and find yourself getting stuck with launch academies boston philadelphiabased coating boot camps you'll learn all the skills unique to launch your career in programming and software engineering and just ten weeks with a cutting edge javascript curriculum that valls every cohort to teach students the most current indemand skills is the quickest route to becoming a software developer thanks to their eightweek program in a lifetime of postgraduate support launch academy makes sure you get the job you want by continuing to teach you job prep skills after you graduate best by over ninety percent of launch academy graduate jobseekers secure jobs as software engineers get started by tiny open house of free learned to coat event or scheduling a wound one video interview make sure to ask about special offers for learn to cope with me listeners during your admissions interview find out more at launch academy dot com yeah no that's that's awesome and i remember taking like so many workshops in such a short time the the at the at the village after i think i took like seven or nine in like two months or something something pretty crazy but for people that are teaching themselves had a code in whether they're you know at home like on the computer like doing classes online or they're doing workshops girl development workshops what are some of the biggest stumbling blocks that he would win that you'd witness and then what is some advice that you have in overcoming those.

software engineers software developer ninety percent two months eightweek ten weeks
"software developer" Discussed on SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on SwiftCoders: Weekly Interviews with Swift Developers

"Yeah i met with the council of that enzyme i did a couple of sessions also read this book color is your parachute a popular book about making career changes and so i did an euwide did a really cool pod prices have gone through during a looks at work sheets from that and and essays and things like that and them i mean as i'm talking about it now the flicked the funny thing is that transitioning into being a software developer and a programme is was such that the obvious choice lake as i am as i value added some of these are the koreas that may be more in line with myself core values like him architecture or something like that it it just didn't really appeal to made but as i started to break it down and look at what is it to be a a software developer and so many of these aspects are so similar about why i love about being composer what are they on i think being so of being in this has been assigned a new agius and think that you know being in touch with kind of fundamental building blocks of them of creation and then you know assembling something from these building blocks all omission slowed down time and then that perceived in in real time so few if he's i mean like when you rugby's music you'll say writing the viola pots and you will kind of listening that new way on that but you've got to have an idea of its in the context and when it's going to be conceived as a piece of music in real time and software developments a lot like that in the you'll looking at small aspects of coyote and damn but you have to keep in mind this big a big goal.

software developer real time rugby
"software developer" Discussed on Practical TOC

Practical TOC

02:19 min | 4 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Practical TOC

"Because a question like how long will this task take can be very very difficult for a software developer too answer um they're answer is i don't know that's the honest answer you so whenever you have this regimented for uh requirement and milestones to perform to from software developer perspective that that was very painful and so i believe that agile was developed in response to waterfall nice i said that agile and see damn i don't believe the conflict blazed there however when uh uh people who understood angelo ri exposed to see cpm what they see is things like ask asking them for task duration estimates and we're looking for a project completion date were looking for for some of these various uh sam strong imports that waterfall was asking for now we handle the project management totally effort than waterfall but i think when when developers would see this it would be reminiscent enough to them of waterfall that they would prefer to go without joao and really when you think about the change matrix anything about the the benefits of not changing or the mermaids agile was affording the opportunity to software developers to be more flexible flexibility was was huge in there mines it also uh was more empowering to them than having these external constraints imposed on them from above eddy tansil who the serbs ovation your i would agree with it you know i also would agreed you know i was actually a wall all manager and when i needed to go in the manager ideological work with masters to manage projects the biggest shift i and goes who in the planning phase was.

software developer joao software developers
"software developer" Discussed on Quit

Quit

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"software developer" Discussed on Quit

"But in this situation he is going to actually the hill his last interviews fifteen years ago i i don't remember how old listener mike is but i'm going to guess he calls himself an older programmer i'm going to guess that he's in his thirties orf early forty's i'm just gassing i don't know let's just pretend his forty because if you're 30 you're you're not going to call yourself older any now thirty five i'm not going to call myself older anything 45 i'm a bit older than some of these young kids coming out of college okay so he's in his early forties and he is not interviewed for fifteen years and in fact isil last job he says what wasn't even interviewed for so it's been more than fifteen years probably so what is that can i be like today what are they going to ask you to do you hear all these horror stories of like oh you wanna work at google oh you got to solve these crazy brain teasers and questions i have never ever asked a software developer or ask for that matter anybody that i was going to hire those kinds of questions go up to the whiteboard and careers out problems create a method that is going to search a list of items and sort them by now if you can't do push in palm sorting in a binary sorting and that kind of stuff like today it's not often that you really need to take that used to be a a skill as far as like flexing your developer muscles was writing some nine of you know they don't need to do that anymore because you can fight we have stock exchange we have these other websites that are great they just make it incredibly easy to figure something like that out you just do not have to worry about being ask those kinds of questions and if they're going to ask you go to the whiteboard and right me now.

mike programmer software developer stock exchange google developer fifteen years