17 Burst results for "shankar narayan"

"shankar narayan" Discussed on Movie Herald Tamil Podcasts

Movie Herald Tamil Podcasts

05:12 min | 4 months ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on Movie Herald Tamil Podcasts

"Hill folks. Welcome to movie podcast. Soda me added on the odyssey. It'll be totally ordered index. Papa finding conclusion the mail on did in the finals support with the man and the mall in physical. Not wanna of the be swimming buffalo once again in the shock on the i've got some of them from alabama along the wanna come gopal king romana so be sorted about on the the the start by the new icon could definitely on the Abuse funding imdad abuse. When the landau of the time diamanti immediately explained money out that it'd be optima optima used for knee date on the one dollars total nomad bottle so dilemma. But in order nine on the pd little bits who does later at up running any actually but the over the date. On the successful la order odyssey nobody would be up Funny on aberdeen out of our leader of dozens under bulldozed Message around the league in rushing lunch crossing the mom beyond the by the united thousands were like a peak for a kalinin gene. Nana negga anna. That was it. Fame were financial policies. Economic policies. Allama started booming and there was a very big change a over there on the nearby auto vineeta monitoring all over indiana the last leonardo. So on an edit. The loan did but it's a political movement other lure marie the mighty love cinema one. The marie and a good idea but on a social commentary on hundred year but on alami on the solo shankar narayan opener. Her money only add them with us out or is this a meal on the tap. Not the bang on the lam. Our quarterback boost quota more in the mariana born down the challenge family and activity back up political season. But the now opinion reject the nandita. He was working. I would want hundred. Get out over mighty upper neria following the marie Anecdote now buying iraq for nine hundred a month as nikon wound up on the nine. Ndfu mola's olympic zero hundred. Cr out of a debate about it so on and so invited up. Say every non and you get a of bitty in recent times dom would our political panel on the the aura. Puttick agenda gary ponder lamberti ranjit daughter. Where we put another the you. Might you pay your brand. That are being own energy policies. Crack down machine. I'm a cherry on the he'd done. Jim bamber domino to the tonight labeled mansingh lois. It and i'm going to go locally our article out proposal quota political eighty I love the normal alabama area. Low mass. I left area the mall. We look june the weight on on site yet to go if It'll be gone around onto the around but you know associated with an actual brandon. I'm i'm apart. We'll make explicit. People are not. Allow this lucian ashamed. What is associated on john. Have unlimited on on uh Explicit solo dish in la not one doctor On yanic poet the snow rope on a wooden be which got to see what mohammed on the on the on the buddha they of being there when the city to you.

one dollars tonight leonardo Allama indiana Jim bamber domino thousands marie hundred alabama nikon nine hundred a month mansingh lois dozens hundred year lamberti lucian Nana olympic zero hundred john
"shankar narayan" Discussed on AI in Financial Services Podcast?

AI in Financial Services Podcast?

06:18 min | 7 months ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on AI in Financial Services Podcast?

"So shankar. I wanted to start off talking about what elements of workflows within banking where we can really apply conversational interfaces today. I think there's a lot of claims about ai taking over customer service or some other functions but of course it's more nuanced than app when you take a look at where your technologies being applied and what you see in the landscape. How would you summarize wear conversational interfaces fit in in banking right. So there's a lot of hype around conversational So i would like to break that particular meant we are on the very early stages of conditionally. I am in the technologies just evolving as long so in terms of in banking. I think the key use case for conditionally is of several but let me talk about the customer engagement side am banks are looking at cutting costs on call centers and reputation calls which comes into the call center they move into some form of a flow for chat bots and chad votes has to be intelligent enough to understand that alonso's and respond appropriately the challenge. Which we've been seeing and which most of the companies thunder companies are evolving from celebre. Give you an example. This has been restarted. This company was that everything's moved conversation and unstructured data. And we just happening where you have people chatting or come on what they can ask anything. Because there's no structured work or the zone many shropshire that they can ask anything. So you'll you'll heavy lifting is done by your systems in entirely to understand. The piece has to be good enough to understand the intent and appropriate the answer Their tools at one is banks have to be pretty strict in terms of how they respond just to make sure that the brand is kept so the way. If if it's an ai which is open to training or training without any human interface. It can this phone and get trained and If based on property may give a wrong response so if we need to have a better control on that and stock has to be built in that so what we are seeing or the bureau of let me give you an example right when we started in twenty seven twenty eight when we launched our first services with a bank the workload pretty structured the opportunity impact build a lot of variations on radiance fall the the intense again the stroke of the nlp to understand how pavilions for that to respond a car in the food has to happen is let me give an example if i make a query that hey there's my checkbook i applied for it guest today so you may have multiple variants which built in and the system understands what you intend hits and response to it. We launched. We had of art. Sixty thousand interactions per day mid some of the banks on viet launched in india. Where the there are twenty million customers and the operational team was overwhelmed. Because you can't keep having team billions so we have to build a deep learning mortar so that it auto trains and the billions auto bill so this my team both so there was a lot of learning which we act do as we each rated in canonisation layer journey the customer engagement side. That's the sign the law of other use cases which is emerging will the last few years especially in a machine comprehension whether market documents which banks have and. Let's assume that you are a relationship manager and you just want to know that on. How is the apple Gonna be doing tomorrow. And what does the cio report. Amancio information office of has created and the relationship manager doesn't have time to read through it so you have a reading the document which is being fed understanding the intense and comprehending it and you can quit any queries and it will not give up particular on servile pick relevant answers and showcase whether human gan understand it and pick up the knossos. It's such plus plus right. So i see that as a segment which we are working on with some max banks so using a for internal processes you have the rpm which is basically. That's a separate were to complete version. But in terms of con- additionally is fell focus on you. See a lot of use gives us or hr all the mundane tasks which people have to communicate with. A human is being moved onto box or workflow base os and that starts the shift which is happening. And we're seeing that. I have data which shows the in fact last month a one of the banks did six million interactions in a month. Or the because it's amazing but the final. Wally masur doing now just to clarify chocolate. This is six million internal interactions. You're talking about this. hr faculty here. No no no. No your customer writ large of a lincoln howard phasing customer actions retail banking iraq jumps rea-. Now that makes sense humans out there but just imagine a call center will not be able to have that kind of scalable volume now. There are lots of unique interactions which are happening which banks looking through. So i'll give you an example while the banks had to adam. Api just tell where the credit card is going to be delivered on which day just going to be delivered because they didn't have the use case but customer Asking that i applied for credit card. Where is it. I haven't received it so bank said okay. I don't want this to go to the call center. I want to based on customers asking these questions. Why don't i give a particular times time kind of thing where i can tell where the where the credit card is share not share so what is happening with conversation is if banks can leverage and i think banks are slowly understanding the scale of it

two years ago singapore this week over fourteen million dollars over seventy employees coo shankar narayan today Ai
"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

"A fire arm trying to keep it with you at all times and if you're going in some place like a firearm is not allowed to keep it locked up that's cool most happy more pop group toss reporting the king county sheriff's department and police are warning people after an attack on a link light rail train this week a woman was punched and kicked for her cell phone como Suzanne fawn has more on what sound transit in law enforcement are saying about security thousand people take a link light rail every day Alex right in her husband take it I never felt unsafe out here at night police in nineteen year old woman was attacked and robbed for her cell phone while she was on the light rail train Sunday night as it was getting ready to stop in Columbia city investigators say a man grabbed her phone when she tried to fight back he kicked her and punched her several times in the stomach and took off this is the second robbery in a light rail train this year and one of several recent attacks some wonder if more security is needed no I don't think that that would hurt on September fourteenth the man was stabbed in the back while he was on a light rail train headed to you dub on September thirteenth a high profile attack at the Westlake station one man was killed and two others hurt in a shooting I Hassoun transit what it's doing to prevent these violent attacks they told me they've increased security specifically in the west like tunnel stop right after the shootings that's almost as and far reporting the worst part of justice is the number of serious use of force cases is declining within the Seattle police department it follows reforms mandated to address excessive force and biased policing in twenty eleven the DOJ found that more than twelve hundred instances were police you serious force over a twenty eight month period after form started to federal monitor found a sixty percent reduction facial recognition software used by federal law enforcement is at the center of a new lawsuit come was Ryan Harris says those behind the suit want to know how it's being you the American civil liberties union has raised concern that facial recognition software is used in concert with security cameras that are just about everywhere to essentially keep track of all of us even though most are suspected of a crime ACLU Washington lawyer Shankar Narayan says the F. B. R. has admitted that uses the tech to run searches against a large cache of images claim they don't need a warrant for probable cause they don't track how effective the technology is AA invaded questions about whether the use of the tool was constitutional this is just because you walk through a public space that doesn't mean you forfeit your protection against unwarranted searches but they want to know more so we can have that discussion Amazon which has government contracts for the software says it should never be used illegally and agency should tell us how they use it Ryan Harris como news we're hearing from the Seattle city council candidate whose campaign sign was vandalized with racist graffiti district four candidate John Scott says it's not the only time something like this has happened.

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

"Pentagon awarded Microsoft massive contract for cloud computing Amazon was widely considered the front runner for the ten billion dollar deal but president trump is in a well known feud with Amazon's Jeff bass those who owns the Washington post there's talk those tensions played into the decision Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has made his first public comments of the surprise announcement was focused on the core principle of enabling our partners are cut to achieving their missions and the same is true even for the department of defense in the United States there are reports Amazon could appeal to government auditors or a file a court challenge facial recognition software used by federal law enforcement at the center of a new lawsuit couples Ryan Harris says those behind the suit wanna know how it's being used the American civil liberties union has raised concern that facial recognition software is used in concert with security cameras that are just about everywhere to essentially keep track of all of us even though most aren't suspected of a crime ACLU Washington lawyer Shankar Narayan says the F. B. R. has admitted it uses the tech to run searches against a large cache of images claim they don't need a warrant for probable cause it'll track how effective the technology is a invaded questions about whether the use of the tool was constitutional variances just because you walk through a public space that doesn't mean you forfeit your protection against unwarranted searches but they want to know more so we can have that discussion Amazon which has government contracts for the software says it should never be used illegally and agency should tell us how they use it Brian Harris como news we're hearing from the city council candidate whose campaign sign was vandalized with racist graffiti district four candidate Sean Scott says it's not the only time something like this is happened feel.

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

"Pentagon awarded Microsoft of massive contract for cloud computing Amazon was widely considered the front runner for the ten billion dollar deal but president trump is in a well known feud with Amazon's Jeff Bezos who owns the Washington post there's talk those tensions played into the decision Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has made his first public comments of the surprise announcement was focused on the core principle of enabling our partners are comfortable achieving the admission and the same is true even for the department of defense in the United States there are reports Amazon could appeal to government auditors or a file a court challenge facial recognition software used by federal law enforcement at the center of a new lawsuit couples Ryan Harris says those behind the suit wanna know how it's being used the American civil liberties union has raised concern that facial recognition software is used in concert with security cameras that are just about everywhere to essentially keep track of all of us even though most aren't suspected of a crime ACLU Washington lawyer Shankar Narayan says the F. B. R. has admitted that uses the tech to run searches against a large cache of images they claim they don't need a warrant for probable cause it'll track how effective the technology is a invaded questions about whether the use of the tool was constitutional Marantz is just because you walk through a public space that doesn't mean you forfeit your protection against unwarranted searches but they want to know more so we can have that discussion Amazon which has government contracts for the software says it should never be used illegally and agency should tell us how they use it Brian Harris como news we're hearing from the city council candidate whose campaign sign was vandalized with racist graffiti district four candidate Sean Scott says it's not the only time something like this is happening.

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

"Of massive contract for cloud computing Amazon was widely considered the front runner for the ten billion dollar deal that president trump is in a well known feud with Amazon's Jeff bass those who owns the Washington post there's talk those tensions played into the decision Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has made his first public comments of the surprise announcement was focused on the core principle of enabling our partners are comfortable achieving their missions and the same is true even for the department of defense in the United States there are reports Amazon could appeal to government thought auditors or a file a court challenge facial recognition software used by federal law enforcement at the center of a new lawsuit couples Ryan Harris says those behind the suit wanna know how it's being used in in civil liberties union has raised concern that facial recognition software is used in concert with security cameras that are just about everywhere to essentially keep track of all of us even though most aren't suspected of a crime ACLU Washington lawyer Shankar Narayan says the F. B. I. has admitted it uses the tech to run searches against a large cache of images claim they don't need a warrant for probable cause they don't track how effective the technology is a invaded questions about whether the use of the tool was constitutional Ryan says just because you walk through a public space that doesn't mean you forfeit your protection against unwarranted searches but they want to know more so we can have that discussion Amazon which has government contracts for the software says it should never be used illegally and agency should tell us how they use it Brian Harris como news we're hearing from the city council candidate whose campaign sign was vandalized with racist graffiti district four candidate Sean Scott says it's not the only time something like this is happening feel.

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

"Stay connected stay informed the home of the Huskies komo news coming up on komo news I'm surely harder we're hearing from the C. E. O. of Microsoft about his company surprise win over Amazon Harris with facial recognition software in the effort to get federal law enforcement to tell us how they use it those stories plus a look at our commute conditions coming up it's four thirty here's ABC an investigation into president trump is official with the house boating mostly along party lines to set the official rules if this is Jordan from president reacted just moments after that vote on the hill I saying that this is the greatest witch hunt in history we also heard from his press secretary he said this does nothing but in trying unacceptable violations of due process against the president the rules authorize the house intelligence committee to release transcripts of its closed door depositions and clears the way for future hearings to be nationally televised committed to trying to determine if the president violated his oath of office by asking a foreign country to investigate a political opponent police say it was a tip from a member of the public that led investigators to find a fourteen year old Virginia girl who had been missing for nearly ten days firefighters in southern California say progress is being made on two blazes that broke out overnight forcing evacuations stocks closed lower today Terry Alden or ABC news thousand have been ninety seven seven continuing with our top stories from the call mode twenty four seven news center I'm Rick franchise the Lisa Jaffe facial recognition software used by federal law enforcement is at the center of a new lawsuit come as Ryan Harris says those behind the suit want to know how it's being used the American civil liberties union has raised concern that facial recognition software is used in concert with security cameras that are just about everywhere to essentially keep track of all of us even though most aren't suspected of a crime ACLU Washington lawyer Shankar Narayan says the F. B. R. has admitted it uses the tech to run searches against a large cache of images claim they don't need a warrant or probable cause they don't track how effective the technology is a invaded questions about whether the use of the tool was constitutional Marantz is just because you walk through a public space that doesn't mean you forfeit your protection against unwarranted searches but they want to know more so we can have that discussion Amazon which has government contracts for the software says it should never be used illegally and agency should tell us how they use it Brian Harris como news in a surprise move last Friday Microsoft beat out Amazon for a massive cloud computing contract with the Pentagon come was Charlie harder tells us the CEO of Microsoft now is talking about that big deal most agreed Amazon was the front runner for the contract but president trump publicly questioned the process he has a well known feud with Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has remained quiet about the contract until now on the core principle of enabling our partners are cop to achieving their missions and the same is true even for the department of defense in the United States Amazon may not give up on the ten billion dollar deal so easily there are reports the company may appeal the decision to a government auditor or perhaps file suit Charlie harder colonials a man in his nineties has become the first victim to die of the flu this season in our state he lived in Franklin County in or near the tri cities Dr Amy person spokeswoman for the local health department says now is the time to get vaccinated if you think you have influence stay home from work or school and if you think you have influenza and you're a person at high risk which would be over sixty five infants children pregnant women people with heart or lung conditions or diabetes they should be checking with their healthcare providers last season two hundred forty one people died of the flu in Washington state just ahead of our traffic update worded Washington Supreme Court says the state cannot be held at fault for the accident that because the I five bridge over the schedule river to go down in twenty thirteen put truck carrying an oversize load struck the overhead support beams of the bridge causing it to fall into the water no one was killed three people into vehicles plunged into the water as well the state sued a Canadian trucking company which countersued claiming this thing was partially at fault in issuing a permit for the load and it's made it to the bridge in a five to four decision though the court points to a state law that says vehicle owners or operators must exercise due care in making sure their vehicles can pass under a structure well the state can't be held liable for damages caused by an override vehicle the dissenting justices say the state could not be found liable under that law but still could be at fault if it failed to properly maintain the bridge hello Neil komo news for thirty former Iraq injure with our triple a traffic earlier today we had that five vehicle crash in federal way because it's a big mess then just now crews put out a car fire in federal way but that's because in a few lucky list to slow things down will not only looking lose but we have the three right lanes reportedly blocked so it's solid traffic in an off in the direction that you might not expect making your approach to the past and pass the scene it was quite the visual distraction that's true both directions of five twelve between still street and I fiver struggling and then east on continues to be sought to golden given route southbound one six seven heavy south of highway eighteen it's still really tough coming out of liquid downturn JBL and from some earlier problems now we have another car fire to tell you about and it's on west marginal way all lanes are blocked both directions northbound and southbound on west marginal way between second and Highland Park way so you need to use an alternate route your next come on traffic up for forty four years check on the weather now with meteorologist Shannon o'donnell Halloween twenty nineteen looking like a beauty here in western Washington so awful we've got the soggy ghosts and.

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

"Seven news center now I'm refrence size with Lisa Jaffe's a prominent local Republican now says president trump should be impeached former senator Slade Gorton tells The Seattle Times he sees more than a dozen actions on the president's part that warrant impeachment but he wants a if trump should be removed from office no this isn't the first time Gordon has split with his party their state Attorney General in nineteen seventy four he called for president Nixon's resignation for abuse of power in the Watergate scandal today the house voted to formally authorize impeachment hearings against the president by a vote of two thirty two to one ninety six Jeff Pohjola companies continuing to get reaction from around the northwest Republican congressman Dan new house of eastern Washington says the impeachment process has been one sided it has not allowed both sides of the issue and I mean in the political process the Republicans and the Democrats to have access to information about the the the ability to ask the questions necessary from both sides of the aisle new houses Republicans have not been allowed to call witnesses or see documents that are being produced as evidence against the president should federal law enforcement be able to use facial recognition software to watch and track all of us without a warrant come as Ryan Harris has more in a lawsuit that raises that question the suit from the American civil liberties union claims agencies like the F. B. I. N. D. E. A. you have put the software including some created by Amazon to work in essentially a national surveillance program although our state is among the nearly two dozen that allows federal access to the driver license photo database the ACLU Washington attorney Shankar Narayan says you certainly never consented to having that information included in what's affecting only a database of suspected criminals that will be compared against and yet that's exactly the use best being made Marantz is it put you at risk of civil liberties violations not to mention racial discrimination said to be one of the flaws of the software Amazon says its software should always be used legally handed ways that do not violate anyone's civil rights and that you should be aware when it's being used Brian Harris como news last Friday the Pentagon awarded Microsoft a massive contract for cloud computing commerce Charlie harder tells us about reports Amazon is prepared to challenge that move Amazon was widely considered the front runner for the ten billion dollar deal but the president has a well known beef with Amazon's Jeff Bezos who owns the Washington post and there's talk that played into the decision Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella has made his first public comments on the surprise announcement the metal thing here is that means that we will make sure that all technology either in the global view all institutions the green on democracy have elected to protect the freedoms we enjoy Amazon could appeal to government auditors or file a court challenge Charlie harder como news companies time three thirty four only traffic.

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

10:27 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"You by you build that there is a lot of news happening all around the world right here at home self find out what's trending what's trending on the east side we talked a little bit about this yesterday the ACLU of Washington is taking issue specifically with an agreement between some school districts in the Spokane county sheriff's department the plan as proposed would allow the Spokane county sheriff's deputies any staff member there doing cases of emergency to access without a subpoena the live security cam footage at a school they're doing this out of safety for students so for example if there is a school shooting unfortunately a lot of times people in the rush of calling nine one one might not give accurate information so when there's a reported shooting staff members in Spokane county of the sheriff's department can look in the cameras they can get a better sense of who the shooter is or the shooters are what kind of weapons they're using exactly what they look like where they are which of course makes it a lot easier for the deputies and all the law enforcement who arrive to go after the actual threat but the ACLU of Washington which has long decided to become a radical far left organization this taking issue with this and we talked about some of the issues yesterday but I wanted to point out one specific part of this that seems completely ludicrous it's actually the subject of my blog KTV H. dot com today this all coming from the spokesman review and they spoke with Shankar Narayan he's director of the technology of liberty project at the Washington ACLU any argues that law enforcement being able to tune in to what were once internal discipline issues could cause an increase in the quote unquote school to prison pipeline they say students especially minorities could be referred to law enforcement when school discipline would have been better for their situation out they bring up this idea that the officers the deputies are just going to **** nilly look at these video feeds and it could cause an abuse meaning they're just happen to look at a video feed and it shows some kid breaking a chair or something at the school that would normally be handled by the school and not necessary law enforcement office and law enforcement will see this and go ahead and show up and arrest the kid now there's no evidence to suggest that's even possible based upon their agreement if it has to do something not with an emergency in progress you have to go through the normal legal channels but let's ignore that for a moment because we hear the school to prison pipeline argument be thrown out there **** nilly it does not exist there is no such thing as a school to prison pipeline that is in the jury that activists likely a seal your Washington the folks who work there they use that to ignore the reasons why kids are being suspended or arrested to begin with if a kid is getting suspended at a school it's because they did something wrong right I mean generally we understand that that's the case were not choosing to just randomly suspend or expel kids they did something and let's use the example coming from the ACO view of Washington they broke a chair okay well then the question becomes why did they break that ship could it be that they maybe have a problem in their family that could use some kind of address addressing perhaps a conversation about the importance of family and strong role model should actually take place whether we're talking about specific cases or just general because we don't have that conversation does the student conduct that we're talking about here does it deserve suspension or expulsion maybe it does right maybe it does but maybe it does right and that's where they get into this idea of the school to prison pipeline because when you suspend or expel kid especially if they come from a community of color that makes it a lot harder for them to navigate society once they've been expelled once the end up getting arrested for something that they may be did at school they have a harder time getting back on the right path and unfortunately that could lead some kids to a life of gang membership which leads them to jail if not death so they they claim that this is all about that okay taking them out of class spending or expelling these kids who'll coaling law enforcement this is being presented as if the city of Washington wants you to believe that this is somehow indicative of an over reach of a police force that they're the ones responsible for the prison to put it at the school to prison pipeline who's calling the cops it's the teachers it's the principles it's the staff members they're the ones who are doing this is spending and the expelling and the calling of the police no I suppose there either doing it because the flat out racist right at me we should certainly have that conversation that can certainly address racial disparities in who gets suspended because of you are black or Latino in this state like in many states you're at a higher likelihood of being suspended or expelled okay so let's maybe the teachers and principals are just flat out racist or maybe they happen to be ignoring the root causes of the behavior or of course we should also conceived sometimes kids need this kind of punishment which ever you picked however it's a teacher and administrator making that decision it's not the cops when the cops all you want you can win the Spokane county sheriff's department what you want they are responding to schools calling them no I suppose the sheriff's department could abuse the camera system as the ACLU speculates it's certainly possible but it was if if if that was their intent in all of this if that was the actual intent of the law enforcement agency here what do they just do it without an agreement one they just half into the actual system and surveillance system on lawfully of what the ACO does is supposed to respond to actual abuses rather than sort of minority report as the death try to figure out well cop might end up abusing it so we better not do it well I I suppose I thought might arrest someone in error we now saying that to prevent mistaken arrests do we stop arresting people know this is absurd it is part of a movement by the ACLU of Washington to always plant seeds of doubt in the operation of police officers now at one point he could have clearly said the A. so your washing or they see you ACLU national that you know what we are doing this because we need to be that person to win shore no government over reach present themselves as heroes basically saying look I'm principal I know that sometimes I'm gonna take a bad to take a position on it these different issues but I'm doing it for the greater good now ten years ago twenty years ago I would look at the ACLU doing something like this and I was said okay you know what fair enough someone does need to be that person who defends positions on up on a a principled basis even if they may be look like bad guys and they've certainly done that the is so you in the past having to do with free speech but they're no longer that selfless because they're not consistent because instead they decided to be driven by a French progressive agenda that they decided to adopt Xing aside decades of nonpartisan history in reason magazine actually points this out really really well the ACLU does not defend our right to own guns individual rights to own guns they were against the Heller decision but I'm supposed to believe that the ACLU is principled on constitutional rights that they're taking this position on the surveillance camera because all will their principal watch principled on the second amendment can you explain that to me so your Washington because they're not they're taking progressive policies in this is one of them that they decided to do all the name of social justice and you can tell that from the way that this individual who works with a seal your Washington speaks this is a social justice because for them they created one whole call it does not actually exist and it actually nor is the problems the root causes of these problems that I think are worth addressing in having a bigger conversation about but they're not interested in that it's all the cops be suspicious of the police that's a dangerous position to take because when you tell someone to be suspicious of the police will you act a little bit differently with them and that needs to be addressed no I'd love to hear from you sent me a text on the number of tax resolution hotline one eight hundred four six five eight seven seventy text me at one eight hundred four six five eight seven seven because I certainly concede that on this kind of topic there is going to be a bit of difference in how we decide to talk about surveillance from a perspective of a conservative I totally get that this perspective from the ACLU goes one step too far you're listening to the chase Rancho let's find out what else is trending what's trending the sports ball Seahawks pre season officially starts today they're taking on the that team with the animal correct but tell tell the the Bronx the Broncos the bright I think that's a flank we we so we we talk a little bit in a casually about this because it doesn't really matter not really certainly pre games matter to the rookies or the new faces on the team they're the ones who are going to play today I'm assuming that if Russell Wilson even plays it's gonna be for maybe three minutes but really this is about choosing who his backup to going to be it's really about choosing who they're going to cut and so to that degree people care but beyond that we're not gonna see anything that's meaningful tonight our way nine the fact Russell since implying he's not even gonna get three minutes only the new one play with them yeah and I feel that I'm a sports guy and I have no idea who replied I am I am so excited than that this is the game that I will be at this is the only Seahawks game that I'll be going to I'm going for Katie T. H. purposes because I serve on a board in the building having to do with all the community charities of the month that we celebrate on this station but all across and so we go there with the charities and the non profits and we go on the field that part so it's kind of fun but then afterwards we watch the game I of course I watch it from this week because I'm not gonna go in like the regular people seats and the talent you do a front I go into this week and I'm bringing a friend because I've got access to the sweet and I'll watch it for the first like first quarter maybe and then I kind of move on we'll certainly do a detailed play by play exes and ohs recap tomorrow easier all right again based only on my experiences on the field pushing.

Washington Spokane county three minutes twenty years ten years
"shankar narayan" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

10:34 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Talk powered by the Pacific northwest. So the cash San Francisco Seattle Vancouver in there also awash in human faces in urine more to the point urine Vancouver has a. A solution. Piaget six. Yep. We're going to explain that. So speaking San Francisco is sort of a sister city to Seattle in ways ideological and others. They've now officially banned. The board of supervisors there has banned facial recognition software to be used by police. Joining us now to discuss this is director of technology and liberty project the ACLU of Washington. Shocker narayan. Shocker. Welcome back to the program. Thank you very much for having me such pleasure. So this ban on facial recognition technology. So what what exactly are they trying to stop from happening with this? Yeah. I think you know, in order to answer that question now step back and kind of give a sense of why we should be particularly concerned about facial recognition or face Valence as we call it as a surveillance technology. It's undetectable right? It's based on a biometric character characteristic that you cannot change about yourself, which is your face, right? If you go out in public, you know, you can for example, leave your okay card at home. So it doesn't get tracked. You can go not drive. So that your license plate doesn't get read. You cannot change your face, and you can apply this technology on any image or video public or private before. Or after the fact, it's not just about identification of social about people's movements their emotions their propensities. And we've also seen number of studies in the last few months come out that show that the technology is biased that it's not as good at recognizing people of color. On other Rollerball communities, and you know, this is a technology again that could be used for life or death decisions. You know, if incorporated say into police body cameras, so I think this is really the determination of San Francisco that they want to take a different approach where you know, elsewhere, for example legislative session this year where the tech companies were pushing the really permissive approach to facial recognition. San Francisco is taking a different approach that recognizes the historic cross it where virtually every surveillance technology has had these proportionate impacts and relying on the tech companies to self police that hasn't kept us safe. So I think they're saying that default should be show us with technology isn't biased com over combat that those studies that are already out there. And let's have a real conversation about the appropriate place of this technology in our society rather than the opposite. Which is to just let it out into the wild. As the tech companies have wanted to do Shankar. The one thing about this allegedly being of bias type of situation that you can have with the facial recognition software is the lack of ethnishity diversity in the data sets. So how do you even begin to change that to make it work? It's really really difficult. And I think you've put your finger on an extremely important point. You know, one of which is that the tech vendors themselves are not a diverse space, and it's really really difficult to get hold of training data sets that actually have the requisite diversity, which is why you see, you know, borderline on ethical situations in which government databases of immigrants, for example, or databases of abused. Children have been used to train facial recognition algorithms. There's a big report about that a few months ago. So I think that's very difficult. And even if you manage to overcome that there's also just the surveillance environment that you're releasing this technology into, you know, it's it's not a secret, and it's well documented that certain neighborhoods have more cameras in them, and it's not necessarily because more crime happens in those neighborhoods. But it simply based on sumptious about where crime happens. So this then becomes technology. That's over using those neighborhoods. Even if the technology itself ends up being perfectly unbiased, this is going to be extremely difficult to fix which is why I think San Francisco made the call that they want to ban it. And then of course, you know, if new evidence comes to light or if their way to to fix the by sees which seems very unlikely they can revisit the discussion. So what's the practical application of banning it San Francisco is well, it's the city and county. But I mean, you get across the city line, and suddenly it's not banned. How does San Francisco actually, well or next to San Francisco down the peninsula tail? You've got. Yeah. You've got all. I mean, how does this actually from a practical application how does this work banning it in one city? Well, not very well. Short had to that. Which is why for example in Washington state? We hit advanced Bill the session that was intended to to get ahead of the issue by imposing a statewide moratorium until two things happened one was that the attorney general would take a look at the technology and look at the five biggest products and certify that they were not having these proportion impacts on particular groups in other words, if they were by free and also that a taskforce was convened to talk about the appropriate place of facial recognition technology in our society. If any part of this whole debate, I think is is is not just about concerns that are substantive on the technology. But also a process question about when we have these really powerful technologies. Can we have a discussion driven by our values? Where are? Communities. Get a chance to say no to some uses of these technologies in contrast to what we have now, which is largely big tech vendors with the bottom line, you know, of of proud of profit motives that involves selling a lot of this product making those value calls in judgments for us. We think that's backwards. And we think that, you know, having a process where those communities can can speak out is really something that should happen before the technology gets released into the wild Shankar Narayan with us. He's with the U works on the technology. Liberty project San Francisco has banned fish recognition technologies by law enforcement. So this is interesting shocker because there's a lot of disagree with the ACLU on and then on topics like this. I have great deal of sympathy for your views. And this is also I think cross left right spectrum, folks. Like me, I'm a small government cat. I don't want. The government tracking me at all. I prefer to be able to live a life of relative anonymity. And I know that's weird for talk show host, but it's not just facial recognition technology. So where does the ACLU stand on say the RFID license plates that are going to be forced to buy some people's belief in Washington state? They're going to track use your drive track. If you make aggressive turns or say, for instance, the the tax per mile gasoline approach, which is eventually looking to put a GPS unit your car to track driving where you are your speed. And again, if the computer determines made an unsafe turn, where's the ACLU stand on that in our state? Yeah. I think he you know, you first of all you put your finger absolutely on the way, the political lines fall. You know, I think this is not a partisan issue for ups. It's never been we've been working at the state level, and at the local level for many years with strong bipartisan support to get these frameworks around surveillance technologies who are not just throwing them out there. And I think we've had really good success, you know, with with libertarian Republicans, some of whom have been really strong prime sponsors of our bills, and and progressive Democrats on the other side, you know, forming strong coalition should to try to advance these perspectives. Does give me a lot of hope that that we can be a state. That's a leader. Right. Where we're not simply saying that the this narrative that I think tech companies are investing a lot in which is that. You know, just good, right? Because this tech good bad narrative as opposed to asking the real questions about what is the technology for where the benefits how can we restrict the data to be used just for those purposes? And in fact, in our f I d you know, about I think twelve thirteen years ago, you know, we became one of the first states to restrict use of the data in our ID licenses that I think over these years we've had some good success in getting lawmakers to enact privacy frameworks around concerning technologies. We can continue to do that. All right. We'll come with me on this. I want them banned. So I'll tell you what I'll take you out to coffee. We'll work it out. And then I need some pro Bono work on a traffic ticket. Really? I'm kidding. You. Our guests. No, I'm not doing that tour guest. I'm just doing that to our guest. Shocker Narayan is gonna say yesterday copy. I'm very I'm very happy. You know, always happy to have a good conversation about surveillance. We'll do that. But we'll do it in a private location on film by anybody. Appreciate you coming on shocker. Thank you so much. Thank you so much. It was fun. Coming up is Washington state really a best state in the nation, Texas, if you agree or disagree nine eight nine seven three plus open air urinals in a city near us such fun. We'll talk about that next step is going to check traffic horse now, Tracy, so we're still seeing some delays because of an earlier issue on eastbound four ten out your one hundred sixty six I was just checking some of the cameras out there. And of course, it's caused quite the lineup coming off of the valley freeway getting onto four ten five twelve in itself. So we're gonna find an extra seven maybe even twelve minutes onto that drive, especially for those heading out to Bonney lake. A wreck on southbound five near the dome has lined up from highway teen heading out to the scene. And of course, northbound drivers are slowing down as we've passed city center. Drivers on highway sixteen seemed to be in pretty good shape. At a gig harbor who headed across the water here in Seattle. If your head the M's game at T mobile park, you will run into some slowing westbound.

San Francisco ACLU Shankar Narayan Washington Seattle director of technology Pacific northwest Vancouver Piaget Bonney lake T mobile park Tracy Bill Texas attorney twelve thirteen years
"shankar narayan" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Specifically I guess the pain and suffering of the people who were on these airplanes and has to do with how long they knew they were doomed. Yeah. This is the part of air travel that it's not part of this is the thing that I am not afraid to die necessarily but on an airplane. When stuff starts going bad. I'm afraid of how long I'm going to know. And how I'm going to act in Emma going to scream from my mother at cetera. I'm afraid this terrible. I'm afraid of embarrassing myself. Just. I am the last thing. No, look, it's a human reaction, etc. But yeah, the two planes had different amounts of time. Six minutes to twelve minutes is the planes were pitching back and forth, and people were terrified. So I guess this is one way to look at this. Are there other ways that you could value human life because this is this is gonna cost Boeing a lot of money started cost a lot of lives? Six million dollars six that's. That's okay. Boston still does that was the actual number calculated really Boeing the airlines working with the government calculated about a six years ago at six million dollars per, so they're probably if you add an inflation cost of living or dying and raise that it's probably in the eight million dollar category right now. I was just I was I was thinking literally you were making a six million dollar man quip. No, six million bucks. Well, that was then it's going to be a little bit more than. Yeah. Experts say the Boeing company overall could be facing payouts in excess of one billion with a B one billion dollars. If it can be proved that it had knowledge that the model had safety flaws. And so the people on board line air flight, for example, it ditched and kept going back and forth, twelve minutes. So you add that all up per person. And then that's the figure you would come to that. Can you imagine sitting there knowing the pilot is not getting control of an airplane? I've I've been in that temporary circumstance landing in. Chicago. It was quite clear. The pilot wanted out of that vector where you're on castle. Really controversial question is it is it fair to say that people may be near the end of their lives, or who who aren't raising young children because there's a lot of responsibility that their lives are just as valuable but could a lawyer for Boeing going and said, well, some of these people were at the end of their lifespan, and they didn't I mean is it can even do that. They do that all the time with insurance company. So how would that be different? If you were a lawyer trying to get a number figure now the beginning of their life versus the end of their life versus potential they had to society. I don't even like the discussion because you just you know, I know I brought it up. So. You want me to make it even more cynical do, Mike? So there's also a calculation based on where the crash happened, and they will actually literally calculate lower amounts for people outside the United States or outside northern European countries. Where there's a strong tort system in place Hasso, if the if this plane crash in Peru with mostly locals or this plane were to crash, let's say in Indonesia, let's just say in Africa. In the calculus is different than it is places. Can you? This is not an exaggeration. It's not me being mean spirited, this is that well more than actual. I mean, this is a blend of what what settlements have existed, and then what they feel like they are going to have to pay what the local torch. Rod remember because your local tort law. Your your law that allows you to get damages and punitive penalties changes everywhere there. So depending on where this case is where these negotiated it's going to change their people at big companies candy who they have like there's probably ten or twelve people at a big company into department. Who knows exactly the lawsuit settlement number, exactly? And they are sworn to secrecy. Like, you wouldn't believe I've a dear friend of mine who was one of these people at Microsoft, he knew exactly the amount of money for wish. They would settle say a patent infringement claim and one dollar more than that you're asking. Now, they have to ruin you in court. So speaking of human lives there this young woman. Thank god. She lived her name is Tiffany, Vincent. And this is from king five news. She had her whole career planned out. She was leaving her career in the air force. She wanted to go be in the civilian police. She was injured in the Amtrak crash, and this has made it now she may not walking in they've told her that she's not going to be able to wear a bulletproof vest cetera body armor. So she probably cannot go I can walk. She can walk along, but you can't run and she's like having physical activity. Let's think of this picture correct man that might so in that case you've got a number of deaths that occurred in this crash. This these these companies Amtrak is a company sound transit washed up they were warned and they knew that this track system wasn't ready. So is there a different calculus when it is largely government entities that make these decisions that end in loss of life or the radical change this young woman's life is your different calculus? And should there be when government is involved governments involved here? But there she's suing Amtrak. So so Amtrak it appears that that there were plenty of warnings that. This was a thirty mile an hour corner. Yeah. There was I mean Amtrak acknowledges that there was warning in place for thirty mile an hour corner. This was a guy who even talked about. Apparently the warning prior to hitting the corner too fast. So I don't know. I mean, you can blame I guess other folks for maybe allowing them to use a track, although they had been using it other transit gone on that corner. And it hadn't actually, you know, they because they went at the correct speed. I don't know this one looks like it's on Amtrak. I guess you look at the Washington State Department of transportation report where they're engineers wrote this this this part of the train track is not going to be ready until such point that you get basically positive train control. So that they, you know, the computer system can take over they knew that sound transit engineers has I recall warned about this. And I'm really truly not interested in going and trying Tang this round people's next. I'm just wondering about the different. So when they talked about positive train control, which obviously should have been in place. They also still did do not require that. Right. So so that is something that is. Actually again, on the they're saying, these are the things that work you should be doing this. And we're done, you know, have at it. And the problem is that they weren't using that and the feds had given him track. I don't know how many breaks all of next year next year. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. We'll get around to this. And it never never happens. I I guess I observe a different treatment when it's a private company versus, you know. And I I guess Amtrak sort of a private company, and you're talking about her case specifically where she had this dream of becoming a police officer. Now that looks like that's not going to happen in what her vision was still probably work for a police force. But she's not going to be running down purpose, for example because of her physical abilities. Now, what they are right in in her case with the lawyers are going to argue is that it's more than just a dream because he was working as a police officer in the military police. So so the bridge is a very narrow one between those two they hire military police all the time is not a whatever her, and so she there's definitely going to be a claim for for. A lifetime of lost wages as a result of this. And that certainly going to inflate it. So I haven't read a little bit about her. Although I missed the part that, you know, thank God, she's able to walk now something tells me that a young woman Tiffany Vincent is not going to be stopped. I hope she does won the lawsuit. Something tells me that there's a whole lot to come for this young lady in pursuit of her dreams in her life. So it come back onto candy, Mike and Todd show a gentleman named Shankar Narayan. And I wish that was my name. How interesting would I be if that was my name candy do what that name or do you think Bill is better with? All right. So he's with San Francisco, and what what what does he do there? No, he's talking about San Francisco. They are going to be the first city to got that guy. C L U all he'll be thrilled to hear from me. And he's director of technology. And so he does a lot of privacy issues. All right. So San Francisco first city in the country to ban facial recognition cameras, so Shankar Narayan with the ACLU technology division joins us. The candy Mike and Todd show next. We'll get to that. Tracy Taylor's going to check traffic.

Amtrak Boeing Mike San Francisco Shankar Narayan Boston Chicago United States officer Microsoft Washington State Department of Africa ACLU Rod Bill Indonesia Tracy Taylor
"shankar narayan" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

07:29 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"You cannot change your face. It is immutable. When you walk around your face goes with you. And that's why I think researchers have caused for caution and have called for a lot of concern in. How facial recognition is ruled out. In fact, I just saw today a brand new article by Luke star who ironically as a researcher for Microsoft in which he he he he compared facial recognition he called it the plutonium of AI, and that was because he thought that it had the potential to really change our society. Just by way of changing how the relationship works between government and covering, and I think we should take those concerned seriously, particularly again, given that there is now a mounting body of evidence that the technology is biased and right now, Amazon and Microsoft are lobbying and Olympia on behalf of their facial recognition technology. Shocker explains that they are what they are doing and the terrifying scenario on how it could be used. Well, as part of the data privacy bills that we discussed the last time we were on a little known component of that Bill actually authorizes facial recognition Bill that the Bill that came out of the Senate had this. This closet, basically said, you know, if a business puts up a placard you've given consent. It also authorized widespread law enforcement use of technology. And of course, we think that's that's a little bit back. Words because we haven't really had been discussion of the impact of the psychology. And I think we need to be very careful before the legislature simply blesses the technology, and and let's proliferate that we figure out how it's actually going to change our society. Remember, facial recognition isn't just about recognizing someone right? It's about much more than identification. It's about things like whether someone who's happy or sad. Whether someone is potentially dangerous. So for example, imagine facial recognition incorporated into a police body camera that gives the officer score based on analyzing someone's face as to whether they're dangerous or not about officer making a life or death decision based on that technology, which again, we know may not be accurate and has actually less accurate for people of color for women and for other vulnerable groups. So that's the kind of world that we're kind of taking a headlong leap into. And unfortunately, I think the the approach that these technology vendors, you know, who who have largely written this legislation or taking is to say, you know, trust us, we're gonna roll the technology out. And you know, there may be mistakes. But it's going to be fine. I think our approach would be more cautious to say, let's have this discussion with the right stakeholders at the table. And if they're limited ways in which we should use facial recognition, our our society. Let's put some really strong safeguards around them. But we're not there yet. Shankar Narayan from the technology liberty project director from the ACLU of Washington. So one of the things that he was talking about was there would be a sign set up as you walked past it into it. If there's a building area, you give your consent by walking past that sign, and I brought that question to his attention because just earlier this month if yeah. Earlier this month the vessel opened in New York City in Hudson yards. And this is the gigantic kind of public sculpture in a way, and it looks like a honeycomb and a lot of people were going there hiking up these honeycomb stairs and taking this picture because it catches the lightness certain ways, very interesting as far as architecture goes. Well, they had a placard that said any image. You use is ours. We own it and video you post is ours, we own it doesn't matter. If you're in it, and they had at the very bottom said this is going to be a facially recognized area or something like that. And people started taking pictures of placard going. This is not how consent works just because. I walked through your doors. Does not mean I can send to you than using my likeness and image in any way. You please to advertise your goods, and what this space is basically Hudson yards. It's a mall with apartments on top. So they were saying you can't do that. That's not consent. And so that's the conversation happened in New York right now with facial recognition. It would be the same thing. If you're in a space you've already consented. Yeah. I mean, that's that's the funny thing is and we talked a little bit about this with them as well. Like when you're not necessarily consenting when you're on surveillance video, but you are surveillance video for a lot of your day in some places. I mean, we are in here. Frequently on Facebook. I'm leaving right now. Exactly the camera, and and then we walk outside, and maybe you walking past a place with outside security cameras, and you walk inside a convenience store, and you're on camera again there. So it's, but this is a different sort of thing. He said, this is essentially supercharging that whole technology and turn it into something that just not only knows that you were there. But who you are. And then can like, you know, source on that date, and essentially decide make these decisions for you and the whole notion of of a mandatory consent. Should be a little a little frightening to people because I you don't feel like if you walk into a building, even if it's a privately owned building, which many of them are publicly owned buildings. You don't feel like you're immediately providing some sort of window into your personal life and yet with face recognition software. This is what some of the companies are arguing that you defacto do when you walk inside. Are you freaked out about that? This is the future. It's a good question. I'm not I guess I've not that freaked out generally by the intrusion of technology. I try to limit it. I don't use one of the personal assistance. I don't tape over the camera on my laptop. So I guess it's not that. I'm paranoid. It. Just feels like all right. Well, someone were to hack this thing on the other hand my assumption is that every single thing I do on my computer, regardless of how private by settings are. I feel like is is is retrievable by somebody else. I mean, it seems pretty clear that it that it is. And so I just try to behave accordingly when I'm walking past a a business. My assumption is I'm on some security camp somewhere in it. I guess it doesn't bother me at feels like I am just one of billions of images that they're getting in. So you feel like you get a little bit of anonymity. Just with by being lost in the crowd. I like when I go to the self-checkout at some stores. They have the little camera right at you. It's self checkout, and you can see the monitor because you know, you're being. Recorded. I looked at like check when makeup and chick my hair right in the camera. So it any point if they are going to be looking through that video. They have something interesting to look at for a whole like ten seconds. I watched somebody in the in the bar the other night. Sitting at a table. They thought they weren't being watched. It wasn't a surveillance cameras me eavesdropping sort of visually who was practicing smiles and taking pictures, and then and then and I was thinking like this. And then Finally, I guess I guess he goes the Tinder date locked up and had been practicing like it was actually kind huge. It was very very cute it. So I guess that was self surveillance. You know, it's a small number fifteen after a fashion. Alright traffic.

New York City Bill Microsoft researcher officer Shocker Luke Facebook Olympia Amazon Senate Shankar Narayan ACLU Washington director Hudson ten seconds
"shankar narayan" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

09:48 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Northwest. Moto? Welcome back to the gap sort of tank tops got for you. Oh, yes. Hey, Shankar, Lou. Hey, everything on our show comes back, the minority report. And so it just kind of works for what we're about to talk to you about. So shocker Narayan is with the technology. Liberty project director at the ACLU of Washington. Thank you so much for coming back on the show because as soon as you know, the Amazon facial recognition story popped up again, and how now some developers are protesting against it. We were like well now we have to revisit this. Yes. Indeed. I think it's very timely especially also given that facial recognition as being discussed in the state legislature right now and being pushed by both Microsoft and Amazon, so let's start with where would the average person see this being used? Well, part of the issue is we really don't know what uses are happening right now what we can say is that for example, we did a public records request him several states for law enforcement agencies, and we found at least a couple of agencies that were using facial recognition and public spaces without any suspicion without a warrant. In other words, you could be subject to recognition just for walking around in a public place, and that seems very problematic to us, especially given the demonstrated by season technology and the lack of control or even notice consent for the person who is simply going about their daily life. Well, let's talk about consent because this has popped up in New York City one of their new apartment buildings and shopping malls. When you walk in they have a placard display that says by walking in these doors, you are gay. Consent. Is that really the way that it could work like I could be walking down through Westlake. And because I'm in that neighborhood in that area. I have given consent because I've walked past a sign. Well, you know, just the way you say it, I think you already know the answer there really isn't an opportunity to consent there, particularly not if for example, the only grocery store in your town is using facial recognition, and you're only alternative might be to go miles and miles away. Or even if an entire mall is using it if the mall the next door over as using it. If facial recognition becomes ubiquitous in the settings, then the placard isn't going to help you very much you you are simply going to have to walk in because ultimately, you will you will need to do business somewhere. And unfortunately, that is in fact, the approach that's being considered in one of the bills that's happening in Washington state right now, and it really does go to show. I think that we need to have a conversation about where we want to have facial recognition where it's appropriate and where it's not and part of the problem with the private use. Of course, also is. That those databases may be accessible to government actors for law enforcement purposes, as well as to third parties who maybe using it, you know, for example, around your health insurance. So there's really no control over the technology right now, and our recommendation is to get out ahead of the technology rather than let it proliferate into the wild figure out what goes wrong after the fact, can you explain sort of legally, or at least from a from a ethical standpoint that distinction or the line between there's I mean, obviously, we're on surveillance cameras all the time. But face recognition sort of takes it up to that next level of a much more analytical approach to the same sort of thing. I mean, should people be less worried or less concerned at places that put them under the sort of perpetual, surveillance, you walk into a convenience store, for example. And you always on camera as opposed to places that use facial recognition software. I would say that facial recognition super charges your regular camera. Baser Valence that's for several reasons. One is that facial recognition is largely undetectable. Because of course, you can see the camera, but you won't see the facial recognition technology. That's being used on that footage for that. Same reason facial recognition is more pernicious because it can also be used after the fact on any video or still image. So you know, the government doesn't have to decide or a private entity doesn't have to decide who. The follow around with the facial recognition tool. They can just use any footage that that's been collected that exists, and the third reason is of course, that you can't change your face. You can choose if you don't want to have your license plate scanned. You can choose not to drive, you know, you can make other choices around your privacy. Having to do, you know, your apps, and how you do business on the internet. You cannot change your face. It is immutable. When you walk around your face goes with you. And that's why I think researchers have caused for caution and have called for a lot of concern in. How facial recognition is rolled out. In fact, I just saw today a brand new article by Luke star who ironically as a researcher for Microsoft in which he he he he compared facial recognition he called it the plutonium of AI and that was because he thought that it had. The potential to really change our society, just by way of changing how the relationship works between government and covering, and I think we should take those concerned seriously, particularly again, given that there is now a mounting body of evidence that the technology is biased. So let's talk about you mentioned, Microsoft, and Amazon and they're in Olympia pushing this technology in using it in different ways. How are they doing that? Well, as part of the data privacy Bill that we discussed the last time we were on a little known component of that deal. Actually, authorizes facial recognition Bill that the Bill that came out of the Senate had this this closet, basically said, you know, if a business a placard you've given consent. It also authorized widespread law enforcement use of the technology. And of course, we think that's that's a little bit backwards because we haven't really had been discussion of the impact of the psychology. And I think we need to be very careful before the legislature simply blesses the technology, and and let's proliferate that we figure out how it's actually going to change our society. Remember, facial recognition isn't just about recognizing someone right? It's about much more than I dedicate. It's about things like whether someone is happy or sad. Whether someone is potentially dangerous. So for example, imagine facial recognition incorporated into a police body camera that gives the officer score based on analyzing someone's face as to whether they're dangerous or not and that officer making a life or death decision based on that technology, which again, we know may not be accurate and his actually less accurate. For people of color for women and for other vulnerable groups. So that's the kind of world that we're kind of taking a headlong leap into. And unfortunately, I think the the approach that these technology vendors, you know, who who have largely written this legislation or taking is to say when you know, trust us, we're gonna roll the psychology out. And you know, there may be mistakes. But it's going to be fine. I think our approach would be more cautious to say, let's have this discussion with the right stakeholders to table. And if they're limited ways in which we should use facial recognition, our our society. Let's put some really strong safeguards around them. But we're not there yet. So would you let's say you had a new iphone and it had the unlock facial recognition recognition unlock. Would you use it? No, I would not because I think it's not worth the risk to my privacy to to unlock. My phone with my face. Honestly, I'm perfectly happy perfectly. Happy lucky my phone with a with a password. It's it's generally worked. Well, and again, you know, it's biometric that's collected on you your face print that you can never change. And once that face sprint falls into the hands of third parties. You and your privacy of security of not just that piece of data, but all of the rest of the data that you have that may be subject to access with that. These are permanently jeopardized that's too big of a risk that Shankar Narayan from the technology. Liberty expert, he's the director there ACLU of Washington Shankar. Thank you so much for spending some more time with us. And I'm sure Amazon, and Microsoft and Facebook and Google and everyone else will do something else that we will have to have you back on again much appreciated. I would be happy to come back. Thank you. Kimmy Klein taking a look at your drive. Now this time brought to you by Subaru of Puyallup. Kimmy in Everett. Our long-term accident.

Amazon Microsoft Shankar Narayan Washington Shankar Washington director Kimmy Klein New York City researcher officer Subaru legislature Westlake Bill Lou Luke
"shankar narayan" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

08:48 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"Tracy Taylor. In focus. Candy, Mike and tasha. What is the most valuable thing you own your house? Your car. Now, it's your data Washington. Lawmakers are trying to address how companies collected share data what they know about us. How they sell it with do with it. A new Bill suggests you can find out who knows what about you. And then just contact the company and say, delete me. And then we just trust them to do that shocker does that even sound remotely close of what this Bill is asking, and what we are assuming it's going to do for us. Unfortunately, the reality and the the marketing around this Bill or two very different things. It is it is being marketed as something that's supposed to give power back to the consumer in the area of data privacy. But unfortunately, the first problem is that would written by the technology companies themselves, and it was really stacked up with loophole. So that a company that holds your data can actually override your consent around that data, even with your lack of consensus, you withdraw your consent to they're using your data. They can still come back over right that this Bill is really problematic. Speaking with us is Shankar Narayan with ACLU with Eric Civil Liberties Union, how do you how can you actually regulate? This sort of data privacy thing on a state by state basis that seems like it would be almost fundamentally impossible is that true. It's certainly difficult to do. And it would be preferable. I think if if congress were to enact strong data protection or if our federal regulators like the FTC were to do. So, unfortunately, the prospects were that are not looking great. And so it is possible. I think for states to take a leading role California, for example, inactive their consumer Privacy Act, which have stronger protections against the sale of your data. But unfortunately, I think the technology companies have taken notice and are looking to enact weaker statute in different states, including the one in Washington Shankar. Can you give us an example? So let's say I mean, you I'm sure you've dealt with people who have had these nightmare scenarios on their hands wants their data gets out there. What are some of the problems that you routinely? See, well, certainly what we see is that consumers rarely even know what they're consenting to when they do business with an entity. So really what's happening? When you use a, sir. Service when you do business online. Even when you tap a search term into a web browser. You are accepting terms of service that largely allows your data to be shared and soul to third parties without your really understanding that that's going to happen. And the problem with that is that so much of our decision making is now data driven that those pieces of data can come back to buy two down the line, for example, when you try to get a job or when you try to get a loan. Those data brokers will have sold your data to the company that Ben will use an algorithm or a program to figure out if you are actually worthy candidate for that loner for that job. And you will not know which piece of data at was that you let go off Deo gave up that had that consequence for you. This Bill is being marketed away to to reverse that. But unfortunately, doesn't give real power back to the consumers. What can you can you? Tell us a little bit about the gap between what's happening in California, for example, and what is potentially going to happen here. Yes. Certainly, so, you know, the gold standard in the space right now really is the European approach and the basis of that European approach to data privacy really is that the business that collects data has to get meaningful consent. But they actually have to get that consent for a specific business purpose, and what happens to that data down the line with they're allowed to do with. It really depends on the business purpose that they've declared here it's kind of the opposite in Washington statute. We basically fume that the business has a purpose that they are legitimately collecting and the burden goes back on the. Consumer to come back and fight. And, you know, even if they would draw their consent the entity that holds the data can simply declare different business purpose and continue to hold a despite the fact that you would and consent. So we think the more consumer focused model if Europe, and and California which follows a similar model is much better than making it optional for the companies to decide and giving them so many different ways to override the will of the consumer. So what about AI because that's something that does come up when you talk about your data, and what somebody else has and everything else in who's generating who's picking what are some of the concerns with the algorithms and the data that we need to look at now to help us in the future. Yeah. That's that is really good question. And that goes back to the decision making processes that. I talked about many industries are adopting automated decision systems, which which are called eighty s which are all based systems that use the data that people are giving up to make decisions about them. For the first time in any state this year with the ACO us backing a Bill was introduced in Washington that would actually make it mandatory for there to be public scrutiny around these algorithms because of course, the first problem is they're often deployed completely silently, the consumer isn't aware when they make credit application or when they get a public benefits check that determination around that is being made by now Brigham. So the first thing to do is surface them the second thing to do is to figure out if they're being fair and their decision making by but opening them up to scrutiny. That's what the Bill in Washington would have done it. Unfortunately, didn't advance, but we are gonna come back to try to make that apart in Washington law, and that is extremely important as well. So most of us have given up some rights to our own data. All. When we when we don't read the fine print, right? We are acknowledging that we are conceding this stuff to whatever company that that is we're buying a service from our acquiring a product from this law assume supersedes any previous granting of dissemination of our data. But is it possible for companies to then find a clever rewrite of these things that no one ever reads in just essentially change that stuff that we're approving? And and essentially, you know, neuter the any new law. Well, it really depends on how you write the law. And that is in fact, one of the problems with the Bill, that's that's in front of the legislature right now is that among other things definition of consent has been watered down, you know, it's gotta be meaningful consent. And what we know right now is that for consumers, it's really kind of a chicken and egg thing, right? They don't know for sure all what data they're giving up. And as a double whammy, they actually don't know why that data so valuable because they don't know who it's going to be sold to and what decisions it's going to be made are going to be made on the basis of that data. So we need to really make that equation clear on the consumer side with a lot of education as to how your life can be impacted. Right. This is not just about UCF targeted ads, which is what a lot of people think is the consequence of giving up your data. That's the least of your worries your worries really are not getting a job not getting housing your benefits, getting cut in half, your health care, your health insurance premium going up, you know, all of these real world consequences that have meaningful impacts on people's lives are being driven by data. And I think we need to educate consumers better on the fact that this is happening and also rewrite the laws so that there's more transparency around. Being collected. And I think, you know, the European model is the way we really need to go to try to achieve that. But unfortunately, the.

California Washington Bill Tracy Taylor Washington Shankar Shankar Narayan Mike FTC Europe tasha UCF Deo ACLU congress Ben
"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:24 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

"Time is ten thirty seven some Seattle students demanding that local and state leaders do more to combat climate change. Fact, they went on strike from school today to protest political inaction on the steps of Seattle city hall, the local and state lawmakers to do more here in our state and on a national level. Well, they want congress to adopt the green new deal, which would shift our country to one hundred percent clean while no one has declared yet the first poll of potential candidates for governor has been released. In addition to president Washington voters will be selecting a governor next year. Jay Inslee is running for president. But hasn't ruled out seeking a third term at the same time. Now, he wasn't asked about it in this survey by Chisholm strategies, but another democrat attorney general Bob Ferguson seems to be pulling away pollster dean Nielsen poll repor, you know, really represents a big shift to work Bergerson. And in the last year Republicans on the other hand favored their 2016 candidate Bill, Brian. Jeff Pohjola, KOMO news. Public testimony in the state house today overbuilt at aims to protect our personal data while regulating technology that recognizes our faces Ryan hearkens with Microsoft spoke in favor of Senate Bill fifty three seventy six this would apply to companies that handle the data of one hundred thousand consumers or more Bill would provide the strongest privacy protection. In the United States by giving Washington consumers the rights necessary to control their data, but Shankar Narayan with the ACLU of Washington says the facial recognition provisions do not do enough to protect people that biggest problem with face. Enables this massive amount of passive surveillance in public places. The Bill was approved by the Senate earlier this month. Health officials saying round to the flu is upon us that were around eight hundred positive tests for flu and Everett clinic last week and the Everett herald reports providence regional medical center, and it's emergency room have a near capacity Daniel Koenig with the state health department or a lot of this here. We've been seeing mostly the h one n one strain in the last number weeks. We've been seeing a little bit of h three n to strain coming through that is known to be a stronger strain that does cause more severe illness. Health officials say to still getting a flu shot for those who have not received an immunization so far this year. Okay. This is kind of strange new NASA research showing more than half the astronauts returned from space, come home with reactivated herpes, viruses reason could be all the stress they're under from zero gravity cosmic radiation. And of course, being separated from loved ones. Most of the astronauts didn't show. Any symptoms, and it was only detected during medical tests. Scientists are not worried about other negative health impacts that could result from long periods. High above us there in space. Komo news time is just about ten forty. And we've got Bill Swartz helping to Harley exterior sports desk. Telling us defense wins championships in Washington. Huskies used it to their advantage in round one of the NC double a basketball tournament. It will let you know who the opponent is to Bill a patented zone defense leads nine seat Washington past eight seed, Utah state seventy eight sixty one in the mid west region. First round game. You heard on KOMO news Washington stymied the aggies into only thirty five percent shooting, and they force Twenty-one turnovers. Senior posts Noah Dickerson dominated the paint with twenty points and twelve rebounds. And you dubs first NC double A tournament appearance since two thousand eleven office pretty good actually, remember.

Bill Swartz Washington KOMO flu Jay Inslee Senate Bill Seattle city hall Seattle president Everett herald congress Jeff Pohjola Noah Dickerson Bob Ferguson United States NASA
"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on KOMO

"Ryan Harris, KOMO news five years ago today. It was one of the state's worst natural disasters. The oh so much slide leaving forty three people dead and a remembrance ceremony during ten fire district twenty four chief Dennis fester maker says he drove past twenty minutes before the slide occurred. And then got what he thought was a routine call of wires down. That was actually the most complex emergency. Jeff make that chief fencer maker says they were able to do the rescue and recovery work with the help of local state and federal agencies ceremony included the dedication of highway five thirty newly renamed -ocial slide memorial highway and in the families are saying they need four million dollars to help complete a memorial park. If you donate we have a link set up here at komonews dot com slash hotlinks. While no one has declared yet the first poll the potential candidates for governor has been released. In addition to president Washington voters will be selecting a governor next year Jane's Lee is running for president. But hasn't ruled out seeking a third term at the same time. Now, he wasn't asked about it in this survey by Chisholm strategies, but another democrat attorney general Bob Ferguson seems to be pulling away pollster dean Nielsen poll rapper, you know, really represents a big shift to work Bergesen in the last year. Republicans on the other hand favored, they're twenty six. Candidate Bill, Brian. Jeff Pohjola, KOMO news. You live in Snohomish county or you're a fan of John and black appliance. Have you heard new chapter underway? Six months after the arson destroyed their flagship store they've reopened a new and larger store there on every malware the new location almost twice the size of the previous one fire last September causing three point five million dollars in damage and update no arrests ever made in that arson case, plenty of public testimony in a state house today will rebuild it aims to protect our personal data while regulating technology that recognizes our faces Ryan hearkens with Microsoft spoken favor of Senate Bill fifty three seventy six which would apply to companies handle the data of one hundred thousand consumers or more that Bill would provide the strongest privacy protections in the United States by giving Washington consumers the rights necessary to control their data, but Shankar Narayan with the ACLU of Washington says the facial recognition provisions do not do enough to protect people. The biggest problem with face for Valence enables this massive amount of passive surveillance in public places. The Bill was approved by the Senate earlier this month health officials saying Brown to the flu it's were around eight hundred positive tests for the flu the Everett clinic last week and the Everett herald reporting providence regional medical center and its emergency room have been near capacity Daniel Konig with the state health department for a lot of this here. We've been seeing mostly the h one n one strain in the last ten number weeks. We've been seeing a little bit of h three n to strain coming through that is known to be a stronger strain that does cause more severe illness. Health officials say it's still worth getting a flu shot for those who have not received an immunization for this year. Komo news time nine forty defense wins championships and the Washington huskies.

Komo Bill Ryan Harris flu Jeff Pohjola arson Washington Lee Washington huskies president Everett herald Snohomish county Dennis Senate Valence dean Nielsen ACLU United States Bob Ferguson
"shankar narayan" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"shankar narayan" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"He's a scout up as or prior to prior to the naked woman they used to have these issues in the air and and she took me there you know and i saw this guy plain through the window you know what i mean and and and he was just he was like watching a movie dino you know he you know he he had learned from guys like louis belsen harmon g krugman these guys how to put on a show as well as play the drums and play him well and i don't think anybody was doing that at the time now but it was really great seeing that an and so i asked her immediately do you know a could top player of course you is certainly right about that red yeah shankar narayan not danger hub two bought after years of peak entsch finally i realised side gotten some notoriety in show business when the bouncier saw me walking down the street and said hey come in for free you made it yes yes i'm sorry to say though i know you the pussycat lounge had been here for like three hundred times delays turned to coming up yeah a metropole so you put the band together the bor gotti brothers you met you you'd emu met gene it just came together piece by piece right while at eddie uh and and gene were were working in in in a club with a joey a home owned a call to starlight remote date david was not really with us he he came on to sing with us some of the wreck right the fell to the fifth rascal i heard a corrode let him in marietta exactly halved exactly but you know a the four of us was gene my solve dino and a eddie.

louis belsen eddie david marietta bor gotti