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223: The truth about metabolism | Cate Shanahan, M.D.

The mindbodygreen Podcast

56:40 min | 6 months ago

223: The truth about metabolism | Cate Shanahan, M.D.

"Welcome to the MY BUDDY GREENE. Podcast objects in walkup founder. And cosio of my buddy green and your host. Today's episode is brought to you by my buddy green and our incredible museum plus sleep product before this product. It took me hours to get to sleep and end up tossing turning than hitting the snooze on the alarm as woke up in the morning. Yes I slept but it really wasn't quality now with magnesium plus I fall asleep faster I stay sleep and I wake up rejuvenated and without an alarm clock. Look we all know when you don't sleep. It's pretty brutal. And it is terrible for your immunity in terrible for your health and yeah I slept but it wasn't quality sleep and now I never knew that sleeve could be so good. I hope you check out our pioneering sleep formula at my green dot com slash museum. That's buddy green dot com slash museum. So Dr K Ahan is a board certified family physician and the author of deep nutrition and her latest must read is called the fat burn fix boost energy and hunger and lose weight by using body fat for fuel. It sounds awesome to me cade trained in biochemistry genetics at Cornell before attending the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and served as the director of the L. A. Lakers nutrition program for six years as a basketball fan. I am very excited about the Lakers. So Kate Welcome. Thanks so much for having me on your show Jason. So there's so many interesting concepts in your book and the the first one that stuck out to me is your view on fat and you talk about toxic body fats and healthy body fat and so many people say oh body. That's bad but there's a difference so let's talk about toxic body fat versus healthy body fat. Yes the most important at aspect of health is whether or not you can burn your body fat for fuel and healthy body fat. Is there for you to use as a fuel and in fact your cells do better when you are burning your body fat? Then they do. When you're burning the the calories from whatever it was that you just ate and the reason for that is if you think about nature is pretty smart and what we build body fat from is the extra whatever in our food and it's not just fat from our food that ends up in our body fat. It's extra any big so if we eat too much car too much protein if we too much of anything it's going to end up in our body fat and the body fat that we build is designed so intelligently to be the best fuel like we don't just build random fat there's very specific recipe for building healthy human body fat and has to do with the type of fatty acid if you heard the term saturated versus monounsaturated versus polyunsaturated so there is a specific ratio that our body does well with of Saturated monounsaturated and polyunsaturated. And that's what our body. What's in our body fat? It's building our body fat from the extra calories in our food. So how do we know if the body fat you know? The body fat I have on me is healthy or toxic. The best way to now is through an assessment of how you feel when you're hungry so this is actually really an important metabolic click Whether or not you can burn out for fuel like I said is the number one most important determinate of Health Longevity Performance of inflammation status. It is the number one most important thing and your body is actually. If you just know how to listen to it your body may have been telling you that your metabolism is holding you back specifically inflammation and it talks to you by way of how you feel and one of the key things to pay attention to is. How do you feel when you've gone longer than you? Normally do without eating anything in other words like. Let's say you normally have a some kind of breakfast at seven. Am and normally have lunch at noon. And you didn't get your lunch. You're too busy now. It's too. Are you starting to feel hanger? E R us. You know that feeling of of irritable hungry angry when they call angry hungry angry and are used to kill brain fog. There's actually eleven very common symptoms of not ways that your body's trying to warn you that you're not able to burn your body fat for fuel and when you feel any of these eleven symptoms. It means you're not burning your body fat for fuel very efficiently. You don't have a healthy efficient metabolism that can easily flip from whatever the calories were in your breakfast burning those up for fuel to burning your body fat. That's why you have body fat. It's it's not just supposed to be like this challenge of you know. Let's keep that body fat down. Let's make sure it's on all the right places it's there for energy. It produces all kinds of chemicals that help naturally regulate your body weight your energy level your mood your hormones your immune system and when it's healthy all those things are working properly and when it's not the first sign is that when you've gone longer than your normal without eating your you'll feel good that's one of the most important science how you feel so ever couple couple follow up questions one you talk about extending time between meals and knock getting angry or brain. Fog is intermittent fasting the test so to speak and playing without extending fast periods. To See if I feel okay I can do this. That is one way to test it absolutely actually book the fat fix what. I was at a have like a little worksheet that you can use for week to test and see how often raise snacking and howdy. How often do you feel just in the course of a normal week? Because I don't WanNA necessarily have. People Dabble with intermittent fasting if their metabolism is not healthy enough to do that and and that is a thing that happens that you can actually try to go on. an internist intermittent fasting routine and But not be ready for it and you won't get the benefits If you're not ready for it you can. Actually you can actually feel worse or you can actually do some damage wrote so you mentioned Healthy Metabolism. And something else you said. The book which I thought was very interesting is we tend to say fast metabolism a lot but you say no healthy metabolism is flexible enough fast. So can you elaborate on that by a flexible? I'm referring to the ability to flip back and forth between burning calories from whatever you just ate. And then burning your body fat. So that it's a seamless transition so that if you eat something and whether or not your next meal comes along in three hours or three days your body fat as fuel you we do get to a point after a certain number of hours or days without eating anything where we're not doing ourselves any good but most people don't have to worry about that because most people at most will skip a meal right. That's kind of the most common way of doing what we're calling now. Intermittent fasting. When I grew up it was called. Didn't eat lunch. It wasn't a big thing and and I mean I'm I'm making light of it like as if this new thing now. Intermittent fasting is a thing. But it's it is because so few people are actually able to seamlessly. Move from burning the calories in their last meal to burning their body fat anymore. Because we do have this problem of widespread of toxic body fat. It's a metabolic problem and it goes by a bunch of other names. Include so toxic body found at the highest level to understand if we have it. It's it's largely about the feeling it is there. I'm curious like I'm the guy who gets you know. Blood Testing quarterly. Have Twenty eight miles of blood. I I've talked about the PODCAST. I had like ridiculously high homeless. Osteen at one time. It was interesting that none of other markers were pretty. Much more elevated. My homocysteine was sixty. Three I see that when people burn their protein for fuel more so than they should be doing so I got to twelve freight that's important and so so wait up jury so protein for fueled talk about that. 'cause 'cause you also talk about having too much protein so I'm curious what do you what's the most part in this idea. That too much protein can be a problem because a lot of people. Don't think that right so yeah too. Much of anything is going to turn into body fat. Okay so we can't. There's no carte blanche with any kind of a any of the three macro so it's not like you need a car. Be Wants me. He can eat all the fat. And it's certainly not like you can eat all the protein one So anything in consumed in excess has to be stored body fat and And when you are eating too much protein you're consuming a lot of a molecule called nitrogen In Adam and nitrogenous very reacted with oxygen and so it promotes when you have so much of it. Your your liver has to deal with too much nitrogen. Your kidney has to deal with too much nitrogen and can promote something called oxidative stress and inflammation and so Glutathione gets consumed when that happened. Glutathione is one of the bodies most important antioxidant fighting cofactors and The body makes it. And when your need for inflammation fighting enzymes exceeds your ability to keep up with glutathione demand in the many many other many components necessary to control inflammation than your home assisting level goes up it's a reflection of uncontrollable inflammation and that can be caused by excessive protein especially protein powders and it almost always happens in the setting of eating the wrong kinds of fats in having unhealthy body fat. That is making you More often and making you You kind of live on the edge of eating too much and not eating enough. Because you're not able to use your body fat smooth all out interesting. I actually the way I got it down a frank by doctor and he got me in a cocktail vitamins immediately and I actually started to eat. Something happened for me. I'm forty five in my forties. Where the more meat I ate. My Lipid profile started to go the wrong way and so I also cut down the amount of animal protein. I was eating so those two things and went down in the teens pretty quickly and I have. Mta Jeff are all about so yeah. A lot of people doing the lean and clean. Get into the same exact problem because lean lean meats very high protein. So you're you can end up eating thirty percent of your calories from protein which is difficult especially in the setting of not getting enough of the right kinds of fats. So yes so pulling back on that doubly can make some things Function better I mentioned. Ice Got started on. Homocysteine rang. 'cause I mentioned I get all those labs and so with regards of what we can. Come back to me after the show genetic Weirdo that way. Most people don't have sky high esteem so with regards to labs and having the wrong body. Fat like ardor labs like is it just about feeling. Are there specific markers if someone wants to do? Bloodwork that call outs that? Maybe something wrong. Definitely there's a whole host of them and I do go over all of that in the book but just kind of give you some examples. One of them is the ratio of your checklists right number two your HDL number If you're traveling all right is more than two. And a half times your. Hdl and shield just to refresh. People's memories is the so called good cholesterol It's very often an indicator that your body fat is not accepting shipments of new fat kristoff. So the triglycerides stay in your bloodstream. Too Long and that's what elevates your rights and that you have so much inflammatory processes going on there. Hdl drops your body can't control of some of the things that keep hd levels high which are like location reactions. Those little few can't control location which is a form of oxidation and than your hdl level drops if you can't Control Lipid Oxidation. Which is another form of oxidation than your HDL. Drops so that ratio is is very important indicator so ideal ratio if you said over two and a half is no good where do you want it to be for triglycerides? Hdl while ideally be one or more HDL triglycerides splinter. Many people get when they follow the The Diet that is totally free of these these bad oils. That are the source of your toxic body fat and I WanNa make sure that we cover that you are definitely not a fan of vegetable oils. You're definitely not a fan of vegetable oils right now. I I think vegetable oils are the number one cause of health problems in this country. And I think it's It's a tragedy that Harvard is still recommending them. So can you just run through them for everyone quickly like in terms of levels of of of damage if you will for sure? So there's there's I call it the hateful eight eight of them. They're one easy Monica's there's three season three S.'s. So corn can look cottonseed. Soy's sunflower staff lower and then the other two Grapeseed and Race Brand. And those last two you'll see more commonly used in restaurants. The first six are are often used in restaurants but most common in a super comment health food stores. I mean it's it's also shameful that whole foods and other health food stores use these things in their products that they label healthy people think they're healthy because they're organic so you touched on the macro so protein fat carb and we talked about having you know potentially too much protein which begs the question. How much is enough and in your opinion like what are the best sources of protein? I know we're all individuals varies but it Kinda so protein is the goldilocks Macro Nutrient Ghost Important one in most fussy one should say like there's a just right zone but it's zone you know it's not a big zone as somewhere between twelve percent and thirty percent depending on what else you're doing So but that's a range. It's like a factor of two So it would be somewhere between Say like of fifty grams to maybe a high of a hundred twenty. But it's super variable depending on your lean mass your height But it's not gonNA range too much beyond that fifty and one hundred twenty. You can do pretty well with one hundred twenty. Don't necessarily need more even if you are six. Seven of yes. That's not many guessing. Many of our listeners have my height but I always appreciate getting advice just for me. Yeah I you I heard you earlier. Podcast we're basketball player up so yeah so that's protein is like the most important macro nutrient to to pay attention to make sure you're getting enough but not too much and I always recommend getting protein from whole foods and avoiding protein. Powders as much as possible in there if you're curious about why but that's an important message that I want People who hear this to understand that Protein powders are not the same as food body processes them very differently especially if we have that raw kind of body fat and have too much polyunsaturated. Cedar Hills in our in our diets. So what are your favorite sources of of protein? I'm curious what your favorite Vegetarians. Sources as. Well so my vagrant vegetarian sources would be really anything. That's high in protein to deliver a good solid wall it without raising blood. Sugar too quickly. And that's it like I don't I'm not I'm not telling people that they need to You know peel their their grapes and a tomatoes and stuff like that to avoid the lessons in the skin. That is that. Is You know something that maybe a tiny fraction of one percent of the population by actually need because maybe they lack some enzyme. After having some antibiotic but human beings come into this world with healthy immune systems needing to to do such micromanagement of the things that we eat. The world around us is filled with natural food and we've cultivated a lot of it to make sure that it has the amount of toxic know that we can handle. We create toxins when we cook food right. So it's not like we'll ever live in a toxin three world so create toxins. They do so that we don't eat them so our beans. Okay refried beans. In your opinion. It depends on factor. They're Frieden so I'll tell you. What would we do? A lot in our in our cove nineteen court eighteen. So my wife calling an IRA family. What we do a lot of lately we do our take tortillas with some refried beans and in the Pan we use our primal kitchen avocado oil spray and we put a little like organic Jack Cheese and we have like are being cheese Caissoti as we do that a lot and then we also do a lot of like wild salmon with like some veggies or call fire right so so you tell me how are we. How are we doing? You have to check the container so does not refried beans. I'm assuming they're coming out on. Canterbury make from an Arab Cup comes over cat. Organic refried beans Joss chat because some of them don't have any added fat and some of them do and chances are if they do. It's not going to be the traditional Lard. Because people are terrified and wrongly so of of it these days so if there is any fat it's probably going to be one of the wrong oils so so check but they do make a fat free form. So I'd recommend those instead. You have the fat-free beans because you're not gonna find the traditional fat. You're not gonNA find him in Lard unless you actually go to Mexico. Maybe it's yeah. It's more expensive to use so fewer and fewer people even in traditional Mexican areas like Mexico. you're gonNA find fewer fewer where they actually use the traditional fat. It's it's now just going to be. It's basically think of it as filler. Right. It is nearly free and it acts as a preservative and it helps fill you up literally so why not add it if you're an evil manufacturer and all you care about? Is your bottom line. Interesting I've fat free 'cause you're also fit will segue to fat so I if we don't really talk about fat free law for most part it's were over that as a society but for beans not the case for it well for every food we have to consider what is the nature of the fat. Whether we're talking about enes are salad dressing. So what are your favorite like in terms of you know. We're not demonizing fat. But there's a difference. The healthy fats healthy fats. Like what are your? What are your favorite healthiest fats. So the there is no such thing. Nature does not make an unhealthy fat. We do in our factory so so if we're talking about fat that is on a whole food. It's good so whether that's beans themselves. Do a little bit of fat any other seed fruit Like a coconut or avocado or eggs. Cheese dairy fat Animal fat. That's natural fat. Nature makes that stuff and human beings have been consuming it since probably since there were human beings herbs at least since we discovered and cultivated some of these High fat things like beans and nuts. The so that's all good and then so then the really the only other question becomes okay. Well I cook stuff. In what way add with an added fat? What kind of added finest safe and those are the traditional added fats which are very close to whole foods right so butter for example. That is too simple steps away from milk. One you let the cream rise to the top. That's step one. Step to your turn it for a while in like a wooden chair right. We don't do that anymore. But that's how simple it is. You don't need high heat. You don't need complicated equipment. You don't need refining machinery. You just let the cream rises to the top skimming off. And then he start turning around and many make butter so it's very close to a whole food all of oil. You start with Plump Green Olives and you run a very heavy stone over. This is how it's done traditionally thousand years ago before we had factories and the Oil squirts out you collected all and it's dark green and full of sediment in it which is full of nutrition which came from the olive pulp loaded with antioxidants loaded with minerals That's good stuff and the same with any traditional fat coconut oil. That's traditional. That's because it's so easy to get the fat from a high fat through like a coconut also. Fruit Avocados are also very easy to get the oil from those things That when you talk about peanuts that is An oil that it's like there is a good version of it in an oak cave version of it and it has to do with how deeply it's been processed it's analogous to olive oil. Really like we know I press extra virgin olive oil. That's the better stuff and eventually there's a quality of olive oil that so bad it's called laminate because we didn't eat it. I think it was called. It's called that because we put it lamps and burned. It was good for fuel but it wasn't good consume and so there's you can do that with fat from anything you can. You can get every last drop out of the original product in such a way that you're damaging it and then you need to refine it and when you refine it you strip away. All of the beneficial nutrients antioxidants vitamins minerals. You've made it like it's empty calories but you also probably pretty toxins in the process. So that's why my hateful eight are in The Hague? So you mentioned peanuts leads me to ask about nut butters. I was pleasantly surprised in your book that you know you were okay with peanut butter. Which makes me in a lot of people listening. Probably very happy so you are. You aren't of all that butters is that the case. I'm a fan of food yet. Good foods toxic stuff that we're too stupid to recognize right. I love the code. I'm a fan of food. Nature doesn't make to nature does try to trick US sometimes. But it's really just for its own protection so that we don't overeat right and we're not that dumb that we're going to over we're going to overeat stuff that is literally toxic and we're going to haul over debt. We have this very important. Oregon cod liver. An animal. Animal livers are capable of dealing with a certain amount of toxins. The herb of workers are exposed to all kinds of toxins from the plants. They eat hundred percent of the time How is it that Koalas can handle eucalyptus a no other animals can because the eucalyptus like oil and Turpentine toxins in there because the Koala has enzymes in its digestive tract and liver? That break it down. Will we have enzymes in our liver? We have actually bigger livers than most other than most carnivores because we do so much cooking and cooking creates toxins. That didn't exist whether you're eating animal food or a plant food so we covered protein. We covered fats. What about carbs? What are what are the healthiest CARBS EATING? Near opinion that healthiest carps are those also that are closer to the whole food and those that like nature makes right and that's because when nature makes them they're in a delivery system that is not like main lining sugar so for example. Let's go back to a beam So beans are in a matrix of protein fat and fiber like the carbohydrate in beans are is in a matrix of those other three components and so it just takes time for our digestive enzymes to get in there and break down the carbohydrates. So it's not going to spike or blush so far mentioned blood sugar. I'll go to sugar quick. I think that's one thing that everyone can agree on. Is You know sugar not so good but I think the question is like look. Sugar is is part of life. It's fun to have dessert every once in a while so curious like how much sugar is okay and our favorite sources of when you do decide to have a nice treat Yeah sure I think the best form of sugar is fruit and I actually use fruit as like a think of. I like to encourage people. Think of it sort of is a spice where it's going to spice up something that you're eating for example. A salad like. Let's say you've got kids? Who aren't big fans of spinach ruble or whatever your? Greens are but they love blueberries. Well throw some blueberries in your salad along with some carrots and some other stuff and you know if you WANNA have a desert. I don't think it's beneficial relate to use these artificial sweeteners. Let's just not You know loaded up on sugar all the time. Because the artificial sweeteners have been shown to disorder your appetite systems in your head which is one of the four fat-burning systems they talk about in the fabrics. Book is the Relation Center in our head and if we separate sweet taste from energy the way the artificial sweeteners do that is confusing to our brain. It's like sweet. Tasted come along with a lot of energy and if you use artificial sweetener that's calorie free. Their sweet taste. But there's no energy and it just can use the brain so you hydrate energy. You mentioned before five Burns systems which you cover in the book when what are those four systems the I'll give them to you. In order of simplicity so the simplest of all is the might contract. That's where all the calories that you'd never burned in your light get burned inside your cells. The energy factories of yourself a produce this thing called. Atp Energy That's system one system. Two is the hormones that regulate your energy balance regularly what your body does with carbohydrate for example what it does with that whether it's GonNa put in storage or whether it's going to take it out of storage The third is your body fat itself. Your Body. Fat. Isn't organ it. We don't think about it like we think about our livers or kidneys. Like how healthy is are those organs. How healthy is our while? We also have very important question right now. The most important one because so many people the answer is no. It's not healthy is how healthy is your body fat. Because your body fat is supposed to be Providing your cells with energy and it also all these hormones and these hormones that it creates give you energy or make you tired and hungry and when your body fat is unhealthy you have low energy and you feel tired and hungry all the time. Because that's your body fat saying they're slink. Almost no energy in here that your body wants to use because the fat itself is toxic as a very bad state to be in when your body fat you have it you want you need to burn it if you WANNA lose weight You just need to burn it to get through your day but it damages your cells. That's aw that's what it damages fabra system one. That's what I mean by toxic body fat that you're it's fat that you can't get energy from efficiently without damaging yourself and so just to finish the fourth is your appetite regulation centers in your brain which are the things that control your cravings and You know we talk about sugar being addictive substance. That's where that addiction happens. And the fat hormones that your fat cells may are constantly trying to talk to your brain and when you have inflammation in your brains from too much of these fish oils that your brain can't see the body fat. It's like your brain thinks restarting you look in the mirror and you see body fat. Your brain has no way of seeing what you're seeing it does is get information from the hormones and when the appetite centers are inflamed which they will be. If you've been eating the seed oils then. You can't see that the rain can't see has no Nonni of all this energy in your body fats. Let's go hungry entire all the time she does the pig we come back to. Hungary tire those the two big accuse. Something's off so tired so one thing you know I love. It seems like there are lots of health benefits to drinking coffee and so. I drink coffee. I just love I love the taste of coffee have espresso on the morning of a cup of black coffee. I'll have coffee later in the afternoon. Mike question to you is how much is too much. And what is it a problem like you talk about like tired like we all so much of us like reach for that coffee in the afternoon Maybe it's partly habit. Maybe it's partly so I'm just really tired. And what's what's healthy in your opinion to the onto cops. You're always relying on caffeine and you're not really You can get to a point where you need it. More than I think is healthy I also Recently it was very disturbed to discover that caffeine reduces the blood flow to your brain which isn't cool because I like my brain to have plenty of blood but caffeine reduces that and You know it's totally counterintuitive. How it make you feel more alert. Actually reducing the energy flow of nutrients And Fuel and oxygen to your brain. And that's a you know. Finish fascinating question. I think the answer is that it reduces the blood flow to the brain areas. That are extremists baked. You're concentrating on something. It makes that be the only thing you're paying attention to. Which if you're in a good mood makes it more fascinating so to cops. But do I get a Third Cup since I'm six seven? Yeah we should probably portion. You're talk about the portion of your cups. Like how big are they big? I'll give myself a third cup so hurt you. I mean it's not like it's it's what I put that limit out there. It's more about your relationship with stuff than what it's going to do to your body even your brain blood flow question because this is an N. of one but my dad has been like the perfect petri dish of what happens when you consuming extraordinary amounts of coffee He is I seventy eight. I think now he's got one kidney 'cause he donated the other to my brother ten or more years ago he still working. He does cross it every day. He walks or bikes tour at seventy eight and He's I have never seen drink water. I think he owned hotz his. He has to measure his coffee in pots. Not Cups. So I know you're based in Florida's you have abundant vitamin D. But that's something. You're also fat of Vitamin D. Absolutely I mean. It's a vitamin right. One of the few things that I learned in medical school that was true. Nutrition wise was had. Vitamins are good for you. And of course didn't learn the right amount of vitamin D Reich is the RDA. Vitamin D is somewhere around. Four hundred in that. So overdue for updating. Because I don't I don't I mean that was just based on averages and may back when it was actually determined generations ago now people got enough sunlight but we don't anymore and I Went through a period where I was testing everybody When I lived in Hawaii believe it or not and and most people were low less. They were surfers and even a few of them were low or unless they were supplementing healthy level of vitamin D and European. So there's a good data to say that you need more than thirty with lab value cuts off at thirty I feel like Let's try to think about what people used to get. Which was probably if you get your skin if you're wearing a bikini or bathing suit in twenty minutes in the summer Can make twenty thousand units international units of Vitamin D. So you know you're not going to probably do that every single day because you'd get a somber If you're fair skinned but You know something. Close to twenty thousand units once a week which translates to at least two four thousand. A day only gives you. I've tested enough to know this. A level of the low thirties. So I maybe fifty is good but I'm not some says you have to get it up to ninety data. They're so How would you summarize your food philosophy in Near opinion like what what does work for most people. How should we all be eating? So that was actually the entire subject of our first book called deep nutrition while your genes needs traditional food. Which Kinda spoiler alert genes need traditional food? And that's my philosophy. We should feed our genes. What they expect they bald on and we in this country we talk about nutrition as if we just invented it like you know that we talk about the science of nursing humans as if it's something that We still need more data on is that we have no data as if we have no data available to us from anything other than these recent studies in the RDA and randomized controlled trials. And that is the biggest lie nutrition science. We have tons of data on what people used to eat in the form of cookbooks and just traditional cuisine so that is a humongous body of nutritional knowledge that Really nobody is talking about. And that's why my husband and I wanted to identify whatever there might be in common with all traditional cuisines around the world because that's what our genes need. That's what they evolved to expect so we did identify that. And there's four of them and that's what deep nutrition is all about real food and there's four four elements of real food that are super important for optimal health. Could you talk through those four? Very quickly absolutely. The first is fresh food so things that have been cooked fermented and sprouted. So if you have too much fresh you got to preserve the rest later by new information or things that are self preserving lake seeds. They should be sprouted. I to optimize their nutrition and the third pillar is meat on the bone so this is including not just the lean meats leaning clean not good too with the fat that comes with the animal you also need to include the skin and the joint materials huge thing for the Lakers and huge breakthrough in their healing and recovery processes to get gelatinous material. And then the fork. Which is something that we've come so far away from it like we just roll our eyes. Even which is organ meats. We don't eat or the meats in this country and we are way less nurse than we would be if we did and I'm talking about You know all animal parts. We used to eat them all if you look at any book published before nineteen hundred. You're going to see recipes for every part of the animal literally knows detail including like weird things like the Asakusa so there's nutrition in all of that and we don't get it. So you mentioned working with the Lakers and Opinion I played basketball in college and I love basketball and I think that professional basketball players are the best athletes in the world. It's amazing what they're able to do an up curious in working with them like what's the what's diet of a professional athlete at the highest level. And how did you approach that so before I got there? The diet was your typical sports. Nutrition dietician recommendation which was really kind of law of skinless boneless white meat chicken brown rice and steamed Broccoli with some kind of fake butter on it if anything in no salt now. That's not what they did. But because their idea of healthy food is so alike a limited and so unpleasant to consume they were addicted to all kinds of horrible fast foods and Junk Foods Candy. You know any kind of dessert. Any kind of try and deep fried anything. So that's what it was. We got there and by the time that when we implemented our program they came to understand a lot more about what healthy food actually really isn't how delicious it is. One of their favorite things was seuss made with his bone stock from you know the pillar on meat on the bone That when you have that gelatinous bone stock in there just makes it so rich and you can have any kind of animal fat. You candidate kind of plant fat. You can have any kind of spice or anything to make it taste. Good and with chef at the Lakers facility was so talented that people would they would start their career. Maybe with the Lakers and then they would go somewhere else. They came back. They would come back in they said. Oh my God I love. This food is so much better than anywhere else. I've been because we're just getting back to route our roots. This is traditional food. This is how good food is supposed to be. And it's supposed to be fantastic because he use all the parts that are available to you. Don't throw away most flavorful. Things like we do right now. Few likes bone broth. Yes I love your skin your hair nails and in addition to your joints enter gut. And so I be remiss not to ask With his passing what will was Kobe. Bryant like what was it like working with heaven. And how did he? How did he eat? He was very direct very respectful very much. The leader if he believed in something he wanted everyone else to know what it was and He he. He was pretty sophisticated in his philosophy. He said that he didn't believe that any diet that wasn't good for your overall health could be good for your performance which is pretty profound right. Because we've got nutritionists. Were arguing that you need to eat. More sugar than I think is healthy. Because if you're an athlete you just need to feel with sugar. Forget they have body fat and in? Kobe didn't buy into that nonsense. So I you know. We haven't talked about covert at all and we aren't Kovin world and we're not going to go down the cove in Robert Hall but one thing I am. I've been curious about lately. Is You were becoming very sanitize world? So you know hand sanitizers the cost of living if you will and traveling and we of need to do it but there's definitely a consensus that it's not good for the skin bio so like what. How do we can't Iraq that that's the one thing we're doing this damage? We've gotTa have to do it when we travel and so forth so like how do you? How do you can rock the damage to the skin on your opinion with all the Senate like we're in the sanitize world? Yeah I think the whole approach needs to be looked at from a different perspective of is it really wise to forever try to live like the boy in the plastic bubble. A you remember that. Remember that movie in. He didn't have an immune system. Didn't have like whatever white blood cells so he lived his whole life without any good microbes and we know we're trying to be exposed trying to avoid the nature which is dirty And you know the approach that we're taking with this. Is that anti nature boy in the plastic bubble approach which I think you know if I if I were in charge of the world here I would have done it this way. I would have protected only the most vulnerable and I would have protected them most aggressively but I think to try to prevent a pro trying to prevent the common. Kohl's is that really smart. Is that something? That's sustainable. The answer's no and so to answer your question about what's going to happen with this endless Jesus's hand sanitizers. I think a lot of people with skin rashes. We're GONNA see a lot of people with weird skin infections even potentially from overuse of these weird chemicals that are killing off the good on our skin it. What can you do about it? Well if you insist on using the hand sanitizer if your employer does I would prefer actually that you wash with soap instead of regular so just because you're not going to at least be selecting for pathogens that can survive whatever chemicals in the hand sanitizer. Soak physically destroys the path. All you know everything equally right so it's not like selecting out for anything that could be more aggressive in burrow into your skin and caused serious infections like you know the series kind of staph and strep that people can get but and then Putting a moisturizer on your hands to at least foster a moisturizer with real traditional hats actually the moisturizers can foster the development of good bacteria and This scientists not really been. It's not something I'm an expert in there's probably dermatologists who a lot more about it than I do. But I it traditionally a lot of hot high sun intensive cultures did use skin creams complex. Ones like they would have certain kinds of clay certain kinds of fat in there and my belief is that it fostered the development of healthy bacteria because in these tropical climates. You get cut. It's so worm you could. You could have the worst kinds of weird organisms growing in that cutting. It gets sick really quick so they were without knowing anything about germs and microbes. They probably had figured out that. You healed faster when you use certain things on your skin so if you have to use hand sanitizer you definitely. WanNa use moisturizer your hands look for some who say fats in likes it. Like good healthy moisturizer. If you will I would still say to avoid the hateful. Eight in your moisturizers oils. So unlike a coconut oil is a traditional Actually in tropical climates they would ferment coconut oil in the Sun for certain defined amount of time And then use it as a hand sanitizer so that tells me that they were. Fostering some healthy bacteria in there are not handsome Kaiser. I'm sorry as a skin lotion. So by last question it's it's May twenty twenty What do you think we're GONNA be talking about a year from now like what's really interesting to you. In terms of attrition science or like where the world is going you know where. Where do you think we're GONNA be talking about a year from now? Well I'll just give you what I think we should do if we're smart. We if we know what's good for us we should take this whole corona virus As an opportunity to understand that our modern diet is the reason. This virus was so scary. It wasn't scary because older folks were getting pneumonias in nursing homes and dying from it because that happens every single year from the flu. That's why we invented flu vaccines and flew antivirals. So that heart even though it's not you know it's horrible if it's your grandparents they're dying of this but it's not the scary part that's that's part of life. Death is part of Life Infectious Disease Healing Older folks. That is part of how you know. It's they used to call it and this is going to sound terrible but this is the way the world used to be. It used to be more much sure about death as part of life and death at the end of life as an okay thing if that person was ready for it and so they used to call pneumonia the widows friend because it was. It's hard to live alone. You know when you're eighty five ninety In the day right in nursing homes so it was very often. That was how elderly women who die was from pneumonia and every year. The flu kills tens of thousands of elderly Americans and in fact way more than this corona viruses killed And and so. That's why I'm saying it's not scary because it's happens every year. What's been scary is that the virus seems to take out young people in you know. We talked for a while about well. These people have underlying health conditions yet. They have an unhealthy metabolism. And at but what made it really scared was every once in a while we'd be like will this person didn't have diabetes or any underlying conditions and it still took them out. It's a really bad virus. That's not what happened. What happened. Was that person who was labeled healthy. Had undiagnosed prediabetes fatty liver or other metabolic disease because the vast vast majority of prediabetes in fighting liver is undiagnosed in this country because doctors. Don't you know have a lot to offer for it? So we don't really screen for it so in your opinion like if we live Ellen listening wants to look for those things. Are there specific labs or tasks we should get to know if like someone listening may say like well like I think I'm pretty healthy but maybe not like how do I really know beyond the Hungry or tired so we already talked about the HDL tranquil strive ratio. That's very very important. If you're glycerine are much over one hundred certainly over one. Hundred and fifty. You may have a problem if your HDL is under fifty or the ratio is off. You know it's not two point five or higher And then If you're fasting blood sugars are consistently over ninety if your average blood sugar as measured by your elected. Mclovin is in the pre diabetic range. Which so you're glaciated Mclovin usually should be five point six or or lower that's a A number that diabetics and pre diabetics follow to see how well they're controlling their blood sugars. another is is your blood pressure normal is your blood pressure is higher than one. Twenty five over seventy five on a consistent basis you have a mild or very much higher than that more severe metabolic problem and it all comes down to the health of your body fat because in today's world and I haven't said this yet but you know these these these hateful ABC toils. They're not a minor component of a person's diet. Unless you're you know purposefully unless you're aware of them and you're avoiding purpose. They are at least eighty percent of your fat calories. And so if you're having half of your calories from fat these things are at least thirty. Thirty five percent of your total calories. That's a massive amount. We don't consume any other toxin in anywhere close to that quantity. And so that's why. This is the most important health marker whether or not your body fat is healthy because these the seed oils have something called polyunsaturated fatty acids they build up in your body fight over time. That's why your body becomes toxic because it has a high percentage of the polyunsaturated fatty acids from seed oils. That's why you're buying fat. Works against you. That's why metabolism goes down the wrong direction. And if it were not precede rails. I don't care about any of the other drug foods. If it were not pursue this corona virus would not be as serious as it is we would not have all this underlying conditions because the seed oils aren't 'cause the main cause the most powerful cause of these underlying conditions while we also need to shutdown that markets where people eat bats. It's it look it so it's horrific. It's sad there's devastation with people. Losing Lives People Losing Livelihood Z. CanNot like it's just sal around and it's it's it's complicated and I do think we would all agree that There there will be a focus again. Hopefully on you're really trying to take care of oneself so that we can build up our immunity and hopefully it gets hoping that's the silver lining. Yes I think that that is a silver lining. So we'RE GONNA start to get a little bit more real because for most of my career. Some people just didn't care if they were diabetic. Because they're like yeah but I'm fine. Take my meds I I don't care it's just you know it's so it's going to increase my risk of stroke. You know in ten twenty years it was a theoretical thing but this now makes it real in terms of staying alive flu season because I think it we're seeing we're coming understand that these infectious diseases hick off people who are not healthy. And that if you WANNA be able to live your life without having to be hospitalized for a month intensive care unit next time one of these things comes around then maybe let's let's take a good look at your diet and get yourself away from the judge received mostly in junk food. So if you go on any diet and stop that that gets you away from the deep fried stuff at restaurants all the junky muffins and stuff that you buy from Bay Grease and drive throughs and stuff like that. I I include that Junk Food and candy. You know if you get away from that kind of fake look extended shelf life food than that's like eighty percent. It sure it's in your salad dressings. You Might WanNa consider having something other than a salad. If you don't make it sil- addressing just put butter on steamed vegetables Sure is also in Mayo right so if you go to a restaurant that where you wanna get a sandwich. You'RE GONNA use their mayhem. You'RE GONNA get that bad stuff in there but But it's not as bad as the deep fried. It's not as bad as like that Muffin or the donut or the ships that are fried in the usual bad hatefully So my my last question will be on the fun light side. What is your favorite vegetable fun question? I'd say I'd say to be the onion because it's in every cuisine You can have it raw. You can cook with it and when you cook with it it helps de Blazer Pan so it helps if you cook meat first and then you add onions needed like the Brown stuff from me. You can D- glaze it with onion and a flat win spoon It it goes good with me with vegetables. You can caramelized. It makes Sugata as almost nothing. It can't do. Wow I love. It will close their the the underrated basketball kate. Thank you so much for all that you do and congrats on the FAB earn fix. Everyone needs to pick it up. It is a fascinating read. Congratulations thank you so much and it was fun talking to you.

basketball Lakers flu slash museum caffeine Kate Welcome founder Jason Dr K Ahan pneumonia RDA Mclovin Mexico
64. Kennedy Space Center's Space Shuttle Atlantis Experience Is Part Museum, Part Themed Attraction

Museum Archipelago

13:33 min | 1 year ago

64. Kennedy Space Center's Space Shuttle Atlantis Experience Is Part Museum, Part Themed Attraction

"Welcome to museum. Archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. We're going to start today's episode with a thought experiment. Think of a museum, the first museum, you think what does it look like hold that thought now think of theme park. How different do they look from each other. My guess is pretty different. But the Kennedy Space Center visitor complex in Cape Canaveral. Florida has aspects of both on the one hand it's a museum galleries, featuring spacecraft historic launch pads and the complete Saturn five rocket laid out in an enormous room. But on the other hand, it's a themed attraction, a destination featuring ride like simulators fiend concession stands, and the new space, shuttle Atlantis experience. It's as if the complex only a short drive away from Orlando Florida is competing for visitors against one of the Globes, most effective themed attractions, Walt DisneyWorld as it. Turns out not everyone mentally separates museums, and the parks. So discreetly avenue view about the relationship between entertainment and education. This is Tom Owen, a vice president of PGA, destinations who worked on that. New space, shuttle, Atlantis experience at Kennedy Space Center. Oh, my name is Tom Owen. I'm a vice president with PJ destinations. My background is in theaters scenery and lighting design provider. And so I've been able to incorporate that the ethical thinking into my work with museums, and zoos and aquariums and theme parks early the entire time. I've been here. So that's that's been a lot of fun. It's not surprising that someone who works in both museums and theme parks, would see similarities between the two but I am surprised that Owen doesn't see the world divided between education and entertainment. I think that entertainment is a great way to educate people if it was just the dry, fax, people would get bored and leave. You know. So entertainment doesn't. Finnish education. In fact, I think it, it often times makes it more effective. We believe that you can actually learn quite a few things from theme parks and themed attractions if you can appeal to emotions or connect people with people, there's opportunity for learning in all types of attractions. This is Diane Lochner, who is also vice president at PG, and she also worked on the space, shuttle, Atlantis experience. Hello, my name's Diane. Lochner I'm a vice president at PJ, V destinations PJ, be works on designing destinations and attractions where people spend their leisure time. My background is actually an architecture. I'm a registered architect. And so might intrigue is the understanding of the built environment, but how that impacts visitors as they're working their way through attractions and museums and the space shuttle, Atlantis experience can be described as both a themed attraction. And as a museum the exhibit. Which opened in twenty thirteen features one of the three remaining shuttle orbiters, the white part of the US, spatial system that looks like a giant glider Lochner, and the rest of the design team use principles of famed attraction design to introduce visitors to the orbiter. So we made some conscious decisions about how to introduce people to the shuttle itself. It's a it's a very scripted linear experience prior to witnessing the shuttle, and that was intentional because we needed to emotionally prepare the visitors to accept the information that they were going to learn about the shuttle, and so before anybody actually sees the shuttle itself. There is a short pre show film that gave a little bit of information, mostly about the, the people that were involved in designing the shuttle, it's not heavy it's, it's not deep. It's not long. And then they move into another theater, that is got a very inspirational film again, about the shuttle, and the launch. On some of the sequence of the process of the shuttle, and then, and then finally, at the end of that film, the shuttle is reveal very dramatically this type of time control with required. Film reminds me of a more, recent example, George Washington's headquarters tent displayed at the museum of the American revolution in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. This tent is presented in its own feeder, with screens and projections. If the tent with simply set up in the gallery, without the focused attention, people would just walk right past it. But by making large production out of it with lights screens and sounds, the effect is a viscerally memorable experience. Now back to the spatial Lantis, the image on the screen actually sort of aligns with the space shuttle, beyond at the end of the film, the screen actually lifts up and the visitors are presented nose to nose. So to speak with space shuttle, Atlantis. It's really been an interesting thing to watch. Visitors by and cry as that screen lifts up and reveals the shuttle, we created that really important preparation so that people were ready to receive the information in sort of start to learn and start their experience at spatial Atlanta's after the screen dramatically lifts up revealing the orbiter visits pass through a hallway, the screen used to be, and enter the Atlantis display after which they are free to wander through the entire gallery. The main idea of the gallery is that the US spatial system with an innovative program designed to use spacecraft so that the frequency of going to space, could increase an astronaut's could get more work done in space. The main takeaway, about the space shuttle, Atlantis attraction was the idea that the individual orbiters the, the thing that looks like the airplane, that everybody thinks of as the shuttle was part of a system, and that whole purpose of that whole shuttle program was working in space. And so we depicted Atlantis. As a workhorse. In fact, the way that we chose to, to display, it was banked at a dramatic banking, and with the payload bay doors, open, telescopic, arm, deployed just as it would have been at the moment that it was selling away from the international space station. So that, that message of, of Atlantis at work was a powerful image that we wanted to in ingrained in the minds of people every exhibit that was designed had to be approved by Nastase stem education team. So there was a again, a very strong interest that people learn and, and that, but also that the project would inspire the next generation of space exploration, that the project wasn't designed for people that are already space enthusiasts are already knew a lot about space. It was really designed, for the most part for people that we wanted to inspire, so that they would become space enthusiasts and maybe take an interest in stem or maybe even take an interest in. Career in the space program. So here's that middle part of the ven diagram the intersection of themed attraction and museum, the shuttle, Atlantis experience is educational, and it deals with a set of historical events, but heavily relies on some of the principles of themed attraction design to get the point across fundamentally, I see themed attractions as engineer the to create a specific emotional response in visitors and through that they offering a scape from the real world. They are chance for us to enter a fictional world, frontier land on the old west themed land in the magic kingdom at DisneyWorld never actually existed. But the clever trick is to make it feel like a lift in space that has its own history while I'm in a fictional world. Even the smallest thing that reminds me of the real world takes me out of the Aleutian and hilariously sometimes a theme park will even go so far as to put fake historical markers, and even museums that describe. People and events that never happened. But nevertheless, led to what the environment looks like today, but when I'm learning about the real world. I'm not sure the same strategies always apply. The real world is messy and the study of history, for example, is not amusing in episode seventeen of museum archipelago. I covered the spectacular failure of a Disney theme park concept called Disney's America in the early nineties, Disney's misguided idea would have put a park, showcasing, quote, the sweep of American history, including the institution of slavery. And the civil war within the fun, fem- park environment just outside Washington. DC Cortlandt Milroy writing in a series of Washington Post editorial about the then plan, Disney's America around nineteen Ninety-three brought out the inherent contradiction of the project. Merging fund out with a view into American history. He writes against the backdrop of continuing distortion of African American history. Which includes awful, textbooks and self-induced 'em. Nesia about the legacy of slavery, a slave exhibit by Disney doesn't even sound right by contrast, the US space program happens to be an example of a much less problematic history that as a result, works displayed in the themed attraction setting and one on US government property, not at DisneyWorld being shuttle astronaut was extremely risky of the five shuttle orbiters that have gone into space, only three of them are still around to display in museums. But nobody became a shuttle astronaut by accident and since the failed Disney's America concept, the big parks, have stayed out of attractions, based on real life histories, or at least relatively recent real life histories, instead, they have blurred the lines between various destination types by switching modes both Owen and Lochner, seal world where competition for visitors leads museums to focus more on creating that specific emotional response. You. Find in famed attractions. Museums are beginning to investigate other attractions relative to relative to continuing to capture more visitors certainly the ones that were talking to in the most recent projects, they are really beginning to understand that they might have to do some things that are a little more out of their norm relative to, to appealing to visitors because they still wanna make sure that obviously, they are achieving their goals, relative educational standards and things like that, but, but certainly the competition for time has really increased. So I think I think in general museums are starting to think about different ways of, of curing the experience for individuals in really beginning to connect to, to visitors emotions in, in different ways. Even though the, the objective of busy of may not be for providers to come in and learn something or at least not. To, to be able to go down a list of facts that they learned about a certain topic, which, you know, somebody might say his is their objective. I think people learn things going to parks. For example, if a if a kid is at a certain age, where they're they've been fearful of roller coasters, but they did they get brave, and they decide to, to get on a roller coaster. They're learning something important important about themselves. And the fact that they're put into a an experienced, it's really special and over the top, and different from their everyday experience, it inspires them at an opens up their, their world of thinking when thinking about museums as a medium. It's useful to look at theme parks to he parks and themed attractions are an incredibly young medium. And I if wonderful look back at the recent big immersive theme park experiences like the Wisden world of Harry Potter and the new galaxies edge Star Wars land and see a golden age of themed attractions, like the golden. Ages of film, gone by what role museums plan all this remains to be seen, but it all comes down to what people think of when they hear the word museum at the beginning of this episode what did you think of museums will continue to resist categorization? But I wonder if the trend for the largest, most visited and best funded museums of the world will continue to be towards themed, attractions, the carefully choreographed visitor experience at the space shuttle, Atlantis might make its way to history, museums. And when that happens, you'll hear about it on museum archipelago. Club archipelago members get access to a bonus podcast feed this week, on club archipelago, a collection of thoughts about the role of trust between people sponsoring exhibits who are emotionally close to the topics and outside contractors who do the nuts and bolts. Join today at patriotair dot com slash museum. Archipelago. This has been museum are Pelivan. You'll find a full transcript of this episode belong with shown at museum, archipelago dot com. If this is your first show, don't forget to subscribe for free in your favorite podcast player. Thanks for listening and next time. Bring a friend.

Tom Owen US vice president Disney Kennedy Space Center Diane Lochner Ian Elsner slash museum America Cape Canaveral Florida Pelivan George Washington PG Orlando Florida PJ Philadelphia
61. Jody Steele Centers the Convict Women of Tasmania's Penal Colonies at the Female Factory

Museum Archipelago

14:44 min | 1 year ago

61. Jody Steele Centers the Convict Women of Tasmania's Penal Colonies at the Female Factory

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started museums on the Australian island of Tasmania are a microcosm of museums all around the world. They struggle with properly interpreting their colonial past the exclusion of first peoples from telling their own stories in major museums, and having a large privately owned art museum reshape small town, this month on museum archipelago. We're taking you to Tasmania for the next three episodes were conducting a survey of museums on the island and exploring, how each of them relates to the wider landscape of museums today, we begin at the cascades, female factory in the Tasmanian capital city of Hobart. It's at the center of a shift in how Australians think of the role that convicts played in the colonization of the island Nilekani story is the story that everyone's heard about everyone seems to have an affinity, you'll want to discover something about it. It's awed that the famous story is equally as fascinating and as intra. Ticket as the mail story. And yet, until recently, nobody's really showing that much of an interest in it with the exception of Family Research, is what people who have specific connection the site tells the story of European colonization van demons land, the original European name for house mania, from the female perspective, the whole penal transportation to a stray and subsequently van David's land started as a result of prisons in England post industrial revolution and people ending to crime to, you know, without all of the industries that used to machines, taking their jobs. The prisons, just started to literally or floor so they needed a mechanism to get the people out of those spaces study the overcrowding and the colonization of Australia was an attempt or one of the many attempts to get that population out of Britain, and essentially fall, far away, over one hundred seventy thousand men, women children were transported from Britain during the transportation phase, which started in New South Wales in the late seventeen hundreds and. And invent land in eighteen ninety three the only museum in has mania that represents the female convicts story is the cascades, female factory where Dr Jody steel works as the heritage interpretation manager tie. My name is George steel, and the heritage interpretation manager for the foot off the historic sought management authority. We are lucky enough to be the portfolio manages three world heritage thoughts, which phone pot of the strain comeback sites. World, heritage nomination and the famous factory for under her portfolio, understanding, why the site is called the female factory means understanding, how the female convicts were seen as resources to the early, colonists, moving men Acuras labor force was something that seemed to make a lot of sense to the Brits to be able to pick up men and moved them across to fold trees into gather all the materials necessarily for building as literally building, and you colony. And then, of course, if you want that population to grow that can't be done with men, alarm, so in the early eighteen hundreds. The first vessels with women on board came, there's women in the first days as convicts we usually assigned directly out to the early promo population as your servants. So you housemaids you kooks and things like that as soon as anyone in that situation needed to be reprimanded for anything. I done they needed an establishment to do that. So as a result of that the cascades, female factory was established right here. Yeah. Rocky of eliciting? So the female convicts were an amazing resource to that particular set of colonials, they could have female convicts coming in care for their children witnesses educators, and a lot of these women were just petty criminals, you know, that were quite skilled at a number of trade. So you had you seamstresses and all of the trades that the men didn't lend a hand Stor. You needed somebody to do laundry for the colony. And so having a prison filled with women who you wanted to put onto hard labor to punish them laundry was one of the greatest ways to do that. You could all of the military prisons. Could have they, they uniforms laundered here in Boston? And so it gave the colony massive resource of trades that the men went to, which is why it got its name is the female factory the system operated under a strict series of punishments. That was nevertheless, at the discretion of the guards, it was managed by a hierarchy of those incarcerated and was encouraged by attitudes towards what it meant to be a respectable woman in the colonial society. A lot of the women who were assigned out where assigned out to people, some of them to people that they knew some of them even today, husbands, which is quite curious. And I think in those instances, there's an absurdity to the system where these women were assigned to people that, that would genuinely in love with. They wanted to have families week they go pregnant pregnancy while you were under sentence was considered a crime, which meant that those women ultimately would be removed from their assignment, bought back here to have the child, they would spend time with the child when it was a baby. They would be usually waned quite quickly from their mother and sometimes. Within within months that mother would then be back on the sentence being punished separated from her child with the child being left in the care of other convict women in the nursery, usually, but sort of three years of age the child would then be removed from this location. The nursery here removed into an orphan school, you may never see your child again now as somebody who wanted to have that baby with the person they will with that must've been horrific and then there is the flip side to that story when you could be assigned out to an individual master, he may have had absolutely no choice in folding pregnant, and yet you were the one who gets punished for that occurring, you would come back in here and quite often that into that, individual, who you were assigned to originally would simply just get a new female convicts servant, and, you know, you'll lift under punishment for something that was clearly not your fault. It must have been horrific. Dr Steele, says the biggest interpretation child. Enj- is that it's so easy for visitors to see the entire population of incarcerated people rather than individuals with vastly different often contradictory experiences. People come with a an understanding of mass population. They think of the convict population, and unless they happen to be descended from an individual convict. They find it really hard to think about the individual within the system and with over seven thousand women, passing through this sort of, you know, base few yards Lorne, and it seems to be that mass mentality that we try to break down here, which is one of the well, from my perspective is one of the more fun, things that I get to do is to find the audio-vidual, who's got an amazing tale, whether it be of a tragic tale, or title of resilience and strength telling the stories of individuals is complicated by the fact that not many artifacts remain. The site itself is made up of three yards surrounded by sandstone walls with only markings on. The ground indicating the size of prison cells or nurseries, the challenge here. Unlike a lot of our other convict site, museums is that the artifact jewel material associated with female convicts in really present even state, museums don't have a lot of material associated with female convicts, there is an, the material history surrounding them, that's made maintain it has for the men. That's probably one of the hottest things to deal with is the fact that the most of the convict population clearly didn't have access to the time or the inclination to sit down run daily journal, and most of them the literacy Wilson, particularly high, usually when they arrived, but part of the cone BIC system was actually educating a lotta these people. So a lot of them lift with a much better education than when they came in. But again, by the time they could have sort of sat down and written a journal, they will most likely off getting married building businesses building, the, the colony as it is today. So there's a massive gap and. We really do. Rely heavily on what he is. The administrators view of these individuals. Right down to the way they described the when they got off the ships, and then we rely heavily on their descendants, who have all those stories in the ARL histories associated with how they fit family some built up from as individual women. Dr Steele, talks about a massive cultural shift in Australian attitudes towards ancestors, who may have been incarcerated because the family stories of the female factory go back just two or three generations. It's an opportunity for the museum to better interpret, and educate by becoming a hub for those stories for a very long time having a convict densest. It was considered something to be ashamed of, and that's probably only shifted in the last twenty years, why people now have the sense of pride of being descended from Kong-based when they were became aware that even though they may have been criminal, some of them quite serious. Some of them petty that they wear responsible for essentially building the new colony of ustralia and so. That's that's been a real shift in people being really proud of it now. And because genealogical Ray set she's now like enormous. We've got access to things that, that aren't that oppressor record the convict records business records and images of shopfronts where these people built businesses massive massive change in attitude. The female factory is in the middle of a design process to open the brand new history and interpretation center on the site, the process begin with an architectural design competition, judged by an all female panel. It's really important when we're working on this, that we recognize the contribution of women to society. I mean that is that he's what is place is, is recognized and part of that process when we put the coal out for the actual design competition was that we really wanted women to contribute to this project. We had over fifty original people who came in here, put their hand up to get involved in the competition and. We pulled together a team of amazing women mostly architects, and the chair about Boyd, Sharon Sullivan, who oversaw the process, and it'll was the review of all of the nominations looking for things like female contribution, of course, looking at the heritage impacts, and how the building would would sit in the in the landscape. And what stories the building itself might tell that the new building that they were hoping to put in this space will be clearly identifiable as a brand spanking, new building, that is that is part of our intention, but it will also hopefully be aside from being beautiful architectural structure where hoping that it will recede. And then the individual stories will come out as you're inside the building the building, will be located, or the cellblock location. So, I guess, in a linear form, it will represent part of the historic landscape, but outside of that most storytelling, we'll have to be in a very different format. We'll have to get really. Creative. We work really closely with a group of people that are called the female convict research center, that started, as, as a bunch of women female researches, who I think that would forgive me for saying that totally obsessed with female cone, BT street, and they have built up a an amazing Dada base of all of the female, convict women. And so we have access to that database, any would I mean what an amazing thing to be able to nor that you have a female big ten sister to be able to come here to tap into that? Find out how long they were here exactly what space they were living in working in even being punished in to be able to go to that space and stand essentially in the footprints of your ancestor would be an amazing thing. You can see the winning design in the show notes for this episode. The architects, call for a beautiful, but solemn building with plenty of play between the open spaces of the yards as they are today and the confined spaces of the cells as they used to exist. List, who is a city partially built with convict labor, but the reminders, the type of stone on the building, for example are subtle and you have to know what you're looking for a structure like the one proposed removes the subtlety and makes it harder to forget. I would, I would love, you know, the female convict history to be the first thing that people engage with, and then to flow on into into the story of the men, I want people to walk away, even if they don't have a better understanding of, of convict female convict history. I want to walk away asking questions and I think that's what we all want in, when we billed as places we want them to start questioning what they believe what they think what they knew before. They walked in the door. I don't necessarily I mean subliminally I'd love to educate everyone who will stir the dole. But quite often those people are on holidays, and they probably don't won't be lectures for narrative off about convict history. But I want them to walk away, questioning, you know what these place meant to test mania or you know what the women at least filter will win through to try and get some kind of, you know. 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219: The strange future for restaurants | Kimbal Musk

The mindbodygreen Podcast

49:28 min | 7 months ago

219: The strange future for restaurants | Kimbal Musk

"Welcome to the MY BUDDY GREENE. Podcast objects in walkup founder. And cosio of my buddy green and your host. Today's episode is brought to you by my buddy green and our incredible museum plus sleep product before this product. It took me hours to get to sleep and end up tossing turning than hitting the snooze on the alarm as woke up in the morning. Yes I slept but it really wasn't quality now with magnesium plus I fall asleep faster I stay sleep and I wake up rejuvenated and without an alarm clock. Look we all know when you don't sleep. It's pretty brutal. And it is terrible for your immunity in terrible for your health and yeah I slept but it wasn't quality sleep and now I never knew that sleeve could be so good. I hope you check out our pioneering sleep formula at my green dot com slash museum. That's buddy green dot com slash museum kimball. Boss is a chef. Restaurateur Philanthropist and real food entrepreneur his mission to pursue America. Were everyone has access to real. Food is mission. We can all get behind Europe by degreen. He's been named the Global Social Entrepreneur by the World Economic Forum and he's the CO founder and CEO of the kitchen restaurant. Group was by the way. Has One of my favorite restaurants called next door ever in Chicago or Denver. I always go. He's also the CO founder and Executive Chairman of two other incredible companies big green and square roots so in terms of the restaurants they source sustainably grown food. American farmers stimulating the local farm economy to the tune of millions a year his nonprofit big green bills permanent outdoor learning in classrooms and hundreds of underserve schools across America reaching over three hundred fifty thousand students every day. And then there's tackle able food companies swear reuss which build urban farms in climate controlled shipping containers with the mission to bring real food to people in cities around the world empowering next-gen Farmers Trini Coop List. On the board of Tesla and SPACEX quite simply. He's one of the most successful mission driven entrepreneurs in the world. Today was sure thinking out loud or asking alowed. He's along brother Kimball is an honor to have you here on the podcast. So welcome thank you so much. So let's star going way back when you broke your neck in a pretty serious snowboarding accident we were. You could have died and you're paralyzed for a number of days and you had a recovery that required you to stay red horizontal for two months so walk us through that injury and how it changed. Your Life Changed Your perspective. Yeah I mean it truly was Was the worst and best thing that ever happened to me. My life was a mixed between food and technology. I whipped in both areas but I love food and I was trained. Chef but technology is magnetism around technology. Because you you you can do something and reach the world really. Is something wonderful about it? Ned? Since it wasn't my love you know what I loved was food and I kind of one foot in checking on foot in food very frustrated with my life in many ways I probably would continue that way for a long time and I would I did. And as far south especially unhappy I was. I was not a happy person. And I'm people have a very heavy person and and I Ski Hill is actually on a children's run on an inner tube so it wasn't even on the snowboard. I wish it was a cooler story and it was an energy run. But you know for ten roles and I'm six foot four and This was the time of the surgery. Six hundred five so that was amazing. I love a nick and I was in hospital paralyzed. Which is is impossible to describe. It is It's this feeling of nothingness. You don't feel pain. You don't feel anything I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy. It is just the most terrifying thing that the doctor was explaining to me. That was the way I had broken. My neck is very very unique. Way of breaking Break your neck different degrees and I had broken at zero degree angle. Which has never happens. And so he said that they can actually removes the Paralysis Adams. The blood out of his final was ruptured. This is like a quadriplegic situation and they went into the spinal column removed blind and For two months I had to be horizontal bed but of course able to walk now and function Yeah I mean it was. It was extraordinary in with breaking the neck was debt. Epiphany moment I think which most many people talk about where. Wow I'm GONNA change my life this I've now I have permission to change it known. Judge me I could go go train for the circus of I wanted to do and be like hey broke his neck. Whatever for me. It was food. And you know there's a lot of beauty and wondering and awesomeness about restaurants in creating the gathering place but it doesn't have the ego that you get from building these world changing technology companies. And you know when you almost die you your ego's just obliterating and so it was an opportunity to focus on food wasn't just restaurants Sweetie kids in food was that was really important to me was giving kids a connection to real food. My kids were time for and seven nine out four kids but the older ones were that age and it reading meant so much to me in an I already done work on. The side is philanthropist. Supporting School Gardens that I said Figure out how to scale school gardens. I'M GONNA figure out how scaled gathering place because we. We need connect with each other. We need to meet the love. The love of our life for the first time we need to go celebrated anniversary or take a friend for a birthday. That's what lasts all about you. Know what are we living for if if if not that and it kind of brings us to this crisis today. Which is about my worst nightmare. You know where we. We have to sit at home and not connect with each other. I'm just not designed for that at all. I really am struggling with. I'll be honest so there's a lot to unpack there And I'm going to go back. You mentioned passion or technology and Passion for food in your opinion. What are the similarities between those industries? and what are the differences and going from one to the other is not something you hear of every day. I'm curious you know you talk about similarities and differences and what can check learn from sued and vice versa? If anything IT'S A it's a great question and it is a question that that I think about a lot. Let me talk about what I hope will happen. Rather than maybe what is happening? What is what I hope will happen? Is that technology will come more and more into food in a way that it helps us to connect with people more and more easily more affordably. More excessively and at our restaurants working on The ability order from your iphone for example and that is not in any way meant to move hospitality removes a server. It just meant to be you know we've all been in restaurant all the time when you just WanNa order another round of drinks. Watch your iphone or the drinks. It's that easy you've been in a restaurant where you want to leave it and then you're waiting a little bit longer than you'd like to the check technology that easy things technology to solve and yet yet. We haven't been able to solve that and so what I'm doing now. Restaurants is building technology that enables that time on demand ordering from guests but with the intention that we spend more time connecting with friends with our friends in the restaurant. Maybe we order an extra drink because we have. We're having more fun than we have a bit more funding. We expected them. Start Happy Hour and all of a sudden. It's nine PM. I want technology to help us do that. And so so that's kind of where I hope it's going where where I think. The technology industry can learn from. Food is just as amazing power of connecting with each other That I that I I know I know many of my friends so the valley complained so much about how boring it is. There's just so little connection with with others But it's it but that's changing. There are more restaurants opening better restaurants shifts starting to realize you know. Their talents are appreciated. Their people are starting to be more social so I I do hope that there's a merging of the two over time and technology to me is really anything. A plate is. Technology table is technology. We invented those things at one point so eventually they will merge together and and if if what what results in is a more connected more beautiful world that I'm I'm on board so you mentioned accessibility. And you said your mission is to in America. Were everyone has access to to real food. So what does that America look like to you? What do you want to look like? And why is access to real food? Just been so hard you know. I think there had been a number of reasons. Real food is a physical that you trust to nourish your body. Who that you trust the farmer and that you trust nurse the planet? It's really not that complicated. But the problem with the industrial food system. Is You ship food from thousands of away you use flavor you harvest the product Info? It's ripe so you'll get lettuces or that don't taste very good Is Terrible for the environment. You don't even know who the farmer is can't trust the organic Organic certification especially outside of us in shipping enthused from as far away as China. I mean it's it that no one wins in this case and certainly not consumer an and not the earth the foreign so so the challenge with it is there's so many ways chat to tackle is what I what I've done at at the kitchen with our restaurants is we have. We have two two levels. We have a restaurant will kitchen. Which is high- higher. End Strong focus on supporting farmers that we know entrust very seasonal. We'd love the playing with the seasons and wherever in right now on a summer's on his own summer salad that is very basic region of Missouri and Aruba that with Tarragon and mints and Chives tossed in there. We're able to grow right here right now. In in all of those agrees can be grown in in April in Colorado's with a little shaved Palmerston's up and just not about and it's just one of them was delightful salads. You can imagine that's the kitchen does and it's like A. It's that some special seasonal food. The challenge is this a little more expensive than most people can handle and so we created next door which is really meant for twenty five to thirty five year olds more fun. The first thing you didn't order there's Margarita. You nothing to think too much about the food because when you're twenty five year you're thinking about Margarita and forty seven. I'm thinking about the Margarita in so an excellent that as you. Leave your the Margarita. First and then We're changing the menu. Imagine with the Cova crisis we really thinking hard about how to change the menu to match the future so in addition to ordering on your head blown which I think we'll be much safer for the guest really doing it for our staff staff. Inter customers a hundred times a day. Not Having to exchange credit cards with their social distancing technology can really help there but in the menu were also changing the Burgers so we're wrapping burgers and paper in the restaurant you know. That's not a normal thing for a restaurant like accounts to do. But we think that it's the right thing to do knowing how how you design a burger that that is still in that very affordable price point eight ninety five ninety five but with locally raised beef absolutely all real food and in a in a in a wrapped in paper so it's safe and delicious literally working on changing the menu as we speak What we're essential business of we actually get to use this time to innovate which is actually a little bit cool as well but so that's what we're doing in the restaurant side. Think about the next door has focused on the twenty five to thirty five year olds in the end the kitchen. More thirty five fifty five year old focus and then swear roots is our urban farming company. Which is about the age range. Eighteen to twenty five where young farmers get access to a shipping container. That is a leave cooler. Part of the five Acre farm that they run to one year and it's a full profit business but the purpose of it is to empower the next generation of young farmers. They only do it for a year and then they graduated. We set them up with a job in the industry after that usually farming sometimes in a package food or restaurants on the Gulf of the goal is to reach reach young adults eighteen to twenty five and then with big green. We are a nonprofit. We will in schools and we build earning gardens. Which are beautiful apple classrooms that teach kids ages four to eighteen science math entrepreneurship skills? English depending on the grade all of Antle at the end of highschool and that is in almost seven hundred schools around the country. We'RE IN CHICAGO MEMPHIS. Pittsburgh Eaten Annapolis Detroit Denver and Ellen. I love it Enzo personally I remember the first time my wife and I discovered it was the kitchen next door and the train station in Denver I did. We did exactly what you said. It started with a Margarita and then it just kept on just kept on going although we were you know. I'm forty five now so you know. I aged your restaurant a little bit at just out next. Always my favorite for sure because I I think I just WANNA chill out. I just want to relax and we loved it and you know what I love about the mission and what you're doing with the kitchen and big green and square roots. Novi take a step back. You know it's about about access but it's also about education you can have all the access in the world but if you don't know about why that choice is better choice. You're probably not gonNA make it and they go hand in hand. I love that approach about how you've come to a market where all the pieces have to come in you don't you don't just pop restaurant and say like okay. The Foods Amazing. And you're gonNA love it and so forth like education in critical whether it's with children whether it's with in the urban environment it you're you're dressing the whole ecosystem if you will or the system and that Liam Powerful. Yeah I love to Chicago's babies ample where we have square roots just on the on the Michigan side of the border and then we have Chicago kitchen as well as next door and then we have two hundred learning gardens city. And so we're we're having a wonderful impact on that city and I can't say enough good things about its recall. That has just been a not not only not only part of the mission and good to us as an organization is oftentimes you go into a city and they're welcoming over less welcoming. You surprised they. They're they're really believers in the mission really really want Chicago. To be the best city in the world Mayor Emanuel and now mayor lightfoot both leave in in in helping the under served in their inner cities to learn about real food the the guests in in the city of Chicago wants to eat real. They want they want to next to what they want. The kitchen attack the kitchen. Chicago's most successful restaurant. And that is a very disturbing They quote the shark tank of restaurants cities such orange he succeeded. And we're very proud that we we. We've been successful air. And then with with two hundred learning gardens where reached one hundred and thirty thousand kids every school day in Chicago teaching him science in English and math. And then as you get to high school. We teach them entrepreneurship skills to grow the food and sell to local restaurants and we organized that and it's phenomenal program while I've actually Parked myself in that Chicago restaurant on by one day turnaround visit jobs. My wife and I both on that we park there. Isn't it the most beautiful face in the city? It is just as the rest of the river you've got the sun streaming in and that building. That building was an unused restaurant space for two decades before we took it over and we just love with old buildings that that Modern Day Restaurant Tours And they're just truly beautiful. He's all buildings there. There is a magic to it. We even even remove the plaster in that restaurant in some of the others where we can. And you'll see the construction drawings that they wrote in in marker back in nineteen fourteen when they built the building and we leave that up so cool. That is quote. What look at everything you're trying to accomplish. Is Coal Looking at the whole system? And is we talk about access. I'm very curious. I'm sure this is maybe a fluid conversation as the world is changing so rapidly but before we go to code and how it's GonNa Change The restaurant world. I'm curious like what is the new thing about all three organizations. You know the kitchen. The kids next door while four big green square roots. Like what is what is the vision. Where do you want? Were you want them to be and say three to five years but is the ultimate vision? Yeah I don't think like I like to think fifty years out and say by the time I pass away as hope. I lived to a healthy ninety seven. That'd be nice. My grandmother lived to ninety eight so I can ask for ninety seven and I wanNA believe that. I've made impact how people connect together not just over food but food being Michael for it but I want a more connected world. I want more marriages throughout through our restaurants. I want more parties in connecting friends and and with when it comes to our learning gardens in schools. I want kids to grow up that with a true understanding. Of what real food. Is this still? Choose to eat other food. I mean I have a burger in our restaurants. I'm not judging a better but I but my kids the kids that we work with across all of our schools now over three hundred fifty thousand kids. They know what tomatoes they know what lettuces they know what it is and they can choose what eat or not but but at least they know what it is and then when it comes to our young farmers might vision in fifty years is we will have Graduated thousands of next generation farmers into the American food system and whether they build new farms whether to become the CEO of the next Google. They're gonNA come from this beautiful background and understanding what real it is. And they'll feed their employees better. They'll feed their kids veteran. Will they'll feed their community better and generally it's a happier world because of that ain't bad. Take me there so on that note you know how will restaurants change in a Kobe? Nineteen world like what? What can we expect? What is that dining experience? Look like yeah I mean. I couldn't be more sad about the this particular viruses is so cruel when it comes to the restaurant gathering place There are many restaurants like a fast casual restaurants fast food. They're probably fine but gathering together. Was your friends with your wife. Your husband with your kids Those are the very special memories that that revenge for appeared right now where that those memories are not being created it is. It's it's economically devastating of course and I feel for the entire industry. It is a tragedy for for the General Venous in well-being society that that that tragedy might long time to recover We take a long time to recover what I look at in China for example and watch very closely where they have virtually no cases all grown of anymore. The restaurants are forty percent full. There's still a lot of fear in those communities around whether they can come out they've also been culturally wired to remain at home order things online and Iron any issue with people ordering delivery or takeout from restaurants. I think we want to encourage them. But but it's not the same thing. It's not even close to the same thing of the vibe in the hospitality. The the smile on your face when you walk into on our restaurants it you feel the energy of people around you at that at that that is gonNA take a while to recover A. I honestly don't know how long it could be years but I'm in for my fifth year time line. Thank goodness is fifty years because if you said five I'd I'd be worried but I do think we'll be okay within five years and mostly because of vaccine will come at some point that My hope is that our governors in our mayors will will enable us to reopen with a mandated fifty percent. So what I would worry about is irresponsible reopenings. So a total carefree reopening. I think is a mistake but I don't think it's a good idea for us to keep our restaurants closed we should. We should enable them to be so that the cultural wiring enables us to go out to eat to safely and then let that bill very slowly over time. That would it if I was. That's what I would suggest and what I hope is. We have plan like that. What I'm learning about is a plan. Where there there's this like. Okay you can open now and we made up getting a spike beck in the virus in the up to close game and and I feel very fortunate to be in Colorado. We have a governor here. Who's doing Garett Bolles? Who's WHO's being very thoughtful He's he's reopened the state but now county-by-county are we gonna be reopening based on the actual data in state. I'm it feels healthy. Feels like a good path. But I honestly I think we'd be lucky if we end up with fifty percent of the gathering place restaurants still around a year from now while this. I mean full service restaurants. So one theory. I am curious what your thoughts are a read a lot of opinion pieces on what's going to happen and so one interesting theory which. I read and I. I think makes potential senses. The middle is going to get really hurt. explains so like on one end to restaurants who are going to survive and thrive through this horrific time. You're going to have to do you. Killer takeout and the. That's cocktails everything. It's takeout scrubbing go. However when people are gonNA come back to restaurants because of social distance facing you're GonNa have to you have fewer tables and because there are fewer tables you're going to have to charge more so potentially it's going to be more expensive More premium to go out and eat a meal. And so you're going to have this sort of evaporation of the middle where there's going to be like on one hand take out and on the other hand. I'm in a restaurant. Used fifty tables now has ten and so because the economics you're GONNA have to charge a lot more through that experience. Yeah I haven't really thought about it that way. I think the the way I would probably say is is different is if you do fifty percent occupancy This is a very important point that people don't realize you can't take tables at restaurants because there's nowhere to put them magic thinking off the table out of every restaurant American women. Would we put them like? There's no way to put the so. That's that's not gonNA happen but what would probably happen is we might put plans on every second table so that those tables are in the restaurant and they just are not suitable and I think things like that are reasonable to expect but if you're creating a fifty percent capacity what I think is going to happen is landlords will have to charge fifty percent rams the banks will have to accept sixty percent payments from the landlords so the economic system there. That's a in a behind the restaurants moorlands. In the banks. Have stieg haircut. The restaurants will probably talking about how restaurants will probably be able to break even if percents But we missions gathering place so we are not gonNA close. We're going to open so we can't be the gathering place we're GonNa do it super safely. We're GONNA do navy order on your phone. So that keeps the guest safe and also more about the staff in this case in the gas. 'cause samples he so many guests per day. The number of staff in the restaurant would be reduced because we would see and then within a few weeks we should be able to see if this is causing a spike in infections. And I don't I don't mean it's GonNa take very long because that's like happens very quickly as we saw New York and other places. It doesn't take long understand impact. And so I think within say two weeks we can see the data and then we could move to a seventy five percent occupancy and maybe maybe some reduce safety proportions. We wouldn't need to wear masks. Maybe that but that would be decided by the health experts and then We might move to one hundred percent after that but not with the idea that we're in the clear we would be at one hundred six NC knowing that at any point we might need a drop back to seventy five percent of Obama fifty percent. What we need is a very thoughtful reopening strategy so that we don't close the game because if we're forced to close a gain that would be absolutely the the nail in the coffin and I don't even mean because restaurant tours would WANNA do wouldn't WanNa do at Orlando's wouldn't be flexible. Banks would be flexible. I mean that we would lose. Our Workers Office would be at that point convinced they should not be in the restaurant industry. They should find another industry. Wilkin and it'd be mass exodus from the front of business right now. People still expecting to come back to work and they still loved the restaurant industry and most people are because they love it. Not Because of the money and Were most cautious about that. So in our case we're not planning on changing pricing we're not planning on increasing pricing We are expecting everyone to be in a together. Meaning banks in the government and the and the landlords and be expecting guests to adhere to safety protocols We're requiring staff to do that But price point. We're not. We're not expecting to change in fact we're working hard to even lower prices because we think that people are going to be much to out. Sir. So I'm curious in a very uncertain world in what are you and I'm sure you have ups and downs like everyone especially being entrepreneur What are you most worried about? And what are you most excited about right now? Well when most worried about is the government because the payroll protection act needs to change to Support restaurants as you heard. Most of the money did not go to restaurants. Even the rest of the biggest employers in his payroll protection act is meant for payroll and most restaurants Especially the small ones will cut out at me unforgivable. So they they're changing. That are heavily will get restaurants supported the needs to change that the window when the heaped starts needs to win were allowed to reopen right now. The window starts on April Twentieth. Which is which is really stupid. Because we aren't allowed to hire people where we'd be breaking the law to hire so they gotta change that. I'm most worried about it because government terrifies me. It's the you know the famous frayed. What's the scariest sentence you could ever hear is? I'm from the government. I'm here to help. That's a good once so on very worried about the government. And how they're GONNA help that. They we do need their help The most optimistic about is when they connect with people over skype or zoom or Google hangouts. Everyone is talking about getting back. Gathering personally can't wait and wait fields the lot he eat again. I can't wait to go out and have a Margarita. They can't wait to take your friends out for a birthday party. They can't wait to take their their a life partner. Wives husband due to To a restaurant it can't wait to go to a concert. Venue gain Live music. They just can't wait to do so. I'm very optimistic. That once the under control. I think we have. We'll have a great opportunity to revive the the industry because people will be so they wanted so bad. I I'm just hopefully that. Will that will be happen sooner than later on? I just don't know when that will be so you mentioned earlier having a tough time like everyone else dealing with all this. I'm curious you know. What do you do when you have a bad day? You GO FOR IRAN. You know to go to recipe ago to drank like what's your what's your own routine. What do you do when you're like you know what I need a break? You know it's amazing so I play I play strategy games with my friends. So they're these games like chess but they're lumo complex jest but his chess is one of the Games. I play and it's amazing. How much it takes my brain away from the stress of the day. Because you into the game in your life to to focus on the game and People have play out pretty good saw. Don't win all the time I'll when maybe thirty or forty percents of the time and it's a great stress reliever for me to get my head out of this endless nauseating cycle of news if you if you do have some time today and you decide you want to check the news while you feel worse. After that. His misery Mike Microscope. Amplifies everything everything white about? And it's always been that way but it's much worse now so strategy it's been great any other really wonderful thing. I gotta say this Quarantine has done is is. I'm at home with my kids and so I had lunch with them. Every day We got these remote control airplanes. You know go out into distant field and slide him in his. And it's I would say for connecting to my kids. It's actually been quite Quite a gift. So you mentioned connecting the kids like a lot of people listening you have a famous family to say the least And what I have so much respect for so i. I was raised by a single mom and have so much respect for single moms. And you know. Your mom was a single mom and of curious. You know your mind and I'm sure a lot of people here reflecting right now You know what what did your. What did your mom do so right if you will you know raising you your brother? Eli On your sister. Tosca what what was her? What was her secret you know. My mother was is still an amazing role model so she wasn't quite a teacher in the standards that a very maternal. Lots of talk. Let me show you how to do. Things was more of a role model of. Hey Times are tough. That's not a reason to be happy. Life isn't fair all the time. That's not a reason to be unhappy very much. That sort of a a Com matter-of-fact matter-of-fact that view and cushy. She worked fourteen hours a day of river. Cheap he's still does to this day and so supported the family of what that will so that gave us an enormous amount of independence and we had a role model of someone that that worked very hard loved. What she did and her her phrase that I grew up with was to what you love the money will come a my mother was a Dietitian is not not a high paying job and she was a model as well which is actually very low paying job unless you get famous. She's gotten famous in the past few years but it took her until she was sixty nine to earn more than twenty thousand dollars a year in modeling. You know like it's just not a money maker but she loved it right in her died Was she was very successful with that. But in terms of generating money but the point is that you do what you love and my comments something that my mother has always has always shared with us and then something that I think is. Great is she. She's a good friend. You know so. It's not like there's a she. She never really tried hard to be the mother maternal mother she. She tried hard to be what she wants. She just naturally was a good friend. Even seven eight nine it was. It was a good friend Which was really Nice. So good listener. More like a supportive person support listener. You may maybe it has been to say so. The cheerleader killied friend. So you mentioned Shoes Dietitian. Now model was like a Curious like your mom is absolutely stunning. What what is she what is she? What is she eating? What is she doing? What's what's her her secret to Health and wellbeing. What is she doing so right? One hundred ten. We'll be doing our restaurants an answer. Big Green and splattering is my mother's philosophy of home at Coined by Michael Palin but my mother is is a has been since she was twenty twenty years old a real food advocate and her belief in eating simply in a way that you can consistently do it so she really is a believer in sued that matches your lifestyle. Not just not food. That is a trend of if you if your lifestyle. Is You go to go to office in a city. Any can you have to be there at eight? Am and you leave in full or you should. You should figure out a diet that works wealthy during the day. You you work at home you you actually need a lifestyle evidence better there and And it's really about mentioned into your lifestyle so that you aren't catching the next trump and thinking that's gonNa sold your your your diet. Bet But she she wrote a book in the ninth book feeding fantastic and it was all about really tracking what you eat understanding what you liked. Eat and it's a simple thing. If spader in breaking into a little table of days of the week in each hour of the day and every time he gets up thing just write down and at the end of the week. Do you watch what you've eaten and you say these are the things that I like to eat? Eat and so you can start to design food for your lifestyle that way it. Everyone is a little different. I love that one hundred percent agree. I if it doesn't fit the lifestyle you're not going to stick with it. It's GONNA come and go at one of my favorite lines around. Exercise is the best exercise. Is the one you actually do if you if you hate if you hate running you're never going to Rut? You're GONNA stop running so out what you like and build it in your life otherwise is gonna come and go yet. Exempting amid look the seven rules of attack to people seven habits of effective people and it has another great tip on eating and exercising. And it's basically it says. Think about our weekly basis. How many hours do you want to dedicate to eating with your family with yourself? How many hours do you WanNa dedicate to and then break it out across week? Don't think about a day by day because you can be so aren so but if you think of one week ahead. Oh Friday's going to be a little different to Saturday. Because I've got my kids at home on Saturday. I WANNA do brunch with them and I want to do yoga. Try and do the gym. You know it's it's really understanding your lifestyle and matching into that so locate your successful entrepreneur. Who's been Annapolis for twenty five plus years of juries if you could go back twenty five plus years to nineteen ninety five and give yourself advice when you any law started. Zip Two together. What advice would that be? What would you what advice would you give yourself pretty happy with the path that I took? I wanted to be an investment banker. South Super Weird but in the eighties. I was super excited by being an investment banker got into the top business school in Canada and and I got then I got the best internship in investment banking summer and wild. Did it suck? I do not want to be my life and all and so I had dropped all my finance forces and at the same business school because you can get out without changing but if you restart and so I started doing physics in plus electives and enjoying my university more a social experiment than a business school training I didn't enjoy so I think the the advice that I give myself would be. It's absolutely oh Kedah to change. What you're doing. I actually did do that. Did that often done alive. I went from technology the food and done that and I feel good about that but I would say there have been times when I've stuck in too long when not because I'd intrusive appearance is what makes the business. But but it's because I didn't love it and if you don't love it I I call doing startups. It's like chewing glass looking into the abyss is hard as hell is. So you better like glass. Sandwich Ephraim for me the rep the gathering place in restaurants man. I will chew glass to make sure that happens but building a social networking APP on your phone. It's not it's not man for me. I just can't wake up in the morning in and keep doing so that same note if you go back to nineteen ninety five. What advice would you give your brother back? You know. He's he's obviously the great for himself. feel I really feel empathy and I do things for the right reasons like because we really believed the world needs it and we've personally tortured ourselves. You know not other people. Don't jams up internally you can. It's torturing to do that but I think surrounding to do for for me at least than for my brother. We both do what we believe. And we hope I mean. My brother did cars rockets. Last in the world you'd ever make money on and know he's doing well. I mean that's that's that's an unusual thing you know. I I even with the nonprofit route because I really felt like that's success fascinating. We needed to learn about on school grounds. If you're a for profit the red tapes too high or with this making a nonprofit and I think that just doing what we love if you love it the world needs it and if they'll pay for it you've got yourself a amazing combination that that could guide you through entire life if you ever will read as if you just have to. They don't pay you for it. You have to have existing financial wealth which I happen to have this in providence nugget. But really you have to be able to be paid for what you're doing otherwise it's so. Everyone knows. He Llamas an entrepreneur. But what's something that we don't know about Ilan as a brother he loves to FACE STRATEGY GAMES OUR GETTING SUSAN's crisis. So he likes to play like that games great because they don't just teach you how to win teach you how lose and when you're going through the incredibly difficult crisis like this you're losing twenty times a day so you kinda need to take the edge a little bit and so teaching. Kids yourself yourself. How to deal with using his is actually also very populism. So he's he's a good sport when he loses he lose as long as it was a good game. Okay what was a bad game? Then then doesn't so how look for so many people. This is an opportunity for a reset. It's people are trying to find a silver lining I. It's also people dealing with you know unbelievably difficult circumstances and a lot of people are probably the question of you. Know what what do I WANNA do? And what is success? Really look like and I'm curious you know for you. Know how. How do you define success? What does success look like? And and what's your advice for? People asking that very question right now is trying to make sense of this but I do. I like to reset that is that is an unfortunate reality here which is is a reset of so many industries restaurants for sure there the eye of the storm but for many businesses. It's a reset and sometimes it's a good thing. I think in the case of restaurants two or three years from now we might look back at this and say wow that we said really set us up for understanding. Wh who who were better I think that for individuals. I I believe a reset is an opportunity for you. Change change of career if you think the wrong career. It's an opportunity to change your life if you WANNA set yourself. I always wanted to move to London after the bicycles on now many of them write that down. And maybe you should do that. You know like Like A it's when I broke my neck. It was a gift because it gave me so much permission to reset my life. And I I view any crisis like that and this one included as as an opportunity to give yourself permission to make a life change since you've always wanted to make a love and so last question any any closing advice for aspiring entrepreneurs right now who are looking to start a business or in the thick of it. Well I think that Be careful about starting in business right now because what the the nature of the beast is changing on a daily basis. So I would. If you have a good idea I would continue to think about it and work on it but you may want to give yourself a month or two before you dig in because because we want to get to a plateau of of the new normal and then I think it be lots of opportunity in what we know what that is if you are in the thick of it is a great churchill. Close if you find yourself in hell keep going up. I found myself coating that. Watch so most entrepreneurs right now are in hell? Just keep going. Well we'll close their keep going. Everyone keep going well kimball thank you so much for spending time with us and all the amazing work you're doing at the kitchen big green square roots and we all look forward to getting back and having a Margarita in a group bigger than one and it sounds rape out to everyone and anyone around me all thank you so much.

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224: There are no accidents in life | Jay Williams

The mindbodygreen Podcast

57:31 min | 6 months ago

224: There are no accidents in life | Jay Williams

"Welcome to the my Buddy Greene podcast. Op Jason Walkup founder and co-ceo of my buddy green and your host this episode of the Mind Body. Green podcast is supported by priors. Ice Cream. Briars has been making ice cream for over one hundred and fifty years now. So you know. They're the real deal and now briars has a line of sweet treats called CARBS that fit right into the low carb lifestyle with only three to five grams of carbs per serving the Briars carbs. Martin range includes tubs and bars and flavors like chocolate covered almond vanilla or my personal favorite caramel. Swirl if you're living a low carb life and missing that taste of your favorite ice cream tribe briars carp smart and good or briars dot com slash. Go to get a coupon that's BRIARS DOT COM SLASH. Jay Williams was arguably the greatest to ever play college possible. He was two time national player. Veer Duke NCWA champion. And I remember watching him play he just dominate Games. He went on to be the second overall pick in the NBA draft in two thousand two. But after just one season his basketball playing career ended after her rift. Motorcycle accident in an instant. It was all gone and Jay was fighting just to live in his New York Times. Bestselling book life is not an accident. He shares his story of being athlete. The highest highest and the lowest loaves after his accident. We contemplated suicide twice now in his thirties. He's convinced at the crash that almost killed him age. Twenty one was no accident but it tragedy the taught him how to live and learning how to live finding purpose and reinventing oneself are all so important right now as we look to emerge stronger and our covid nineteen Parl. Jay is actually my neighbor here in Brooklyn. He's a doting father devoted husband and h. Mendes human being so Jay. So great to have you here and let's start. Let's rewind. Walk us through that. You know devastating injury. You had what happened and just walk us through that talk about the severity. Yeah I always I got lucky to be the second pick in the draft. A played a year for the Chicago. Bulls really cool moment for me as a little kid. Got a chance to take Michael Jordan's locker only for a year and You know here that anthem being played being introduced that way and you know I think the most uplifting thing about their experience Jason was that I was able to get my mother and my father as it would have helped him achieve a level of success that they'd Wayne to achieve their entire lives. But my my accident per se was a lot of my ego. It was. I had a Yamaha R six. And a Lotta guys had motorcycles around that time I saw Kobe shock Mj had a motorcycle. Racing Team Amber me it was it was it was something that coming out of was so so attached to a lot of my teammates and they'll some being drafted on a team. That wasn't as good. I felt extremely lonely right. Wasn't that same sense. A commodity that family type atmosphere that was conducive to success that we had in college in. Nba A LOTTA. Guys have their own families. Didn't spend as much time together. A lot of guys were doing different things On the road than the lives of their actually portraying at home which is easy to get caught up into a lot of guys were messing around with drugs. A lot of guys had their own personal agendas as related to the Games and you know scoring points and selfishness and things of that sort and was very difficult for me to adjust to that life. Because that wasn't the world I came from know playing basketball dukes so writing for me was a sense of community because I rode with a whole bunch of guys in the level. Communication was extremely high with something I felt. I had in college that I didn't have in the League but I found to riding with all these different individuals and riding at incredible speeds. I knew I should have been writing at but was like a pack a pack of wolves so for me that day. I wasn't riding with anybody. I wouldn't go see my agent and leaving my agents place I had the bike in third year in was coming towards the stop sign nose rubbing it as the car you know. I click the buy from third into neutral because it goes third neutral. Second I and I read the bike. The first time pretty loud because I think my ego just wanted my agent to see the exhaust system that I had on on the tonight is put in as he stared at me from doorway. That pretty loud second. Time rubbed it louder than the first and Had no protective gear on no helmet. No jacket twenty. One years old. I was only a couple of miles away from my home. Downtown Chicago and In the middle of my third rib discerned by go click. Click in die. Wish I would've let go of the bike but once again my ego was at stake. There are a lot of people that told me. I shouldn't have been all my bike but I want to control my own destiny which is kind of like the underlying thesis of my existence. At that time I wanted to be in control right So I grabbed onto the handlebars knee jerk reaction and now might momentum was throwing me backwards but grabbing onto the handlebars kind of pivoted. The bottom wheel of the motorcycle. Kind of put me on angle so instead of running stop sign actually pivoted about thirty five degrees to right and as I grabbed on my brisk and throttle back the throttle you more in I was going about sixty five seventy miles per hour. As I looked up I was going towards my destiny which was a utility pole and try to turn the bike at the last second to the right in the whole left side of my body so as you can imagine your momentum This way but the poll is silent so my body stopped by Lasantha Body. Stop while the right side of my body kept going and The injuries I sustained were a joke. Oh my wife. I can relate to new child. I separate my pubic emphasis by about thirteen inches Which is what happens when a woman has a baby their splits. Essentially I dislocated my knee. Tore every ligaments in my knee and I had torn my new owner. Which is the nerve since signal from your brain all the way down to your lower extremity your toes about picking your foot up yeah and proceeded to be rushed to the emergency room for life a life saving surgery and hemorrhaging. Yeah Yeah I told my finger artery which is one of the biggest arteries by so That moment for me was very surreal. Because you know you always have people that tell you. Hey you make this decision. These things can go wrong but I think being twenty one years old feeling. I don't think I came across like I was invincible. But my actions came across the. I was invincible. Because I got Boston a lot of the moment stay in. I think that's when things really could for me that life just turned for me like in That's when everything changed while twenty one I think we all think were invincible. And I think everyone listening to go back to twenty one and think about all the stupid things. We did the decisions as part of life as part of the process. I am I I do remember when you got hurt and reading about it and seeing it on TV at the time and saying you know while like a man that this hurts and then reading your book Which everyone else to pick up because it's not just a book for basketball fans like me. It's a book about Adversity perseverance The Human Spirit reinvention lot of teams. That are very important right now during covid nineteen much bigger than the basketball. The reading the book. I remember reading the details just like on a level of pain and detail of what you endure word. I just started like feel the tension like as like you know you know any watching injury on. Tv Yeah he never. Joe Eisman I grew up is Lawrence. Taylor. I remember watching that it break. Legis or Gordon. Haywood are ever washing. Just you start at a reading. Yours is like Oh my God just a level of pain but at any rate like the story did obviously and there and want us to walk through the process. You went through in terms of what you did go through to get back from potentially almost dying to to being able to walk. That's like phase one then phase two of trying to compete at the level. You were competing to before we get on the other things. Just give people a sense of what you do. Endure and the length of time Until people that I died that day now as we born that same day I think there is such a completion. With what you do to who you are in today's time in age and his no with unemployment so high out of know what Marcus added this twenty. Six million something around there The first question. We asked people when we meet them. I am Jason. Hi I'm Jason. What do you do is exactly where we go in? So for me from somebody who was so used to being in tune with their body athletically and physically I I didn't know of I was GONNA survive after I after I I I started thinking about. I threw it all away. I started in actually going through his basketball because that was my identity when I got hostile. Things kind of quickly changed me about like. I don't want it right like I think the severity of the entire situation cut hit home for me but I woke up Essentially going surgery which is really scary. New Dock Mallet Ham Hand. She told me that they were going to do life. Saving Surgery because I tore my famour artery and You know as I had the mask over my face and they were trying to get me to relax. I. I couldn't help but think those have been last brats. I took net that moment in my life very much like a dream. I don't know if you've had a lot of these dreams where you wake up in the middle of the night The energy around this pandemic has been barely disturbing way of wife. And I been having a ton of dreams distancing like you know their stuff billy out there in the universe right now feels like things are a little bit up in the air chaotic in. We all have those rings or wake up in the middle of night and you look at your significant other or you take a second to take a moment for yourself and you say. Damn. I'm so happy. That was just a dream. Move just a dream and you can take breath. Maybe a sip of water. You re permit any by the way to go back to sleep so for me. I think coming out of that with my is kind of slowly opening up this drink. This has to be a dream. This can't be my reality. I can't have to metal pins inserted into my covers that are extending about two. Fbi The sky connected to a halo. I cannot my left leg air. Three metal pins stuck in my Shin. My Niemeyer Hi Thi- holding my leg up in having to in my throat thinking what the hell does happen to me. And I felt so rog in kind of hit me when I over to my left and I saw my agent who is the same agent that I left doorway. That was reverend engine for me and guy looked like yet. Kevin would like me crying for hours. Is His soldiers look empty. He looked Pale There there was no juice in his body was just Exhausted in in so for me I think a lot of depression and heaviness of centered itself. Were been me at that given moment especially when I asked the doctor you know not will I be to walking. Was like why be able to play basketball game with her walking back in that room. And I'm sorry my answering your question. But it's just hard to smell up those two years in a in a in a quick short way because they were filled with animosity. They were filled with anger. They reveal with ten plus surgeries they were feel with. You know hours and hours and hours in two times a day of physical therapy. They were filled with psychological therapy With issues I had with my father issues. I had with myself issues. I had with thrown away the one thing that I worked so hard to accomplish that it was my reaction. It was my decision that had shifted the course of my life. It was me dealing with other people reminding me of my decision other people reminded me of what I had thrown away. Other people trying to find a bridge to compensate with me about what I what's but trying to reflect the pumper okay. That's what I did was at who I was Emmy also being frustrated Jason. Because I never took the time to think about who I was who I want it to be. What I stood for. It was this world windows. This tornado of chaos Because I I did try to come back after a year and a half and I wasn't myself but I was comparing myself to Hawaii was in. I was physically different. I didn't have that same thrust. I didn't have that same bounce But everybody else perception of me. I was struggling with allowing that to be my perception of myself and I hope I'm doing a good job of the no. This is anything in in your story in the book. I think for me. There were a couple turning points. If you will as process one was you were an dark ways. Understandably at one point Thought ABOUT ENDING IT. Taking your life twice yes and then so obviously. That's pretty heavy. Let's let's start there and I'll go to the other. I think turning point in all of this yet will the first time. It happened After I was in the hospital for about a month and a half two months between Chicago Masonic there for a month in ICU. For about three weeks and then I got transferred down to Duke in a private medical plane and I was in that hospital for about a month and We are into the home in North Carolina and always in my hospital bed. And had you know? It's very humbling. When you know two months prior year on a billboard going down I ninety And you're competing against Michael Jordan. Kobe Bryant and Albertson me Tracy McGrady Jason Kidd's on the biggest names in the game that you've dreamt of doing since you've been a little boy to the next moment You know me not being able to feel anything from my waist down Me Being Oxycontin in oxide coating you know becoming addicted to that in time Me Still Having Sutras in my leg and you know be frank with you might not being able to work for very long time and not knowing if I was going to get Rejuvenation back I had such severe nerve damage down there wondering if I will be you'll have a child and things of that sort so the heaviness of that moment was just Exponentially deep in having a woman named Judy who was I mean literally holding me so I can go to the bathroom but not knowing when I would have to go to the bathroom or not not being able to do that for myself so I I this tattoo on my left wrist. That says believe here and I just remember staring at it aimlessly one night just thinking to myself like I don't believe in anything anymore and trying to take some Dole scissors and just kind of go over but I was. Sola may she aided I mean I was a maybe weighed about one hundred and fifty hundred the divide pounds You know I met my playing weight right now. I wait one ninety five. You know that was a pretty stocky individuals displaying so skinny in just not having the strength to go over that night and be on a really a break. The Skin Greeks so fragile. This week I and my mother coming. Just kind of praying with me After seeing misusers being by my bedside and just being exhausted That I am talking to me about you know begging me not to take my life because there was still. I was still hearing that. There was a purpose for me. I know that purpose was in the second time it's years later. I was even darker because I was addicted oxy codeine in Mexico and then know still taking ignored need to take visit singing and more psychologically because I was Linear city in had so many people that would stop me. You're that guy that played all your play or you got. I May to do everything. Wait what what happened to me like? I using the product to numb myself. Psychologically of the pain that people would force me to address in when I didn't take time to address it so yeah I tried to overdose on ad than gotTa was unsuccessful at both attempts in so in many ways you need talk about this in the book you know you you obviously bounce back. You're you're you're you're here with us today. I WANNA give away too much book phenomenal book but you bounce back. And they're obviously turning points in one's life when you think about ending your life and you don't and it's me there. There was another turning point in the book. When you're trying to make your comeback years of past and just not working an you eventually say having a work in my whole life. Yeah eventually say I'm done and I'm going to move off and I'm curious to of thinking about that and I wanna hear what was going on your head and grief grief top of mind right now. I think they're everyone's experiencing all sorts of grief with covid nineteen talk about collective grief and whether it's grief you know APP for for missing. You're not being player missing a graduation. Or what have you grease extends beyond you know losing a loved. One and experts will talk about grief their stages of grief anger sadness acceptance healing and a dollar of work on this. I'm curious how do you think about the stages and you went from doing everything to get your self back to normal? Which is a painstaking process than getting yourself to a level which you are on the cusp of making a back like you were you. Were there like he were. You were right there. I'm curious like the stages of grief. Did THEY RESET. Walk us through that moment of deciding walkaway again it was that was at a relief for the grief reset itself. They need to experience it again. Or that point Was going on in your head. Yeah I don't think it was transition in the the moment that kind of started to finally provide some light clarity to what is what this experience is to be alive right. We're having role having inexperienced right now regardless whether you look at this you're washing his interview or you're paying attention to conversations you're avenir you're interacting with a set of energies on a day-to-day basis. And if you don't try to push yourself to become aware of how gifted we all are to have opportunity to experience these things I think it's very easy. With all the distractions out there to to just Kinda roam aimlessly with your life and I think at that juncture in my life. I was trying to come back to G. League I played for a guy named Dennis Johnson that play to Boston Celtics with Larry Bird and one what will championships in. I toured a hamstring off. My come back to the G. League and just a series so just torn having just it's not like roll an ankle. I remember him kind of spending time with me in the hospital. Because I this has been you know. Two and a half years of this journey ups and downs so tired knows emotional. And come back and you're GONNA be bigger than ever and I'M GONNA be right here waiting for you. I'm in hold your spot and you let me know when you're ready and who would have thought that. Dj would have been prolific in talking about life more so than the game of but the game of life at that given time. You know I went back to Durham. I was doing more physical therapy and I got a call from my team mate Just telling me that the guy that I felt like was my last bastion of hope. Give me a chance in the G. League at randomly just died from heart attack and on the court working out with team I just played on and I think that was a moment. It was a different level because agreed had nothing to do with me. A wasn't any more about what I lost. I started to think about his son that I was close to his family. What our relationship was in the words that he has said to me in the hospital just kept resonating with me and that was a moment where I said. I would do a disservice to myself if I kept chasing personnel was in. I think that transformative moment that transition moment I started the process of. Let's find out who this has made me and An start from there so I you know I think there was a sense of appreciation and you use the word gratitude because I recognize that damage. I'm actually here like I'm looking at my feet. I'm building my hands. I'm seeing the people I love. I'm here in those moments of grief and anger had taken away from the things that were actually present in right in front of my face and while I was not paying attention to those things. I was so focused on what I lost. I didn't pay attention for once about what I gained. Mo- I started to reshift my energy towards that now is a a humbling. Ground Zero Process for me But I think that was kind of like the first time I started. Be Like Upul like this. Kinda who Jason Williams is now in this given time and place. I wonder who he was back thin in. Okay like who do I WANNA BE? I never spent time thinking about any of that Jay. So you've done such an incredible job of starting over do numerous times and reinventing yourself and I think it's suffice to say it sticking it's working and this is a theme. I think for so many people right now. I think there are a lot of people out there crossroads Right now covid nineteen You mentioned unemployment is tough out there and so this. This is a time for people to reflect. Go Diva and asked like the you know what is my purpose. What do I really WANNA do? So what is your advice for people out there who were trying to ask those questions and trying to reflect and figure out what is right. What is next? You're kind of forced into that. What is your advice for? Selling right now is asking some of those questions. First and foremost I think a lot of the life that we live in. Both you and I live in building which is amazing. Year via skype at face base A couple of floors apart but it is think my first piece of advice is it's okay to be still for second We live in the Matrix and a listen to a lot of executives. Talk IN ONE. Executive was talking about neo. Sometimes you have to symbol the plane after you jump off the cliff in like. I've been doing that for a lot of my life is like jump off a simple simple symbol. A symbol a symbol. And and then you're in a matrix in your scattered in this person. Polls new direction ego. Go here kidding you got your job. You got your wife another by the time you get through all these things that have happened. You're like wow. I just had a day what happened. What happened today? And I'm a firm believer in that regardless of how difficult times are I have to believe that there is a purpose because if I didn't find purpose in those difficult times than I will be doing disservice to myself in my overall growth in my outlook so I think the fact that we have a chance to be still is really good because maybe that would help people Kind of reshift or repurpose. What their original intent was in where to where to put that energy into and I know we are going through a lot of challenging times. Mother has gone through to kidney transplant and almost died this year from lights in. She hasn't been able to see myself my wife or a ranch out for the past three and a half months or months it's been challenging that have lost family members And I I know it's tough when you're in net that amount of grief and anxiety and anger to try to find a place with into holistically. Haven't outlook what I'll tell you what this really makes me time. I have with my kid my wife from it the face time that I have with my mom and my dad like I'm present like I'm in it because I'm I think witnessing how special moment this is instead of displaying I can do this in year. Seven of Miami my NBA career. Or I don't have to do this now like I'm like no more sense of urgency. About what my intent is for right now because as meaningful. I don't know what else can happen. So said of always being four thinking beach heuristic with where am I going to go? It's it's good to recalibrate about where you are in with yourself about. What's right in front of you? I because that's the only way it's not until you stop climbing the mountain to realize where you climbed from and I think once you stop and you take a second to. Oh Wow I icon. This is I didn't recognize it and he look up but why was just climbing without any intent without any direction I was just So take a second to stop to realize where you want to get your foot one underneath you. Yeah Hey everybody. Thanks for tuning in. We're just GONNA take a quick little break to hear word from our sponsor. Today's episode is brought to you by my money. Green and our incredible magnesium plus sleep products before this product. It took me hours to get to sleep and end up tossing turning than hitting the snooze on the alarm as I woke up in the morning. Yes I slept but it really wasn't quality now with magnesium plus I fall asleep faster. Stay ASLEEP AT. I wake up rejuvenated and without an alarm clock. Look we all know when you don't sleep. It's pretty brutal. And it is terrible for your immunity terrible through your health and I slept but it wasn't quality sleep and now I never knew that sleeve could be so good. I hope you check out our pioneering. Sleep formula at my buddy green dot com slash museum. That's my buddy green dot com slash museum. And now back to the podcast in so I would say purpose for a moment you know purposes so important especially we had a couple of experts in the PODCAST shares. Is Their husband. Wife doctors experts on brain health. I ask them a very specific details of one of the things with regards to diet. You can do for your brain because the statistics on brain health or absurd. I want to say at the pace. We're going I think by twenty fifty I wanted to say. Half of the population over eighty will have dementia. It's something crazy like that and I asked him specifically what's the number one thing you can do for brain cells and they said purpose. They didn't say like you know eat. Kale was permits. And so you know purpose. there's a quote from your book which. I love them when I read it to. Just stay on it for unpack little bit by life has always had a purpose. I had just been too obsessed with trying to recover what I lost instead of focusing on what I'd found that's when I realized there are no accidents in life. Yeah it's I think what I found was a person who has lost a person who never put any time or energy into himself about what was meaningful to me. I think I also found that I was allowing external things to dictate. What my own internal thought was of myself what. It's that leaves me by next passage from their quote from the book. I'll grab which is a up until that fateful day I needed recognition and affirmation from everyone and so I read that I was like Whoa. That's an appropriate message. Because if I see what's going on in the world social media this is like we're all falling into this trap and so so. What are your thoughts about look recognition in affirmation? It's it's important and I think we all we all seek that. We all crave that. I'm curious like your perspective on that. With the just the average person with social media and just how in some level we do need that but what does it cross the line and become unhealthy. Well I think a lot of people. We're still navigating that I it's for me. I think my purpose is growth and I have a platform on TV that allows me to be very transparent with how I have grown in ownership of mistakes. I've made try to provide people with visibility into the complexity sometimes of decision-making I know that that there's a lot of responsibility that comes along with that. But that's something that neglected for a very long time. I think the more I focus on different ways I can grow in different people around me that I surrounded myself with. Continue to challenge made to grow Ultimately housing become a better. Father helps me become a better husband and house may be more self reflective in continue to learn lessons. I think one of the things are SEE MELODIC. People currently is this The perception of success in that P. Bull want to showcase how successful they are. But you know I spend time with people that are quote unquote successful and money does not translate or equate to happiness and happiness is another word that I think is interesting because happiness is not something. That is sustainable. Twenty four seven. It's about finding those moments of gratitude and appreciation in in kind of taking this approach. Jay that this is a this is a journey in this journey is going to be filled with highs and lows but is our job to try to find that medium to put this journey into perspective. So I don't know that equates exactly what if bites is for people that are trying to showcase what they have but it might thing is I look at people all the time to showcase thing monetarily materialistic and the meaning almost in a way it. You a little bit okay. They're a little bit loss. I've been there been there. I I know that is so there's more realtively than anything. I guess that I see. So so what does success mean to you today? How do you define success for you Teaching my daughter something new every single day trying to do something that will make my wife happy. You know our our relationship. I think I brought a lot of baggage into our relationship that there are things that aren't necessarily address relationship wise myself because I was so focused on me in my own growth. I never been in a relationship in books about relationship growth. You know what I mean. So listening to Esther Parole. Who is incredible by the way this analogy about? I think I had become so I repurpose a lot of my own intention towards my new career right because this is a whole deep conversation. Get your opinion on it as a guy like I couldn't I couldn't give my significant other I wasn't ready to provide a family so I can. I had to figure how me I and I had to be able to provide. Because that's what a man does sure so. Think I kinda reshift allow that. My new career and Esther gives his great analogy about you know when you walk into your home. What's the first thing you think about? It was the first and sation walking into your house after a long day gives you and I was like oh. I found myself answering pockets. Like home home along their work and she's okay so you had a long day at work. That means what you're saying to your significant others that I just you so much energy and time into my job that my energy and my job is more important than my significant other guy. Just walk in the door dynasty. Be and dying to find out about my day. Exchange my energy. But you're saying no. Your job is more important God before doing such a disservice to my wife at. I've found things that we are going to work. I'm strategizing how can I articulate this differently? How do I do more research here? Well how come on that Brennan Time Energy and effort into my relationships. Why am I saving all that for my job? So what I'm saying to my wife is that I've never thought about that. Before I've just been running while valuing my relationship more than I value my job and it just a. That's the kind of stuff that being pushed around. The right people helps me. Think about my growth in those categories to. I love a Sarah. We have a class with her and I also love. I think some of her message. There's another Famous therapist Dr Sue Johnson. Who I also love. I think so much of what they talk about is the I would describe it as the slow erosion happens in relationships. Where typically the big thing that happens that you hear about is the result of all these minor breakdown in communication patterns that lead to like the significant significant thing whether it's cheating or a big blow up fighting typically that's the result of something as little as like coming home. And what you did. You know it's it's so sue. Johnson talks a lot about that. Yeah she's fantastic but I'm curious. Also you mentioned your daughter. How is being a father? Changed you with regards to wife. Perspective is in. I'll be very transparent with you. It wasn't until I met my wife that I recognized that I was extremely selfish. Wasn't done with malicious intent. Which is everything have been about me my mba career was about me. My accident was about me. Reinvention finding a job my career was about me Nelson. I met my wife knows this is about us right but still it was. But it's still Kinda Kinda about me to a degree right My Job Kinda dictated to us. We're we're gonNA live Jewish strategy things around my schedule because my schedule was pretty demanding or my daughter came into the picture I was like. Oh says nothing to do with meaning more not about me and I think that lesson. That is still ongoing for me. I think has helped me make things more about my wife in a because I understand it now. I think I've never sometimes. You don't have experiences to understand things until you do in. It's it's exponentially more rewarding to me than things being about mean anymore. It's been such a unique transition to that because that what she learned something new that brings a different happiness outside of me that I've never experienced or felt before what school is. She GonNa go to. He know how how this covid nineteen effector education See Her grandparents to learn from them. In what kind of things should I be talking to her about? My wife reads voraciously about lessons. How do we potty trainer right? I just found myself in whole other. World requires a lot of attention almost in a way about the other stuff that requirement to just kind of taken a back seat. But I've also found my eye on all the things that have taken a backseat to my daughter. I serve to thrive at those things in my hold on a second. I haven't out gated as much time to those other. Things with those are thriving. Now because I'm putting energy into something that's meaningful and actually matters is interesting to me it's it's a completely different vortex at a haven't experienced before so you also mentioned you know having a platform and feeling responsibility what would you want your legacy to be? What do you want people to think of it? Ajay Williams five years. Ten years from our way beyond that I am. I'm a human being. I think we I think we have really lost the definition of what the what that means the especially now day We walk on Street and walk asked my family and their other people walking on a sidewalk in the other sides. Walk or the other side of the street. It's like I feel like our world is going like this in so many different ways politically Internationally regardless of whatever people's opinions are about any of that it's just feels like we are extremely isolated in very divided. So I think when I go on Air. I try to bring simplicity to complexity I tried to example. We talk about Michael Jordan today and obviously Michael Jordan is maybe the greatest athlete we've ever seen he's Jordan but also try to describe the complexity of the way. I was raised being African American. I I'm sure you and I in the area grow may have had different upbringings. There were things that my father made me way more conscious of young Asia. Maybe your father did not to worry about you. Know if I see an officer at hood on a take I take your hood off or you know hands on the wheel and it just didn't seem to be as much leniency. My father would talking about things like that so I remember having conversations with my dad about people that spoke up about injustices at a very young age by people. Epi No really use as a role model to me about. They were sensitivities in. How you had to articulate what those investors were because people have different backgrounds this into Jim Brown or Muhammad Ali that we're to draw a line in the sand at one of the things. That was a little bit disappointed from even though he's done it in a different way was that Michael Jordan was the most powerful athlete ever had him a planet but he never felt like he took a stance on something even though he wrote in his way. Yeah that's a very complex conversation and I can have that conversation not alienating Michael Jordan. That's a beautiful moment about the journey that he had how he had a navigate that Accident in which he had navigate that but that that is more related ability to me. I can't relate to it. Takes off from the free throw line. I can't seven billion dollars. I can relate to that person that struggles with the complexity of hobby more than athlete. Though in that that's bringing it down to human that I think is really beautiful and related and I tried to find note similarities to build a bridge between people about. Yeah we all struggle with this even how our perception of successes well you mentioned struggling. We all struggle with our journey and your depression. Mental health is the does not discriminate. And I'm curious what you do when you're just having a crappy day do you have a you have a go-to How do you get yourself out of it? We all have them. What's your what's your Go-to when you're having a bad day. You Know I. This moment that happened to me this year. I woke up with my life in got a call from my mom's doctor that my mother had average colitis in septic will England. The call was call where the tonality quickly translated to. I don't know of my mother's going to be here anymore and I'd call a friend one of my friends very helpful because it was in the morning to give me a plane. I was on the playing on that now stress out of my mind. I was sad because I spend so much time with my kid in my wife that I didn't really spend much time my mother's at used to but I was also a father and husband just the the challenges of that because my mother is in North Carolina North Carolina alone. My Dad and my mom are still legally married. But they're not together all the time and in a way with what I've been able to do I kind of been like that Her some also kind of like that Other adult in her life is like to our home down there and she looks at me for responsibilities and things of that sort feeling guilty inside and I was listening to be pop talk about acceptance in so I found myself kind of going through the alphabet. Like Him. And getting lost in that. Much of acceptance of bonding of compassion. These words that he expounds upon because he goes into such larynx about what these words meaning about. Neuro this for me. That brings me back to the moment. I was twenty one. I want to control the moment we all do. I want to control and it always helps recalibrate about. I'm not in control at all. It's okay for me to experience this and it is a sad moment and I don't know if my mother is going to be here one of the things. I WANNA talk to my mom about when I see her. What kind of instead of this being sad me making us about me. How do I reach this moment to help? My Energy beat more towards my mother in about me but make it about her. How do I help her? How do I help her? Be at peace or help her fight through this or it's funny because whenever I go to those moments I realized that ozone where it's not maliciously with I make it about me so what. I'm feeling about what I'm going through. And to a real retransmission at energy from me to you or them that helps me visit outside of my own funk and it gets what they're going through a set of what I'm going through so is something you said. I'M GONNA go back to your lots chapter again. I love the LAS chapter. Guys got to rebel book. They'll those calculus chapter but you also say people ask you the question if you could give yourself advice to younger solve and you say you never answer that one. We you answer that today. You could go back in time and give yourself if I thought about that. Water is it still. I don't want to have I. I don't know I can't answer it. Billy's is not that I can't answer. It is said this is how I learn. This is why my spirit is here on this earth in almost twenty one. I'm thirty eight years old. These seventeen past years have been never thought I would be a child. I know if I was ever going to be able to find a Substance type of relationship with somebody that challenged me that love the mentally change for in grow for another that. I don't think any of this happens that way. Our to go back and tell my younger self do it this way earlier. It just changes the entire trajectory of my life. Sure and I don't I don't know if I would have found this type of purpose. I didn't go through that Ray who I would have been if I played seventeen years an MBA in May two hundred and fifty million dollars and what that path were. That would have taken me. I don't know I would have been if I have to go through my last relationship with a girl that I love in. But it just wasn't in the alignment in. I went to a lot of pain that helped me redefine who I wanted to be my next relationship with my life Those are all things that were put in my life for a reason for me to take those lessons to become different in better in. That's how I look at life so don't want to go back and give myself advice so as a as a young child. I remember my mother telling me that the parable of the boy with no shoes cried and cried until he met the boy with no feet. And what is that about? It's about perspective. It's about gratitude. We all to some degree go through something like that. Various degrees of severity. Whether it's a loss of loss of someone we love or loss of something that's important to us but I'm curious like what is your perspective on how we can all gain more perspective how we can all live in a constant state of of gratitude. If you will for someone who's been the Jalan back you've lived it. There's there's real world experience. What is your advice on how we can get caught up in the BS of the minutiae of every minute of every day. There's only one way to do it. S to discipline yourself. Psychologically about the choice you give yourself with all those moments throughout the course of the day in it's tough it's challenging but with all those decisions you have a choice on what your outlook could be and I still find myself making the wrong choice but it is such a different approach that I have now because I feel I pay attention to myself making that wrong choice and I could go back to. Why do we make this choice? Why are we going down this road? Okay let's not do that so it's It's retooling your mind with the way you think and a lot of times look. I I understand. I talked to people I try to. Approach the slight with empathy and compassion. Not so much with Vijay. Do that I try to understand what magic to a place of why you would do that. And then try to find a bridge that would help you think differently about your experience. Because it's I think there's something that not I've ever in down three or four things that just from our conversation. You're interviewing me that I've learned from you and I so I think there's it all depends upon what type of mindset that you're bringing into your experiences interview inter experiences with growth mindset. That could be a change maker but you have to. You have to want to be aware a walk growth opportunities around you because you can easily choose with all the shiny objects I joke around. Like one of my friends Every time you send me a random a random note and I love his notes sometimes I reply back with a Gif of squirrel right and like a job. Because it's like my my dog like highway heavy rain right and it's the there's so many squirrel moments that we have throughout the moment each and every day so many shiny objects that can take our mind away and I think retooling how you the squirrel moments how you see those shiny objects Johnny object. Okay let me put it into perspective that takes discipline that takes practice in some practice on how you think should be overlooked. Should be some of that should be cherished and he will try to take moments of course tonight to to work on my last question for you. What's the best advice you've ever gotten? The best advice ever gotten worse off. If that's I want to end on a positive note but if you're say in my book I think to a degree. This is including reflection now to in the past should be left in the past. Is this easy for to steal. Your future is still your president and thing for me. It's really easy for me if people disagree with what I say or if people try to use worse to hurt me for me to live in this world about what was and I'm thankful for what was at allow me for what is right now and I think that's important but I also think that sometimes I mean a lot of people J. that don't spend any time reflecting about what was going in going leads me know we talked about Lakers. The victim mentality versus the Victoria and tolliday in in in creating we tell ourselves stories. And it's do you get wrapped up on them and there's a lotta pack. There you know is something that should should happens to everyone and others various levels of Shit and I think you have a choice of. How is this going to define me? What is my story? What do I want my story today at difficult? There's a lot of work that has to be done to someone that this may be agree. I ended because FRINCIS one time just random brain is should happen to everyone right. Should builds me it builds me so it goes back to toys that you can allow a moment to define you or you can allow a moment to help you. Grow in those are Syria moment. Man should happen to me every day right but it ultimately comes back to your willingness to get up and say. I'm still here. This is what I've learned from the should happening to me and will continue to happen to me. Yes but I'm also lucky enough to be here for Shit to continue to happen to me respectable. That's my thing. Nobody said I have to be here. Amen to that Wilko's there. Thank you so much for all that you do and for spending time with us and everyone you gotta check out. Life is an accident will link to the book in the show notes Jay. Thank you appreciate you being patient with me for all the time that had to cancel TV this TV in your home. You can't escape it anymore so I appreciate it.

Jay Williams basketball Michael Jordan Jason NBA Chicago Kobe Bryant North Carolina Buddy Greene G. League Billy New York Times founder and co-ceo Briars Briars BRIARS Brooklyn Jason Walkup slash museum
218: Micro moments for macro shifts | Kelsey Patel, reiki teacher & author

The mindbodygreen Podcast

00:00 sec | 7 months ago

218: Micro moments for macro shifts | Kelsey Patel, reiki teacher & author

"Welcome to the MY BUDDY GREENE. Podcast objects in walkup founder. And cosio of my buddy green and your host. Today's episode is brought to you by my buddy green and our incredible museum plus sleep product before this product. It took me hours to get to sleep and end up tossing turning than hitting the snooze on the alarm as woke up in the morning. Yes I slept but it really wasn't quality now with magnesium plus I fall asleep faster I stay sleep and I wake up rejuvenated and without an alarm clock. Look we all know when you don't sleep. It's pretty brutal. And it is terrible for your immunity in terrible for your health and yeah I slept but it wasn't quality sleep and now I never knew that sleeve could be so good. I hope you check out our pioneering sleep formula at my green dot com slash museum. That's Pretty Green Dot Com Slash Museum Chelsea Patel is not after Rakia healer and spiritual empowerment coach. Who's one of my favorite people as she has a meaning energy? And even though recorded this podcast before coded nineteen her message that she shares the title of her first book. Burning BRIGHT RITUALS. Ricky and self care to heal burnout. Anxiety and stress is more relevant than ever you. I had her on the podcast episode. One Zero Seven. You're going to want to check out. It's great to have her back today. Kelsey welcome hi. I'm so happy to be back grads on the new book burning right. Thank you thank you and so we have to start. It's the titles burning bright. Yeah so let's start with burn out what is happening. What is happening? You know I burn out now. It's funny because when I had when I was writing this book. It was probably a year ago in burnout was not anywhere near as mainstream as it is. Now where you hear and see burnout articles everywhere and it's real and fortunately we have things we can do about it and unfortunately. Bernas not going anywhere right now and I think that the book but more than that all the practices that are available to us. That maybe aren't as mainstream as going to a doctor and different things. They are available to us all day every day. And it's about creating micro changes for the macro shift in your life and that to me is how the only way that we're going. Start to shift burnt out. I like that micro changes macro shift. You're one of my favorite lines. Catch Myself as an entrepreneur who we always attend to like you set a goal. It's like okay. Let's let's go reach the goal and you get to the goal the next goal and when he talked other entrepreneurs wherever you are on the business however people define success whether it's by revenue or headcount or profitability. People say oh. I can't wait till I till I get there and what I always say. You know your problems. Don't go away. They just change. It's not like we got to a certain level in this having done this. Ten years is is a metaphor for life to like your problems. Don't go away you are common denominator you know and I think that's that's exactly it is. Striving can create the sensation of the same mechanisms that people use for survival. You know like you're constantly going and doing and needing more and more and to me. It's like this idea of. I WANNA see achieving become over achieving. You know like I'm done giving really needing to have a shift in our mindsets because the truth is you know burn out is there but burnout is also something that is more or less for most people. It's needless suffering and it is self induced. And if you don't start chipping away. And that's what those micro moments are if you don't start chipping away at the ways that you are showing up in the world to achieve the things that are your goals and dreams. Then you're never going to be present for the moments when something really great happens to be able to like take a step back and see and feel and be in the moment of it so that you can give yourself space and permission to know your rhythms if you've done a big project or big output. It's like a wave. It's going to have that crash and you need to be able to take time to give the rest and repair instead of this hustle and grind mode all the time. So do you have a breaking point? I wouldn't say that mine was like a fall to my knees moment where it was an epiphany it was my burnout. Built up gradually and it became so What's the right word? It was so slow in its graceful presence that I don't think I recognized the signs as I was in the midst of burnout just dealt with it. I had you know as you know I had really bad debilitating back pain. I had a lot of anxiety but I didn't think it was anxiety. I thought I was a super achiever. I thought I was a get shit donor kind of person that I just had a different bead in a different tempo that I had more desires than when I say it now it's very ego maniacal but it was this idea that I could keep going and what I didn't realize is that I was suffering in the process. What are some of the signs so some of the signs at least for me and many different people that I've worked with over the years? It could be this feeling that there's always more to do and I think many people feel that I feel bad. Yeah I still feel it. It's a but in those moments. It's not it's noticing it and noticing if your mind is just continuing to race and if it's even if you do have a to do list which great many of us do it's about knowing that you get to also turn off and have the quiet space and the moments where there is no need for doing because you've done enough So people to me who experienced burnout don't have good sleep. I mean really burn out comes from stress right and stress can impact so many different parts of our lives from sleep to sex drive to our health. Our physical health our blood anything. You run a blood panel on somebody WHO's stressed. And even if they're eating the right foods they're still going to have deficiencies in certain areas are inflammation in the body that can be fogged brain fog. There can be lack of mental clarity. There can be exhaustion. I mean the list goes on and on for people who have burn out but the burn out is coming from stress and I think one of the biggest things that people don't talk about is mental burnout. We believe in the physical burn out like A. I'm so exhausted but people don't realize that M- many times that physical exhaustion is coming from the mental fatigue. Because you've not giving your mind space and permission to get quiet so in terms of getting quiet finding that space. Is there a minimum? What you think. Is there a certain amount like he kinda need for example? With regards asleep there are many will say functional medicine doctors like okay. You need to Have your electric sundown no TV LIGHTS DOWN DEVICES OFF. Temperature like it. It just creates. There's a there's a ritual to that but sort of gets you in a quiet space getting ready to to go to bed versus is what a lot of people do. Tv on Netflix narcos. I just watch Marcos Mexico too so it was pretty good. I just love this like all the stuff really happened. It's not not not optimal for great sleep but We have asleep product for that magnesium plus it helps but like it's like but. I think so many people do that. They're binging on netflix watching. Tv checking social media texting not ideal. But where I'm going. Is I feel like that. So many people are constantly doing something. How do we create that space? And how can we incorporate it into our day without having to One extreme to seven David Pasta. Yeah I mean as a great question I again. I go back to that micro-moments for macaroni shift. Because it's not. Oh if I have a morning ritual and I have an evening ritual than I did it good and then I did enough. It's what is your day entail if you have a lot of interaction with a lot of people and you're more of an introvert and not puts your system into a stress mode. Even though it might be a joyful experience your body can still interpret it and have different triggers that go off in those moments and it's really about meeting yourself if you're on a retreat. You might not need the same morning ritual an evening ritual that you're going to need when you live in New York City or you have a big upcoming event you know to me. It's about finding those down moments throughout the day. Even if it's taking a break from work and going for a five minute walk and not taking your phone with you and breathing really taking some conscious breath. Sits you know in the book. I mentioned something as simple as a hand washing ritual. That very appropriate Tuesday's very appropriate. Wash there yeah exactly but not just washing the hands for that moment of what we physically need to wash off but also energetically so. It's you know it's Energy Hygiene. It's mental hygiene. It's physical hygiene the same way that you would go to the bathroom every day. Multiple Times a day. And you don't think about it. It's connecting to yourself each day and asking mentally. Do I need a little break right now? Oh physically do I need to stretch my body right now? Those people want to believe that it's much harder needs to be more regimented than it actually. Does it's really getting in tune with yourself getting radically curious about how you're showing up to the day about what triggers you in distress. Your may not even be aware of it and then finding something that you can do for yourself to help shift that vibration so that it's not this compounded stressed it's built up throughout the day. It's and then you take it home and you're like I can't. I gotTa Watch Netflix. I need to have a glass of wine. It's not letting build up into the red zone is my my opinion and what I practice and also what I teach people. What if you're someone like me like you really passionate about what they do? Love love what we do. I think when that happens you just end up working more because so true. I mean look. I've been in New York for six days. I told you today I just woke up with a cold sore. But we're not going to get it right all the time. It's not going to be perfect every time but we can learn over and over and over again and to me in my life. I'm not going for perfection. I'm going for as much peace as much ease as much grace and as much Compassion for myself and my humanness in the journey. And I messed up all the time and people that I know that are like you and so many that want to do well in the world and they want to contribute to the world and they WANNA help and they wanNA show up in integrity. The what I would say to them. And that's what I say to myself often almost probably every day as a reminder is you can do what you love and you can do great things and you don't have to suffer to do it and I need that constant reminder win. Let's say it's the end of the day and I've had tons of meetings and all I want is a hot shower and meditate and read a book and I know I need to come down because my energy has been really high all day and I'm happy I'm not stressed about it. It's actually joy because I feel really great. That's not every day by the way but on those days I'm actually aware that I'm still on the mouse wheel and so I have to do everything that I know. Works for me to be able to give my mind and my body permission to unwind from the day and some days. It looks like laying on the couch watching Netflix and just laying with a blanket and a cup of tea and some days. It looks like having a dinner with my girlfriends and just talking and loving on each other other times. It's being alone and telling my husband. I'm GonNa go journal Army now. Go have a bath even though my mind wants to post instagram stories and write a newsletter to everybody. Because I'm feeling so passionate and fuelled and I know that that's not good for me so I choose not to step into it. Does that make sense? You have to comment. I love the hotch our because you know cold showers cold bass or all the rage everyone talking about the health benefits and I'll just modern do it. Yeah just does not bring me joy. Yeah when I go to the Korean spa I'm happy to do a cold dip. You know I'm happy to get in the cold water but on an everyday basis if I put my body in cold water I actually stresses goes. I'm sorry Wim Hof sorry. Everyone gets the method Olbermann fast for longevity but the long cold showers cold baths and just some for me that no they self. That's what we know about ourselves right now. So you're Rakia. Hiller and in the context of Ricky you know where does Ray Kief into to burn out? What are some of the tools that we can use from rocky in in real time some of those micro-moments to help help manage all this absolutely so ricky to me is just one of many tools that I hope everyone allows themselves to have in their tool belt right of life and for me? Rakia was the thing that really helped me understand that I could move energy in my own physical body Without needing to book an appointment which sometimes can take a long time. It can be expensive So for me in the book which I'm really excited about. I teach people how to do Rakia on themselves so that you don't I mean. There's a beauty in getting an atonement in an having ricky certification. I teach it as well in the world but I wanted people to recognize and understand that two minutes of breath and connection to source and allowing yourself to receive in clear out. Energy can make a huge difference in the next moment of your day and we're all energy were all composed of energy and the energy that you show up within. The world is going to be reciprocated. So if you give yourself. These mini moments of connecting. Breath is a beautiful entry portal into releasing stress and energy rocky is connecting you to your breath and connecting you to source so that you can ask for support and receive that support so that you don't have to walk around throughout the day and become a martyr or believe that you have to do it all on your own and as the only way that things are. GonNa get done so when you go to a cocktail party. You're traveling and someone says what do you do you mentioned rate. What are some of the more interesting responses from people? And how do you hold that space and provide a an answer not fills with the ball right right? I you know it's funny. I still feel weird calling myself a rocky. He'll I don't ever really like to say the words like I'm Hueller or I'm a reiki master. It sounds I don't I don't know what the right word is. It doesn't sound It just doesn't sound like it's it's me as much and so I tell people that I am a teacher or I will call myself Spiritual empowerment coach or and. Then they'll be like what you can see their brains firing and figuring out in the neurons where that belongs and then and then the west side of La. They're probably like me to towards whereas if you're visiting your parents and TACOMAS. Oh 'cause we call the police like what is that. Is that a cooking method like a cooking method. It does yeah like a way that you it kind of is you can rake your food As I teach my students but I would say for me. The funniest moments are my husband is in a very different profession than me. And we'll have dinners with like J. P. Morgan or Goldman Sachs and they you know in the beginning. I mean I've been doing this now for a decade almost so ten years ago people were like what what is that and now it's so much more common. Joyce and people. The term is is definitely a lot more A lot more out there and we had dinner recently with our friends. from J. P. Morgan. That were in. La and one of the guys. They've now love talking to me about it. Typically our conversations are more geared towards my work than anything else and one of the guys on the trip head on when they were there said he and his girlfriend recently went to a retreat in Mexico and he had rocky for the first time. He couldn't wait to tell me about his experience. So I actually have to say now in twenty twenty. If I'm on a plane or anywhere I am people want to talk about it. People WanNa tell me their experiences even if it has nothing to do with Ricky. They WanNa tell me their experiences with the Shaman or with their acupuncturist or a meditation APP. That they did which I love. Because it's just making it more common and it's making it more conversational than ever before. Well a lot of people will say money's energy at probably peaks interests of this fellow J. P. Morgan well. Also they're burnt out. The is that people are you know I think it was eighty percent of people. I have a bunch of statistics in the books. I also really want to talk to people from fact based what's the okay all right rabble stats off to you guys. So eighty percent of people say they have worked stress and forty percent of them say that they have extreme work stress. So imagine what? That's that's a lot of people right. stress cost employers three hundred billion dollars every year horribly vaccine manifest itself and yet healthcare costs ninety percent of doctors visits are for problems related to stress stress. I'm sure you know this stress can shrink your brain shrinks the prefrontal cortex which is part of the brain that manages our highest cognitive abilities over time stress disconnect circuits in this part of the brain causing confusion brain fog in trouble concentrating. Chronic stress can also strengthen the parts of the brain that default emotional responses and impulsive behaviors. And then this is one of my. When I saw this I was like I have to get this book. Out into the world in the nineteen sixties Americans had among the highest life expectancy in the world and today the US ranks at the bottom of major developed nations and for the first time ever recorded life expectancy in the US has dropped three years in a row and it's mostly because of deaths of despairs deaths of despair which is actually related to stress. Its drugs alcohol and suicide and part of that and talk about this in the book. Is this idea of loneliness. Low in of yeah and part of you know in the book I talk about the try it at home. We've all heard mind body spirit and I changed it in the book to Rock Paper. Achey and you know rock is the body. It's the physical connection with Earth. What we eat. It's how we how we connect with our physical bodies how we take responsibility for them. The paper is is. The mind is looking at your thoughts on paper. Figure doing journaling exercises rituals intention setting just really getting into your mind how you absorb information if it's reading because everything that you do and I do is based on imprints. It's the imprints of our life. It's what we've experienced what we've been taught know what we've been taught by our families and then the last community rake it's not just about rocky but it's about spirit and spirit is also to me considered community it's a feeling of belonging it's a feeling of connection. It's a feeling of that energy of being so loved and feeling that you can walk through the world with a sense of support. Some people call it faith. You know sure so. I'm glad you mentioned. Uh Hilo loose up. We had Celeste. Hudli another great author on the podcast recently. And we talked about you. Just call me a great author. Yes author first book. It was unreal. You're on the PODCAST. You gotta be agree with that. But I'm just saying it feels so cool to hear my name in the midst of authors plural during the go while Celeste Headley was on and we talked about the loneliness up Amac and she had a essentially a great tip and theory loneliness. It's not it's not necessarily about The super deep connections or having taught friends. We talked about. Dunbar's number. Like this idea. That like you sort of Max out at like one hundred fifty rounds of my face. Your friends on facebook really don't matter but what was interesting. Is the idea of that conversation. You have on the line at starbucks with a common stranger where it's just. Hey how's IT Goin'? Her symbols that or would flavor. Did you guide? Or how are you doing today? That banter if you will is such a huge benefit and as we think about the loneliest Democrats. Simple Hullo is just enough so I go back to. So what's The rock paper Rakia version of? I'm on the line at starbucks. How do we take this a step further instead of just you know hi? Good morning how are you doing like what? What's your version of that as we look to fight the loneliness epidemic? I I'm not get the quote exactly right But there's a beautiful mother theresa quote and it's about making everyone feel happier after they've been in contact with you right. This idea that to me you know with the title burning bright it's like walking around in your essence of brightness. And if you are willing to do these little micro acts for yourself every day. You get to walk out in the world from a place of fullness where you aren't needing anyone else in the outside world to give you that energy you're not seeking it from outside of yourself. You have this well in resource from within and if you have that then you get to go out in the world and help spread it and we're all Mir's to each other right so I go into a coffee shop happened today. And the person that's across from me at the counter or next to me. There's were smiling at each other. How's Your Day? It's great. How is your mighty great to you? Know it's just this. It's the human connection is you say and I think what a lot of people forget is that you do have the power to fill yourself up and sir. We all need support sometimes from people. I certainly do as well from anything from a massage to a phone call to whatever it may be but I do think if everyone takes a little bit more responsibility for their own wellbeing then we can walk out into the world together. And that's when you can actually lend a hand to someone is because you're not annoyed that they are taking forever to walk through the grocery door because they are trying to get their car out. You help them. You know what I mean. It's it's really about filling yourself up and then you can go out and fill the world. So what's your non-negotiable for anyone listening right now. Like they must do like starting today doesn't matter what's go on your life. You have to be able to do this one thing. Check in a daily Self check-in if you don't know what you need. How the Hell is anybody else going to? What is what does that look like so to me. That looks like One of my favorite things and go through a whole process of this in the book. But it's as simple for people with their morning rituals. There's a reason everybody talks about mourning. Rituals is because it matters and I know that there are parents. You certainly you and clean have two small children. I mean you have to find the moment when you can get it. It might not be right away when you wake up because you might get woken up by your kids correct right so it might not be the moment that you would normally want but you still get to be able to make that moment for yourself. It could be sitting in your car before you go into work and taking those five minutes. Those two minutes and that Self check-in looks like a few deep breaths scanning your body seeing if there's any areas of tension or if something has just caught it self in your body from the beginning of the day or from night what your upcoming day is anxiety might start to build you breathe you send breath to that area of your body and then you can place your hands on your heart and ask yourself what's oneself loving act or what's oneself loving choice that I will make for myself today. That simple the do you take in Tori at the end of every day since like hold yourself accountable and can but to me. Sometimes that's like more of a to do list. Thang is two. Oh now. I've gotTA DO my gratitude list. And now I've got to. Yeah and then it's like oh I didn't do it yet The energy of that inertia to me. I just want people to be kind and gentle with themselves and show up for yourself because if you don't then you're going to go out into the world with that energy and hope and expect for other people to show up for you and you're GonNa get disappointed so my last question. We were talking about this before you came on but you travel the world you work with all sorts of people individuals groups like. What's The craziest story? You've heard or seen witnessed firsthand. What the power of Rakia can really all my God? This one's crazy I went to a I went to Marianne Williamson Talk That's crazy right there for some people listening before she was running for president. This was years ago. This is probably two years ago so just to be clear. It was two years ago and I was so excited I was going with my friend and as we were walking in she. My friends see somebody. She recognizes they say. Hello in the women's kind of like hobbling and she has a Santa Lan with something wrapped your underfoot and she goes. Oh I'm so she's like I had to come tonight but I I was getting out of a car. Had the most freak accident today. I sprained my ankle. Her Inglewood swollen and I felt this energy comes through me and I we just met and I asked her if I could make her ankle. Were standing outside the theater. And she's like Oh my God yes please. So Rakyat her ankle for probably less than three minutes. We go in. We HAVE THE EVENT. We all leave sake by the next day. My friend texted me and shared a text from her friend. Said who was that woman. Because I woke up this morning and I am completely able to walk. My swelling is gone and I know I had a sprain gone. I don't know what happened. She was so weird out about it. and then there's a little silly ones where the other day. I did a workshop and a girl. It was like three thirty PM. She had a hangover and she said she cried every thirty. Pm exactly maybe. She needs more than the rookie has young and she had a full workday and she said she had tried everything that day. That quote unquote cures hangovers. And I had done ricky workshop. And she's like my hangover is completely gone so I'd never had tried Rakia and now I am an absolute believer while yeah professional sports teams ever reach out. It's funny I've worked with. I'm trying to think of I've worked with athletes before You know they're so. Athletes are so sort of trained in the the matter now So I would love to work with Roy so some of them will try anything to like especially when they have an injury. It's like I'll do anything absolutely and look it goes with everybody. I mean I think there's so much in be Rakia so much more beyond the physical too. I mean ricky kin has I've watched it clear Traumas FOR PEOPLE. I have watched it Especially coupled with the F. T. emotional freedom technique tapping And just overall like micro shifts in practice. I've watched people shift from like a horrible divorce and bankrupt to an amazing love and abundant. You know just. I've seen the abundance in the shifts for people in many ways I've helped not I don't mean to say me but I've I've worked with people who've had a newborn baby and they've had an insane fever and I've sent distance Ricky and the next day the babies out of the hospital you know. So it's just I think part of its intention and prayer. And it's the ricky itself but to me. Every one of us has this ability inside. And it's not something that anyone Needs to feel that there is a barrier of entry to so really last question. I mean at this time. How do we taught how to? How can we all tap into that? We all feel like how do how do we happen? I think I it's a choice. You have to be willing to choose to be open to this. The you know there's there's a willingness because as as you've I'm sure seeing and I know that you like energy work as well and have had your own experiences with it if you weren't open to it and you didn't believe that it would be supportive of you. How much do you think it was actually going to help you right? So it's like anything in life. If you don't think that it's something is possible than it's not going to be awesome so to me. It's it's a mind set it's really a willingness and I grew up Catholic and there's a lot of people that reach out to me asking me about how to balance being religious and having some sort of like a traditional connection to faith and also rocky and practices like Yoga and different things and To me I I have all of it incorporated and it just feels beautiful to me in. It feels abundant feels very connected to be mutually exclusive. Yeah not at all and I think the same thing with doing this on yourself. Ricky might not be the thing for you. It could be a positive meditation and could be acupuncture. It could be a really amazing Kunda. Lena Yoga class it could. There's so many different. Avenues could be walks in nature. There's so many different ways at each of us can tap into this the source energy. It's just about knowing yourself figuring out which one feels right for you. Which one feels like? It's going to be the most supportive for where you are right now. Amen thank you Jason.

Ricky Rakia Netflix Rakia starbucks La J. P. Morgan slash museum Anxiety Chelsea Patel founder Bernas Kelsey US New York City Wim Hof instagram ricky kin Celeste Headley Mexico
60. Stephanie Cunningham on the Creation and Growth of Museum Hue

Museum Archipelago

14:28 min | 1 year ago

60. Stephanie Cunningham on the Creation and Growth of Museum Hue

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started people of color. Specially people have African descent have been fighting for museums to be more -clusive over fifty years ago. It's the reason why institutions like the studio museum in Harlem was rated at the reason why mocha the museum of Chinese in America. Also New York City was created El museo de Badio all these institutions came up, because of the lack of inclusivity within these institutions, what we've seen today is not actually a shift in inclusion in white mainstream museums. But a kind of two tiered museum, which is still the white mainstream museums and the development of these culturally specific institutions. And so it's important for us to realize that there has been need for institution building for people of color, but also these white mainstream institutions at hold a lot of our cultural heritage. You have to also include us into the scope and the framework of their institution, become more inclusive, as well a twenty eight teen survey by the Mellon foundation found that eighty eight percent of people in museum leadership positions are white. This imbalance continues through museum visitor ship numbers, even though many museums are within communities of color or within states that have high populations of people of color. Stephanie Cunningham has a clear answer for why these white institutions aren't changing, when you've been practicing exclusion for so long you can't change overnight. And that's one of the reasons why she cofounded museum, Hugh. Hello. My name is Stephanie Cunningham, I am the co founder and creative director of museum, Hugh and arts organization that works to increase the visibility of people of color, working in arts and culture in museums in particular. It's really important that we begin to think, more critically on how to change this how to shift this. A make museums more innovative inviting that will attract more people of color, and also be very honest about their history and their conflicting provinces as well within the institution. Stephanie Cunningham, co-founded museum Hugh, with strategic director Monica Montgomery, in two thousand fifteen the organization began in New York City as a collective of people of color working in museums and other cultural spaces. We realized that we really needed a safe space, a space, where we can have psychological safety where we can be ourselves talk about our experiences, working within cultural institutions, whether it be micro, Gretchen macro, Gretchen or racism and talking about hap- some best practices of the things that were also going well for people within institutions as well museum Hugh began infiltrating spaces with programs like he's Eum tours, which the organization leads in art museums and other performance venue. News. The tourists started in New York City, but have since branched out to different parts of the country. We go to an institution about teams of thirty deep and we'll have a conversation focusing on an staff and artists of color, and also narratives color as well, because what we also realize is that a lot of the narratives, within museums and cultural institutions don't reflect people of color. And so we kind of invoke, and incorporate those within our own tours and presentations within the spaces. The Huseyin tours are one example of museum Hughes focus on the Fenton participation within the arts world. Another is jobs. Particularly jobs in creative and leadership roles at the heart of the issue is not a lack of qualified creatives of color. But instead, that the doors of museums and the surrounding ecosystem are largely closed off to people of color through extending museum, Hughes Network and by pipeline ING. People of color in the museum and cultural fields Cunningham has seen how a mostly white cultural institutions desire to be more inclusive is necessary, but not sufficient when it comes to actual inclusion, and that's why last year museum Hugh became a membership based organization last year we decided to become a membership based institution, and this came out of our fellowship at race forward racial equity in the arts organization about fifty or so institutions throughout New York City were invited supports and we all had our own platform in ideas. But the basis was for all of us to create racial equity framework. And so we decided with the museum he membership that we can focus on institutions that are willing and wanting to work with us in changing the framework of their institution, making it more inclusive of people of color. So we've been able to facilitate a lot of opera. -tunities a lot of jobs for people of color within these museums, and also worked with them in trainings on cultural competency, because we know that these conversations, although well intention, they can fall short. And so we need institutions take action steps in so action steps, look like creating real policy and also procedures in ways that they are accepting people of color in allowing them to have a seat at the table. A railway looking at their board. And so looking at railways that we can begin to focus on the framework of the institution and working on them from the inside out in episode forty eight of museum archipelago, the whitest Q podcast. Co host Arianna Lee makes the point that many museums can claim by verse workforce's, if you take into account people of color working in the museum's janitorial services department, but less. So in the seats of power to that end museum. Hugh created an internal, sir. Survey that any, cultural or museum related institution can use to develop an assessment of their current staff, and institutional attitudes towards inclusion and diversity. This isn't a change that happens overnight, because you've hired people of color. We want it to be a core part of the foundation in the structure of the institution. So in order to do that, we have to think have to encourage them and support them in thinking about this more critically it's been a real blessing that story institution country have wanted to sign on with us. It's about over eighty and so we're looking at different ways to support them in creating the toolkits, and creating more towards and not just focusing on our as usual members will also mostly on people of color in the field as well. Coming hymns focus on Ziems and other cultural institutions comes in part, because museums can be more resistant to change than some other parts of society. And in the case of museums that resistance has knock on facts. Many people of color have the needed qualifications in many of our fields, but yet don't see them represented. And so we have to realize that there's a real epidemic that have people of color, not represented in leadership, or given opportunities. And so for me tackling museums. Number one for me is, is my focus because, you know, I have a degree in our history and cultural, heritage preservation, and also think that museums for whatever reason within the grand scheme of society, that's, that's been changing isn't a seen as a place of importance for the to be racial diversity. I think it's needed in all industries, but especially in museums when we're talking about cultural heritage or talking about artistic freedom of expression. It's incredibly important that we begin to look at museums I because. Museums create a narrative that we see through our, our landscape. And so it's important that people begin to see people of color representing history in our because that then opens up a new lands, and recognition of cultural contribution that people of color, do not get in this country. And so for me museums have to begin to create a lane that is really much more inclusive than they actually are for museum. Hugh increasing the number of people of color at museum leadership, levels begins to shift, the framework, not just of that institution, but of the entire museum ecosystem, for example, there is a very prominent I won't say, the name at sedition design company that works with so many using EMS throughout the country, and they went to meet with a museum that they were baking with to begin to work with on. Exhibition design and during the meeting, they were asked by the person that they will working with a person represented by items EM, who was a person of color, axe them. Do you have people of color on your staff? And they for whatever reason had not even thought about this. They're like, well during exhibition design. Why does why does this matter? But it does matter because perspective and cultural differences in understandings are also needed, and so they, you know, reached out to museum here because they were like do you know of anyone exhibition design that, you know, can can possibly work with us? People of color are also going to begin to ask these questions of companies that they're working with as well. And having companies think about this issue because it's gonna affect their bottom line museums. I have incredible cultural power, and most of it is on checked, Cunningham's point. Is that without serious change that cultural power won't last forever wisdom? Hugh is just, you know, working to change that. And to utilize our collective power in our voices to call out issues and help usher in a change. That is constant not a change that is dependent upon the funding that institution gets for diversity, and inclusion, but something that is a core part of museums, and other cultural institutions, because I honestly believe if museums do not change, become more inclusive. Expect obsolescence expect museums, shutting down, expect museums continuously become relevant for the greater public coming him also hosts an excellent podcast called black visually past guests have included Blake Bradford, who. Also featured on episode forty three of museum archipelago as the director of Lincoln university's museum studies program. Bradford also sees a pipeline of black students, exposing them to career paths that are largely closed off to people of color museum. Hugh has three different membership types. One is an institutional membership for organizations to align the diversity and equity efforts with museum, Hugh, and also to advertise job openings through museum, Hugh. Another is the heures membership for people of color interested in the museum, Hugh platform, and finally, the allies membership for those looking to support museum Hughes mission. You can listen to black visually and learn more about Cunningham at Stephanie, a Cunningham dot com. You can find more information about museum, Hugh and sign up by going to museum. Hugh dot com slash join when a person is being colonized or pressed one of. The first things that's targeted is, is arts and culture in artists works. You've been either destroyed or a commodified, or appropriated and these are the same things that we see within Newseum 's at we see within the realm of what exotic -ceptable within our culture. I want us to continuously strive to create opportunities to speak up against the restrictions or the barriers that have been placed on people of color within arts and culture. My work really out of you look at all the things that I've been doing falls under two, you know, two parts is, it's really just looking at ways to support people of color to increase our visibility to facilitate our employment and get us more entrenched in the creative economy. And also on the other part call out in challenge. Ange and address, you know they barriers and, and, and the, you know, hierarchies and, you know, issues that relate to specifically, you know, racism and lack of opportunity in the field for people of color. And so that's what I'm continuously doing is just working on ways to shift, this field and move it into where we can see much more equity, much more diversity much more Harrity, as well in the field is incredibly important to me. This has been museum or Pelayo. You'll find a full transcript of this episode along with show notes at museum, archipelago dot com. Club, archipelago members get access to bonus podcast feed that sort of like the director's commentary to the main show and fun, extras, like stickers, support the show and join club archipelago today for two dollars at patriot dot com slash museum. Archipelago thanks for listening and next time. Bring a friend.

Hugh Stephanie Cunningham color museum museum of Chinese museum Hughes New York City director end museum slash museum Harlem Elsner Mellon foundation El museo de Badio America Hughes Network Gretchen Arianna Lee Ange Pelayo Blake Bradford
73. Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

Museum Archipelago

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

73. Sanchita Balachandran Shifts the Framework for Conservation with Untold Stories

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Pews Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so is never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started. The field of conservation was created to fight change to prevent objects from becoming dusty broken or rusted but fighting to keep cultural objects preserved creates a certain mindset the mindset of protector a mindset. It's too easy to imagine objects and cultures. In the state of stasis. This is how it always was and will be forever. Often I mean just given the colonial oneal had an imperial histories of museums. It was because people were going to be gone forever. That culture was gone. And so this is the last trace but in fact. That's not how cultural heritage works it. It's transformed it's changed. It continues on in different forms and a lot of the way the Conservatives think about cultural heritage is is about out mitigating that change. which makes it a little bit fossilized but to me that changes where things are really vibrant exciting and people are so closely connected to cultural cultural heritage that it really feels alive? This is since Cheetah Bala Chandran Associate Director of the John Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Hello my name is Cinci Bala Alexander. I'm conservative and I'm trained in the conservation of archaeological materials in particular and my day job is the associate director of the Archaeological Theological Museum at Johns Hopkins University. Bala Chandran founded untold stories a project that pursues conservation profession that represents and preserves a full spectrum of human cultural heritage for the past few years. The project has been hosting public events at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation Conservation Untold Stories emerged of bollocks hundreds frustration with how narrowly the field of conservation has been defined at felt that there were literally early too many untold stories in the field of conservation. I wanted to find ways to actually start to think about what else cultural heritage could mean other than say the things we typically think of as belonging in a museum or many of us cultural heritage means going to this important looking building that has paintings and sculpture and has labels labels next to it and I think we kind of decided in some ways at that's cultural heritage and preservation means taking care of those things and really I've become more and more aware error and curious about the fact that cultural heritage is much more complicated and diverse set of practices. It's often not necessarily about a single object or a thing but rather how that thing might function within a community or communities as as part of a series of practices and exchanges and storytelling and I just wanted to have a way to kind of work with people who are really doing that work outside the museum and doing it in ways that I think preserved Europe but also change cultural practices since untold stories takes place at the annual meetings of the American Institute for Conservation. A lot of professionals in the field Are already gathered there. The meetings attract over one thousand conservators blake many professional conferences. The meetings are often held in a nondescript hotel how setting but untold stories makes it a practice to conceptualize where attendees are sitting and the history that preceded them an example of this is the twentieth nineteen eighteen untold stories event titled Indigenous Futures and Collaborative Conservation. How many times have you been to a conference and you could be anywhere right? I mean you're in this big room and you never leave the hotel or the conference center and part of what I was interested in was trying to actually place a somewhere so twenty one thousand nine since we were actually meeting at the Mohegan Sun which is a Mohegan owned casino. We were on native land. It seemed like a really important opportunity. -tunities to talk about native sovereignty kind of history of genocide in our own country. The fact that anyone who's non-indigenous in this country is a settler settler colonialist but to really think about what this means in terms of how we take care of collections that have come to us as a result of historical happenstance stance but also a very violent past and to acknowledge the fact that museums which for most of us who work in museums are very safe. Welcoming and joyful places uses are evidence of this history of of pain and removal so the opportunity to work with the commod educational initiative was really exciting. Because because it's a partly native co-founded and they do a lot of educational work around questions of how even think about the history of this country story and to me. That was really important to be able to say in native space as opposed to you know in a place somewhere else. Part of of Bala. Hundreds point is that there isn't such a thing as a textualist cultural material. The intentionally nondescript conference ballroom has a lot in common with deliberately sterile museum environment episode. Sixty eight of this show features an interview with Ed Wanda's spears director of programming and outreach at the adamant educational initiative and one of the convenors of the twenty nineteen untold stories event in the episode. She discusses her presentation about how native native narratives are violently presented through White Lens in museums. It was in Donna spheres of Who suggested the title she had worked in museums? She's very familiar with these questions. And she's the one who suggested indigenous futures which forces you to recognize that this is not something of the past. We really wanted to do something. The thing that felt like we were going to push. This had to be uncomfortable but it also had to be aspirational. Where do we go now? And how can as conservatives servers we actually be part of this very kind of collaborative supportive mission to ensure futures. We can't make it happen by ourselves. It's it's not like we're saving anybody and that's another big concern of mine. There's a real sort of savior mentality that I think conservation has ask we save objects and I certainly came out of graduate school thinking that I was going to save everything and to me. That's a very problematic way to think about it because frankly if the objects still survives it didn't need me it made it thousands of years without me somehow. We've decided that we're the ones that making the that make these things live live forever which is pure arrogance so part of this event was really to think about how as conservatives can come up with action items and by action items. It was practices but more than anything of kind of Shipton in a mental framework for working much more equitably and more humbly to really have a sense of respect for this notion that there has already been a history before you and so when you enter into this hopefully collaborative relationship you need to acknowledge alleged. Things have survived for a long time without your intervention. And they don't need you but you could actually provide some sort of service some sort of benefit that could actually really help the untold stories team. True to their mission is careful not to present the workshop as a single solution or even a set of solutions. The team wants wants to counter the assumption within the profession. That all you need to do is go to one workshop and then you're all done you know. Unfortunately this doesn't change the working working practices it doesn't change the mindset. It doesn't change the way an organization functions and what happens is then marginalized people are called upon again and again to kind of keep performing this vulnerability and this discomfort for themselves in order to educate people who are unwilling to do the work that consistent like every single day for the rest of their lives work that will be required to make transformative change possible part of what in the twenty nineteen in conversation we. We felt very strongly we had to say is if if you really believe in equality if you really want to do something that is truly collaborative that does not assume some sort of hierarchy. It means being really uncomfortable the entire time and maybe at the end of it things will change but you you still have to kind of follow through on it when it gets really uncomfortable. And the fact is most marginalized communities. People have done this entire lives so it it just feels like it's time for you. Know I think in general the museum community to say we're willing to engage in these kinds of difficult ongoing perpetual natural conversations. It's really interesting to approach these issues from the framework of such a technical profession. What is different? What has changed interest in the field of conservation since you were in school? I I was in Grad school two decades ago. So it's you know. I guess I would break it down into technical practices desist which I think most conservatives would would think of themselves as doing sort of things with their hands changing a surface in some way and then more social practices this or how do you how do you be in this world. In terms of technical practices. I mean some of the things that we do on a regular basis or certainly did to me raise a lot of questions about how do even come up with this. So you know one of the things that I was trained on and I think a lot of conservatives still do is something like spit cleaning leaning for a long time it was known that something like human saliva has really amazing cleaning properties. And you know it's the reason why your mom might have like littered Dom uh-huh and rubbed off your face but but it works really well and it's you know there have been attempts to make this much more scientific Tillich. What are the enzymes designs for example in saliva that work? But you know now thinking about it. My Gosh you to spit on someone else's things it's really really strange concept and yet it was something that was really suggested as a very efficacious way of doing a treatments for me. This is meant that I really have to be extremely aware of the choices. I'm making an at least be aware of the discomfort that they raise in me when I started thinking about what I'm actually doing. And then there's how how does one work with anybody else certainly in academia and I would say also in in museums are very hierarchical spaces where you know in the museum. The end the sort of curator often has had the privilege of storytelling and often when people are not within. The museum are consulted their consulted assaulted. Either after most of the work has been done or that that information is extracted from them and presented as part of this larger narrative rather than allowing doing people to simply say what they they believe. These objects are how you know. The story needs to be presented for those in an established field like museum professionals or conservators. It's easy to go with the language and practice that exists before you arrive. Projects Untold Stories challenge those assumptions and help help create a new model for me. It's really about kind of activating cultural heritage. In in very kind of living ways underlying all of this work with untold stories was to really think about what is possible in terms of preserving cultural heritage if you think of cultural heritage as being something that's preserved by people in in conservation labs only to that's really limiting and it also is untrue because we have millennia of people caring in for their things and their stories and passing this knowledge on through oral traditions and other kinds of traditions so to somehow claim that we are the only ones capable of doing this kind of preservation. Work is fundamentally untrue and so to me kind of bringing up this resilience but also just this joy of doing miss incredible connected. Human work was something that I wanted to be around the next untold. Stories event will be held. During the American Institute of Conservation's turns annual conference in Salt Lake City from May nineteenth to May twenty third twenty twenty the title of the event will be preserving cultural landscapes. And if you can't physically attend the event will be live streamed you can learn more about the untold stories project and watch recordings of past events at untold told stories dot live this episode of Museum archipelago is brought to you by a new museum. podcast cast called stories here. The latest episode is an excellent two part series about the eastern state penitentiary in Philadelphia. It includes the story three of a family secret being hidden from daughter revealed after talking at the site with former incarcerated person. The Ad Copy did not ask me to say this but I feel like anyone interested in museum archipelago will really enjoy stories here in addition to the episodes about the eastern state penitentiary. I think my audience would. I really enjoy the episode about the international coalition of sites of conscience to listen to the stories here dot com or type stories. Here into your favorite podcast player. My thanks to stories here for Supporting Museum Archipelago Just Justin time for your holiday. Travel are archipelago at the movie series continues with two thousand and four is national treasure decoration. The most most dramatic moments take place at museums across Washington. DC Philadelphia and. New York's wounded by guards video. Ma But the movie and Protagonist Nicholas Cage page go far deeper on issues of public ownership provenance and museum tour groups than the action packed. Plot suggests go. I'm joined by friend of the show and IRA FRIEND REBECCA REAPS TEEN to discuss this wild ride of the archipelago at at the movies. Deep dives into national treasure and night at the museum are now available. Exclusively to club archipelago members. Now the member yet join now at Patriotair Dot Com Slash Museum archipelago. This has been museum. Archipelago you'll find a full transcript of this episode served as well as shown it's and links at Museum Archipelago Dot Com if this is your first. Show subscribe for free in your favorite podcast player. And if this isn't sent leave us a rating or review. Wherever you get your podcasts? Thanks for listening and next time bring a friend.

American Institute for Conserv Museum archipelago Museum Archipelago Dot Com Philadelphia Supporting Museum Archipelago Patriotair Dot Com Slash Museu John Hopkins Archaeological Mu Archaeological Theological Mus Collaborative Conservation American Institute for Conserv Bala Chandran Bala Cheetah Bala Chandran Cinci Bala Alexander Elsner Europe American Institute of Conserva Nicholas Cage Johns Hopkins University Mohegan Sun
82. Statues and Museums

Museum Archipelago

00:00 sec | 5 months ago

82. Statues and Museums

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So, let's get started. The statute appeared in two thousand eleven on the path of my daily Commute to the University of Florida. Where I was a student, it was a statue of football player named Tim Tebow, and the strange thing about it was that Tim Tebow was still around. In fact, it was just a few months after he graduated, and it was commemorating events like touchdowns that I remembered seeing I remember seeing him around campus, and now I was looking at him houses statue, but it wasn't. Wasn't just a statue behind the statue was the entrance to a hall of honor which featured football trophies, but the space was not just a room with trophies. It was a story about the football program where trophies were an inevitable consequence. In short, it looked like a museum reader, rails and old pictures of the early days of the program were presented alongside pigskin football's from the nineteen thirties with lighting, but this wasn't just one university all across the football conference. These trophy rooms looked like museum spaces. At Florida State University just a few hours away. The trophy room begins with artifacts from and descriptions of the seminole nation. Even though these are tellingly light on the details, the point was to tie the athletic program success without a historical figures fighting a US invasion. It's all done very deftly one minute. You're looking at a map of what is now Florida? Drawn by US general and the next. You're looking at a tattered Football Jersey the next, a bronze statue of the stories heroes. There's a bridge between statues and museums. They feed into each other. So why do athletic programs adopt statues and museum like spaces because they want to sell us? A selective account presented as a neutral archive of the past. Last week Bristles at the center. Black Lives Matter UK protesters tore down the Statue of Edward Colston, a prominent seventeenth century slave trader. Protesters rolled the statue through the street and pushed it into Bristol. The same harbor that Colston's Royal African company ships that forcibly carried eighty thousand people from Africa to the Americas used to dock. Before it was thrown into the harbor, the Statue of Colston had been standing in the center of town since eighteen ninety-five, and it wasn't as if the source of Colston's wealth was just discovered last week. The idea of how do we make visible for instance, the enslaved people who are invisible at all of these sites of memory that were about white supremacy when they were created, and now they still are, but we don't talk about that rate like how do we make that visible something that I've been embiid playing around with for a long time? This is Dr Larry Montero professor of history at Rutgers University Newark and Co founder of the museum on site and creator of Washington's next. Interview Episode Seventy seven of the show. She explains and answers when the arguments against taking down white supremacist statues in the context of the United States the slippery slope argument and the people who make this argument tend not to be the ones who are like overtly Gung Ho in like you know, it's our. It's our southern heritage to honor Robert. E Lee sought those folks. It's more. The people who are historians sometimes are historians sometimes like folks. The argument that they make is that will. Yes, it's not good that there is a statue to Robert E. Lee, but the thing is we take him down and obviously using him to stand up for all the confederate statues. If we take him down, we'll then. Where are we going to stop? Because it? The reason why he's not appropriate for us to honor public spaces because of slavery will, there are other slave owners that we honor in public space, and of course, the biggest ones there are George Washington Thomas Jefferson. And of course is no way in hell. We're GONNA. Get rid of those statues, right? We're GONNA take down the. Washington monument I don't think so. You know so the idea is. It's a slippery slope that were starting to tumble down the minute that we start taking down the statues of people who supported and promoted slavery Montero's answer to the slippery slope. Argument is yes. Washington's next the tone of voice in which I I hear the slippery slope. From scholars and from museum practitioners. And from public parks officials is less one of like panic and concern about attacking that legacy and much more one of full. That's just silly. Obviously wouldn't do that. Dr Saudia Karachi, senior lecturer in modern history at the University of Birmingham writes in flux. Perry unpacked about toppling statues. Critics accused protesters of wanting to rewrite history yet fail to engage with what is really at stake, namely identifying acknowledging and removing endemic structural problems of racism in repair to form a suggestion. By more than a few people is museums wind up? The statues of problematic people in museums is the bottom of the harbour, really the right place for Statue of Colston. Of course, these questions tend to ignore that the bottom of the ocean is the final resting place for hundreds of actual. Thrown overboard from Colston's chips because they were deemed a poor investment for Colston's company on the Zeke Appel go. We've investigated what various Eastern European countries are doing with old statues of dictators like Lenin and Stalin. Monica, notice interviewed on episode. Five of this show describes how her family's native Lithuania removed. It's ubiquitous Soviet statues from city squares all across the country. The removals were events that helped build the young nation, but once the statues were removed from their original locations. No one knew quite what to do with them. Many of them ended up at something called Curtis Park a kind of half theme park that includes a massive statue garden. The statues are presented simply and somewhat randomly each has a little description of the city and square where the statue used to stand many Lithuanians and the Lithuanian government have criticized the uncritical approach to the parks laughed. Visitors are free to do whatever they want. I guess like once you got into the actual dash you. It's Kinda funny because you can do whatever you want. So like planning on top of London installing, picking their nose Tottenham on the head. Doing whatever you want but I like to think that I have some sort of connection. Some sort of understanding that spews images might have been both sterry inspirational different times. Somebody's life for me. They've always been images. That were bad like no like I. Feel like throwing I always do that. Lenin Stalin phase like these are the faces of terror that drove my grandparents out of. Yeah but. Interact with them on this like humorous level is really interesting. The situation at Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Art in Sofia is somewhat similar. The outdoor sculpture garden is littered with statues. Commemorating Soviet power placed wherever there's room I visited many times, and I'm never quite sure how to react. There's a lot of power in deliberately taking these statues out of the context they were made for what once may have been in imposing statue, underscoring who's in charge in the public square is now just two key, leading impotently outer Rosebush in Eastern Europe the statues of. Of Lenin and Stalin and others were erected during the communist times and were swiftly removed when the system fell in the West statues erected more than one hundred years ago. Still stand without context Washington's next. Because the money he made from owning working in selling people isn't a footnote. It's the reason he was the first president. Even at the museums of Bristol Website Colston is identified as a revered philanthropist slash reviled slave trader in that order. As if the money he gave away to the city of Bristol wasn't violently extracted from the people he enslaved. It's not a sufficient answer to simply put these statues in the museum I. Don't know if there's enough museum space for all the confederate monuments in the American south or enough museum space for all the statues of King. Leopold in Belgium, but more importantly political exercise in selective remembrance neatly packaged as an unbiased archive. That statues represent is the same exercise that museums represent. Represent museums and statues are bridged together. Many of these statues are right in front of museum entrances, priming visitor for what they can expect to find inside statutes, museums share centuries long history of supporting white supremacist colonialist, racist ideologies, helping them flourish providing the evidence for them, and under girding them through their placement through their air of authority and through their supposed neutrality. The statues of American football players at American universities helps me think about this because the stakes are so low, the rivalry is so clear. Our football team has heroes and the long legacy, and it's telling that the two tools that were employed to make that point are statues and museums. This has been museum archipelago. Haven't checked out club archipelago. Now is a great time. My favorite episode of Our museum movie. Review Series archipelago at the movies is now completely free joining Rebecca. We've deny as we break breakdown two thousand four's national treasure, discussing the tropes of museum films. Now Museum Exhibit Design is reflected back through popular culture to listen for free and hopefully find a little distraction. Could the Patriots Dot Com Slash Museum archipelago and look for the episode on national treasure. You can find a full transcript of this episode and links to other episodes at museum, Archipelago Dot Com. Museum archipelago is supported by listeners like you who have joined club archipelago on patriotic. If you can't get enough about how museums shape, our lives join now for two dollars a month. If this is your first episode, subscribe to the show for free using your favorite podcasts player, and if it isn't leave us a rating reveal. And next time. Bring a friend.

Edward Colston Lenin Stalin football Washington US Robert E. Lee Colston Bristol Tim Tebow Com Slash Museum Dr Larry Montero University of Florida Bulgaria's Museum of Socialist Museum Exhibit Design Archipelago Dot Com Bristol Website Colston Colston Elsner Florida State University Florida
September 21, 2019: Happy Museum Day!

5 Things

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

September 21, 2019: Happy Museum Day!

"Hiring isn't easy but there is one place you can go where hiring is simple in smart that place is ziprecruiter where growing businesses connect to qualified candidates candidates try it for free at. ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash five things ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire good morning. I'm Taylor Wilson and this is five things. You need to know the weekend of September Twenty First Nineteen get you started. Happy Museum Day. Get yourself some free culture on Saturday sixteen hundred museums around the country will be opening their doors to the public the annual Newell Event which is organized by Smithsonian magazine encourages museums galleries and historic sites to allow free entry just as the Smithsonian Institution's Washington. DC based facilities facilities do year round to get a free entry. All you have to do is head to Smithsonian. Dot Com Slash Museum Day and Click the get a ticket bought in where you can find a museum you want to visit just enter your name email and download the branded ticket there are free options in all fifty states and also the District of Columbia the United Nations General Assembly kicked off earlier earlier this week in New York bringing leaders to the US from around the globe president trump will be on the road on Sunday with two of them. He's scheduled to visit Houston with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Render Modi before visiting Ohio with Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison who he hosted on Friday night for a state dinner. Meanwhile General Assembly week also comes with widespread. Ed's bread climate protests both in the US and around the world. Both students and employees alike took off from school and work to hit the streets and fight for climate change awareness high school student. Alexandra said that change has to start with the youth so for me. It feels really important to encourage you to be involved in this movement just because we're the ones who are going to be here longer than anyone who's all day and it's us in our kids who are going to be really affected by next up getting ready for the seventy first annual. Emmy awards and though it may now be months in the rear view mirror. All eyes are on game of thrones to see if the mega hit. HBO Show will go out with a bang. Thrones is nominated for a staggering thirty two awards including best drama series which it has won the last three times it was nominated in two thousand fifteen sixteen and eighteen and meanwhile another HBO show Veep will also try to finish strong after wrapping up in May Star Julia Louis Dreyfuss. We'll try to go six for six and best actress. Emmy Wins Butch. You'll face stiff competition with the star of the Marvelous Mrs Mazel Rachel Brosnahan. You can tune in Sunday night at eight eastern five Pacific on Fox two of college football's giants will do battle on Saturday Notre Dame and Georgia. Just how big is the game. Well you swim coach. Jack Bauer Lee has memories the bulldogs games dating back to his enrollment in one thousand nine hundred seventy and he says very few games had hype like this one. He said quote very seldom. Have I seen a buzz like this. Maybe nineteen seventy-six was something like this. Alabama came in and they were undefeated and the town didn't sleep on Friday or Saturday night on quote. This game has even extended beyond the stadium. AM with one local store jokingly pulling Irish spring soap from shelves ahead of the clash against the fighting Irish and the soap company responded by sending Georgia heaps of its products with bulldog logos on the boxes. The home favorites number three ranked Georgia will host seventh-ranked. Notre Dame and Athens Georgia on Saturday night at eight PM Eastern time other the big games around college football will include eleventh ranked Michigan at thirteenth ranked Wisconsin and number eight auburn at Seventeen Texas. Am stay up on all the action with with USA. Today sports and last up happy birthday friends the Sitcom Turns Twenty Five on Sunday and the gang is still there for you in reruns the series presented in two thousand and four but it never really left television or pop culture even superstar movie actor. Brad Pitt made an appearance on the show though he told USA Today that actually messed S. Stop his first line with then wife. Jennifer Aniston flood my first line line at flood and we'd go back nostalgia might drive a love of the show for many any but thanks to Netflix. It's also widely popular with millennials and Gen Z. ears. You can catch new episodes of five things Monday through Saturday on apple podcasts and wherever or else you get your pods including the Google home and Amazon Echo you can also subscribe for free and leave us a rating and review if you'd like plus be sure to follow in tweet us at USA USA. Today podcast on twitter shout out to Pete Rosenberg who told US earlier this week that the Washington monument is his favourite in DC five things is part of the USA. Today podcast network hiring can be a slow process cafe owed to her as Coo Dylan Moskowitz needed to hire a director of coffee for his Organic Coffee Company Company but was having trouble finding qualified applicants so he switched Ziprecruiter ziprecruiter technology finds people with the right experience and invites them to apply to your job. Bob Dylan posted his job on Ziprecruiter and was impressed by how quickly he had qualified candidates apply and in just a few days he found his new director of coffee with results like that. It's no wonder four out of five employers who post on Ziprecruiter get a qualified candidate within the first day see why Ziprecruiter is effective for businesses of all sizes. Try Ziprecruiter for free at our web address. ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash five things that's ziprecruiter dot com slash the number five T H I N G S Ziprecruiter dot com slash five things ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire.

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63. Sex and Death Are on Display at The Museum of Old and New Art

Museum Archipelago

09:57 min | 1 year ago

63. Sex and Death Are on Display at The Museum of Old and New Art

"Welcome to museum. Archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started museums on the Australian island of Tasmania are a microcosm of museums all around the world. They struggle with properly interpreting their colonial past the exclusion of first peoples from telling their own stories in major museums, and having a large privately owned art museum reshape small town, this month on museum archipelago. We're taking you to Tasmania over the course of three episodes were conducting a survey of museums on the island and exploring how each of them relates to the wider landscape of museums today, we visit the museum of old, and new art in Hobart Tasmania, Australia. It's known as Muna and it's by far the largest museum in Tasmania now the only by square footage. It's in fact, the largest privately owned art museum in the southern hemisphere, but also by its influence on your often on ABC radio Hobart and across Tasmania, we'll hosting an international podcast about. Museums. Would you spend your precious travel dollas to record? That's Helen shield, host of terrestrial broadcast radio program in Tasmania is one obvious enters. She's a Hobart local and she interviewed me about this series. Listen to how she describes the way that Mona shapes the island eight it wouldn't be a trip to Tasmania these days without stopping on one particular museum, which is single handedly changed tourism. And prominent international reputation of his island stopping at Marna Mona often called the museum of Saxon death opened in buried Dale a suburb of Hobart in twenty eleven the building on the Norris. Bunker out on the peninsula. Overlooking a river, sneaks up on you, as you approach once you're inside through a rather small, entrance that whisks you on the ground. The architecture is designed to make you feel lost. There are no signs or directions. So you have to choose your own route the maze, like paths split in two with no indication of which way you should take. Other than which one might seem more attractive to you, tunnels and stairs. Which won't always move you up or down by one story are another an escape from the disorienting experience. Instead, they might lead you to a tight claustrophobic chamber a lovely cafe. Overlooking the water or another massive previously undiscovered subterranean open space. I don't think people expected it to have such an impact. It's kind of a lair their villainous. This is being co Blackhall a Hobart based musician, whose watched Mona reshape the creative community and the art landscape of the island. My name is Shanghai black. Oh, I live in Tasmania. I'm twenty seven and I'm a musician among other things. The museum is the product of Tasmanian millionaire and art. Collector David Walsh Walsh made his fortune by gambling. And Blackhall says that he is a much talked about figure in Hobart. He he'd be an interesting guests. Jintai boo. Who's quite unusual in his manner, and he'd fight. He's money through gambling, and who's good with numbers in his introduction to one of Mona's past exhibits Walsh, recalled spending, a lot of time in Hobart, smu's Zia, GMs as a teenager. And apparently he's to get dropped off by his parents in town at the museums and Easter just walk around the day as a kid, and then become up again at the not on come home. 'cause navy was annoying them or whatever at home as a kid with a name like the museum of old, and new art Mona could pretty much include any type of art, but looking at the collection, it's clear that David Walsh has a fascination with sex, and death and bets that the rest of us do too, and it turns out, he's right. Social animals like us love thinking about fucking and dying and excretion and wrought Walsh, himself calls. Mona a subversive adult Disneyland. There's the holy virgin. Mary, a painting created and part with elevate. Int- deng. There's on the road to heaven, the highway to hell in which the remains of a suicide bomber cast in dark chocolate, there dead horses, and rotting festering wounds with swarming bugs encased in acrylic, there's audio animatronic skeletons fucking, there's a digestive machine that turns food into feces and stinks up an entire gallery, the art tries to punch you in the gut, and mostly succeeds in part because there aren't any descriptive. Plaques telling you what's important about the art or how to feel about it. I say I'd never seen anything like it really something. And these from someone who worked scene, and spent his free time exploring mediums, so often we are in neom. World were very stressed out by the labeling. We spend hours and hours thinking about what the labels and placard look like next to a piece of armour. And so it was really refreshing Winston understanding, no labels at all. He normally. Clinical music copulating and they're enjoying it. Always removing feeling from the equation like go objectively this is this. But moving on your only guide to the museum is it's inhouse app called the oh, the oh, will provide some interpretation of the art, but that interpretation is hidden away in a little tab, called art wink, which has the icon of a penis. It's delightful to see art off the pedestal. But Blackhall says that that levity might also make it easier for the artists. I think it's a very uncomfortable thing to be asked to explain please explain know as pulling Hansen says, and it's like, oh. How do I say this stuff without being twit gets almost like they've made the unconventional the everyday, you know? And sometimes you wonder around there and they'll be people in smokes getting about. And you might y you know, these these odd smokes. I'm not sure you know what's happening. But it so it's like now it's a pot of your every day, do you think for Tasmanians that there's a certain amount of pride that it's here? Definitely, I think people have welcomed with open arms almost, and the way people talk about you here. You know, wherever you are the art minor. Yup up. Very good. You know, lacking kind of very gruff way. But like all. Yep. Very good going to go down to the bone fire with the kids, you know. And it's good. Mona has also been well received by art critics and by tourists visiting from outside Tasmania as a new destination on the global art tourism circuit. There's no doubt that the museum has changed Hobart a city of a quarter of a million people. I feel like it. Partly began with minor this. You know, Sarah NHS is tourism like feel like where in the I you know, that it's, it's watching us the world is going that Lyon there and it really in the last year. Oh, two, you can feel the new foot traffic you can really feel it and it's a little bit at I don't know if actually quite got the infrastructure for the amount that we of tourists that we now have luckily, moaner, I think, took responsibility for itself. But yeah, you can definitely feel the on the, you know, we have cruise ships, not coming in and out sometimes their cruise ship traffic jams, whether I have to white and the by for the other one to leave before they come in, and yet, it's changed rapidly in a very short space of time, quite shocking, even with the crowds of people visiting it's hard. Not to feel alone in the space as if you're the only one experiencing the art, the museum also hosts solstice festivals, which I'm told transformed the town with musical performances and large public art. Installations, eight slang having access to the blow like it feels that you've you've got an, you have an insight into this world that you would have never been apart of had you lived somewhere else. My lasting impression is that Mona is a monument to a kind of joyful secularism in the world where monuments don't feel particularly secular or joyful, the feeling of visiting is a little like launching confetti Popper in the serious place of worship and getting away with it. It is in short life, affirming. A very special thanks to the newest members of club archipelago, Sean Blinn, Blair Chisholm, Victoria, capacity. And Alex, join them to support the show and get access to special bonus features like longer versions of some of my interviews. My take on the museum industry, an inside a tours of museums all around the world all with the same humor and quality you've come to expect from us. Eum archipelago. Join today for two dollars a month on patriot dot com slash museum archipelago and get museum archipelago logo stickers mailed straight to your door. That's patriot dot com slash museum archipelago to join club archipelago. You can find more about being co Blackhall by searching for being a black hole music on Facebook and Instagram. This has been museum archipelago. You'll find a full transcript of this episode along with show notes at museum, archipelago dot com. If this is your first show, don't forget to subscribe for free in your favorite podcast player. Thanks for listening and next time. Bring a friend in ELS nine Boston. Find museum archipelago move you get your podcast. I've listened.

Tasmania Hobart Mona museum of old art museum David Walsh Walsh Hobart Tasmania Eum archipelago Blackhall museum of Saxon Marna Mona Ian Elsner Muna ABC Australia Facebook Boston Helen shield
69. Soviet Spacecraft in the American Heartland: The Story of the Kansas Cosmosphere

Museum Archipelago

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

69. Soviet Spacecraft in the American Heartland: The Story of the Kansas Cosmosphere

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm ian elsner pews. Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started. There are many sites on earth that play a role in human spaceflight the mission control building in houston texas where flight engineers communicated with the apollo astronauts on the moon or even the grassy field in south eastern russia where eureka garin landed to end his his mission as the first person in space but hutchinson kansas isn't one of these sites. No spacecraft engineering happened here like in huntsville alabama. Emma no rocket engine testing happened here like in pearling taken mississippi. There's not even a historic exploration related radio telescope here like in parks australia despite this hutchinson a town a forty thousand people is home to the cosmos fear a massive space museum. The cosmos here boasts enormous collection the spacecraft including the largest collection of soviet space hardware anywhere outside russia. How did all of these space are the facts and up in the middle of kansas to find out. I visited hutchinson to talk to causes here curator shannon wetzel. I think some of our brochure say why not us right. The story of the cosmos fear is more or less the right place at the right time. What's all says that the museum museum has had many decades to be in the right place at the right time. Hello my name is shannon wetzel and i am the curators here at the concentrate the cosmos fears. I was a star projector in folding chairs so up at the kansas state fairgrounds in nineteen sixty two by woman named patty carey she was inspired spire by the launch of sputnik and ultimately wanted to set up a space science center in the mid west the volunteers. We have who knew her personally. I did not know her. Personally have pretty not much call her very nice arm-twister. You didn't say no to patty kerry and that planetarium grew to what you say now by the late nineteen seventies his potty carey was making plans to transform the planetarium into the kansas causes fear and discovery center the collection as we know it started in in the late nineteen seventies nasa is looking to a hedge singers unload but looking to get some hardware out there for the public to see and the cosmos fear was beginning its first expansion so we had the space and the connections. That's how we wound up. Collecting eighteen space harbor the cosmos fear was in the right place a big building in the mid west and the right time the late nineteen seventy s the era was a strange time for space exploration. It was after the apollo program but before the space shuttle the smithsonian errands space museum opened in washington dc in nineteen seventy six and and i get the sense of the whole bunch of space artifacts that didn't make the cut for that museum ended up in hutchinson this massoni and nass. I mean they want to get ed stuff stuff artifacts priceless our tracks out for the public to see everywhere and maybe also that's a sign of their success status and they have gotten into the mid west and it's been a priority and we are so grateful to the smithsonian. I don't know if you noticed on our labels. How many of our items on display are from from them and we're just grateful to be. I believe we are the only smithsonian affiliated kansas looking carefully at the collection. You also see another pattern hardware from missions that didn't go exactly as planned. It is heavily damaged mercury boilerplate capsule from the mercury atlas one mission. There's liberty bell seven another mercury capsule. That was the u._s.'s second human spaceflight mission in nineteen sixty one the astronaut survived but the capsule sink into the ocean and wasn't recovered until nineteen ninety nine and then there's the apollo thirteen command module odyssey which was restored and added to the museum in nineteen ninety five live at the end of the apollo thirteen mission. The astronauts were home safe. It was fantastic and then it was viewed more as a failure than success. Apollo thirteen was displayed in france. It wasn't viewed as something that should be around here necessarily and and so yes it was on display in france for awhile and then our guys restored it. I can't imagine any museum turning away the apollo thirteen command module today but but it is the cosmos fears ethos to say yes to an unwanted unrestored artifact even if that artifact is sitting under the water or somewhere in france they see the investment in the recovery and the restoration as well worth the effort to add it to their collection but there's also a bigger point that the museum is making thing with the collection as a whole space exploration is as much about the failures as it is about the successes. I believe that apollo thirteen had come up with contingency plan before it wasn't on the fly and in a way it was testing their contingency plan and it went wonderful. They got home safely. We discuss a lot. I know about how it seems in our culture. There's a fear of failure. We are afraid to fail or if something doesn't work the first time that means that idea should be discarded and i think that that's not what got us to the moon. That's not what made our space program successful so without meaning to. That's kind of become one of our catchphrases around here. Don't want our campers our students to be afraid to fail but the collection it wasn't just made up of american space hardware. The cosmic sphere also boasts the largest collection of soviet space artifacts anywhere outside of russia and this fills in the sizable reasonable gaps of how most other space museum's present the space race the cozma sphere team which included patty carey served obtaining soviet space hardware in in the late nineteen eighty s and early nineteen ninety s again right place at the right time. The soviet union was cobbling. They were looking to get rid of some of their artifacts artifacts. We worked through a broker and we were able to obtain them so they are part of our collection. They are not loaned pieces by the decision to try and collect them. Why why didn't other museums try to in the same way that you did. I think that our early leaders were very visionary in what we could become and recognize that in a sense we were only telling half the story half of the space race coury is colored red and filled with soviet space objects and text about the soviet human spaceflight program and the other half is blue telling the american story. Our gallery is is setup particularly well in the sense that you get a comparison. We split the gallery in a sense where you can see. This is kind of what was going going on the soviet union at the time. This is what the americans were doing. I think that our gallery does a really good job of comparing the two in a linear way so you can say okay during the mercury program and here's the vostok program the effect is striking the causes fear is not a design museum but by putting the artifacts from two different superpowers superpower's close to one another you get an appreciation for the subtle and not so subtle differences in the industrial design compare the design language of the soviet looking at the moon rover on display at the museum with the american mars rovers that americans might be more familiar with and you can see the different ways each program approach the problems of surviving in space even without the color coordination wessels favourite soviet are the fact is the luna sphere a copy of a soccer soccer ball shaped device carried by luna to whose only purpose was to cover its crash landing site on the moon with little pendants embossed with images of the hammer encircle. The soviet sent the luna sphere and it's just a small ball that upon landing it has a small explosive in it and all of these little art gallery calls them cosmic calling cards all of these cosmic calling cards go all over the surface of the moon. What a nice little just such a <hes> a metaphor for the cold war a little stick in the eye wetzel said that it's becoming increasingly difficult to teach younger generations about the political context context of the space race after all. It's been thirty years since the berlin wall fell very difficult to explain. I would even say the cold war is kind of difficult to explain because first of all they didn't live through it. I don't know if you did but i mean i was on the tail end of it. It wasn't isn't black and white there was so much great and i think that's the difficult part especially you've seen. Our gallery is pretty big. A forty five minute tour down there you just barely make it to the shuttle and that's if you're rushing so it's difficult to portray those ideas in a short amount of time to a younger audience no matter what you do do it gets wrapped up nice eight as we change here on earth so too does the way we teach the story of spaceflight what's will give me me an example of the list of items. Humans have left on the moon. A list that includes everything from the propagandistic lewis fear pendants to actual trash left there by the apollo astronauts. I didn't with our campus yesterday. We do a collection sure and i was telling they were appalled. I was like wow the generational it were hauled. What we we trashed the moon and i'm only did this is one of the reasons i will always keep coming back to space museum's museums. The environmental consciousness that the apollo program itself sparked by its images of tiny fragile borderless earth now gets the chance to reevaluate valuate apollo a new and that's just one of the ways that the cosmic sphere free from specific location can tell the story of human space exploration better than the site-specific museum visiting the johnson space flight center in houston texas visitors learn how that site play the role in the larger apollo missions visiting using the parkes observatory in australia. You can learn about how that radio telescope was instrumental in broadcasting famous images of neil armstrong stepping onto the moon and to the rest of the world. The cosmos fear allows visitors to take a step back. This has been museum archipelago. Hi it's again since you've listened all the way to the end. I'm going to go out on a limb and say you're a fan of museum. Archipelago join other fans by subscribing to club archipelago. It's not so secret club that gives you access to a special bonus features like longer versions of some of my interviews my my take on the museum industry an inside a tours of museums all around the world all with the same humor and quality. You've come to expect from museum. Archipelago repel ago joined today two dollars a month on patriot dot com slash museum archipelago and get museum cappella lugar stickers mailed straight to your door. That's patriot dot com slash museum archipelago to join club archipelago book. You'll find a full transcript of this episode kalang with show nuts at museum archipelago dot com. If this is your show don't forget to subscribe for free in your favorite podcast player. Thanks for listening and next time bring a friend.

patty carey smithsonian errands space muse museum museum soviet union museum archipelago dot com shannon wetzel space museum russia kansas france hutchinson kansas houston texas australia soccer alabama
62. David Gough Reclaims Stewardship of Tiagarra for Aboriginal Tasmanians

Museum Archipelago

14:32 min | 1 year ago

62. David Gough Reclaims Stewardship of Tiagarra for Aboriginal Tasmanians

"Welcome to museum. Archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started museums on the Australian island of Tasmania are a microcosm of museums all around the world. They struggle with properly interpreting their colonial past the exclusion of first peoples from telling their own stories in major museums, and having a large privately owned art museum reshape a small town this month on museum archipelago, we're taking you to Tasmania over the course of three episodes were conducting a survey of museums on the island and exploring how each of them relates to the wider landscape of museums today, we visit the TR cultural center and museum in Devonport, Tasmania, Australia. The museum is situated on mercy bluff, a traditional aboriginal sacred site that now hosts a nature trail and a caravan park, the museum was built in nineteen seventy six to promote aboriginal culture and cultural tourism. But the displays were put together by nonindigenous citizen. Fans and scientists David Goff of the local Devonport Latrobe aboriginal community remembers visiting the museum when he was younger and seeing offensive words on the plaques and on the walls, younger looking at stuff. And so he came out. There's things here that words really inappropriate Woodstock about us in longer race of people able Levin, writing, my family and ask stories, and running know why that suited them arrival as savages in medic, and all these things that they write things that were like, we didn't have may file. So we're going to all these things that we were really limited people. But we live straight to Osei ges today Goff is the chairperson of the six rivers, aboriginal corporation, and the manager of TR. When of the first things he did his manager was put masking tape over those words, you know, as soon as I got the, the case and the dole back, I put masking type IVA woods sticky TAC. Yeah. Put type I really. Inappropriate words written on the Mike. Beautiful people rather than some of the words were under that slits and said, we're now we can put ourselves in here. I'm rather than this place. Told stories about it sort of left us as we Don exist anymore because we're not, we don't have out our stories in here, offensive, racial language, covered up and written, over by the very people at describes is the perfect metaphor for what t- Agora was in the past, and what it's going to be in the future. Hello, my name's Dave mangoni gov. Antiga Tig our coach who center museum, Devonport Tasmania, g guards and ritual nine pains to keep this sought is a significant sought with caravan park. His just there was where there was hots and a village aboriginal Tasmanians lived in Tasmania for at least sixty thousand years, often completely isolated from mainland Australia by rising sea levels, European colonization of the island and a violent. Guerilla war between British colonists and aboriginal Tasmanians from the mid eighteen twenty s to eighteen thirty two known as the Tasmanian war was devastating to aboriginal Tasmanians for much of the twentieth century, including when Kiara was constructed the Tasmanian aboriginal people were widely and their own the Asli thought of as being an extinct, cultural and ethnic group, those around about people at a massive the Jim saw that people impacts colonization displacement, as my able to focus on chopping wood to make money to survive and cultures changing shift that growing up in schools, some kids go original, what does that mean that I'm not that I really grow up nine a lot about whether it's his or what, what happened to, to the families because the United States it's pretty will specially here a families went through griped trauma. That still is affects us. I was saying young kids growing up in the Justice of traumatic patents that happen to a series of careful museum upgrades, teaching aboriginal culture to his wide and audience as possible, and activism, golf plans to change this. So it's important for, for our families to Putin for the other the other kids in the areas as well. This will go to the schools is United State help were without kids side. The other Keats in builds his mutual respect and understanding about who we all think understanding way, apple podcast will give them. I've flee y full it's golf took me through the museum as it is today, except for the masking tape, and some offer handprints, the museum looks almost exactly, as it did in nineteen seventy six, we enter through the front door, a fake cave that opens a description of the land bridges across the Bass Strait. Which today separates Tasmania from the rest of Australia. Since it's pretty pretty. We have got some money to do some changes and upgrades into this museum the section but with very mournful. But actually now this plice Tom captial and is actually becoming a museum of museums side of really coach about making changes to. I'm this, this panel here talks about twelve thousand years, par to us ideas, where we will connect to Astrada and have that allowed you know, what people would say migration and people in animals. We neither actually came close to here, and this is a great like people lived around this, like wasn't just people walking backwards and forwards, and we've got a lot of average heritage saw in rock shelters, a London eighth, what went over and kids for here and spend an hour within the talk about living sites, and we use caves as living thoughts, and we have several different kinds in our country, that some leaving kinds, and some ceremonial caves, and the ceremony kinds week. We try to keep quiet from my, so the public because I get van lost a have visited a lot of thoughts because I was on the beverage heritage count. For quite a few years, and obeyed very heavily involved in protecting heritage around the country. What happens is when someone comes across damage is something that was signed that realize what it was. So then it gets thrown back, and she sang will if I had a nine I wouldn't have done that is. That's why went on the council already or sunshine, djing that act about protecting it. Her teach Tyke out that the ignorance goals and to some ju diligence around prices, they're going to dig somewhere, the guy to do something in an area. They need to contact heritage and find out this through something they had that would damage the gallery continues through detailed dioramas golf says visitors specifically school groups of children that come through our fascinated by them. But he says that without proper interpretation without stories being told in the voice of aboriginal Tasmanians, the dioramas true, meaning is lost and the lasting impact is lessened in today. That they will meetings. The way of meeting think, mafia Latin nine for rob a sh- unite, and it's because that's what by soared as but people drive up full were drives and destroying them, and we constantly trying to make get protection trying to get would heritage listing of various because some of these about four times as high as building. So when you're standing there, and you're looking at ever line shells on, on that, and you save the hot United though, Fady in a eighty bets. How old these places is many thousands of years old. And they we have rock patriots RAF markings in those areas to which probably five times out of the Spinks. There's a lot of ceremony that happens around these, these living solids babies born in the elders Apostoli in buried, there reminded there, so for us these not rubbish tips that they're there. You know, hospital with church of everything their gripes, there, everything, family members of that, too, with before, drives, and reburied people. So exposing people's reminds really, really young said when you're out there trying to stop people that they're now saying it's their culture to fold drive on on these areas, golf sees the public education, as crucial not just to protect the sites, but also to protect the stories. So this place going through this with kids and getting to understand maybe change some concepts and understanding about what, what, what's around them and what a landscape actually made. So when you say something like this, you can sit around to someone else inside genome of the seats, then you become the educator, and then you can pass on the raisins about why you would look after it because once it's removed the story can go the museum is currently closed only open for prearranged tours consisting most. The of school kids and the occasional podcast or even the ownership of the museum has been contentious up until recently, the Devonport city council rescinded the lease from the six rivers, aboriginal corporation in two thousand fourteen and did not hand back the keys until twenty fifteen Sammy Howard, fellow board member of the six rivers, aboriginal corporation, explains that the museum has been hampered by red tape every step of the way to our which fees drawn those Nonni a the only museum caving, pice in stri, figurative stike funded on today's of what she added governments set us up to file. You don't give didn't give us the training and the things that way knighted on starting to sink it would become a collection of who jumps because every time we get through one hope there's another one put in front of us. The white governments have got to be silliness with phone. Welcome a money issue don't working when you're trying. To deal with these things people want what they told could talk about. Matings of may was return on investment. And it's a difficult spice when you when you talking about sharing culture and having applies to your community bay is plice means a lot to families in this area. But both Howard and golf are optimists about the future of tiara the corporation hopes to bring some, high tech exhibits like touchscreens into the museum and build the resources to maintain opening hours with staff and guides from the community all will centering their own story, a number of factors contribute to their optimism. The museum can now apply for specific funding sources from other Tasmanians there's an increased interest in understanding the land in its people, and the greater understanding of British colonization of the island, we sort of feeling that this is a year where we'll get the spice opened again over just bring school gross right now with this business plan, what we're doing is to get out to spend some, some of this money and upgrade some of the interpreted here and put ourselves and ask stories into this spice. This is really important. It could be an option of having a self God into with they walking around, and as they come to different sections, getting told the stores wanted to tell, but everything costs money, and it's not just upgrading the museum all over Australia and indeed all over the world, the practices of welcome to country and acknowledgement of country are slowly becoming more common as a way to open the vents school, assemblies, and conferences is a difference as an acknowledgment to country and I can be done by anyone is to acknowledge the land and the traditional papal land. And that can be anyone in it should be done by people to site where you do a speech form. Former function is firstly decided after knowledge, the traditional this land. If United nine of is to mention the nine of them into college the land, we made on his is they land in Besser, thinks a welcome to country be done by someone who's from that country. It's basically welcoming balloon to. Up land and for people to understand why affiliates repulsive and opaque guitar stand to beat about who we are what land, they're on. And, and Linda hitt about the traditional papal custodianship, rather than undershoot, Gough, describes visiting native American nations in the US state of Zona and realizing that the challenges that members of first nations face all around the world, including developing museums, that simultaneously served their own people and the wider public are similar, and so are some of the solutions, dude. Wave they're doing that war on, I consider my friends and Harrison. Mc knowledge minutes coming up around universities with I see it at seven, that's, that's a great feat when we're doing things here. I'm getting things in support from my friends will have been gone through similar things conversation on their loss weight, which was around knowledge moments that people not what? We do is always, I would comment on that. And then pay backwards and forwards. There is some support in. Which is really, really positive. Hi, it's in again since you've listened to all the way to the end. I'm going to go out on a limb and say you're a fan of museum archipelago join other fans by subscribing to club archipelago. It's not so secret club that gives you access to special bonus features like longer versions of some of my interviews. My take on the museum industry, an inside a tours of museums all around the world all with the same humor and quality you've come to expect from us. Eum archipelago. Join today for two dollars a month on patriot dot com slash museum archipelago and get museum archipelago logo stickers mailed straight to your door. That's patriot dot com slash museum archipelago to join club. Archipelago. This is. Compelling. You'll find a full transcript of this episode along with shown up that museum archipelago dot if this is your first show. Don't forget to subscribe for free in your favorite podcast player. Thanks for listening and next. Bring a friend.

Tasmania Australia museum archipelago art museum Devonport Latrobe aboriginal c museum of museums United States Eum archipelago Devonport David Goff Ian Elsner mercy bluff Devonport Tasmania Woodstock Bass Strait United State TR cultural center Sammy Howard dole Devonport city council
70. The Gabrovo Museum of Humor Bolsters Its Legacy of Political Satire Post-Communism

Museum Archipelago

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

70. The Gabrovo Museum of Humor Bolsters Its Legacy of Political Satire Post-Communism

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm Ian Elsner Pews Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode so he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started in the middle of Bulgaria not far from the crumbling boozers monument why as the town of gap reveal situated in the Valley of the Balkan mountains the city prides itself on its unique brand of humor. Many local jokes are self deprecating about the gap ravine obsession with frugality and entrepreneurship and center around the comical links. The townspeople go to save money. The Mascot of the city is a black cat without a tail. It said the bruins prefer cats without tails because then they can shut the door faster when they let their cats out saving on their heating bills. This used to be the kind of humor that exist in data in the region around gobble not owning governable but then abrazos abuse were smart enough to brand it as there's best the entrepreneur does entrepreneurial course this is Margarita Sheriff's. Go hello my name. AMY'S MARGARITA DOT COM. I'm curator by profession and I'm director of the Museum of Humor and sat are based in Gobble Bulgaria. The museum was founded founded in one thousand nine hundred seventy two before the wall fell. This location was known as the Communist capital of humor extending its reach across eastern bloc countries and and also into certain circles in the West. I visited gap radio because I wanted to find out how this political humor and Satire Museum could have started here during Communist Times yes and how the museum is tackling. The global memed driven culture of the world today. There are a couple of precursors that we have to go through to understand how the Museum of two things one is the governor of jokes so someone announced a competition in the newspaper that the municipalities paying certain amount for each job that gets druid into a collection of the jokes so they collected a lot of a lot of these jokes made a book and this book was this absolute bestseller. It was immediately translating of course in the Russian those who in different languages like French English German and it started selling L. Inc very very well and the other thing that happened was car narrowed the Ghabra Carnival which was restarted in the sixties this and it is typical for being a carnival a with a lot of political humor and satire the people running the Carnival and later the museum were experts at walking up to the line without crossing it when we speak of political satire do not imagine that the general secretary of the of the part to being saturated it was very clear to what level of satire can reach so satire was an instrument in the hands of good communists to fight. Dole's who abused power but to certain level so talk to maybe your local exactly exactly 'cause very clear you're aware to set our can reach as to the governor will joke. They're not political they deal with the economy with them and tolliday of the of the local people combining the two or maybe more realistically using the Gabar Vo Jokes as a Trojan horse to present more political satire was what led some entrepreneurial Gab ravines to open the museum typical will style day didn't Butte a new building Aberdeen refurbished old leather factory so the building we are in name is a former ladder factory for secrets cheaper second it could go slightly notice because you don't need the same kind of permissions nations to build and to refurbish and if you wanted your out of the mainstream project to succeed in Communist Bulgaria asking for permission was not the way to go. The museum started to put on. BNL's festivals held every two years which featured invited Western guests. The first was in nineteen seventy three. They immediately started with the bi-annual. The first edition was dedicated to Kerr tools and small satirical sculpture. It was international and they brought in the jury amazing amazing names like amazing petunias international out so how could how could that exist well. If you ooh think of that time most Tunis in the Western World would be critical. They'll be leftist so they'll be very welcome in Bulgaria and that indeed the gathering place for people from East and West but there was a problem with that first biannial the jury selected for first prize a cartoonist from Turkey Berkey a country on the other side of the Iron Curtain Director. Oh well what we did and they started asking themselves between never asked for permission mission to make that make an international together. All these people are going to be a huge problem. What are we going to do and then he thought okay don't think I can do is go straight to the monster. So the museum's director went straight to the daughter of the general secretary very with Mela Sheesh Cova who would later become Bulgaria's minister of culture. She was she was good enough to listen. She was smart to pursue seve good ideas and support them. So it worked she came she opened the be annual. Antidote went to on well and they never gave award award having more to a cartoonist coming from a country. That's the initial. The museum and the bienial kept growing until communism collapsed in one thousand nine hundred nine nine thousand nine hundred nine. They had more than eighty four in guests artists jewelry coming in for a new and that was massive after eighty nine was the collapse indeed at that time there were more than one hundred people working king house of Humour Mark. Because if you think of all the different departments cinema literature folklore it was big enterprise. We need a lot of events tweets amazing executions when I look at photos from exhibitions from the seventies and eighties. I'm absolutely astonished by exhibition designed. You see it's it's amazing. It's so well done. I don't think anywhere in Belgrade Bulgaria exhibitions were so good. After the collapse the museum staff shrink to a skeleton crew as you can imagine until one thousand nine hundred ninety nine my colleagues would insist that humor is juniper very so that whole human being laugh and humor is omnipresent than Union for so and so on the first fight I short of had to have with the team when I came was to say I'm sorry but humor is not universal. Humor is so culture based. It's totally coacher base. Of course it's safe for into say humor is universal and not go into political humor. It's safer but you don't do your job. Our mission needs to be very very timely to very actual to show things that are happening today from their museum can do that. Who else would be able to do that while it has improved over the past decade in Bulgaria. Media Freedom is declining most of the press has been purchased by the guards and corruption and collusion between in media and politicians is widespread. You know there are issues with freedom of expression in Bulgaria Freedom Media media media ownership and so on so at least a museum should be some sort of outlet the museum addresses the Civic Space in Bulgaria with a new temporary Rachel exhibit called Garden Town. The charming subtitle is where mischief has a happy end motive of town where the different neighborhoods address different issues such as you know graffiti. You're invited to draw or voting over. Dare the place where you go by a yourself and it's accidentally a toilet but also voting rule then we have some guerrilla gardening making bumps of seeds leads and then finally is the park where kids because they usually come in groups. They are invited to sit down and have a discussion and reach a decision to give them some advice about how to have a discussion and also explain how they could reach decision like tossing a coin or consensus. ASSOC- or voting or you know different offices including anarchy. It's really something to see how far the museum has come from starting within the Communist system to reinventing itself to remain relevant in ways that are crucially important to a modern Bulgarian audience. The roofs good mitts that the next stage of reinventing interpreting interpreting humor on the Internet to an audience that lives mostly online hasn't happened just yet the first big challenge. I could think of when I I when I learnt that. The museum is looking for director aching to retire looked at it. I was really impressed and then I told okay. How can you change this place. What can you do about it. And how can you make it really fun when all the funny near is on your phone you know you can just scroll. Oh for hours and you wouldn't stop laughing. So what can museum do about that. Are we supposed to show the same things. No I mean you don't go to museums due to look at something that you see on your phone. Internet certainly has changed humor a lot and this is an exhibition that we've been planning for ages and we're trying to to find the right research team to prepare that means different. Thank fully games. It's really interesting to see how Internet has been changing humor and where are we at now. The way that jokes jokes developed in Gabarevo where people told slightly different versions to each other and in the process carefully distilled the most sharable essence of the joke mirrors. Here's the way that memes are forged in online communities constantly morphing to get more attention. Maybe the best chance we have of interpreting communities. He's on line and off comes from a humor museum. The Gabar Vo Museum of Humor and satire which has already morphed through twenty years of communism and thirty years of democracy accuracy is a good place to start. Just close the door quickly when you let the cat out this has been museum archipelago the you'll find full transcript of this episode along with shouts at Museum Archipelago Dot Com Club archipelago members get access to the bonus podcast feed that sort of like the director's commentary into the main show fund extras like stickers support the show and join club archipelago today today the two dollars Patriot dot com slash museum competitive. Thanks for listening and next time bring a friend.

Bulgaria director Gabar Vo Museum of Humor Museum of Humor Satire Museum Museum Archipelago Dot Com Clu museum archipelago Bulgaria Museum of two Ian Elsner Pews Eum archipelag general secretary Gobble Bulgaria Margarita Sheriff Bulgaria Freedom Media bruins BNL Communist Times Tunis Belgrade Union
56. Lana Pajdas Trains Her Fun Museums Lens to Croatian Heritage Sites, From The Battle of Vukovar to Over-Tourism in Dubrovnik

Museum Archipelago

10:49 min | 2 years ago

56. Lana Pajdas Trains Her Fun Museums Lens to Croatian Heritage Sites, From The Battle of Vukovar to Over-Tourism in Dubrovnik

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started Wallner pie dish is from Croatia. We are a small country, and we have your inhabitants than some US heat is, you know, we don't we don't have as many fields. So fiendish three or sarong economy or whatever Theresa May be the most important field. We have. But in recent years, the Croatian city of Dubrovnik due in part to being a prominent filming location of the TV series game of thrones has experienced dramatic overcrowding. They're less time. And it's supposed to break too much therapy to see the people were waiting in lines to anther inside the old town inside the walls. And there were so many agencies Sally game of thrones stores and taking people to some specific areas where where it's kind of difficult to have so many people in the same place, even for for safety reasons. Punishes, the founder of fun museums a heritage and culture travel blog. Okay. Okay. My name is Lana pie. Dash my blog, it's called fun museums because I simply liked to say this museums are fine about all these thing museums. He's a fun experience. People shouldn't seem that to museum. Sars something called elegant smart in intellectual. Just two people can have that experiencing their leisure time. Pie dish is also a museum marketer and consultant who overall fem- is that museums are fun. It's a radical idea and it influences everything from her philosophy on museum marketing to away to approach overcrowding in museums and heritage sites. Exactly that he has the my guiding principle the way I write my hours decals is still say, the most coal funky stuff about each museums. Visit sometimes as young professionals like the all that's why some people from use Iem squatters, for instance, Sora marketing museum, marketing professional sort of education professionals. They sent me messages, you know. You could you stop saying things that way because it's in contrast with our professional values. But then they said, okay, that's what's this was people like no, that's what people like to hear. If you're seeing that it should be more intellectual you need to understand that most of the people can't really read it that way, can truly understand the way you want to press present it to them. But there is a real tension because the access isn't just between what is fun. What is intellectual in episode seventeen of museum archipelago, I cover the spectacular failure of Disney theme park concept called Disney's America in one thousand nine hundred four the park which would have opened in Virginia. Not far from Washington DC with showcased, quote, the sweep of American history within the fun theme park environment. It is particularly notable to witness the confidence and enthusiasm Disney executives had for a tightrope between entertainment and American history and example, is the. Town on the on the east of Cratia each name is code. The town was heavily destroyed in the most recent war in this part of Europe, in nineteen ninety one when it was occupied one almost all the buildings were destroyed almost all the people had to go away from there, and it was one of the most terrible stories that happened in Europe, after the, the end of the second World War, and the now that city is has been quite well restored. Some people went back to leave there and the, the museum was completely renovated and obviously the visit to that museum is a nice enjoyable experience. But in recent history, you really need to, to deal with some awful stuff that happened just less than I years ago, it's difficult to a person from a from western Europe to, and sometimes it's difficult to understand what really happened in them in. The lens of ex-yugoslavia, it's even sometimes complicate even for people from these areas because it's not. It's not that simple as some historians like to present some books like the present or some journalists or, and there are even many different opinions. So I think that museums really sometimes need to take thirteen side. Even though others will disagree museum that deals with those stories and needs to first of all to show, what are those emotions and to collaborate with people who suffered those emotions, of course, some emotional intelligence is very important to for those museum professionals who would create that storytelling that would turn Smit emotions of certain people to people will be just winters or who may have nothing to do with, with those areas are stories. No matter what kind of museum you're about to walk into, you have a sense of what you might find inside and since census partially informed by museums marketing pie dish has made a habit of noting how people react to museums before they go. In most cases, it happens that people procrastinate their decisions to go to, to a museum that happens more often than not most of the time, they will say, like, but maybe some other time I go some next time I would like to is that museum. But today I feel tired, I'm hungry. I want to go to eat to drink I prefer to stay at home watch movie, but I would really love to visit the museum, but maybe one day to when the Mike friends to Peres, for instance, they say, I want to is louver, but there, there are other museums, but may be other time because louver is already enough for, for me for these three days or something like that, right. This tendency to choose the most. Popular museum to the exclusion of less frequently visited once is part of Pisces interest in sustainable. Tourism, partly interested in sustainable travel king along with the museum Inc. And visitors a tour areas that I actually mentioned as my primary areas of focus and interest so museum since sustainable travel, and the sustainability has so many faces, I'm quite interested in seeing about an energy efficiency, and waste management bats over reason being one of the one of my focus areas, even though I don't really pretend to know what, what could be a solution for that some traction such as they are Humber Casto in Spain introduced online booking. And you can't really just commune buy tickets and enter, but you need to walk your sports in advance online. And sometimes you can't get a ticket. If you've just remember Lee before he wants to go and. That these are these are some of the solutions, I do wonder how much of this heavily concentrated overcrowding has to do with the nature of social media itself. There's a network effect of geo tagged photo, not just out of particular heritage site, but at a particular spot within that heritage site. That presents the best angle for a photo or looks exactly the way it did on game of thrones. Of course, there are many other factors that lead to overcrowding the cheap flights the increasing ability of people to travel that they namic travel as a product. And if the Acropolis in Athens is already at capacity every single day, whether this is gonna look like ten or twenty years from now and to go back to Disney, theme parks tourism as a product already has an answer, just raise the prices, but heritage for the rich isn't heritage anymore. Heretic should be acceptable, obviously, for many people around the world, it's not really affordable to even go to someplace is what they want. Be avoided is that it becomes too expensive. So. Wealthy people can afford visiting those attractions. That's what I would like to be avoided and other seeing I would really like to encourage more more people foolery like to travel to visit some secondary attractions. Look, go necessarily to the most famous places, but we at some places around that usually also need visitors and can devote more local people could make money for leaving they get visitors on that particular place. Because more people could be employed in those places are some businesses could flourish shore. That's the basic thing. And this is what ties all aspects of pie dishes work together to use the social media network affect to share the secondary attractions of the city balancing the pressure on the most popular heritage site to read pie dishes blog and to learn about her consulting work visit fund museums dot EDU. Her Twitter handle is. L. A. P. A. J. D. A. S. This episode of museum archipelago is sponsored by the museums heritage and public history program at the university of Missouri at Saint Louis. The museums heritage and public history program is currently accepting applications for the fall twenty nineteen semester. They offer an EMMY degree as well as a graduate certificate their programs address, pressing needs of museums and heritage. Institutions in the twenty first century and prepare students for professional careers in museums historic sites in societies, cultural agencies and related organizations financial support is available for a limited number of students and applications are due by February first. For more information, please call three one four five one six four eight oh five or visit their website at UM S, L dot EDU Ford slash Tilda museums. Thanks to the museums heritage and public history program at the. -versity of Missouri at Saint Louis for their support of museum archipelago. You'll find the transcript of this episode along with shown at museum, archipelago dot com. Club archipelago members get access to a bonus podcast feed that sort of like the director's commentary to the main show. Subscribe at patriotair dot com slash museum archipelago. If this is your first show, don't forget to subscribe for free in your favorite podcast player. Thanks for listening and next time bring a friend.

museum archipelago Disney Europe Sora marketing museum Popular museum museum Inc Lana pie Croatia US Elsner Dubrovnik Theresa Saint Louis EMMY Missouri founder consultant Cratia Twitter
57. The Colored Conventions Project Resurrects Disremembered History With Denise Burgher, Jim Casey, Gabrielle Foreman, & Many Others

Museum Archipelago

15:48 min | 1 year ago

57. The Colored Conventions Project Resurrects Disremembered History With Denise Burgher, Jim Casey, Gabrielle Foreman, & Many Others

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started in American history. Most often told the vitality of black activism has been obscured in favor of celebrating white lead movements in the nineteenth century, an enormous network of African American activists created a series of state, and national political meetings known as the colored conventions movement convention movement was black lead, lack organizers came together across so many of the states, beginning in eighteen thirty folks began to gather and Philadelphia and there were both state, national conventions that discussed labor rights educational rights voting rights violence against black communities. The expulsion of people who work considered residents, and citizens conventions movement, was not just a kind of single thing where there was one issue. They were really dedicated towards Salt Lake's, figuring out conventions were held in at least thirty five states. And keep in mind. This is the nineteenth century. So the weren't fifty states even back then we really think there's a way through this history to rethink everything begins far along the civil war leads up into the twentieth century, Gabrielle foreman and Jim Casey are two co founders and two co directors of the colored conventions project. A black digital humanities initiative focused on researching and teaching the colored conventions movement. And my name's Gabrielle Cormon, and I teach at the university of Delaware, and one of the co founders of the colored conventions project and the founding faculty director at that project. Hello, Jim, Casey, I'm a researcher center for digital humanities at Princeton University and is also one of the co founders of the project as well as one of the code co-directors, the colored conventions project, or CCP is dedicated to identifying collecting curing, all of the documents produced by the colored conventions movement, which started in eighteen thirty. And lasted until the eighteen ninety s the project is much bigger than just Forman. Or Casey at includes graduate, fellow Denise burger. And I am a team member at colored convoking project house over the Delaware, significance of this collection is that none of these documents have all been assembled at one place. Not even run. The conventions were going on were the proceedings and the minute, all in one place for anyone to actually look and free. So is you the first time that the archive will be collected so long to see him to understand not this issues that facing African Americans but in particular how to make more complex in there. You think about the app American community and the kind of civic social political activity that were taking up not just in the United States, but across the diaspora. And so what we're getting in a more complete idea of not only what took place then. But how he activists were able to engineer us shake. And create contemporary, some right? Who medical action and social Justice organizations in our current moment by studying the organizing principles of the colored conventions movement. The project reveals how data can be a form of protests. One of the things that we see in the convention's, most often is that they are responding to a lack of information about who they are, who their communities are what they're doing. Right. And this is about a kind of form of protest where we're trying to combat against things like ignorance, and so many of the conventions would have these formalized ways a gathering information stealing them in the preparing them to get published in all kinds of different ways, and conventions themselves, have a longer life and a longer reach because the proceedings often appear in black newspapers and in the anti-slavery press, and in the progressive white crass. But if you look at the coverage of these conventions, then you, understand the structural. And strategized reach to make sure that we get beyond the people who were actually in the meeting rooms themselves that one of the things that the project has made central to think not just about the podium and not just the podium and the pews. But to think through the ways in which black infrastructure was built around black convention, organizing people. People in the California extension. Do we have this very small, the growing group of African Americans, and they get together in conventions a couple of times eighteen fifties on enter the eating sixties? And what they do is they ask everybody, who's involved, the ask around to take what effectively amounts to a census and they want to gather information about who the populations is it's being left out of the official records, does being left out of the government reports we have all kinds of things happening in California. We're folks are being denied the right to testify in court of law, where you're not physically able to account for yourself. And so the conventions compile all of these mystics and they track everything they can with the idea that the providing it set of youthful information for the writers in the ranks, but also the local politicians know that the community is not just a couple of people living out, gold, rush country. And then when they go to publish it, and this is a really kind of important part is that they prepare some reports. To go out to as they might frame, it the people of the United States, and then they'll often many conventions prepare five reports that are dressed to the people of color in the state or in the country. And oftentimes, they're putting out relatively the same message in the same set of ideas really sort of gearing in prioritizing different kinds of arguments in different places. And so when thinking about the convention is the place to learn about record keeping it's full of so many of these great examples. So folks, who were sort of thinking in multiple direct one time, and how we do things like accumulate data and then build stores around them and the co founders of the project, purposely structured the initiative to mirror, the energy and collective commitments of the colored conventions themselves. When of the first things that struck me when I visited the project website was the terms of use for the projects data. The data are freely accessible, but when you go to download the site ask you to commit to the following principles. I honor CCP's commitment to the use of data humanizes and acknowledges, the black people who. Collected organizational histories are assembled here, although the subjects of databases are often reduced to abstract data points. I will contextualized a narrate the condition of the people who appear as data and to name them when possible as forming explains principles like these reflect the wholeness of black communities, and is an example of one of the ways that the project intentionally and in practice continues. The principles of the colored convention movement itself to respect, not just collect whenever possible way try to intervene in the ways in which black people are represented in academic. They says in ways that do honor to the ways in which the delegates and the conventions were intervening about the ways in which black people and communities were represented in the larger press in the law, and in the exclusionary politics, which tried to erase them. Big data. Seth tend to call things items, right? Black people showed up on ledgers as items, we have a whole history of being turned into objects and objects. And our language that are very common are the nomenclature in libraries, than in museums in the ways, in which we talk about the things that we curate, and so we wanted at all moments testify, and witnessed to the humanity and the narratives of named people whose histories have been disregard and who can be turned to quickly into data sets in ways that are extraordinarily uncomfortable considering the history of objectification and ownership that is the legacy of black people's existence in these United States over more than four hundred years that I think. What we're trying to make sure does not happen that people come to the use of data which is collected in a group of people who wants to respect not just collect though work of people who came before us and largely made our existence in our study possible. And we wanna do that in ways that always is human izing to them. And to us in those burger points out part of the project's purpose is to change the overall narrative of the most often told version of black American history in the nineteenth century, very rushed out a detailed notion of abolitionist in this country. Don't understand actually, the John had abolitionist American, nor do we that understand the way that after working activism, shape contemporary, quote unquote, American lotion of civil right? Of who gets to vote. And why of who gets? He and in a German, racial imbalance allow one soared to dominate movie ability to actually see what happens and they're holding move. He understand what happened. And it also than these this, I think, to create a kind of some of the churn history, American progress than American this neutrality. The co host racial such etcetera that truth allies were much more interested in what I can Americans miss saying about African Americans more involved in creating this movement. And that's one of the reasons that the under study of the convention movement, is a particularly agree GIS Desra member ans- because the movement speaks to the continuous targeting of communities of color in. In this country that has gone on more or less uninterrupted and documents, much longer history of organized protests and formal petitioning for fair and equal treatment of those communities. The C C P is also studying the social network of the convention goers. When you list out who attended which conference you begin to see patterns, not only of prolific delegates, but also the infrastructure around the conventions. The project has even organized records like reviews of boarding, houses, the conference goers, stayed, in another key principle of the project is a commitment to resurrecting women's centrality to the movement records of which might not be as widely published that took a great deal of energy to host a convention that those conventions had hundreds and hundreds of people attending and that those people were men and women, and that women were responsible. For the boarding houses, and the feeding and the housing of the delegates and that so many conversations and political strategy sessions. We know also happened in those informal places. So the project has been committed to resurrecting in centrality in the history that they have been a raised from or anonymous d- in in terms of the records themselves, but that we know they were central to in the actual historical moment. And we have strategies and protocols to make sure as we resurrect this history that women are included in the history that they helped to create QC makes the point that the original convention, goers, were really good at getting lots of people involved in the movement. And this presents yet another opportunity for the project to mirror, the movement. We know that if we can do just enough to help get folks up and running participating different kinds of ways that we can really expand the numbers of who can. Participate in preserving and creating access to this history to that idea. We've created this annual holiday to celebrate the birthday Frederick Douglass and what we do every year, we get birthday cakes and we sing happy birthday, and we get together with groups, and we give out these organizing kits to help folks at other locations and communities in schools, organize their own events and together all in one afternoon. Relag online, and we transcribe documents together with the idea that we're both celebrating something. But we're also inviting folks to participate in building arts of the history that we're talking about Douglas day wasn't created by the colored conventions project, but is another example of resurrecting something that already existed before the redefines take place on Frederick Douglass is chosen birthday February fourteenth, and in two thousand nineteen will be held at the university of Delaware Morris library and the African American museum of Philadelphia. They will also be live streamed over the internet. I think a good way to describe the colored conventions project is as an open research framework with a very strong set of principles. It is remarkable for me to see the organizing tools that I think of his modern or at least native to the internet, have their roots in this understudied movement of nineteenth century, black activism, it's also interesting to think how other projects and institutions can contribute and follow some of the same organizational principles. There is a place for storytelling in the midst of all this data. And in fact, that's what tends to connect with people. And that's something that is shared between museum digital spaces, some of the very questions about excess ability and participation that museums are attempting to grapple with finally at the stage where also engaging as a project that creates digital content and digital store. Stories about this extraordinarily group of delegates and participants and hosts who made this movement possible. You can learn more about the colored conventions project by visiting colored conventions dot org. This has been museum archipelago. You'll find a full transcript of this episode along with show nuts at museum, archipelago dot com. I'm so happy to announce that museum archipelago stickers are now available. These feature special treatments of the logo and a perfect for museum conferences, or just to signal, your favorite inciteful museum podcast. The pack of five Sixers is only available to club archipelago members at any contribution level. Join by February I twenty nineteen at patriotair dot com slash museum archipelago to ensure you get your stickers special thanks to club archipelagos newest member Simon. Aubin dorf. Thanks for listening and next time. Bring a friend.

United States Jim Casey CCP Salt Lake Philadelphia Frederick Douglass California Elsner Delaware inciteful museum university of Delaware Gabrielle Cormon Forman engineer Princeton University Denise burger Aubin dorf
58. Joe Galliano Fills In The UKs Family Tree At The Queer Britain Museum

Museum Archipelago

13:45 min | 1 year ago

58. Joe Galliano Fills In The UKs Family Tree At The Queer Britain Museum

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm there. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started sons out the in order to launch museum. It's a long way too expensive process. Who knew this is Joe Galliano, one of the co founders of the queer Britain museum. Heller, Joe Kelley on on the co founder and CEO of quit Britain, the national LGBT key, plus museum of the UK Galliani came up with the idea for a national LGBTQ, plus museum in two thousand seventeen during the fiftieth anniversary of the partial decriminalization of homosexual acts in the UK an anniversary commemorated by cultural heritage institutions across the country. I felt slightly conflicted is none of us, ry was thrones man. None of us route was focused around criminality victim host some sort of Fe familiar, tropes, that we got rolled out. And we start talking about when we saw. Okay. Man lost via missile site itself. Harry tradition where we will we live in a world thankfully, whether it's a rich a wildly diverse says sexualities and gender identities on the left me slightly sad, and also the fact that it was very much hug him on a verse rate of annoyed didn't want did white another fifty years before it was FANG major happening again mobile spatial, we built something momentum of being gathered around that anniversary and that it didn't just fizzled away lost value. The emphasis on the anniversary of legislation could have come from the context of a long history of formal legal repression of male homosexuality in the UK going all the way back to the buggery act of fifteen thirty three. So we had the buggery act, which was introduced on the ice. On behalf of the ice, which was very much around male sexuality, mile same sex attraction police, invest and this'll kind of tight on the books in various fools until onto sixty seven Radi wedding was partially that was that was partially from allies Asian partially from allies, Asian the age of consent was set twenty one where was sixteen for everybody else that points as well prosecutions, absolutely rocketed. So as soon as that in some allowance for people who behave naturally, it was it becomes a big estate, be people with two legislation only focused on male homosexuality, which is, of course, telling it's interesting that those laws were always about men, women would same sex, desire or less rendered invisible in public life of the law. I think there's also if we're talking about muscle of legislation, I think there has been a. Prejudice, which is actually a lot of bounce patriarchy about mayo views of sexuality, and service to who has an active sexuality who has a passive sexuality, and thanks through a lot of portion of history women's sexuality was seen as inservice to male sexuality. And so what would you legislate against them, though? So some stories that when some of the late bills roles to quit Victoria, that they were too embarrassed to actually talk about as being as or anything like that how much truth there is, of course, the focus of queer Britain won't be legislation. But as Galliano's says the laws previously on the books and the increasing number of violent, homophobic, transphobic, attacks in the today have distorted, the country's understanding of itself, and tie directly into the mission of the museum. We've talked about a central. Hubs of be visible globally and within the mainstream will give a message that here is a here's a catalytic space. The will collect stories of his, his, his way of helping grasp on the standing of itself by giving quiz stories that route full place. So got means rice in place books within the culture and also a rightful place place can be there. The word queer has a complicated history. It was synonymous with strange or weird, and was a common slur from that LGBT people activists in the nineteen eighties. We the word and used it as an umbrella term for wide range of sexual orientations and gender identities today, queers and increasingly popular way to identify within the community, but as historical traumas persist, and as the word can still be found in hostile environments. It's important to note that not everyone's in agreement Gagliano, and the queer Britain museum, use the term. I'm as proud self identifier. And as an intentional move away from using the word gay and male homosexuality in general as standing for all identities. The plan is for queer Britain to have a physical space in London opening sometime in the next few years. Although the U K is full of museums. Some of which have queer artifacts and queer stories Gagliano is conscious of how backsliding can happen in legislation and culture, the laws and norms of today, can't guarantee that the future will look the same institutions like museums are part of maintaining today's momentum and can give people who have had their stories told by others a chance to narrate their own history. It was fun. It was fun movements within the museum communities mouth to quit. Spice has made sure of they all kind of announcement stories and say, how can we them three the main, the main of collections Ave, the yet note some places have got further than others? Some obdurate anything. But, but that's really, really good. What are some of the web site, volunteer life, down vote have via night Hughes convincing really good. Museums, LGBT, museums who is as a great, volunteer activists. I think possible fair is the multiple movement forward. Who's being the relies on activists curator's really excited volunteers in it. It doesn't take too many people to leave sites. Elza move somewhere else in the now that's loss. The other thing I think's really Paul is the, the such of Richard. Wildly diverse Sattar stories to tell that those museums never going to be able to tell those stories whereas what we have the ability to do is to create a catalytic, but what we call stories in. We can keep telling different stories which and change the exhibitions will and that'll DT he people convenient control of stories, as well. Whereas actor history, so often, it's been all the people who've told us stories and Galliano is acutely aware that stories are being lost every day about end as well. We also have a digital filled aural history project, which recalling, especially announced about making sure that we, we've got the story of people who with us now he can add into the archives become Paul that. That. H important really that we gather the story is now. Well, well, people can actually talk to us. So that's a really strong focus of the moment. Now in south of understanding where we're going to be headed with the archives. Always is this. We are designing a national survey of museums around the country today. This is the national archives. What we readings through this kind of a proper sentences. What is the nation's HOGAN material that we would think over's LGBT focused so that will mean then the it'll stairs? Where important gaps had we fill gaps. And that's gonna concave is a census wet. See what foes collecting activity when the museum is still an idea what the word museum means is still flexible, in addition to educational exhibits about queer history and culture. The proposed museum is also a place for people to upload their own stories and the whole project serves as an antidote to the psychological damage of transphobic and homophobic, attacks and depression. But museum interesting words net because it comes also. Pitch. And actually, we're talking about something very much broader than just a museum in official sense. They and currently show what a culture values and every good way of being able to understand where we all now on the somehow we go there, and then take them standard and use them to imagine a best of all possible futures new barrels questions who always haven't we get tweeted? We want to be retired should be different every time you come to new van when, when the physical space itself opened water will be looking at a series of Skype characters an awe rolling series of gastritis so that each each Tommy, bring somebody in like you know, what is the story that you need to tell what is the story that hasn't been told material that fit unexplored in other museums archives where able to shine a light phone. Sometimes it'll be about the abstract condition won't that position is going to be bringing line around the block. We can conditions of turning community stories that have been told, for example. So it could be everything from an I'm talking off the top of my head. Right. That's my, but that could be everything from what is Ellen Jones stage, costumes through to what is the quick Bangladeshi experience of bumming in the nineteen fifties, creating a new museum is no small task. But Galliano is ready for the challenge as he goes through the processes collecting and fundraising. He's also focused on building partnerships, his route to creating a robust institution begins with acknowledging that is a bigger project than just one person or one identity many challenges. If you want to look, they're all fascinating and exciting to step up to how do you carry the responsibility to make sure that something that there's such a, an needful? I'm such a desire. Sunny within the LGBT plus communities. How do you carry the weight of the responsibility of having said that you're going to do this, and making sure that you've delivered for those people, you know, or want to create an organization? But if I sat away from it, and the, we've got the right you know, the, there's another person that will be able to take over them, mantle. And so the, the organization isn't about one person but we've created a robust organization that will be able to deliver fabulously. It's my exciting thing I've ever worked till because it's the thing on most. I've never I've never worked for something. I feel so passionately is is important. I've never picked off a project which is. Brilliantly challenging, is this in it scale in the Skype in the scope of all the different stakeholders, the, we need to make sure sort of role close and doing the right things, and, and that we also keep a laser focus on the strategy to make sure that. This episode of museum archipelago is brought to you by the museum studies graduate program at the Corcoran, school of the arts and design at the George Washington University with a graduate degree in museum studies. You'll be quipped to respond to the evolving museum profession by engaging in hands on training in the heart of the nation's museum capital established in nineteen seventy six the program combines academic excellence with access to some of the most celebrated institutions in the world. Thanks to an exceptional faculty of practicing professionals this pioneering program is ranked among the top museum studies programs in the country. The programs affiliations with more than sixty museums and cultural organizations. Enable students to immerse themselves in world class venues as they learn from some of the nation's leading museum professionals students can concentrate in three areas. Collections management, audiences and interpretation or museum management to learn more. Visit go dot GW dot EDU Ford slash museum studies. This has been museum archipelago. You can find show notes and a full transcript of this episode at museum, archipelago dot com. If you liked this episode you can support the show and get some fun benefits like logo stickers and bonus podcast feed by joining club archipelago on patriarch special, thanks to club, archipelagos, newest member and host of the excellent museums in strange places podcast Hannah. Hetman thanks for listening and next time. Bring a friend.

Joe Galliano queer Britain museum museum archipelago Britain UK word museum Paul Joe Kelley UK Galliani Gagliano Heller Harry Gagliano London gastritis Victoria Sattar co founder Hetman
72. Speechless: Different by Design Reframes Accessibility and Communication in a Museum Context

Museum Archipelago

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

72. Speechless: Different by Design Reframes Accessibility and Communication in a Museum Context

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Museum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums each episode. So he's never longer than fifteen minutes so let's get started. Museums tend to be verbal spaces. There's usually a lot of words. Galleries opened with walls of taxed. Visitors are presented with rules of do's and don'ts and artists Guide headphone users from one place to the next it paragraph by paragraph but there's a new series of exhibits designed to be different designed to guide visitors as far away as possible from words. It's one of. These is a collaboration of the Dallas Art Museum and the High Museum of art in Atlanta. It's called speechless. And to underline the point it is subtitled titled Different by design. Beaches has been an exhibition that merges research and aesthetics and innovative new design to explore accessibility accessibility and modes of communication in the museum setting. This is Sarah schladming curator of speechless. Low My name is Sarah shortening and and I am the Margo Be Perot. Senior curator of decorative arts and design and the interim chief curator at the Dallas Museum of art and I love to focus focus on projects that really explore ideas of how design and art can transform our everyday life. The roots of speechless come from linings linings own rethinking of how communicate without language. The idea really germinated out of something very personal for me. which is that one of my children has motor planning disability a neurological issue that rendered him when he was younger fairly speechless? And and I had to sort of rethink how I communicated with him in how we as a family interacted with somebody where language wasn't the primary. Hi Mary Avenue so it started in that idea but I was also in my curatorial work has been really interested in issues of playscapes and interactivity. And how the exposure to aesthetics and design are really great gateways to get people to to really think about about how that impacts their everyday life and so. This project was a merger of these ideas even museums specialize in the visual arts. Have a tendency communicate verbally with their peers. I think that that was the thing that I realized even for myself ideal in visual culture but the way I communicate about it is through words and that I myself have hyper hyper verbal. All of a sudden I had this very close proximity to somebody buddy who wasn't interested in learning from me through language and what I started to realize really because we started using the picture exchange system could occasion Asian system which is a series of images that you use to communicate. So you'd say what do you want to eat and on the sheet would be a picture of a series of different foods and then they could point and and so it's very prescriptive and it would be apple and then when I started thinking was we at museums are sitting on this vast repository of images of you could use Magritte's apple there's so many different looks and feels and kind of different nuances to what an apple could be or these images and in an essence that communication is kind of a two way thing the project is made up of six art installations. Intended to foster participatory Tori environments within the museum context and in particular engage the senses. We had the opportunity about a year ago to invite six designed Zayn teams to come to Dallas and work on this project and then we invited six specialists from the Dallas community that were the scientists but kind of both your Titians and practitioners who specialized in fields like neuroscience and Autism Dementia Communication Disorders Orders Physical therapy related to sensory issues and really to think about the broader spectrum of what disability. Looks like. And how to broaden our own perceptions of how to design for that and think through those ideas but I think the biggest underpinning depending of the exhibition for me and for the institutions were that it was an experience that ultimately was positive in joyful. So that these Foley immersive interactive spaces that each design team was creating was really something that was positive and felt like it offered an opportunity to see the the greatness in the difference between US instead of Seeing a sort of a a negative one of the pieces the by Yuri Suzuki is called sound of the Earth Chapter two and future giant unmarked black globe without the context of the familiar outlines outlines of continents visitors instead here sounds recorded at the part of the Earth. Where would they place their ear against the surface of the globe? Another by me Shikan features features a garden of colorful sculptures that inflate and deflate throughout the day the task of bringing all these installations together fell on designer and educator. Laurie Laurie Haycock Makhala. Makhala was responsible for the overall graphic identity and the corresponding exhibit publication. Tie My name. Is Laurie Haycock Makhala Accola. I'm a graphic designer educator and I'm working on the hook and some of the kind of related exhibition graphic identity issues or for speechless. You know as a book designer ideal with words also so there's a certain irony in working on this project but it made me really attentive to you. Know How do we use image and or language to communicate best like Shining Makhala understands what it's like to communicate eight non verbally. I've been book designer and an educator and all that for years and years and then I I had to brain hemorrhage is in brain surgery which really made my Everything stopped you know. Sarah brought many of in here because of certain personal experiences that make it so we really elite understand in some pretty deep way experiential way what our options are when we are left with maybe for a while Al.. I couldn't I didn't speak or write or read or anything like that so I had to rethink all that so I really identified. With the concept of this project from the very beginning the six installations only female relate to one another and they're introduced by the ground rules. Be Curious be thoughtful. Be Gentle so one of the few instances of taxed in the gallery visitors can experience the installations in any order. They choose by going into rooms off the main area which shining explains by invoking sea creature the exhibition itself will be designed kind of like an octopus is the best way I can describe private. And when you go in the room if you think of the octopus sort of head it is actually going to be an empty room and that room will have some furniture. We'll have some things and they'll be these kind of videos that are really Spin Abi sort of short boomerang videos of each artist in their space kind of showing people what to expect what they would use their so that you could understand yes. They're six spaces. This is a little bit what I do. This might have sounded and I can touch this. This idea that these these spaces are fully interactive is really is really different and that they are gonNA have to sort of unpackaged them a little bit than the place like Lawry's doing Israeli. We wanted to make a space. That was what we called kind of de escalation down and you know those spaces. Typically Museum like sensory spaces and others which are becoming more commonplace in institutions like museum often are off of the sort of educational space or in other places in we wanted to put primary in the exhibition. It we wanted wanted to be fully accessible and not You know stigmatized is probably too hard but making it feel like it was accessible to everyone. Everyone that everybody may need the opportunity to just have a moment to take a rebound in refresh in that space there will be rockers and waited blankets. One of our specialists deals primarily with that so we vetted that project and what we wanted to use in there in that and then the book that lorries done which really shows the whole creative process of each of the different designers will be. We'd pasted on one of the walls and until we'll both be a place for reflection for people to look at these but also a kind of stabilizing line for people if they need to calm down or recenter even though the museum world has a term for visitors needing a break from galleries. It's called museum fatigue and you can listen to a brief overview of it on on episode two of this show the causes of museum fatigue and a best practice. Approach remain speculative researcher. Beverly sorelle found that visitors typically quickly spend less than twenty minutes in exhibits regardless of topic and size before becoming much more selective about what they explore who research supports the notion Russian that visitors have a limited timeframe after which their interest in the gallery diminishes. And this is the reason why you can usually find it least bench twenty minutes. It's into a linear exhibit. But it's clear that museums can do much more. The designers of speechless hope that their approach can contribute the other. The thing that I really wanted to make sure happened in the exhibition was that you never walked from one project to another. You always go into space in the new comeback into the central sort of emptier zone so that you always have a chance to. It's almost like a pallet cleanser. Right you always kind of go from one experience and then you're able to reflect decompress and then you can move into another. We don't know how it's going to go. I mean part of the idea of being being experimental and I applaud both institutions for encouraging. US to go Really go for it is that you don't know what's going to be successful. We're not and so we are investing in doing evaluations during the project. And it's our intention to then Sort of published those findings at the end because we want to understand what worked and what didn't so much of the planning for this. Exhibit comes from making visitors comfortable enough to have a non museum like interaction within an art museum but visitors are used to a museum context with clear taxed instructions so it would be interesting acting to see how soon into visit do visitors. Start playing and lose some level of inhibition. Lose some of the museum context. I stay up at night thinking about that. I think it's been really interesting because even with you know the designers themselves you know it's that balance between I mean they wanna make something that's really spectacular in. Its in in art museum and they wanted to really have you know be elevated at at that level and at the same time how would you interact with this as a child. And how would you change that to be more responsive to that or to think through these things and try and trying to work through you know the best you can but you never know. And and that's what makes it both exciting and anxiety. designee producing started biting my nails speechless with fits. Visually striking rooms is opening into a world. More comfortable than ever expressing itself non verbally audio and images and animations of images are just as easy to create modify and share as words episode fourteen of the show which was an entire discussion of museum. Southeast from Twenty fifteen feels hopelessly outdated in two thousand nineteen images and sell fees are just how many visitors talk about the galleries. They visit like any language. There's a continually evolving grammar in images in Southie isn't one strategy is for museums to give visitors the tools of that that grammar a dictionary in the Sorus in the form of strange shapes and colorful backgrounds exhibits like speechless. Give visitors the tools us to center nonverbal expression within a museum frame speechless. Different by design is now open at the Dallas Museum of art and we'll be until March twenty second twenty twenty after that the same exhibit will be on display at the High Museum of art in Atlanta. Grab your popcorn. 'cause Museum archipelago is going to the movies. Introducing our brand new bonus series archipelago at the movies each episode. We dive deep into a movie about museums and tried to understand what it says about the broader museum landscape landscape the first episode of archipelago at the movies where we watch and review two thousand sixes night at the museum is already available. Exclusively to club Club archipelago members not member yet. Join now and you'll also get full access to the club. Archipelago Bonus podcast plus fun extras like stickers and pins support the show and join today at Patriot dot com slash museum archipelago. This has been museum. Archipelago you'll find full. Transcript of this episode as well as shown it's and links at Museum Archipelago Dot Com. If this is your first show subscribe. Grab for free in your favorite podcast player. And if this isn't leave us a rating or review wherever you get your podcasts. Thanks for listening and next time bring a friend.

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76. 400 Years Post-Mayflower, the Provincetown Museum Rethinks Its Historical Branding

Museum Archipelago

00:00 sec | 9 months ago

76. 400 Years Post-Mayflower, the Provincetown Museum Rethinks Its Historical Branding

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm UNLV museum. Archipelago is your audio guide through the rocky landscape of museums each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. Sometimes a historical event is all about the branding and the brand of Plymouth. Rock as the spot. Where William Bradford and the mayflower pilgrims first disembarked is pretty strong in the American tradition. That I grew up learning the rock symbolized the pilgrims arrival in what is now the United States and at the beginning of their interactions with native nations. Who Live Nearby Plymouth? Rock is an easy visualization tool shorthand. Something that sticks in your mind. But the mayflower. Didn't I land on Plymouth rock or even anywhere near? What is now Plymouth Massachusetts? Its first five weeks on this continent which included the signing of the mayflower compact happened in the bay on the other side of Cape Cod near city now called province town. I grew up in province town. And when you grow up in province town and it's all you know it's all you ever know so I grew up knowing that the pilgrims landed here and we were always taught the importance of the mayflower compact and to go out in the world and realize that not everyone was taught that is just fascinating. They spent five and a half weeks here exploring our shores There are a lot of significant moments before they realized that the train was just to rocky not as protected from the weather. So they got back on the boat and headed to Plymouth for whatever reason in history books and when kids are taught it really picks up at that point in blimp. It's fairly easy to compress five weeks particularly if they happened. Four Hundred Years Ago. The quest here is not just accuracy. It's not about saying well. Actually it's to be aware all participating in historical branding and that monuments and museums are perhaps the best brand ambassadors. Hello My name is Courtney hearst and I'm president of the Board at the pilgrim monument and province town museum. It is interesting even recently. Unfortunately there were some graffiti on Plymouth rock just last week you every news feed was running it especially here locally and it was saying. Plymouth landing place of so we were calling to correct people. Say That's actually not true. The province town museum sits under the Pilgrim Monument. A Slim Granite Tower that dominates the skyline of province town. The monument was completed in nineteen ten to draw attention to the fact that the mayflower landed. Here I good branding as a school kid. Her said that the top of the tower was a great place to escape with friends and since the museum was free she would hang out there. Whenever her school was between sports seasons but during those childhood visits she was unaware of another type of dehumanizing. Branding happening in the exhibits. The whole hang used to be lined with these huge murals almost life size as a kid. They felt life-size. Now that I'm talking I'd say they're not but they're big and each one depicted a different moment in the pilgrim's arrival and the impact on that nation. So it's their first interaction and the native people all look exactly alike. There's no definition in their faces. Their hair is exactly alike. They all look really aggressive. Really angry. And that they're on the attack the pilgrims all have very distinct features. They're wearing different clothes there expressions. They look almost fearful on their cowering. They definitely look like they're being attacked so you can even start to go layers deeper and deeper and deeper in the end the inaccuracies. But when you just look at it the stereotype that it was portraying on a subconscious level the portrayal of WOMP and dog people like this isn't unique but it serves the narrative of the Pilgrim's virtue and nobility in the face of a hostile world now the only way they persecuted in Europe. The narrative goes but they will also persecuted in the new world which creates a justification for anything that happens afterwards. All of this buttressed by implied neutrality of the Museum. They were so inaccurate. That we're actually GONNA leave one of them up in this new exhibit as A. Can you point out what's wrong? In part of the interactive of the exhibit will be show. What's wrong the new exhibit which is called story is a partnership between the province town museum and members of the dog nation. So our story. It were working with In conjunction with the tribe polyp eaters and Stephen Peters specifically have been the real brains behind it and the execution of it we have learned in the last few years through working so closely with the tribe that a lot of the story was wrong and then it wasn't told accurately so we have worked with them to create a whole entire new exhibit. We've got at the room and rebuilding it and it's called our story and what's interesting about it is. It will be told from their perspective as far as how they were living here Before the pilgrim showed up on the example of a story from those first five weeks that has been told exclusively from a colonial lens is a soy of Cornhill the spot near province town where pilgrims found stores of corn preserved by the WOMP dog it was always positioned as they simply found the corn. And that's how history tells it i. It was actually stolen corn. It was clear the way that it was stored the way that it was capped that it had been put there by people. There's no way that you could have been. They even say that in their log so it was clear people are living here. They just hadn't come across them yet. The our store gallery opens later this year. To commemorate the four hundred year anniversary of the pilgrims arrival under the initiative. Province town four hundred the initiative is planning for a much different commemoration than the three Hundredth Anniversary. Back in nineteen twenty back. Then it was called celebration not a commemoration and included and parades. It's not a celebration for everyone and that it is somewhat more solemn in that yes you know the pilgrims came here and they did some good things and they were brave for coming here and seeking that's part of the story but it's not all to be celebrated so we've been training ourselves for the last two years even that small nuance of a word. But it's not a nuance when you see how important it is so everything from that word. Choice will shift To things like we're not having a parade you know that that was an initial brainstorm idea. You think like centennial. Let's do a parade and things like that. We're not going to do that because that would be seen as disrespectful and we understand that so. The collaboration has been so tight throughout that. I think it's going to feel a lot different in all of those ways. I hope but the province town museum is also in the middle of another. Maybe even bigger branding change connecting the pilgrim story of four hundred years ago to the modern history of province town with the past one hundred years province town has attracted artists playwrights and the LGBT plus community today province town is perhaps the best known gay resort on the US is east coast. Hurst wants to expand who we think of as province towns pilgrims. The word pilgrim has been intentionally used to describe the passengers of the mayflower because of passage in William Bradford struggle therefore it connecting his journey to the Christian Bible. That's good branding for hearst. Sees it as through line to province towns more recent history as well or hoping to reframe the word pilgrim and stuff for it to symbolize a group of people and really what they're seeking which is to be accepted for who they are? Whatever that the whether it's religious freedom or any freedom at all. I'm seeking a place where they can be themselves. I think there's a sense that this board and this team are committed to telling more accurate story of province town in the mayflower pilgrims were the first pilgrims to arrive here. Four hundred years ago and they came seeking acceptance and tolerance and freedom and then pilgrims of all sorts of come to province town shores. Since them they were the first but so many the fishermen the artist. Lgbtq community So many so. We're really hoping that we can t take each of those stories. Each of those pilgrims stories and Tele cohesive history of province town growing up here. The AIDS epidemic was so close to us and again you just grow up thinking that's what most people saw and life into that my mom would like crews dinners by Guys House that were struggling and had no on how many of them came here to in some cases. Diane how this town these Portuguese women in the community just took them in and loved them and really took care of them. That's a story. That's you know it's province down story but it's it's AIDS story and it's a national story and that's a case that likely might be in the new updated version in the Museum. So when we say that we wanna tell them more accurate. It's even just a more comprehensive story because it does have a thread in the nation's history as well on example of a future exhibit might be about the spirit this pizza riot of nineteen ninety which are says was province towns analog to the important stonewall riots in New York City when the bars would get out at night and typically the gay bars would get out and not just gay bars but gay people would come into the street and they would Ali pizza and it would be really hard to get through. We'll one night. There was a police officer was giving some giving them trouble on unnecessarily. Shouldn't have been and the group rioted so these moments that were happening here in our cosmo but shifted the town and the town shifted legislature on. What used to be called gay bashing Importing more laws in place and and protecting them even further and it was this moment that for us changed. Perception culture and Robinson historical brands are powerful in the same way that a single monument can shift towns legislation for the better of photogenic. Rock can diminish five weeks of history in the minds of millions of students and the word choice that the museum uses can turn a Bushel of stolen corn into just an innocent lucky. Find as the four hundred year anniversary of the mayflower arrival approaches. The province town museum is preparing for the commemoration by changing things up. They don't use the word branding. But like the pilgrims themselves they're expanding the word pilgrim to include recent province town history. The working to tell the story of members of the WOMP inauguration directly instead of through the Lens of the colonists and they want people to know that the mayflower landed here first before moving on to Plymouth. We obviously want to shine a spotlight on the fact that the pilgrims actually landed here and the time that they spent here but beyond that were hoping to cast a spotlight on province town as a place that is welcoming to pilgrims and that message for us in today's time feels just as powerful this has been museum archipelago. Grab your popcorn. 'cause Museum Cappello is going to the movies. Introducing our brand new bonus series archipelago at the movies each episode. We dive deep into a movie about museums and tried to understand what it says about the broader museum landscape the archipelago at the movies deep dives into national treasure and night at the museum are now available. Exclusively to club archipelago members not a member yet join now and you'll also get full access to the Club Archipelago Bonus podcast plus fun extras like stickers and pins joined today at Patriot Dot com slash museum archipelago. But you'll find a full transcript of this episode as well as shown it links at Museum Archipelago Dot Com. If this is your first show subscribe for free in your favorite podcast player. And if this isn't leave us a rating or review wherever you get your podcast. Thanks for listening and next time bring a friend.

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79. The Future of Hands-On Museum Exhibits with Paul Orselli

Museum Archipelago

00:00 sec | 7 months ago

79. The Future of Hands-On Museum Exhibits with Paul Orselli

"Welcome to museum archipelago. I'm in Elsner. Pews Eum archipelago guides you through the rocky landscape of museums. Each episode is never longer than fifteen minutes. So let's get started. The Modern Museum invites you to touch a rather it would if it wasn't closed due to the cove nineteen outbreak the screens inside the fossil hall at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC. Say Touch to begin to an empty room. The normally cacophonous hands on exhibits at the exploratorium in San Francisco. Sit eerily silent and the please touch museum in Philadelphia which is inviting you right. There in its name has presumably stopped running commercials. No need to keep your hands by your side here. Exhibits are rich in detail encouraging children to touch feel and see the way everyday things in our lives. Were to learn more and plan your visit. Go to please touch museum dot. Org Interactivity in museums in the form of hands on exhibits has been the trend since nineteen sixty two when Michael Spock director of the Boston Children's museum removed do not touch signs. From the display cases since then hands on exhibits have served as a way for museums to indicate their free of their paternalistic. Pasts knowledge doesn't come from on high but instead it comes from the visitors own curiosity investigation and play additionally in science centers. There were all these science content that lent themselves to visit goal and interactive demonstrations. And in a children's museum. They were very much concerned about sensory approaches engaging different types of learning styles. You know full body and kinesthetic when the bulk of your audience's preschoolers they can't read so you need to engage them in some other way. I think that's traditionally where interactive said lived in science centers. Children's museums this is Paul or Sally of Policy Workshop who knows a lot about science centers and children's museums. Hello my name's Paul or Selley. I'm the chief instigator at how polar satellite workshop. That's my company that specializes in museum exhibit development in consulting before I started running my own business and I worked inside museums. I sort of oscillated back and forth between the Science Center world and the Children's museum world but hands on exhibits spread further than science centers and children's museums. Art Museums History museums and natural history museums. To I think the reason the interactive approach expanded was that those other types of museums realized that this interactive immersive approach helped them reach a broader audience as lorrimore museums become more and more concerned with reaching a broader audience. One of the opportunities for them to explore or one of the tools in their toolbox are interactive exhibits and experiences. So the question is will visitor. Still want to use hands on exhibits. Once museums opened again is the trend that started in nineteen sixty two over as a museum designer and as a visitor the last thing I think I want to do immediately after museums open up again is to rush into a super crowded museum. Were sort of training people in the era of cove in nineteen and maybe future pandemics to socially distance and be careful about touching surfaces and objects and so on and so forth. Part of me wants to say especially as it relates to children's museums even before covert nineteen. It wasn't like they were the most rigorously cleaned places in the world. So the thing is it's kind of hard for my friends in the Museum. World with a straight face to say well. We're just GONNA be more rigorous with our cleaning schedules in our cleaning Richmond. I mean are you really going to trail after hundreds of visitors in a decent sized museum and sort of wipe down everything? They've touched after they touch that. One thing that we can see happening is that hands on exhibits will need to work a little harder to justify themselves during exhibit planning stages. He sees the end of so-called empty interaction. There are lots of good examples sir but but maybe there are also some examples of things that I would consider primarily empty interaction and a good example of that is a flipped label. You know here's one piece of text and information on a little flap or a door and to encounter the rest of the information or to get an answer to a question. You have to open up the flap. I mean that's interactive's in the sense that you had to do something to complete the informational circuit but that may be about the lowest level of interaction possible. When I teach graduate students the one thing I often say is the flip. Label is the last vestige jump on exhibit Scoundrel. You know it's like somebody who's now really. Somebody's not really putting in the the work you know they just sort of mailed it in no we can put a bunch of flipped labels here we can put a flip label here and then. That's something for kids to do. It's sort of a challenge you because now that I mentioned that about flip labels it's sort of like well could you actually design a flipped label experienced that is moral ended or engaging in terms of an intellectual sense and not just sort of this base level tattle or mechanical sense and. I'm sure you can. It's that when it's sort of misused or thoughtlessly used leeann results are bad. We can't just so glibly and unthinkingly employees something like a push button as we did before and I am honestly. I don't know that that's a bad thing. Because then it sort of forces us to think. Well how could we provide a satisfying experience in? What are the interfaces or other kinds of opportunities that we could provide them with you? Carry the content that will carry the emotional ideas that we want to carry across in episode. Twenty seven of this show. I get that. There's a certain type of content. That digital media is best suited to system simulation understanding concepts like climate change requires thinking about how complex systems interact with one. Another and computer simulations allow that type of inquiry. It's almost like a video game. Visitors tried to find the edge of the rules of the world except in an exhibit about climate change. Those rules are the rules of atmospheric and Oceanic physics. Right now the best understood and most common interface to digital media is a touchscreen. There is a certain segment of people who love their touchscreens. They're museum with touchscreens. They would do it. I'm agnostic touchscreens. In touch tables they're amazing tools but now we have to be realistic. So now you're gonNA bring somebody into a new museum and asked them to crowd around with several other people and poke at a touchscreen after what has just happened in the world. That's a that's a that's a toughie interfaces allow visitors to interact with digital media without a touchscreen and without requiring the vizier to touch anything with their hands. And if I think for example of a large floor projections system where you could even just tap with your foot to control some different parameters or different people may be on the different corners of this huge. You know large projection could be controlling in real time different parameters could imagine that actually being positive and a worthwhile experience that still takes into account a social aspect but also social distancing aspect as well as you know something that is sort of full body doesn't involve people touching their hands on that you don't have to sort of sanitized floor because people are tapping it with their feet and doing things in his most optimistic moments or sally hopes that the new approach to hands on exhibits can bring Universal Design Front and center flexibility or control with something like tapping of foot which could easily also be. Somebody wheeling their wheelchair over the active area too. I mean I think this brings the notion of universal design to a different place in a positive place. You know these these limitations in this triangulation between posts Cova nineteen perception and the notion of universal design. I'm going to be optimistic. Maybe that puts us in a better place in a more thoughtful place in more satisfying place alternately in terms of interactive experiences for visitors which. I suppose is really what the sort of all boils down to how supported our museums as institutions in various countries or parts of the world where they exist or how resilient are particular museums or museum structures that led them withstand the sort of events. But they're sally sees a silver lining an end to all those mini grocery store exhibits at children's museums. Finally be a good reason for all the children's museums in world to get rid of those horrible mini grocery store exhibit small room filled. With lots of tactile objects kids are just constantly pawing over and checking out and throwing into their many baskets and then they get put right back on the shelves already already. It's a gigantic entropy experiment. So if you're gonNA keep that experience after everyone has touched something. Hundreds of things. White and disinfect. Them all and then replace them for people to just do this. I think constraints are good thing for creativity and now we've just been thrown some public hell in perceptual constraints. We have to think about that because certainly our visitors are going to be thinking about that. If we don't show that at least we're sensitive to that our visitors could rightfully think that we are insensitive. Not only to those design constraints in those design considerations but insensitive to them as people who want to have fun and want to be safe if you haven't checked out club archipelago now is a great time. My favorite episode of Our Museum Movie Review Series Archipelago at the movies is now completely free. Join Rebecca we've seen and I as we break down two thousand four national treasure discussing the tropes of museum films now museum. Exhibit Design is reflected back through popular culture to listen for free and hopefully find a little distraction the Patriot dot com slash museum archipelago and look for the episode on national treasure. This episode of Museum archipelago is brought to you by pigeon by S- recess a real time intelligence platform that uncovers the power of way finding for your museum enabling your visitors to maximize their day at your venue using pigeon. Yes like the navigating bird. The museum's management can gather real time data for managing space effectively in relation to visitors while improving their Roi through marketing. Automation and using pigeon visitors can navigate the maze of museum with ease conduct automated and personalized tours based on their interest. Rsvp for events and get more information about the exhibits right in front of to find out how pigeon can help your museum visit. Pigeon that's recess dot com slash museums. That's G. E. O. N. Dot S. I. R. S. Y. S. Dot Com slash museums things? So much to pigeon for. Supporting Museum archipelago. You can find a full transcript of this episode and links to other episodes at Museum Archipelago Dot. Com Archipelago is supported by listeners. Like you who have joined club archipelago on patriotic. If you can't get enough about how museums shape our lives join now for two dollars a month if this is your first episode. Subscribe to the show for free using your favorite podcast player. And if it isn't leave us a rating review and next time bring a friend.

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