20 Burst results for "seventy meters"

"seventy meters" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:32 min | 11 months ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Starts the weekend seventy meters tracking when showers will move out and we'll see cooler weather we want is justice isn't it never be on the streets yeah mothers in morning three women whose children were killed in a hit and run crash share their grief after Indianapolis police made arrests in the case a break welcome to Friday morning so what have you it is may twenty ninth get ready to head out the door will have a look at traffic in just a moment but first Stephanie needed here with your first forecast and we are looking at a few scattered light showers around self not nearly as heavy as yesterday morning by any means and it is a fairly comfortable start temperatures are in the mid to low sixties right now and we are seeing relatively lower humidity compared to the past couple of days but you are still factoring in kind of a soggy commute for a few locations definitely not all four this morning right now our temps in the mid sixties here in the city sixty four sixty seven in Shelbyville he seven up near Lafayette and sixty four degrees in green castle in our radar right now we are detecting a few showers are very light just southwest of the city eventually will pick up on that chance once we get through say most likely by forty five six o'clock and then additional showers developing and central Illinois and this is all associated with a cold front that is going to really change up our weather for us here today and into this upcoming weekend first though it is going to bring us a chance of a few scattered showers through the later half of the morning and early afternoon futurecast here does show maybe a few stray sprinkles around nothing too widespread and the notice here by around one two o'clock in the afternoon a few additional showers develop as that front swings across the state right behind that maybe a stray sprinkle or two but we should see diminishing cloud cover late tonight and then tomorrow and into Sunday is when we see some really glorious weather here weekend planner does call for temperatures for today to be in the low seventies maybe a few showers a rumble of thunder nothing severe later on today and then once we get through this weekend where we're looking at a lot of sunshine dry weather very comfortable low humidity and daytime highs in the low seventies we are tracking though the humidity and heat on the rise once we get through the middle half of next week and will time that for you coming up my full forecast but we said this morning are going to be a touch down for a few locations east side I. seventy here near Emerson Avenue doesn't look too bad though this morning for your more a drive so as usual route should be okay right now doesn't seem like we're having any issues on the on an off ramp there trying to get onto.

Longterm Care in Denmark vs the United States

Medicare for All

07:54 min | 11 months ago

Longterm Care in Denmark vs the United States

"I'm Benjamin Day I'm Stephanie. Nakajima this is Medicare for all the PODCAST for everybody who needs healthcare except for the corona virus freedom fighters. They are really stand out to American values and God and so And this is actually related to the top. We're GONNA TALK ABOUT TODAY. because You know one of the one of the most shocking things in the US is that Somewhere between probably fifty and sixty percent of virus related deaths are happening in long term. Care facilities So these are you know. Nursing homes assisted living facilities. These are really wear. The hot spots and outbreaks are taking place and Part of this is related to the really terrible horrible. No good very bad. Long-term CARE system we have in the United States Well one of the two of us Stephanie. You have actually managed to escape Our our system and you're getting like an incredible window on the Danish long-term care system. Do you want to talk a little bit about it? Sure so last time I mentioned in the podcast that I was in Denmark. And the reason I'm here is not the best under the best of conditions. My husband who is Dane. His father who lives here in Copenhagen is really quite ill And he's been in the hospital for many days and you know with Karoon virus happening and everything it was. It's the exact wrong timing for him. Be Ill And so we sort of rushed over here. writes about the beginning of the corona virus pandemic And we've been here sort of helping him transition from the hospital into Rehab and then finally Land to an assisted living facility as living facility. So I've been sort of like a firsthand experience with the Danish long-term Healthcare System And I've been so impressed really just with how well everything is. Coordinated how How many resources there are for people and also just quality of the facilities the quality of the flat. He is going to be in and the the cost. It's only going to be seven thousand per month. Which is like just over a thousand dollars for This beautiful seventy meters flats with greenspace on the front of the back and then also in addition to that he'll be getting home help however many hours it is determined. He is needed as well for free. He's not bankrupting. The family for long term care it. There is a time where we were. We were looking at each other making on. I would just like tears in our eyes like I can't believe this is all you know working out for us and everything so so yes so. We a special guest Here today this is the first ever so exciting who is an expert on? Denmark's long-term healthcare system to give us sort of this personal experience and I want to hear more about it from the structural standpoint so I'm going to welcome our guest John Vista. He's professor at the Institute of Society and Globalization at Roskilde University here in Copenhagen Denmark and request has published on the long term healthcare system in Denmark as well as other areas of Danish social policy. So welcome professor crest very much happy to be nice to meet him so we have a lot of questions and we'll talk a little bit also about the US experienced but could you just kind of For folks who are not familiar with what long-term care is and what it covers Could you just give a very basic definition? Yes so so long. Term Care is about take off people who cannot take care of themselves so we would be frail people and what we're talking about. Today are people who are elderly. Who are frail so people who are unable to take care of themselves? They would get various types of support or so in the case so some of it will be homes like. Stephanie mentioned that her father in law moving into a home that is for made for elderly and I think it was together with staff associated with the home and he will have to pay rent so he would pay about a thousand dollars per month for this flat but we all pay money for our housing. So it's not like it's not like long term care is fine is actually not means. Tested needs tested. So you get long term care if you are needed independently of your financial situation then some of it you have to pay for like the red for the flat and for some practical help with laundry and shopping and food services so beside the home home care as a homes like institutional care and practical care. It can also be rehabilitated. Let's imagine that you elderly person at you have fallen then you will get a rehabilitation helping you to get back on your feet and to undertake daily activities Again vacuum. At what have you so we have been attention. Physical training assisting daily living activities. That sort of thing and the final thing is that you will also get a visit. A seventy five year will get once a year by a person who would come and ask you how you're doing and if you need any help to get paid life well that is such a contrast with what we have in the US. So I don't know if it's the same in Denmark but in the US also People with disabilities regardless of their age are in need of the long term. Care support except And so here in the US. A lot of people think that Medicare which is are sort of universal system for seniors sixty five and over would cover long-term care but it actually does not Medicaid. Which is our program for low income. People covers long-term care so if you Are in desperate need of long term. Care if you're just really not able to carry out daily activities like bathing and a shopping and going about the house You cannot get support. You don't qualify for nursing home or help in your own home unless you become poor. Enough to qualify for Medicaid. So it often happens and these are some of the most horrifying stories we see in the. Us is that Someone becomes disabled or they get older and have chronic disabilities and they they spend down all of their money on long-term care until they become poor and then they qualify for Medicaid and they get public coverage. But I'm assuming this is not how it works in Denmark. That's not the case. We have a so-called universal system which means basically everybody who I need so if it's locked so the elderly you have to be above sixty five years of age and then you go food at each test where they've seen. How can you such your toes Can you make your own food? These sort of issues. That would be crucial. Perry to it is once name is to increase the quality of life and the second goal is to increase your ability to take care of yourself because we know that Elderly other people. They liked to be independent and autonomous and not have other people to rely on in order to do whatever it is that they wanted to particularly

United States Denmark Stephanie Medicare Benjamin Day Nakajima Copenhagen Denmark Institute Of Society And Globa Copenhagen Professor Perry Roskilde University John Vista
What Makes Champagne Champagne?

BrainStuff

06:39 min | 1 year ago

What Makes Champagne Champagne?

"Champagne is a celebratory drink. Effervescent drink toast whip but sparkling wine was once the scourge of winemakers the famous. I don't Perignon was actually hired by a French. Winemaker to prevent wine from bubbling. So how did we get here. And what makes Champagne Champagne. Champagne is a type of sparkling wine produced in the Champagne region of France under particular circumstances. But okay hold up. What's a sparkling wine. When does it contain glitter. No it's a wine. That's carbonated meaning. It contains dissolved carbon dioxide gas which bubbles out of the liquid. Unless it's kept under pressure. Her that's why you might burp when you drink. Bubbly or beer or soda. Your stomach is pressurized. Not Pressurized enough to keep the carbon dioxide dissolved so it escapes as the gas other sparkling wines. Shouldn't technically be called Champagne and in some countries legally they cannot be called champagne though. That's really for labeling. Being in marketing folks not for dinner conversations and the Champagne region takes this seriously because it's their livelihood so what makes a real champagne a lot a lot of things. Actually it's all out in the Appalachian Region Control Regulations. And I apologize for my French. It's a set of rules created by the French French National Institute of Origin in quality which is a regulatory group in France. Meant to control the quality and branding of agricultural products like cheeses and wines for champagne to be labeled champagne. It must be produced from the growing of grapes to the processing of the wine in Champagne region and from one or a blend end of three main grape varieties chardonnay pinot noir and Pinot Mugabe. There are all kinds of rules about how you handle the grapes. How they can be planted in pruned? How much fruit can be produced her. Hector how much juice can be obtained from the fruit by weight and how it can be fermented and stored. The process of making. The wine is called the been told whole champenoise or traditional or classic. I you produce bottles of still wine. That have undergone a primary from tation that means that you take grape juice called must in the industry and add sugar and yeast to it. East of course is a microscopic organisms that among other things eats glucose and excretes carbon dioxide. And ethanol all the carbon dioxide is released from the liquid is a gas and ethanol is the alcohol in the finished wine when Ph level hits a certain point on the acid end of the scale scale. You strain out the yeast and bottle wine. So how'd you get the bubbles that's done by creating a secondary fermentation inside each bottle by adding an in a bit more yeast and sugar whereas the carbon dioxide was a byproduct primary fermentation. It's the whole point of the secondary fermentation to keep in the bottles. You seal them tightly with crown caps. The kind that beer is sealed with when the winemaker thinks it's good sparkling after a couple of months at least the caps are removed and spent yeast called. The lease is taken out in a process called riddling. Each bottle is then topped off with a bit more still wine and usually a bit more sugar to taste this. This edition is called the dosage then hefty corks are inserted and backed up by a wire cage cap hold in the now highly pressurized contents champions run about about five to seven atmospheres inside the Bottle Aka five to seven times the pressure that we experience just hanging out around sea level so being inside the bottle would be like diving fifty eighty to seventy meters underwater about one hundred sixty two two hundred and thirty feet which is deep. It's also about the same pressure as as a semi truck tire. The final product must just then be aged for at least fifteen months for a typical blended champagne or at least three years for a single vintage champagne and must have a minimum alcohol content but the very first sparkling wines probably didn't happen in the Champagne region and we're very probably accidents of unintentional secondary fermentation the first historical Oracle record a sparkling wines. Being made on purpose was in sixteen sixty two when an English scientist named Christopher Merit present a paper to the Royal Society about how Sun Wind Humans Simmons the time we're adding sugar molasses finished wine barrels to create a second fermentation and thus bubbles ciders. Were very popular in England at the time. And that's how they we're made with this wind curiosity before then sparkling wine was an accident and a dangerous accident. Legend and or history has it that the monk Dom Perignon was assigned to stop this live in the job the devils wine the temperatures in the champagne region get cold enough early enough that seller Lord. Bottled wine would stop fermenting in winter before the yeast was done. Doing its thing. And then when the weather warmed up in the spring the bottles would undergo a second fermentation Asian dramatically raising the pressure inside the bottles and making them go fizzy and then making them explode and this was actually a weird and huge and scary problem. It was common to lose four to ten percent of a seller due to bursting and bad warm friends could lead to thirty to forty percent of your bottles breaking or entire tire sellers could be lost. A single bottle going off could start a chain reaction around the seller. Workers had to wear heavy iron masks padding for protection when they'd go down a couple of technological innovations sorted this problem out glass quality and let's glass quality. The British worked out how to make glass was super hot whole fueled furnaces by sixteen twenty-three traditionally charcoal had been these safer and cooler fuel of choice but it was commonly produced from oak trees trees at the time and King James the First Navy needed oak for its ships the higher temperatures and cosmetic but useful additions of iron and manganese to the glass made the bottles. Charles much stronger. This led to that boost in the popularity of sparkling ciders and merits observance of on purpose sparkling wines by sixteen sixty to the wire cap that hooks under the bottles lipid secures. The Cork wouldn't come along until eighteen. Forty four until then. corks were held in with tied string to varying effect the invention of the riddling process in the early eighteen hundreds by the cliquot champagne house also made sparkling wines quicker easier and thus less expensive to produce as for why we toast with it. That's a little trickier but it has to do with war. Because of the Champagne region location it seen a lot of battles in. Its time the tradition of French kings being coordinated in the Champagne region started after a battle there in the fifth century. C E end. The tradition of celebrating champagnes wines grew from there alongside the science audience. That made the drink

Champagne Champagne Champagne Dom Perignon France French French National Institu Pinot Mugabe Hector Scientist Royal Society England Charles King James Christopher Merit Oracle Devils First Navy
"seventy meters" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Now that their walls the ancient Egyptian god the mom whatever of destruction a chaos dragon that moved you know every night off the fight Egyptian mythology the Greek mythology they'll thing that kind of have the chaos dragon stories I knew that Egypt had such a a god of chaos known as the pope is but I really didn't know very much about it it is also an asteroid called that well and that was the second thing that I knew was that NASA had named a particular asteroid unfocused and I knew really nothing about that other just them there was an asteroid name Apophis so when I got up out of the of the first thing I did was I went to my computer and I started doing research of specially and to both of the asteroid and what I found was that it had been discovered in two thousand and four when it was discovered that at that time even Nash was Neil wise team believed that there was a chance that it was going to impact the earth they changed those opinions later I'm I'm by the way in all my research for the warm with property I came to believe that this is part of a conspiracy but in any case they they changed their opinion later on so it's going to come very close but it's not gonna get there about how how close is very close so close that it's going to take out the satellite in order to recover well this is the office is pretty amazing right for them to admit that part of it but in any case both of its three hundred and seventy meters or twelve hundred feet wide or because you and I started talking about the NFL when we started this program it is it.

Egypt NASA Nash NFL twelve hundred feet seventy meters
"seventy meters" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Of construction for sixty five will tell you which section of the interstate is closing this time and we're going to start the morning full again temperatures are gonna warm up nicely upper seventies today seventy meters tracking your Friday night football forecast as well the family of a student punch finding out as police officer once more than a suspension for that officer and they now claim there is more video what led up to the incident. Hey good morning happy Friday glided joining us on daybreak on the September six we made it yeah with yesterday made it kind of easy to make as a day so beautiful seventy has our first forecast and sounds like you've got more in store today absolutely temperatures this morning very similar to yesterday morning I were headed towards the upper seventies to near eighty once again for today although we do have that potential maybe like sprinkled we'll get to that in just a little bit right now our temperatures in the sixties in upper fifties right now it's sixty here downtown fifty six in Shelbyville fifty five in Kokomo and fifty seven just north west of us in Lafayette this morning heading out for the bus stop if you find the fifties on the cooler side bring a lighter jacket lighter sweater you won't necessarily need it later on today but so just remember to bring it home later on when you're finishing up your school day we'll see a partly to mostly cloudy sky during your lunch hour temperature warms to near seventy degrees and then by the later half of the day today seventy eight is where we're headed for it this afternoon overall not a bad day we do have that potential maybe a light sprinkle or two through the afternoon otherwise that shouldn't damper any plans and you shouldn't cancel any plans over it since a good portion of I should stay dry for today mostly sunny skies to start off the after the morning rather fifty eight degrees this afternoon at seventy three will see a few clouds here and there otherwise once we get to the later portion of the afternoon and early evening will start to see our temperature step just a touch also on the rise later on today will be the humidity I'll start to feel a bit stuffy through the later half of the day over although we're starting off dry in terms of are due points air mass right now looks pretty good in terms of how it feels outside so not a bad feeling this morning it's not to later on today where we start to feel just a touch sticky stormtracker right now tracking a few clouds in northwest.

officer Kokomo Lafayette fifty eight degrees seventy degrees seventy meters
Understanding the Deep Space Network

Astronomy Cast

04:36 min | 2 years ago

Understanding the Deep Space Network

"So we always focus on the missions. But there is an important glue that holds the whole system together the deep space network today. We're gonna talk about how the system works, and how communicates with all the spacecraft out there in the solar system or Pamela, it is it is a big oversight. And I think it's not just I know some people will spend some time talking, but the space network, but I don't think people really think about how we are getting all of this data from all of these missions back on earth at different distances. Some of them are in different locations. What is the mechanism, and that's that he space network. So what is it? It is three different sites on the planet earth. That are distributed from east to west here in the United States out in Goldstone, California or near. Goldstone Goldstone is actually a ghost town that now I really wanna go to after prepping for the show outside a cannabis in Australia and outside of Madrid in Spain these three different locations the way they're spread out from east to west mean that once you're located high enough above the planet earth. You are always within sight of one of these three facilities each of which is built kind of within a natural bowl in valley between various mountains this protects the telescopes from all the radio noise that you can get here on the surface of the planet. Allowing them to focus on everything out there somewhere. All right got three facilities at essentially three different portions on the globe. So that at least two or one is always being able to see the entire sky. So that all spacecraft can always be communicated with what are the actual? Title. Facilities. Like what what are they? Well, they they are each a set of different telescopes. This is one of the things that I think gets missed in the story a lot. It's not like there is the Goldstone tells couples or is the Goldstone, but deep space network Goldstone is actually a suite of a bunch of different telescopes Madrid is a suite of a bunch of different telescopes. And each of these different facilities has won thirty four meter telescope has two or more. So let me start that over each of these facilities has won thirty four meter high efficiency antenna. So this is the hey, I got. Yeah. We're listening close right now. There's also two or more thirty four meter beam wave guide and tennis. There's some twenty six meter dishes and one seventy meter intente per facility, and it's these seventy meters that we're used to seeing in the pictures, they're big dramatic Goldstone. In addition to being used to receive sound is also used to well, it's also a radar Desch. And so there is the occasional death to things like bees when they're igniting the radar on it too. Not just well catch the radar signals, but measure precisely where all of this stuff is in space so to at each. Ability. There is the collection of telescopes and the big one is the seventy meter telescope. And then there are these other ones as well. And people always make this joke to me when when we talk about how we're able to still communicate with the voyagers and new rise. And they're so far away. You know, oh, we can communicate with a satellite billions of kilometers away. But I can't receive a cellphone signal if you were willing to carry a seventy meter telescope in your pocket, you would always be able to get a cell phone signal LV, no problem in less. You were of course, one of these seventy meter telescopes because they're in radio quiet zones. So there's there's a certain irony. The the way they're set up. They are good for everything that is thirty thousand kilometers and higher above the surface of the earth. But you start getting lower down and this shape of the planet. The mountains that surround them all of these different things served isolate them from signals. So this is where the deep space. And the deep space network comes from is. Well, you have to be high enough above the surface of the planet to make sure you're always within sight of one of these different dishes.

Goldstone Goldstone Madrid Goldstone Pamela United States California Spain Tennis Cannabis Australia Thirty Four Meter Seventy Meter Thirty Thousand Kilometers One Seventy Meter Twenty Six Meter Seventy Meters
"seventy meters" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The very beginning of our production process where the stainless steel frames arrived here on the Lori down. Unloaded here. Medicated for low for city buses. Offer speaker shefty is a senior Representative of salaries, and he took me round the factory employee in total over two thousand people would produce different kind of CD process from Saudi from diesel, and of course, our electric bosses so in as dining in factory, which is probably sixty seventy meters long twenty. Area. Eight ten twelve buses now in assembly around me all the different stages of development. What you can see your that. Everybody has different coloured different kind of specification completely different for war Warsaw badly in Hanover were. So we're delivering budget thirty two countries. So all of them are completely different. Tell me how much difference being in the European Union has made your business in terms of the speed and the ease with which you can deliver to these twenty seven other nations around the EMU while to up to two thousand four when Paul was none you member we had much more procedural customs different regulations. Almost every level of operation of our factory sister. Doesn't fall all of the things accelerated very fast, and it's much more easier to develop on the common European market than before. There's.

Representative European Union Warsaw Hanover EMU Paul sixty seventy meters
"seventy meters" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

No Such Thing As A Fish

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on No Such Thing As A Fish

"Yeah, yeah, I couldn't believe the so I, I don't actually know much about the bay tapestry, not being English myself. So pretty. The topic of conversation. Lost at dinner party every time around the festival site, hey, you'll find three hundred people talk about the bias. Actually gets a bit boring. Sometimes. I literally though of at all. So it's fascinating to know that this thing was a, it was sixty eight seventy meters long, which is incredibly long. If you put that into context. About thirty meters less than one hundred. It's like that would take you saying bowl, roughly seven seconds to run. Yeah, fastest man running the beta tapestry. The thing is, is that, hey, turns out it's not a tapestry at all. No, it's embroidery. So it's got the wrong name. But also if you read the whole thing up until recently when they when they decided to fix this, the final scene is missing. Imagine reading seventy meters of story getting to the final scene and someone's ripped the page out in the William's coronation. Isn't it? Thing they out of this. They've finished twenty twenty. I think they did it on an island on the channel island. There was over one hundred four hundred people today, and one of the stitches was done by Prince Charles. So despite the fact that lives over in France made using British royalty, that's cool. And a lot of people think it was made in Britain anyway, in Kent and a lot of people think it was made completely by women because of the penises and five. So historians think that there there is the occasional erect penis on a dead soldier. And the theory is that the tapestry embroidery was ever stitch by women and the women were ridiculing the men for the fact that they used war to show off their manhood. So it was thought to be kind of a satirical thing. Women were saying you people used to fight with trousers really. Oh, yeah. Was about wasn't aware. The English had terrible dysentery diarrhea that trousers that was Henry the fifth. So it was about as you call it was. So why are they make people in their if people were trials mostly in the mountains? So there's the main bit. There's a main stroke of the top story of the battle of the top of the bottom there. These margins, this is a major thing where there I love the embroidery because you when you see old art, you assume it must be done perfect. The perspective and everything, and there's a couple of moments in the tapestry where they've run out of space. So there's a, there's four people holding chest on four sticks or two, six, four of them, and there's three of them that nicely done, but it went a bit too high on the tapestry. So the fourth guys head. Just making a quick cameo into the tapestry when really should've been gone. My favorite part history is the Oto of Kent is whispering to William telling him to do in the bottle, and it kind of makes him like he's really the impulsive person who was the context of the whole invasion. But it turns out that it seems like it was him who commissioned the tapestry. Gave himself a massive role in the and he was quite interesting wasn't, hey, because he was never seen with spears or anything in the streets. He was Bishop and bishops allowed to shed blood. So instead he's always with a massive club. So they're allowed to beat people around the head which probably didn't join any blood. Have you seen the reviews of the bio tapestry. Great. Tripadvisor reviews everything in the world. As with the most funny reviews ones, there is a complaint there is actually won't star, isn't the Haley's comet. Anyway, I feel like you could say plenty of. Stolen. One review says, we went on a visit to the bio tapestry, big learning curve for some people. We were walking along looking at the tapestry, not much to see to be honest all of a sudden I see a launch finally object. So on the tapestry, this attraction is not displayed as containing content. We have very young children who could see the penis which is an outrage. I wanted to learn about medieval battles, not medieval penises. There's another one store of you says nine quid forty minutes to see compet..

Bishop Kent France Prince Charles Britain William sixty eight seventy meters seventy meters forty minutes seven seconds thirty meters
"seventy meters" Discussed on Cleared Hot

Cleared Hot

03:43 min | 2 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on Cleared Hot

"Of here. It's it's a powerful tool. What's the biggest mistake you see people make when they start to? They can't relax. Boom. Yeah, that's big. Alexis. Just like in the Wintel. Right? Yeah. If election, the wind tunnel, your or the air, if you or general or or if you don't. I mean, I guess I don't know if this applies directly to archery, but if you are all trying to get that thing to fire at that moment when you wanted to and you don't just relax and kind of let the arrow do the work or let the bow do the work and let let it kind of happen, try and force it. I don't know. Is that correct or no? Yeah, because when you're tight, your static memory told you that your accuracy really depends on dynamic movement rather than static move it when people try to be static than everything just locked. So like the foul. Through is improper, and you're literally just trying to build trigger pressure when everything goes off everything. Just the static. You said something in media other day your your worst shots are the hardest ones, right? Everyone's everyone's, yeah. And I said, you're, you're bad shots will be your hardest ones to make and then and you kind of looked at me like, I know what you're going with this. And I said, the easy ones are going to happen with the least amount of effort. Yeah, and I felt that and you know the time that I just get up and kind of relax and and do what I was supposed to do. Relax. Then the a good shot. And when I was all trying to make things happen in all tense than it's doesn't work out that way, which is when you were talking when you were describing your situation when you get mad enough and I was thinking myself, how does that help? And then you said I got mad enough that I flipped the leaf, and that's the key point because if you anyone that just gets mad about their performance that doesn't help your performance that. Makes your performance go down unless you get mad enough that you go. Okay, I, if you people have the ability to reach that point and go that way though, well, very, very competitive, especially ego driven ego driven personality types, have a very difficult time. Task driven can change it. But one of the things that I learned which was possibly my most valuable just based off my personality type now or I guess how it's always been. But the lesson that I learned that was probably most important to my overall archery career was that the only EROs that I can affect are the ones that are still in my quiver because there is a few tournaments were I'd literally just Jack slammed stabilisers over my knees. There was one time where I was the last. I hammer toss this Bo one of my rookie events. I grabbed that long. Forty inch stabiliser just frigging wheel. There's there's a time I was practicing at home at seventy meters, and I was about ready to shoot a perfectly clean round in practice. I mean, like three sixty out of three sixty and right when I got to that lasts era, I'm like one more in this is like I was already visualizing where that target was going to go on my wall and frigging spit one out of the nine. And that was only whole outside of that fricken ten ring. And I l- I hammer toss that Bo seventy meters, and I left it down at the bottom of my driveway by this by the his covert, and it was like three days later, my neighbor called he goes, do you know there's there's like a brand new bow down by your mailbox and I go, yeah, and it's going to stay there..

archery Bo Jack seventy meters Forty inch three days
"seventy meters" Discussed on Cleared Hot

Cleared Hot

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on Cleared Hot

"And so it's there's so much there that even, you know, the intro class or whatever you wanna call it is just a little tiny miniscule fraction. There's so much stuff. So what you walk away from your first class jitsu is these questions about. Body position, arm position and life, Hugh. You, you know, you're saying, how does this even work? How did this even happen? And yeah, you'd overloaded. It might be bad for me Scott. Mirror. Jujitsu. Probably jujitsu more any just because my personality type. I don't. I don't know what your feel bad saying that because at least at least from that aspect that plays into something that I think a lot of people are missing in life that I think is really important, and that's that's literally learning acclimation to pressure situations and you're never gonna learn it unless you jump in, you literally jump into the fire. So you know, people ask me at least in my world of like big animals. You know how, how do I not get nervous when there's this giant bull screaming at me or how do I not, you know, get super nervous when there's like come around and corn. There's a grizzly bear right there. It's like, well, yeah, I can see that nervous, but I actually remember one time shooting in metal round where I was in a downtown street, a Poland, and they put the target like the end of Streep because there is a big mural of the pope there. And I remember drawing back at seventy meters and anchor in and I get into my scope and I'm like doing my best and a gold medal situation to keep my pin in the center of the target. And then I just seen all these heads just leaning into my scope because the crowd was lined up to the target in people's everyone was fighting to try to see the Archer and all I thought was. How how many years are you in a polish prison? If you just stuff carbonara through someone's face? And I just, you know, I started tremor on the front. I'm like, pull through baby, pull through pull through and I pulled through as I came off the line, my teammate goes Jesus. Christ. Dudley is fricking get your shit together. Like as we pass each other. And then he drew back and he was literally in his scope about two seconds. And I just saw start and I go, yeah, get some of that. And he and it wasn't good. But I think had he been to a had you guys as a team into like a sports psychology training so that he knew the right thing to say to you at that moment, which was get your shit together. That's awesome. Isn't that a real way to support your sixty percent of men are just born with that particular train of understanding what to say and that, yeah, that really helped you out. I think when you get to that level, you've well the cream, the cream kinda rises the tops at certain at certain aspects. So I mean, there's there's times were in there certainly been times with teams in the past because in the US they're always had to be open team selections because that's part of the way the funding worked because of the funding was like government funding on certain aspects at had to be an open thing. So there's certainly been times where we've had people. Make teams were they were just flukes and then you go to a big event and you think this, like we literally have a really green person that this is a wild card like this. The wheels could come off this pony real quick. And I mean, an obviously there's times where people surprise you, and then there's times where people do what you would expect to happen, and that's never had dealt with that situation ever in their life. So I've talked in the past. It's like, you know, when people say, well, how do I deal with performance anxiety when it comes to big events? And I'm like, you gotta get to them. I lost way more than I've ever won..

Dudley Hugh gold medal Poland Jesus US Streep Scott seventy meters sixty percent two seconds
"seventy meters" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"I i think that that this is slightly misunderstood this notion although i don't know what i'd be very interested to speak to physiologists about this but my understanding of it would be that a little bit like hunt set thing i said this on twitter on one hundred meter sprint the it looks like you sane bull would speed up from sixty two hundred meters most people will everybody in fact slows down from sixty or seventy meters and find bull and tie star to going to achieve at bolton tyson gear think the only records who've accelerated up to seventy meters so they're all slowing down but bull is slowing down less rapidly than the other ones and and it looks as though he is speeding up i think that or the course of three weeks it's kind of the same that some people get tired more quickly than others do and so the rate of fatty varies from writer to writer now you know you could come back at me and say well you know from was writing bathroom we three than he was in week one in terms of power and so on 'em but maybe not twenty had to make those kind of efforts who knows like say i would like i would i would be fascinating to speak to physiologists about this this claim but certainly traditionally guys at win grand tears are the guys whose bodies hold up better than other bodies with all that implies i think rich on this notion of writing to form you know whether we we ourselves have the physiological know how to be able to answer that question with any certainty it's something that we hear every single year there is a ways arrived who comes into the tour of wealth so usually sorry the toll the jiro.

twitter writer bolton tyson seventy meters sixty two hundred meters one hundred meter three weeks
"seventy meters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The relocation of the us embassy from tel aviv israelis are celebrating the move which takes place on the seventieth anniversary of the creation of their state palestinians of furious and have rejected washington as a peacebroker in the conflict with israel israel sees all of jerusalem as its eternal undivided capital the palestinians want occupied east jerusalem as the capital of any future state in the second of three reports taking a new look at the key issues dividing the two size our middle east correspondent your land now considers the status of jerusalem i'm gonna busy suburb of east jerusalem avedis twentyfive years ago after a breakthrough peace deal with israel there was an idea to have the palestinian parliament here overlooking the old city but it was abandoned the building left empty and now a lot changed a high wall part of israel's west bank barrier cuts off from the rest of jerusalem and yet according to leaks a white house peace plan proposes this area is the capital of a future palestinian state so what does nabil shaath once the palestinians chief negotiator make that sort of dickey disposal that has absolutely nothing to do neither galaxy norwood the national law and order with the agreement signed before with israel is and this is really why we rejected mr trump totally was such onesidedness such desire to invent the whole peace process it's impossible to trust him to be a broker for peace we're talking about east jerusalem and west jerusalem as the capital for the two states which are based on the border of sixty seven if we don't start there nothing else will be interesting jerusalem attract visitors from around the world and it's very hard of the israel palestinian conflict in the nineteen sixty seven war that israel's fought with this neighbors it captured east jerusalem including the walled old city with its holy sites later annexing it in a move that wasn't recognized internationally it sees the entire city as its eternal undivided capital place with three millennia of jewish history near the western wall this is the seventy meters exposed to the people of israel since the destruction of the.

washington israel jerusalem nabil shaath mr trump us dickey twentyfive years seventy meters
"seventy meters" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Nothing else will be interesting jerusalem attract visitors from around the world and it's at the very heart of the israel palestinian conflict in the nineteen sixty seven war that israel fought with this arab neighbors it captured east jerusalem including the walled city with its holy sites later annexing it in a move that wasn't recognized internationally it sees the entire city as attornal undivided capital a place with three millennia of jewish history near the western wall this is the seventy meters expose to the people of israel since the destruction of the temple in jerusalem and near seventy avenue serve as an israeli tour guide but he says he encourages his groups to meet all the different communities in the city about a third of residents palestinian some from families that have lived here for centuries to this is my home this is where i was born this is what my parents were born also so i'm trying to make an understanding jerusalem is all about but the thing is i'm trying to show the unity of the people in jerusalem and how we lived together they've seen how many friends have got their own arab christians are means muslims but on today's to abbas included a new stop that's proving divisive the new us embassy president trump said he was moving the sites to jerusalem from tel aviv last year when he recognized the city as israel's capital he's decision broke with decades of international agreement that any change in its status.

israel jerusalem abbas us trump president seventy meters
"seventy meters" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Nothing else will be interesting jerusalem attracts visitors from around the world and it's at the very heart of the israel palestinian conflict in the nineteen sixty seven war that israel's fought with this neighbors it captured east jerusalem including the walled city with its holy sites later annexing it in a move that wasn't recognized internationally it sees the entire city as its tunnel undivided capital a place with three millennia of jewish history near the western wall this is the seventy meters expose to the people of israel since the destruction of the temple in jerusalem and near seventy avenue as an israeli tour guide but he says he encourages his groups to meet all the different communities in the city about a third of residents a palestinian some from families that have lived here for centuries to this is my home this is where i was born this is what my parents were born also so i'm trying to make an understanding of what drew was all about but the thing is i'm trying to show the unity of the people in jerusalem and how we lived together they've seen how many friends have got their own arab christians are millions muslims but on today's to abbas included a new stop that's proving divisive the new us embassy president trump said he was moving the site to jerusalem from tel aviv last year when he recognized the city is israel's capital he's decision broke with decades of international agreement that any change in its status.

jerusalem israel abbas us trump president seventy meters
"seventy meters" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Yes so it was important for us to find out whether this was just something that could happen because of repeated diving rather than something happening at the genetic level and so we looked into that by measuring the spleen size is not just of bagio divers but also bagio people who aren't diving and so there we found that their spleen sizes whether they were diving or not were roughly the same statistically and so this tells us that the act of diving does not do anything to enlarge lean size and they've been doing for generations only they've been recorded to be diving for probably at least a thousand years we're not really sure how much further before that how extremists that diving from what i've seen him what people have recorded they're diving generally from around thirty seconds to several minutes at a time and this is very active and functional diving so they're diving because it's their livelihood but they did tell me that they could dive for around thirteen minutes at a time and they've been shown to to dive to up to seventy meters deep in that's with no equipment simply a weight belts in wooden goggles it's extraordinary in itself what they do but your suggesting as well it might have a practical application for the rest of us there are a lot of medical implications because hypotheses or low oxygen is an important issue and a lot of different medical contexts so we're hoping that what we can learn from how the baccio have have adapted to low oxygen conditions can teach us something that could be useful for for medicine but in what way in a lot of critical care a situations for various reasons people have a sudden drop in oxygen and from the physicians and nfc geologists that have spoken with it's really hard to predict how individuals will react to these conditions and it could be that this variation in how they're reacting has an underlying genetic basis and so we're hoping that what we learn from the bottom might tell us something about why different individuals.

nfc thirteen minutes seventy meters thirty seconds thousand years
"seventy meters" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Yes so it was important for us to find out whether this was just something that could happen because of repeated diving rather than something happening at the genetic level and so we looked into that by measuring the spleen size is not just of bagio divers but also bagio people who aren't diving and so there we found that their spleen sizes whether they were diving or not were roughly the same statistically and so this tells us that the act of diving does not do anything to enlarge lean size and they've been doing for generations only they've been recorded to be diving for probably at least a thousand years we're not really sure how much further before that how extremists that diving from what i've seen him what people have recorded they're diving generally from around thirty seconds to several minutes at a time and this is very active and functional diving so they're diving because it's their livelihood but they did tell me that they could dive for around thirteen minutes at a time and they've been shown to to dive to up to seventy meters deep in that's with no equipment simply a weight belts in wooden goggles it's extraordinary in itself what they do but your suggesting as well it might have a practical application for the rest of us there are a lot of medical implications because hypotheses or low oxygen is an important issue and a lot of different medical contexts so we're hoping that what we can learn from how the baccio have have adapted to low oxygen conditions can teach us something that could be useful for for medicine but in what way in a lot of critical care a situations for various reasons people have a sudden drop in oxygen and from the physicians and nfc geologists that have spoken with it's really hard to predict how individuals will react to these conditions and it could be that this variation in how they're reacting has an underlying genetic basis and so we're hoping that what we learn from the bottom might tell us something about why different individuals.

nfc thirteen minutes seventy meters thirty seconds thousand years
"seventy meters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The university of dundee in scotland and paul smith lomas from the development charity practical action simon let's start with the basics tell us what are glasses accumulations of ice more specifically they developed from layer upon layer upon layer of snow fall and with each successive layer of snow it compresses the snow beneath gradually over time the air gets squeezed out and you get more hard dense material which we know is glass yours but the key distinguishing feature of a glass here is that it has to flow so why are they important they have impacts that can be far reaching global impacts we've got two big ice sheets greenland antarctica and within those ice sheets we've got something on the order of about seventy meters worth of sea level locked up in in those ice sheets so if all of the ice with the melt that would go into the sea and racy levels quite significantly but on a more local scale is the emergence of lakes these meltwater lakes in front of glasses so glassy is a really good digging holes beneath themselves they're very potent forces of erosion and so when they recede they recede into these holes they've dug for themselves and those basins filled with meltwater and the problem is that these lakes can burst and then sends a flood downstream which can damage communities infrastructure hydropower stations and so on thanks for that simon more from you later now i'll be on a ski lift heading into the alps a little later but our first stop is in the flood waters of nepal poor your charity works there what problems does this area have a with its glasses so the challenge of water is almost two fold you have the challenge of riches classiest producing a lack of water and then you've also got the challenges says either with glacier melt all with heavy monsoon floods so i was in the terai area of nepal working with communities in helping them to adapt to that changing climates at time when floods might come but equally droughts my come.

scotland paul smith lomas simon university of dundee nepal seventy meters
"seventy meters" Discussed on WREK

WREK

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on WREK

"Watt were were actually receiving my regulations summing like a billionth of a billionth of a wad good lord so this brings up something that i hadn't really re i hadn't realized until jpl put out another press release based on the voyager mission just the other day and that is how the the spectacular capabilities of the deep space network that we see here the 21st century a lotta that came out of out of wager no warned you was originally a four year mission to saturn oh saturn's at ten astronomically anna syrup is at one so the ten times further away that means a signal strength coming back from saturn is one one hundred that what at word gorgeous coming from nearby uh and then you go to the earnest we'd lose another basically factor core in order to compensate for that we began to array are thirty four meter stations in order to improve the sensitivity by the time we've got the neptune which is even further away thirty times as far away as the earth is from the sun then we raid the twenty seven antennas and the very large array in new mexico and the raid those with our seventy seventy meters station goldstone now we also arrayed the parks antenna in australia with ours seventy meter antenna in canberra so yes we were pioneering the way of using a raise of antennas to improve the sensitivity it makes for an even greater legacy for this mission and i think if your own legacy as well has anybody else been on the mission as as long as you have a forty five years now is project scientist uh i've been i think that's probably the record now on in terms of on the project itself there aren't a couple of principal investigators three of them uh which are still involved who were our involved two of them doors subaru began to be evolved growing almost from the beginning and with a similar like tenure what part in your own mind does voyager a play in your own legacy i know that may be something that you're not really comfortable talking about but but indulge be i mean useful of a lot going on at keltec vice provost for special projects you've got the celtics space radiation lab uh and a lot of recogition a.

Watt press release mexico canberra project scientist vice provost australia principal subaru celtics seventy seventy meters thirty four meter forty five years seventy meter four year
"seventy meters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Kurdish villagers empire was like a sponge it absorbs surrounding cultures and produce something original for instance if you ever see his coins their extraordinary if you toss won it my land on the side has greek littering and an iranian god while on the reverse the might be south asian script and buddhist symmetry this mix was just part and parcel of the diversity and cultural mingling of kanishka emperor three centuries after kana's death the chinese monk traveler fuss him came to the region around the shallow the old kush on kelly plus him was blown away by an enormous structure apparently built bike on asia it was a stupid a buddhist mound at in this case was built to resemble a tower it would have had a stone base and a wooden superstructure and it would have looked a bit like an unfurled umbrella a really big umbrella according to fuzzy unconscious uh stupid was 400 cubits high that's a hundred seventy meters taller than even saint peter's basilica that but what happened to the stupor ima modern times by the early 20 th century it had been largely forgotten but the colonial run archeological survey of india was intent on finding what was once girls quit stupor when we think about an object being lost it can be considered law south because it is remembered in oral histories our tax but cannot be actually found and as such it exists in folklore or legend a rumor but not in material form and this was true for can because great stupa which was known through with his tax and through the chinese begum accounts and the archaeological service india day were looking for these great stupa can ask us and the dog foot to yes without finding anything but in the winter ninety nine nine the hit jack boeing archaeologists excavated amount nipple shower and a site known as xiaoji kid hair looking for proof that this might be with kurdish because great stupa stood and they found it when they uncovered the conjugal kuskis relic they found this reliquary which they took out from under.

kana kelly asia india saint peter's basilica hundred seventy meters three centuries 400 cubits
"seventy meters" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

The Tony Kornheiser Show

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"seventy meters" Discussed on The Tony Kornheiser Show

"On on iraq and he was one of the passage of the original hooper yes i what i was warned vetted i maya know that's all that was in the country illegally all sorts of things and he was telling me and the bloke who was driving with me that he was very interested in playing american football at the time and he was a lovely japanese like alka throw the football seventy meters in the air and we're like and what i think they or what different yards yards is a water entry so but gan and again that olympics yes right that's why what all i res yes i don't remember anything other pretty much anything other than dan the than the dream team and i remember did you covered every game right yeah there was one play in one game i think i'm going to have this right i think i think it's mullin ewing jordan barkley and i'm not sure the fifth player is the ball never hit the ground the never seen a play like this it ended i think with patrick ewing dunking maybe was maybe watt hockey talent lay if they went ninety four feedback to ninety four feet it never hit the ground i mean they were great and barkley became the biggest star in the world player of the and i give you just a funny sign of the times in reading about this dan a dave so this this campaign i don't remember was ubiquitous i mean it was everywhere astana dave campaign but it was it was it was solely bought and paid for by by reinvest yet laws it's part of a merit well here's what i'm going to tell you read in this will tell you how much sports marketing has changed reebok pumps you want to guess how many million into that campaign.

iraq football gan jordan barkley dave patrick ewing reebok ninety four feet seventy meters