36 Burst results for "seventy five percent"

Macy's plans smaller but camera-ready Thanksgiving parade

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last week

Macy's plans smaller but camera-ready Thanksgiving parade

"The Macy's thanksgiving day parade in New York will still go on with some adjustments because of the corona virus pandemic emerges are loaded with the latest this year's Macy's parade will be one block long there still will be floats and performers and giant balloons but the parade will be more of a made for TV events with the number of participants reduced by seventy five percent most performers will be local high school and college marching bands invited to perform will be deferred to next year the balloons will be tethered to special vehicles instead of held by people several elements will be recorded and some will be live performers and balloon characters will be announced in the coming weeks

Macy New York
Fresh update on "seventy five percent" discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

00:33 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "seventy five percent" discussed on CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

"Black Matt norlander with Dan as previously noted in addition to normal episodes of the podcast were also regularly recorded short episodes on various prospects in the two thousand and twenty NBA draft. We've already done Lamelo Pau overtopping, James Wiseman Anthony Edwards Dinnie Omnia on Yekeh con move Isaac A. Humidity those for any reason and you're interested go fight them check them out today we turn our attention to coal anthony the one point guard North Carolina who was limited to just twenty two games. This past season because of a knee injury and that's among the reasons in probably the biggest reason. North. Carolina fish fourteen in nineteen. What was the worst season? For A, win-loss Perspective of Roy Williams Hall of fame, career statistically coin three average eighteen point five points five point seven rebounds four point zero assists in thirty four point, nine minutes per game. He shot thirty eight percent from the field thirty four point eight percent from three point range seventy, five percent for the free throw line. So he was not the most efficient player in college basketball, but in fairness to him. He was not surrounded by typical UNC talent and undeniably that played a role I have anthony going eleventh in my mock draft norlander hasn't going twelve. So He's a projected lottery pick shore, but some had co Anthony as a possible number one overall pick this time last year. Now there's no shot at that right or wrong. So what's the best case scenario for the in the.

Anthony Edwards Matt Norlander North Carolina Lamelo Pau Roy Williams Hall Of Fame James Wiseman NBA Isaac A. Basketball DAN
Macy's plans smaller but camera-ready Thanksgiving parade

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last week

Macy's plans smaller but camera-ready Thanksgiving parade

"The Macy's thanksgiving day parade in New York will still go on with some adjustments because of the corona virus pandemic emerges are loaded with the latest this year's Macy's parade will be one block long there still will be floats and performers and giant balloons but the parade will be more of a made for TV events with the number of participants reduced by seventy five percent most performers will be local high school and college marching bands invited to perform will be deferred to next year the balloons will be tethered to special vehicles instead of held by people several elements will be recorded and some will be live performers and balloon characters will be announced in the coming weeks

Macy New York
Macy's plans smaller but camera-ready Thanksgiving parade

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last week

Macy's plans smaller but camera-ready Thanksgiving parade

"The Macy's thanksgiving day parade in New York will still go on with some adjustments because of the corona virus pandemic emerges are loaded with the latest this year's Macy's parade will be one block long there still will be floats and performers and giant balloons but the parade will be more of a made for TV events with the number of participants reduced by seventy five percent most performers will be local high school and college marching bands invited to perform will be deferred to next year the balloons will be tethered to special vehicles instead of held by people several elements will be recorded and some will be live performers and balloon characters will be announced in the coming weeks

Macy New York
How the Apple Podcasts Analytics help you understand your audience

Podcasting Q&A

04:20 min | Last week

How the Apple Podcasts Analytics help you understand your audience

"Welcome to podcasting where you learned the best tips and strategies to launch growing monetize your show. This week's question comes from Dan is Dan sky pilot faith quest podcast, and I have some questions about the apple podcast analytics. I love the buzz sprout analytics, use them all the time and find them very helpful. And I go to the apple podcast analytics and I find them really confusing. Sometimes, there's information about a particular podcast that is lacking on the screen. It seems inconsistent within its own podcast analytics as well as compared to what you all offer. Tell me what I should be looking out there. Should I even be using them? Is they're helpful information there. What are your recommendations thank you so much for your question. Dan So apple podcasts analytics offers some. Additional data points that they don't necessarily share with podcast hosting sites such as but sprout, and while having more information is usually really good thing. You kinda need to know what you're looking for and what you're looking at when you're an apple podcasts connect. So on this episode, we're GonNa, tell you in explain a little bit about why the data points might look a little bit different and then how to get the most out of apple podcast analytics. Let's talk about why you might see some download discrepancy between your hosting site and apple podcasts connect. So with a hosting site, they're going to show you across the board. How many listens in episode is getting Apple podcasts is not set up that way apple podcast connect is going to only show you information from listeners that meet specific set of criteria. The first is that the listener has to be using the most current version of the apple. PODCASTS at the second is that user also has given permission for their diagnostic information in their usage data to be on top of that, there is a seventy two hour lag time. So if someone listened to an episode that you posted on Monday, you're not gonna see that reflected in your stats until Thursday on top of that, if you get less than five people that meet that criteria, apple is going to register zero data for that episode so. The key here is if you want to find out information about how many listens and episodes getting, you're going to want to check in with your hosting site like bus browse going to show you how many listens to you over the course of all time as well as where maybe your audience listening from. You're not gonNA, get an accurate reflection of your download information from podcast connect. What is it good for? Actually there are three really good data points that podcast connect can offer you. The first is average consumption by episode when you land on the dashboard for your podcast scroll down until you see recent episodes, once you're there look at the stat in the far right column. The percentage you see here is the average amount of time your audience listening to each episode. For example, if you have a twenty minute episode with a seventy, five percent average consumption rating that means that people are listening to about the first fifteen minutes of that episode. For the next data point, you can see in podcasts connect episode listen duration click through to one of your episodes to see a graph showing you the percentage of listeners that are still tuned in at any point in your episode. If you're doing everything right, you should see a gradual taper from the beginning to the end of the episode. If you see a sharp drop in listeners, click on the portion of the episode and listen to it to figure out why so many listeners bailed at the same time. For example, there was an episode entitled finding the Best Podcasting. Microphone we noticed that people stopped listening around. The, nineteen minute mark when we went back and looked at that, we noticed that that was where we kind identified that podcasting microphone, and so people didn't really have a reason to keep listening. So what you WanNa do is really think about why people would drop off really explore that if that's that you've given them an answer and they don't need to listen anymore if it's more of a click bait kind title if you had an ad run in the middle reverse engineer, why everyone might disconnected at that point so that you can create more content that has people stay on for the duration of the episode. The last thing that you can learn from podcast connect is how many new listeners subscribed after listening to a particular episode blow the Listener Duration Graph for each episode, you'll see a role of additional statistics on the far right. You'll notice a percentage called devices, subscribed devices subscribed as the percentage of unique devices that subscribed and listening to the episode. For example, if you have an episode that has a twenty percent subscribe rate versus an episode that has a ninety percent subscribed rate, you're GonNa WanNa look at what you did to get ninety percent subscription because if you can do more of that, it will result in more podcast listeners. It's GonNa help you grow your podcast tremendously.

Apple DAN Engineer
The Khun Sa Files

Kingpins

05:29 min | 2 weeks ago

The Khun Sa Files

"At the end of January nineteen, eighty to the forty eight year old coon saw lost almost everything. In a matter of days, the empire he'd spent years building had fallen since his escape from house arrest in nineteen, seventy, six Kuhn saw had risen to become one of the most powerful and infamous drug lords in the world from his base in northern Thailand. He trafficked opium out of Burma refined it into heroin and sold it to organized crime outfits across. Southeast. Asia approximately seventy five percent of the world's heroin was coming out of the region. Much of it. Thanks to Kuhn saw, and he was able to do it all with the help of the Thai government and Sean State Freedom Fighters. But in the early nineteen eighties, his luck ran out at the behest of the United States his type benefactors turned on him. And on January Twenty First Nineteen eighty-two the time military descended upon his headquarters in the town of Bond Hint Tech faced with complete annihilation. GHUNSA had no choice but to flee back to Burma taking the remains of his private army with him. They left behind fifteen tons of weaponry and millions of dollars worth of heroin processing equipment as bad as these hits were coon son knew that far more damaging was the loss of the Thai government's support without their protection coon saw was significantly weaker and everyone knew it January twenty first proved that his militia was no match for a real military. Embarrassed and betrayed ghunsa swore he wouldn't let himself be beaten. So easily he was still the self proclaimed King of the Golden Triangle and a world renowned freedom fighter. He would just have to figure out how to rebuild his operation in Burma. The problem with going back to Burma was that he was essentially a fugitive there. But looking at the political landscape, he decided to take a gamble. The Burmese military dictatorship was embroiled in ongoing battles with the Communist Party of Burma and a number of regional separatist groups. Despite his relatively high profile. Kuhn, saw wouldn't be the government's first priority a more difficult problem for him would be rebuilding his army. The only way he was going to hold onto his share of the drug market much less survive in war-torn northeast, Burma was through military strength. Kuhn. Saw and his Sean United Army started going after smaller drug organizations on the Burmese side of the border with each victory. The losing soldiers defected to Kuhn saw as they swept through the region, they secure key trafficking routes and territory for new heroin refineries. Seeing, just how quickly and forcefully Kuhn saw was able to rebuild the Taya Thirties realized they'd have to make amends with him. They appreciated that he was keeping the Burmese side of the border under control by taking over all the warring groups and their financial stakes in the heroine industry also meant they wanted to get back on the drug lords good side. They just needed to convince coon saw that it would be more lucrative for him to forgive and forget their trail luckily for the Thai officials coon Saws Pragmatism won out over his anger. In return for his forgiveness though he required that the Thai government's recognize him as the sole figurehead of the Sean State Independence Movement? This would legitimize his role as a freedom fighter on the international stage. However, in the years, he'd been in Thailand other Sean separatist groups with stronger ideological roots had expanded their bases in Burma. In particular the Sean State Army with whom Koon saw had an on again off again, relationship had become a military and political force to be reckoned with. If Kuhn saw wanted to even be the nominal leader of the rebel movement he was going to have to eliminate them. February nineteen eighty-three Kuhn saw shan united. Army. Swept into the homeowner valley whether Sean States Army kept its main base. It's close proximity to Thailand provided an easy escape route in case of attack from the Burmese government. But for Kuhn, saw, the valley was also prime real estate for opium trafficking coon says, troops faced little resistance the Shan State Army immediately realized they were outmatched and retreated Kuhn saw walked right in and took control of the home. Valley. In the village of Ho Mong he established his new headquarters declaring it the new capital of the future, a Free Sean State, but he wasn't finished coon sauce and a handful of his most trusted men into northern Thailand and assassinated several sean independence leaders. By the summer of Nineteen eighty-three, he had made himself one of the only viable leaders of the Sean 'cause and reclaimed his place atop the opium trade.

Kuhn Burma Coon Sean State Army Thai Government Heroin Sean United Army Sean States Army Communist Party Of Burma Thailand Sean State Opium Sean State Independence Moveme Shan State Army Burmese Government Sean United States Asia Ghunsa
Republicans nominate Trump to take on Biden in the fall

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Republicans nominate Trump to take on Biden in the fall

"Republicans have formally nominated president trump for another term at their downsize convention in Charlotte delegates unanimously sent the president to a November showdown with Joe Biden and soon after I heard from their nominee who during a nearly hour long rambling speech called it the most important election in American history our country can go in a horrible horrible direction or in an even greater direction even as delegates cheered the president's facing a deeply skeptical public in a piano RC center for public affairs research poll finds seventy five percent of Americans think the country is going in the wrong direction as he did in twenty sixteen the president's raising questions about the election's integrity saying the only way he'll lose yes if it's ranked soccer make ani Washington

President Trump Joe Biden Soccer Ani Washington Charlotte
Republicans nominate Trump to take on Biden in the fall

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last month

Republicans nominate Trump to take on Biden in the fall

"Republicans have formally nominated president trump for another term at their downsize convention in Charlotte delegates unanimously sent the president to a November showdown with Joe Biden and soon after I heard from their nominee who during a nearly hour long rambling speech called it the most important election in American history our country can go in a horrible horrible direction or in an even greater direction even as delegates cheered the president's facing a deeply skeptical public in a piano RC center for public affairs research poll finds seventy five percent of Americans think the country is going in the wrong direction as he did in twenty sixteen the president's raising questions about the election's integrity saying the only way he'll lose yes if it's ranked soccer make ani Washington

President Trump Joe Biden Soccer Ani Washington Charlotte
AP-NORC poll: Trump faces pessimism as GOP convention opens

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

AP-NORC poll: Trump faces pessimism as GOP convention opens

"As he accepts the GOP nomination for another term president trump is facing a public deeply pessimistic about the nation's direction in AP-NORC center for public affairs research poll the president's overall job approval is thirty five percent down from forty three when the virus pandemic began gripping the nation in March he's also seeing a big drop in how the public sees his leadership on the virus from forty four percent approval in March to thirty one percent now and as he promises to outline an optimistic vision this week just twenty three percent of Americans in the poll think the country is headed in the right direction seventy five percent say it's on the wrong path Sager made Ghani Washington

Donald Trump President Trump Sager Ghani Washington GOP Ap-Norc
AP-NORC poll: Trump faces pessimism as GOP convention opens

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last month

AP-NORC poll: Trump faces pessimism as GOP convention opens

"As he accepts the GOP nomination for another term president trump is facing a public deeply pessimistic about the nation's direction in AP-NORC center for public affairs research poll the president's overall job approval is thirty five percent down from forty three when the virus pandemic began gripping the nation in March he's also seeing a big drop in how the public sees his leadership on the virus from forty four percent approval in March to thirty one percent now and as he promises to outline an optimistic vision this week just twenty three percent of Americans in the poll think the country is headed in the right direction seventy five percent say it's on the wrong path Sager made Ghani Washington

Donald Trump President Trump Sager Ghani Washington GOP Ap-Norc
Urban Australia

Travel with Rick Steves

03:53 min | Last month

Urban Australia

"David. Because Australia's so far away from the other continents. It's easy for the rest of the world to not really have a clear image of what it's like. The stereotype made include kangaroos on every corner and Paul Hogan Wrestling Crocodiles, in the outback. Do you find that a lot of visitors you meet in Australia come armed with a lot of misperceptions about what they'll find preconceptions invariably wrong. Suddenly it's the case in Australia where as you saw the introduction, the business about Kangaroos hopping down the main street with nothing could be further divorced from reality that image and a Crocodile Dundee. Well, he came from the northern territory and he actually lives in America now, and he's one of our favorite experts. So, there you go. Australia's quite urbanized then. It's very of an is and it's a huge landmass. It's only a fraction smaller than the United States and everyone will the vast majority of people live within twenty kilometers of the coast say fifteen miles of the coast. So you have a huge concentration of people have been buried narrowband typically stretching from Cy Melvyn in the south up to Brisbane that halls probably seventy five percent of Australia's population right there. Yes. Okay. Now, the two dominant cities would be Sydney and Melbourne where where do you go for the best urban thrills? What would you recommend? How do they compare comparing? Them is very difficult and the answer you get when you ask that question will dependent tally on where that person was from. They are Mel Benon. Sevan for Melvin or Sydney Saad and the endless rivalry between the two. People from Sydney Regard Melburnians as easy as boring or as people for Melvin C Sydneysiders as frivolous where you fun loving I come from northern New South Wales I'm a country boy. Oh so you can get unbiased I i. have a Sydney Wife. Sybil on wife. So my leanings now with Sydney, but the only city I've lived in Australia in Melvin. Okay how do you characterize the two times? Is there a different culture for the people in the United States you know we got the coast and the West Coast I think there's a big difference between the two and the difference is really driven by climate. And that Melvin. Has further south and thus it has quite cold winters Sydney's lot warmer and therefore the accident is more on outdoor activities and as a coastal city, you have wonderful beaches what the bond I beach is. One of the world's iconic beaches now is their rivalry between the two cities naturally. So arrival of everything, which is why the capital of Australia is halfway between the two because they could not decide where to put it to avoid a civil war related had to had to avoid. That's great. Now you live in Melbourne and understand there's a lot of Greeks living in Melbourne maybe that's why you do tours degrees. Is there some connection there what's with the Greeks and Melbourne while the Greeks came to Melbourne after World War Two an after the Greek civil war which fetch -ly trashed all the great infrastructure and at the time. Metro will populate or perish, and they wanted to populate with Europeans and so the offer went out to Italians. Of various descriptions as populate Oh perished, I was the manager they were afraid that they would be swept away by the Asians from the north. So perish sort of a almost a racist thing populate with white people or we're going to be bowled over by this rising Asian hord. I. Think at the time that the policy was put in place. It was very overtly racist right and they will also terms that we use which totally unacceptable today and I can't use them already now either. So the the word went out and maybe perhaps the more poor countries in white Europe per day call and let Greeks went on there absolutely, and the time they were considered a little bit too small the. They really wanted white northern Europeans say Germans. Rather, than southern Europeans

Australia Sydney Melbourne Melvin C Sydneysiders Mel Benon United States Paul Hogan Melvin America Sydney Saad Crocodile Dundee Cy Melvyn David. Europe Sybil Brisbane Sevan New South Wales
Dr. Charles Binkley Discusses Medical Ethics in the Time of COVID-19

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:55 min | Last month

Dr. Charles Binkley Discusses Medical Ethics in the Time of COVID-19

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host. David Intra. Cosso with me today discussed the nation's response, the ongoing Kobe nineteen, pandemic and context of healthcare ethics. Is Dr. Charles, Brinkley the director of bioethics at the Santa Clara University's or coolest center for Applied Ethics. Dr Bank welcome to the program. Thank you, David. It's really good to be with you today I have to say dark billy Bigley I particularly appreciate time since of course, California's once again. Experiencing another unprecedented wildfire season. So thank you. For making. Absolutely it's a real privilege to be on the show Dr. Bentley's vile is, of course, posted on the podcast website. On background, our nation's response to the ongoing covid nineteen pandemic has been I would characterize as disastrous. For example, as has been widely reported approximately one third of all Kobe. Nineteen related deaths have been among Nursing Home Facility residents. African Americans have been more than twice as likely as non Hispanic whites to die of covid nineteen complications. Inadequately protected healthcare providers. Now conveniently turned heroes in a war against Covid as if the virus will one day surrender. Defeated, have been required to work in lethal environments as for Service Workers Moreover, minorities instead of recognizing their do a livable wage. Health Insurance and or sick leave. We term essential workers and give them a hand. Clap. Has for the federal government's response to the president's sensitivity apparently goes so far as his stating, it is what it is. That the dictionary defines a business phrase that can be literally translated as and pardon my French fuck it. As for the Congress's response seventy, five percent of direct and indirect cares act money's went to corporations any forthcoming or additional federal response must include for the Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's prerequisite covid related legal immunity protection, or legislation consistent with what over twenty states have adopted to date. Are Spas the pandemic in some brings to light the chasm that continues to exist between medical ethics. Requires provider to support the betterment of public health and a responsibility to seek positive forms that are in the best injures of patience. And how we deliver health care that is substantially profit motive dominated. I'll add in my nearly twenty five years doing healthcare policy work in DC. I never wants to tenor meeting or participated in a conversation with the speaker disgust or made reference to, for example, John Rawls veil of big nurturance or tick him Olam. With Megan discuss the woeful state of healthcare ethics in the time of Covid is again Dr Charles Bentley. So with that as a somewhat lengthy introduction Dr Brinkley. Limb in assuming, you'd largely agree federal policymakers have to understated done a poor job of living up to their obligations and responding to the pandemic. So my question is in your view what generally accounts for this. David I. Think from a public policy perspective. Many of the issues have become overly politicized. So for instance, things like mask wearing school reopenings, how to reopen the economy have not always been based solely on the best medical or scientific principles but they've been put us is to take, for instance, the initial recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about school reopening those were revised based on the administration's desire to somehow make them more applicable or to open up things more aggressively. So science hasn't always. been the most respected voice in the pandemic Dr. Falcone has emerged as really a hero for what is truth, and so you have to consider the perspective of physicians in making recommendations in a physician or a scientist in general is going to base recommendations on doing good and avoiding harm. That's really the ethical principle of medicine, and so for instance, plan the American Academy of Pediatrics Recommendations for. School reopening is a very child centric perspective as well. You would expect the group of pediatricians to speak from the perspective of children and when you take the balance of school opening on the whole, it's far more advantageous to children for schools to be reopened not only because of the intellectual benefit schools provide but all the other resources of schools provide for children besides the traditional reading writing and arithmetic. Takes Her instance the number of hungry children who rely on schools for nourishment, the number of children but medical problems who rely on schools For their care asthma screening vision dental care. You look at children with disabilities who really are dependent on their schools, not only for learning but also for occupational therapy physical therapy and those students not only are not progressing in minsters they're regressing during the pandemic when they're not in schools, you can't substitute the services that they were offered in person with remote learning and must be heartbreaking to those parents to see their children regress in this time. So really the perspective of the most vulnerable and some ways has come to light. During the pandemic when I think globally about how ethics the affected the pandemic

Dr Charles Bentley Covid Dr Brinkley David Intra Dr Bank Center For Applied Ethics Centers For Disease Control An Kobe Billy Bigley Santa Clara University John Rawls California Nursing Home Facility Mitch Mcconnell American Academy Of Pediatrics Congress Director
Putin Says Russia Has Approved 'World First' COVID-19 Vaccine. but Questions Over Its Safety Remain

Squawk Pod

05:40 min | Last month

Putin Says Russia Has Approved 'World First' COVID-19 Vaccine. but Questions Over Its Safety Remain

"Breaking overnight Russian president. Vladimir Putin said that the first Russian produce vaccine for COVID. Nineteen has received regulatory approval from the country's Health Ministry the vaccine was developed by Moscow's Galilea Institute. Putin. said. It forms stable immunity and passes all necessary safety checks putting also said, one of his daughters has actually received that vaccine Brian this news about Putin and this potential vaccine is huge but I think we do need to take it with a grain of salt. Well, trying to make sense of it, Becky, good, morning Wolf Becky as well. I mean trying to make sense of it. You have what you think are the markets sort of key points, right? Trillions of dollars in stimulus potential payroll tax cuts, all the market themes that we've all been talking about on CNBC all day long powering the markets higher seven days in a row you wake up at whatever four o'clock in the morning and Russia says, Oh, by the way, we have a working vaccine it's been approved by our own institute and I gave it to my daughter says Vladimir Putin so it is a huge developing story and I think. Guys it really whether or not you believe it or not, and there's GonNa be a lot of scientists that want to see the data. What is this vaccine? What is it based on? How many doses are available? How much does it cost as the world get it either way the market did move a little. We were up before the headlines crossed, but it did move a little on this news and I think Becky it does call into question. What happens on the day and whether that day is today or not the day the world gets a working vaccine. What happens? What do we do? Do we know? I, guess drink some vodka do we go out and street down the street I have no idea you know I might look here. Here's what I. Here's how I kind of look at this news just from what we've been hearing in the last several months from experts. There is a huge debate here in the United States taking place about whether these potential vaccine candidates should be fast-tracked even more and brought directly to the public before it. Goes through the extensive as one face to face three testing the phase three testing that you would normally see it's very high bar. They want to make sure that that not only is it safe for people to take. But also that there is efficacy remember last week we heard from the Dr Anthony. FAUCI that there's a a real risk that you are not going to see something that has ninety percent or north in terms of its effectiveness. The FDA is now looking at fifty percent as the floor. If they can get fifty percent effectiveness, they would think that that is great. Sixty, seventy, five percent even better. But you probably not talking about a vaccine where you have ninety three percent effectiveness with the measles shot. My guess is that the Russians have taken a candidate and fast forward it without doing a lot of those types of extensive studies that you're going to see on candidates vaccine candidates here in the united. States and there's a big debate about that. There are people here in the United States are pushing for us to do the very same thing but if you talk to. Some of the more cautious experts, some of the people who look at this they say, no, we do this for a reason it would be disastrous if you approved vaccine and then it turned out it either wasn't safe or that it didn't work very well but people would lose faith in vaccination programs. It's difficult enough to get people to accept vaccinations and do this, and there are more people here and the United States who are anti factors at this point who are raising questions about whether they'd even take it but there's a real reason that you go through these extensive steps and try to make these things positive now again. Totally, a guess, but I don't know how they would have had time to do all the testing that that we are making sure everyone of the vaccination candidates here in the United States has gone through and that's just the safety question Becky I mean look at the day we've got so far from all of the US in European trials. If you could put safety aside has any of them showed yet enough effectiveness in treating this forest enough antibodies antigens or whatever it is they're trying to create. I'm not sure where even quite there yet. Anyway on some of the data points and to that point whether it's a safety concern or. Effectiveness concerned with the Russian vaccine I doubt will get the daytime. You put the news on twitter whatever you WANNA call it and there's a group of people that just don't want to believe anything. They don't want any good news is that people are just bad I don't know why that is like Oh, well, it's not real or it's Russia must be faked maybe it is fake who knows there's a lot of candidates out there not just on the vaccine side but on the antibody side, the treatment cyber general and other things we could have real candidates by September by the way September is next month. Let me give you a few reasons to be optimistic. The are one the reproduction rate has held fairly steady. There are community spreads parts of America, but overall fairly steady. The question I've got is this we're starting to get some indications that Americans maybe closer to so-called hurt immunity than we think because t cell reproduction rates have seen higher in some communities ironically corona queens a few weeks ago or a month ago they found twenty five percent of the population had developed t-cells or anybody's and twenty five percent was not ill indicating that perhaps there is a greater capacity for amazing bodies to generate these t cells and these antibodies than we think in other. Words guys. There's a lot of terrible news out there and a lot of families are suffering but the market I think have looked at the fact that we had nine, hundred, sixty, eight, sixty, million people got avian flu, the Hong Kong flu and Nineteen Sixty eight off and fifty thousand or so Americans ended up dying from that about two hundred thousand in today's numbers no vaccine was ever created for that. You can debate whether or not. We have a vaccine it's still exist in some form. The point is I think the market is at least looked out a year and said life will hopefully be. Much, different and maybe much more normal than it is right now

United States Wolf Becky Vladimir Putin Russia President Trump Moscow Putin. Galilea Institute Health Ministry FDA Brian Hong Kong Cnbc Twitter Corona Fauci Dr Anthony America
Makeover: Oil Giant BP Promises to Cut Oil Production, Invest in Renewables

Business Wars Daily

04:09 min | Last month

Makeover: Oil Giant BP Promises to Cut Oil Production, Invest in Renewables

"Somebody had to go I. It's no surprise that Covid Nineteen Delta Draconian blow to the oil and gas industry stay at home orders and line shutdowns of dramatically reduced the need for oil and gas prices and earnings plunged well. Now at least one giant oil company says demand for fossil fuels will never be the same again and it's taking steps not just to pivot, but to make itself over entirely. That business is BP the london-based behemoth last week, the one, hundred, ten year, old company announced a seventeen billion dollar quarterly loss and multibillion dollar writedown of its assets. But what generated headlines was its announcement that over the next decade, it intends to discard its identity as a fossil fuel business. Instead, it'll invest heavily in a wide variety of renewable energy technologies on its way to achieving net zero emissions by twenty fifty. Specifically bb says it will cut oil and gas production by forty percent over the next decade. At the same time, it plans to put ten times as much money into renewable energy investments as it currently does with a goal of investing five billion dollars a year by twenty thirty bio-energy hydrogen, carbon, capture and storage investments in electric vehicle charging stations are all said to be on the menu as our wind and solar. From. A business perspective the move does make some sense BP expects demand for oil to fall between fifty and seventy five percent over the next thirty years as the world attempts to slow global warming. In June BP officials acknowledged that the pain caused to the oil business by the pandemic isn't temporary. It's permanent. They say in a statement, they said covid nineteen would accelerate an existing transition to a lower carbon economy as country seek to quote, build back better meaning in ways less harmful to the environment. The shift is taking a toll on BP's employees. The company announced in June that it plans to lay off ten thousand people. BP's dismal second quarter didn't seem to faze investors instead they embrace the company's new renewable energy shift its share price leapt seven percent on the news stuart joyner an analyst at the market research firm redburn remarked that the move was major positive, thoughtful, and largely unexpected the New York Times reported. Unexpected too many perhaps, but close observers of the company may not have been that surprised. BP has spent the last decade clawing back from its disastrous deepwater horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. For obvious reasons, the company hasn't exactly been a darling of environmentalists, but quickly after becoming CEO in February Bernard Looney made a pledge for BP to achieve net zero emissions by twenty fifty it was the first of giant global oil companies to do so. At the time both socially conscious and traditional investors applauded BP's pledge Andrew Logan and oil and gas director at series a climate change advocacy organization said EP was setting a new standard for leadership in the oil industry CNN reported and Barclays analysts called the plan both fundamental and radical. Last week. Looney. said in a statement quote. This coming decade is critical for the world in the fight against climate change and to drive the necessary change in global energy systems will require action from everyone but so far oil giants. Exxon and Chevron have not followed suit indeed mobile continues to expand oil exploration and production around the world despite its own sharp drop in earnings. The Washington Post reported BP has attempted and failed at other eco, friendly initiatives over the years and BP will continue to invest in and make most of its money from fossil fuels for at least another five years. Still observers agree that this is the company's most transformative move yet, and the realities of business may give BP's ecoconscious strategy more momentum than has existed in the past. As reporter Steven muffs wrote in. The Washington Post for. BP. Is trying to get ahead of what climate change might forced the industry to do. Anyway.

BP Washington Post BB Mexico EP New York Times Exxon Andrew Logan Bernard Looney
Uber and Lyft ordered to classify drivers as employees

CNBC's Fast Money

04:04 min | Last month

Uber and Lyft ordered to classify drivers as employees

"Are following a developing story and Uber lift both stocks are on the move following California court ruling Deirdre has got the very latest deirdre. The court's ruling is stayed for ten days to allow Uber to appeal but it would force the ride sharing companies to immediately we classify their drivers as employees in California in a statement Uber says quote when three million Californians are without a job our elected leaders should be focused on creating work trying to shut down an entire industry during an economic depression lift for its part said quote drivers do not want to be employees full stop will immediately appeal this ruling and continue to fight for their independence. If the appeal is not granted or there's no further stay, there is a chance. Melissa that. Could shut down their APPs entirely in California Uber keeping. Mind has over one hundred, thousand drivers in the state and bringing them on his employees I'm told would be nearly impossible. Now, the other option is that they continue to operate and risk legal liability as you were saying, shares of Uber and lift their down about one and a half and two and a half percent respectively in the after hours investors, they do know very. Well that regulatory pressures had been building, but as I said, Melissa, this was a key battle in one of the most one of their most important markets and it comes as other states from New York to Illinois Massachusetts are looking at similar legislation and to be clear this doesn't just affect ridesharing Uber's pivoting towards food delivery. The classification of those drivers are also at stake here back to you did your thanks dude or both? And I I would think that the stocks would be down even more if this was seen as a true threat to the business particularly for Uber. Yeah I think Deebo said it I mean the expectation was this outcome here we know that Dr Uber was out in the New York Times pending an op Ed making a lot of the points that Deirdre just mentioned here there isn't a whole heck of a lot of evidence that a lot of these workers actually WanNa be fulltime employees they actually like driving for lift and Uber Maybe doing a little post mates little caviar here so it'll be interesting to see what happens just mentioned this would lift you know. They're going to report in a couple of days after the close. After we saw Uber's seventy five percent year every year client ride bookings. GonNa be a really important one for lift the only North American rideshare. That's why this issue in California is probably more significant to them. But I'll just mentioned this at a seven and a half billion dollar enterprise value lift is way too cheap an asset even with all the losses that they have right now ridesharing whether these gig economy workers are employers are not is here to stay in Google wants fitbit for two billion dollars for their data. So many certainly wants lift yeah. I would also think that these drivers in during a time of pandemic one job whether it be classified as a contractor or full employees. I'm sure they're not that picky at this point, Tim? I think there's a lot of folks that enjoy being an independent contractor gives a lot of flexibility not only with how they live their days and how they deal with their families and what they can do. But also from a tax perspective and I I agree with what dancing and there's a lot of these guys at work for multiple a rideshare companies and also agree that I've said this before if you WanNa hail a cab in a major urban center now good luck it's not happening and rideshare is here. There's arguments that this did not do things for pricing for people all around the country, but but the reality is I love Uber here but I look at the chart and yes, they've had about a fifteen, a little twelve, thirteen percent pullbacks, their numbers. But at the bottom here of this rain been in around thirty three bucks, this is a stock that takes you back to a level where I think it's it's found support and you've priced in a lot of bad news. This post mates acquisition gives them thirty seven percent essentially delivery of the food business. And I think it's something that ultimately allows them to leverage their platform don't love the stock, but there's a lot of bad news in here and I think most of that bad news has been priced in.

Dr Uber California Deirdre Melissa Google New York New York Times Deebo TIM Massachusetts ED Illinois
What We Know About Trump's New 'Executive Orders'

Squawk Pod

05:45 min | Last month

What We Know About Trump's New 'Executive Orders'

"As of this weekend, the United States has surpassed five million cases of covid nineteen. Roughly one quarter of all infections reported across the world. It took just the last six weeks for US Cova cases to double the growth of new cases in the US appears to have leveled off at an average of fifty four thousand. Over the last week, more than one, hundred, sixty, two, thousand. Americans. Have died in the pandemic markets and lawmakers aren't sure what to make of president trump's controversial step on Saturday of issuing four. Orders in an attempt to provide economic relief to Americans. This came after stimulus negotiations and Congress ground to a halt leaving many whose livelihoods have been up ended by the coronavirus in limbo. Here's Becky quick. Amo Java's here. He joins us with more on this and there are so many questions on this. I was actually on the phone with the producers yesterday begging to have you on this morning to walk us through this because even after going through hours of kind of trying to figure out what was happening, I have to say I'm still confused yet. Look it is. Is Confusing and the reason, becky. It's confusing because the president really only has limited authority here without legislation from Congress. There's not that much he can do and he's right up to the edge here in do in taking all these actions. In fact, you've heard Democrats complain over the weekend that what the president signed and is Bedminster Golf Club on Saturday was actually over the line and illegal and unconstitutional. Let's walk through what he did first, and then we'll talk about what the reaction is. What he did was a series of executive orders including this payroll tax pause. In which he's going to defer collection of the payroll taxes that starts September first runs through the end of the year. But people would have to pay the payroll taxes at the end of the deferral period. If the law is not changed and it doesn't look like the law is going to be changed at least under this congressional layout right now. So the president is simply hoping here that there'll be a new congress, he'll be reelected, and he'll be able to pass a law making that deferral permanent, but for employers and employees trying. Trying to figure that all out which way do you bet on? That is a real open question. The other one is rental, help the president not able to extend the eviction moratorium, but he is directing federal agencies to find ways to go out and help renters. So we'll see where the federal government can come up. They come up with their and then on the unemployment insurance, it's four hundred dollars in bonus unemployment. Remember that would replace the six hundred dollars a week that people have been getting under. The cares act this is. Money coming from the Homeland Security's disaster, Relief Fund and the Federal Government is going to pay seventy five percent of this under the president's plan. The states will be responsible for twenty, five percent of it, and you've already heard some complaints from the states that they simply don't. The money to be able to do that, and so you heard from Democrats over the weekend that this is entirely unworkable. Here's Chuck Schumer. Unfortunately, the president's executive orders described in one word could be paltry in three words, unworkable week and far too narrow. The event at the country club is just what trump does a big show, but it doesn't do anything it as the American people look at these executive orders. They'll see they don't come close to doing the job. Meanwhile, you had Treasury Secretary Mnuchin on television over the weekend as well. He explained exactly what the president hopes happens here with this payroll tax deferral, here's what he said. We've been told by the states. They can get this up and running immediately, and I would say if the Democrats want to challenge in court and hold up unemployment benefits to those hard working Americans that are out of a job because of Covid, they're going to have a lot of explaining to do. So, Becky, essentially a dare there from the treasury secretary saying look go ahead. Sue Us if you want to be the political party that suing to stop unemployment checks going to unemployed people ahead of an election, go ahead and do that, and that's sort of where we are. It's a real standoff here in Washington. Not Clear when negotiations can resume. We're told that there wasn't really any meaningful contact between Democratic leaders and the White House over the weekend and we'll see what money brings. Hey. Let's start. There's GonNa be a bunch of questions of all three of US want to ask coming out of this. But let let's start just with the very basics. If the Democrats challenge, any portion of this, does that mean they challenge all of it because I could see them saying, okay. We want to challenge the idea of a payroll tax holiday or relief. At this point, but we don't want to stop the checks from going out. Right, I mean, you could there are three different executive memoranda here and executive order. So you could do a lawsuit targets specific federal action that's contemplated by the president here So you don't have to challenge the whole thing. If you're the Democrat, you can go after a bits and pieces. The question is politically, what's the strategy on Ansi Pelosi over the weekend arguing that this was both unconstitutional unconstitutional and also too little. If it's unconstitutional than the Democrats. Really are putting themselves in a position where they they sort of morally a righteously would need to suit to block it, but also if it does provide any little bit of help, they don't want to be in position of being the ones to take that away. We keep saying it's four hundred dollars in unemployment. It's really three hundred dollars that's federal coming from the federal government, and they're saying the states could go ahead and pick up an extra hundred dollars, but we should probably re characterize it as three hundred dollars coming from the federal. Government. Yeah. It's three hundred dollars on the federal government and the states would pay one hundred and you already heard a lot of governors around the country saying Whoa? Wait a second our budgets have been so badly hit that we can't even pay for the services that we're providing right now. Let alone and additional unemployment benefit at simply not possible. We're not going to be able to do it You know Mnuchin and others argued that the states will be able to find a way to do that. And we'll see what governor say this morning as they get into their offices and try to figure this thing out.

President Trump Democrats Federal Government Executive Congress Becky United States Treasury Secretary Mnuchin Cova Donald Trump Chuck Schumer Washington Homeland Security Covid Bedminster Golf Club White House Pelosi Relief Fund
Public health expert: 50 percent effective coronavirus vaccine would be 'better than what we have now'

NBC Meet the Press

05:21 min | Last month

Public health expert: 50 percent effective coronavirus vaccine would be 'better than what we have now'

"We hit five million US cases yesterday for some perspective. The first nineteen case in the United States is believed to have occurred on February six. We hit one million cases on April Twenty, eight, eighty, two days later. It then took just forty three days to hit the two million mark on June tenth. We hit the three million mark on July seven that was twenty seven days later then just sixteen days later we rich four million US cases and July twenty third and again it took us just sixteen days to hit this five million reported case number right here in the United States joining me now is Dr Tom ingles beans, the director of the Center for Security of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Dr Ingles. Be Welcome back to meet the press. WanNa get a little big picture here. You know last week you were you put out a lengthy list of ten recommendations. You guys didn't call it a reset, but sort of like how do we get control of this virus? Now another one of your sort of colleagues in the larger sense Michael Star home is an op Ed. He's basically calling for a reset of some sort New York Times today editorial page calling this. It feels though as public health officials are all calling for some sort of reset. Partial. lockdowns things like this and yet we are not having that conversation at all on the political side of things. Are, are we doomed to sort of live with this virus now if we're not GONNA at all look at your recommendations I DON'T THINK WE'RE DOOMED To this fate I? Think we we know what to do. Other countries have done it. I think the purpose of these resetting reports these for a kind of a reestablishment of the basics. Is that we know that another country's universal masking fiscal, distancing, avoiding large gatherings. Those kinds of things have worked. If we look at countries like Italy and Spain and France, they have a total of about seven or eight deaths today and we have thousand, but it's not magic what they did. We know what they did. So I think if we act together in national unison, we can get there and that's what the purpose of these many of these reports are I want to bring up the issue of masks there've been some people that said if we had ninety five percent compliance unmask wearing, we could get rid of we could sort of get this fires under control. Is that unrealistic and we do need to do more than just mandating masks Do. Not, alone. Not by themselves or alone the solution, but they are a critical part of it. We know that physical distancing makes a big difference. We know that large gatherings are places where super spreading events occur and people have the opportunity or the virus has the opportunity to get around quickly and for. Many people at once. So we have to do a number of things together in terms of you know simple things like diagnostic testing results coming back much more quickly. It's it's unacceptable for the country to have to have testing comeback a week or even two weeks later it's not useful at that point there's no point even doing the test. So a number of that we have to do, but they're not they're not complicated they may be hard, but we have to do them kind of in unison. And all of those, they're not hard except when you when the word politics gets involved, it makes everything a little bit harder and I wanNa keep you out of the political space here. Let me ask you a question about that scenes and to sort of set expectations doctor Fauci implied that the first vaccine that we get, he hopes it's seventy five percent effective. The FDA has said they will approve any vaccine that's at least fifty percent effective. Can you explain to the public what that means what it means and what it doesn't mean and what our expectations should be for the first vaccine Well, we know that many of the vaccines that we use are not perfect. They don't prevent every case of disease but if they prevent a substantial portion of disease than that can help us get to a point where most of us are protected, the disease can spread quickly between people anymore a concept that is called her immunity. Herd immunity doesn't mean we will won't disease anymore. It means it's not gonNA efficiently as efficiently spread in an epidemic form. and. Is there a percentage figure in your mind that you think will sort of give us a huge? Huge step in the right direction is at a vaccine that is at seventy five percent or does fifty percent do you fear that could be a false sense of hope. I think we would take fifty percent because it's fifty percent is a lot better than what we have. Now we've we've no tools to no no vaccine tools or medicine tools that we can use to slow this down. So fifty percent would be would be far better than what we have. Now of course I think we all want something that is seventy, five, eighty, five. Ninety percent effective. But we'll have to see what we get and I think for the amount of time has passed since the beginning of this pandemic to have a vaccine that's even fifty percent effective in in the coming months or the beginning of twenty twenty, one would be phenomenal. But again, we hope it's better but fifty percent would be better than what we have now. Tom ingles be from Johns, Hopkins One of our experts that we have on here regularly, really appreciate you coming on and sharing your expertise with us. Sir.

United States Dr Tom Ingles Twenty Twenty Dr Ingles Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School Tom Ingles New York Times Director Michael Star Center For Security Doctor Fauci Johns FDA Italy Spain France
Dowels Per Inch

Making It With Jimmy Diresta, Bob Clagett and David Picciuto

05:49 min | Last month

Dowels Per Inch

"So you broken network cable that was in the ground Oh yeah. Is that right? Is it a cat cat sixty think for the regular incidents Jason Hansen it'd be mad at me. Jason. Helped me in solace. Up a half ago, we took a cable he was at one of the classes and his don't be this leading that destroyed one from the house he went looked in house and he said Oh all you need is a four hundred foot burial cable. You know woman a little bit more checks on the outside or tougher thing. So we went from the House across the yard about four hundred feet into the new. Black Barn. And today the guys who are doing the driveway. Because, he came up and he said you can say I just broke a cable. He wasn't took a little black wire as thaw. which is it's not a big deal but I have two laser stuff in a few hours. So I have to splice so that I could I'm GonNa have just figure how to connect my computer directly to the laser. Laser unit. The full spectrum laser so I'll figure it all out. So I just have a spicing kit somewhere I could spice it and buried again it's just a you know it's one of those things where you think like you plan your day your mind I'll have to this that a have to find this the whole package splicing equipment, which I haven't seen since a year and a half a mile and a half six this. Thing. They're widening my drive land on the barn, the my local landscaping guys, and he's walking the dog at eight o'clock to call me over his wire carpets out anything important. Stick it out of the ground to five foot pieces. Ten, feet apart like That's my laser job in four hours. Anyway it's. It's not it could have been a lot worse. It's you know these things whenever these guys dig a funny thing was once got tremendous trench to the electric from the street. They had to put three-phase cable from the street all the way to the barn and Derek from Maldon came over one day and he's like looking in the hall and he goes you know you guys cut a phone line didn't don't Cha we did. When he point he pulled in the hall had been dug for like a month I didn't even notice city because that's what he does for a living. In look look and it was a cable like about as thick as my wrist with about twenty thousand wires in it. Ripped right. Open idol even looking at it from one angle ciders thought it was a water of black water hose which water was coming out of it gets its abandoned but if you look at it from the other direction is like. Ten thousand wires hanging out of the, but they will cut very cleanly. And he goes how long ago did you cut this? They broke it about ten days ago he does no one's come to bobby nope because then it must be abandoned. Because usually when these things break, they know right away. Oh yeah and. Because there was a it was his is the bucket. So one half of the why was ripped out of the wall and laying face into the mud so I just thought it was a hollow black water to. And the other one was sticking out from the angle. You couldn't feel the wires anyway. And then about ten feet away in the trees have grown into one of the trees is A. Porcelain. Placard from. Bell telephone. And it's grown into it's gotta be from like the fifties on in the forties because half engulfed in the tree in his bell telephone. So that must be and then when we dug up a French drain by the Barn. By the other by the machine shop, which is about four hundred feet away they found the same cable. So it runs diagonally through my property right under every single holy Dick So. It's abandoned but the little tiny Internet cable, which is about as thick as a pencils broken and I'm gonNA figure six after we get off. labile learn something new. Yeah, it's a pain in the butt though a strip does tiny little wires and well, I'm Gonna I'm GonNa. Try need twice I gotTA. Yeah I'M GONNA try to do a connector connector connecting connector. You know. A peace in the middle, and then just cover covered with like six pounds of lactate and put it back on the ground. Everyone's passionate. Everyone's punching this computers for now. It's not gonNA work. That's what people do. That's fun. Anyway other than that. What are you up to? What have I been up to whip building trailers didn't put a movie out last week as building trailers. We're building eight bullet Bourbon trailers that are going to go to Texas in the last ones I built over probably few weeks maybe four weeks four to five weeks considering the prototype. Now, this eight I started last Thursday now it's almost one week later and they're just about there about seventy five percents done. WHO's still out to do the doors for build bumpers but with a team here, the team that I got helped me out is incredible everything's moving along swiftly. And, we'll make tires. Sixteen fake tires at a plywood. In every single tired uses up just about one full sheet of plywood. And takes thirty minutes to cut because there's I didn't count this probably sixty pieces that I cut out like little arcs of circles we connect them together. To make related them together like a like A. Layer cake then six layers apply what makes up one tire. When fake tire everyone's like why don't you just buy tires because that means that I have to buy tires with Rennes connect the rims to something that's both if I keep it all would I could just nail screw everything. And if I do the cost analysis, it's probably the same amount of money to buy the plywood and take the time to put it together. But I don't have the the ability to just nail in screw I have to Baltin get involved all the Have to down the rabbit hole of using the trailer equipments connect tires as opposed to just using screws announced nothing has to turn so it doesn't matter.

Jason Hansen Black Barn Bell Derek Baltin A. Porcelain Maldon Dick Texas
A broken system, a broken city: Beirut

The Economist: The Intelligence

09:33 min | Last month

A broken system, a broken city: Beirut

"In Beirut yesterday countless people began the painful work of fixing homes devastated by a massive explosion on Tuesday. One woman who'd mlk posted a video of her mother-in-law playing the piano as others swept up broken glass. The music is bittersweet, the city is reeling. The moment of the blast no one was quite sure what had happened there was a deep bass sound for seven or eight seconds there was a rumbling. and. We thought it was a localized explosion, maybe a gas main that had blown up across the street or a car bomb in the neighborhood. Greg Carlstrom is our Middle East correspondent. I A cafe. everyone, of course, left the cafe and started making their way home and it was only on the way back down towards the three Indian towards the ports that I started to realize the scale of the damage. There was, of course, broken glass everywhere carpeting, all of the streets all at the sidewalks pass through an intersection where there were several women sitting in the median holding cloth scraps of fabric bleeding from the head they'd obviously been hit by glass. And every building that you pass by not only the windows blown out but the aluminum window frames blown off. So. You realize that this was not a localized incident, but rather something that had affected the entire city center. The blast was felt as far away as Cyprus it registered as an earthquake in Jordan. It had come from the port of Beirut or something had set off an explosion of staggering size sending up a white mushroom cloud then a vast bloom of orange smoke. Yesterday the government placed a number of court officials under house arrest and again investigation. Declared a two weeks state of emergency. Residents are still coming to grips with the shock of the blast. Felt like it went inside us like a best our soul the way. I saw something bright and I lost my hearing for few seconds. An explosion just went out. The human toll of the explosion has been catastrophic the death toll officially more than one hundred so far, and that number continues to grow as rescue workers find victims who were buried in the rubble more than five thousand people injured by the blast and many of them had to go into a hospital system that was already stretched thin. We've had a spike in corona virus cases in Lebanon over the past few weeks, some hospitals themselves were damaged by the explosion hospital Saint George Hospital across the street from where I live. was so badly damaged that it had to halt operations and when I went by the hospital, you saw patients some of them still wearing their hospital gowns with intravenous lines in their arms bloodied from flying debris and shrapnel for nurses were killed. Fifteen patients on respirators died when the machines failed the other immediate impact is according to officials in Lebanon about three hundred thousand people were left homeless by the explosion. About five percent of the population of the entire country and what do we know so far about what caused the explosion? It seems to be the result of unbelievable negligence even on the scale of the perennially negligent Lebanese government back in two thousand thirteen customs officials in Lebanon confiscated the cargo of a Russian ownership that was traveling to Mozambique. The cargo was two, thousand, seven, hundred, fifty tons of ammonium nitrate, which is highly explosive chemical that is used mostly to make either fertilizers or explosives from mining and quarrying and other industrial uses. So this material was confiscated, it was put in a warehouse at the port and for six or seven years it just south there there was some talk of maybe exporting the stuff for giving it to the army to use but this required approval from the Lebanese judiciary that approval never came you've had officials at the ports and with insecurity agencies who warned this was tantamount to keeping a giant bomb on the doorstep of the country's capital. Those warnings went unheeded and of course, tragically on Tuesday it all exploded but I mean what kind of government would ignore warnings about tons and tons and tons of explosive material just sitting in a city centre the Lebanese government would it's almost par for the course for Lebanon's political class. This is the government that for more than a decade could not agree on a budget. This is the government that for almost thirty years allowed the same central banker to run the Central Bank Lubin, and to run effectively state-sanctioned Ponzi scheme to defend the currency peg it's a country that created a political and economic model that was totally unsustainable. Invested hardly at all in basic services even in good times, Lebanon can't provide twenty four hour electricity routinely struggles to pick up the trash piles up in the streets. It is a perennially negligent government and this is of course, a catastrophic example of that but it's of a piece with the behavior of this government over the past thirty years. So this is a population economy that was suffering quite a bit even before the blast it was the country has been slipping into a profound economic crisis since October the the currency. Lebanese. Pound which for decades has been pegged to the dollar. Began to break away from that since October? It's lost about eighty percent of its value on the black market which has contributed to runaway inflation in a country that imports almost everything from food and fuel to consumer goods. So, inflation running around eighty percent right now and for food around two hundred percent prices have become astronomical this summer we've had fuel shortages that have caused blackouts in Beirut normally three hours a day stretch as long as twenty hours a day this summer and the backup generators that people rely on to provide electricity when the state cannot those are either burning out from overuse or running out of fuel just one crisis after another point. which has led to widespread poverty in the country the the official figures the government thinks around half the country is now below the poverty line that could rise as high as seventy five percent. By the end of the year, there's been a spike in petty crime driven simply desperation. There was one man who was caught on TV robbing a pharmacy for diapers another man who robbed someone at knifepoint on the streets and a once busy part of town, and then came back to apologize for doing it and said, he he needed the money to his family. So it sounds a a years long problem has gotten really quite a lot worse very recently mean why hasn't the government been able to sort of keep things from getting so much worse? The current government was installed in January meant to be a technocratic government that would tackle this economic crisis and negotiate a rescue agreement with the IMF but. Six or seven months later it's made almost no progress. The negotiations with the IMF have really stalled at this point they've had about twenty rounds of talks. But is not even really negotiating with the IMF yet it's still negotiating with itself. You have the cabinet on one side. And the parliament on the other backed up by the banking sector. which are having this very arcane dispute about the scale of the losses in Lebanon's financial sector about how bankrupt the country is effectively. And so you have this surreal situation where instead of Lebanon negotiating with the IMF Lebanon is negotiating with Lebanon. The Fund has told Lebanon that talks are not going to advance unless there's an agreement on the size of the losses or if the cabinet pushes through a few meaningful reform of capital controls, law changes to the electricity sector things like that. Neither of these things have happened and there are increasing calls for the government to step down. Do you think that's the way forward I? Mean, what do you think should be done here to to bring Lebanon back to? A functional state though the problem is if this government steps down what replaces this government and a lot of the pressure on the government right now is is coming from the traditional powerbrokers in Lebanon the sectarian X. warlords who have divvied up power in this country for decades since the end of the civil war in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, this power sharing agreement they have it was designed to keep the peace and prevent a return to conflict after the war. But it's been captured by the. Hands up power based on sect, which runs a massive patronage network The World Bank estimates that it costs the country about nine percent of its GDP each year but if it were to step down without broader changes to the country's political system in this power, sharing system would simply be replaced by the same cast of characters who have ruined the country over the past thirty years. But that power sharing system was was there to to keep the peace to prevent a return to civil war, and that was the argument for years for decades when people in Lebanon would complain about the corruption and. The negligence and the inefficiency of their government, the response would be well at least this is better than a return to the bad old days even before what happened on. Tuesday even before the explosion though that argument was beginning to lose its weights with a lot of people here you have a younger generation of Lebanese who don't have the same memory of course of the civil war that their parents or their grandparents had, and so as the country slipped further and further into crisis over the past year, people have been more willing to to break away from this system than they were before. And I think the argument that well, there could be violence if the power-sharing system was stripped away after what happened on Tuesday after half of Beirut was destroyed by the incompetence of this government I think that argument is not going to carry with a lot of people.

Lebanon Beirut IMF Lebanese Government Middle East Greg Carlstrom Saint George Hospital Cyprus Central Bank Lubin Ponzi Scheme Army Jordan Mozambique Official
"seventy five percent" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

New Jersey 101.5

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on New Jersey 101.5

"Seventy five percent of New Jersey one one point five news time ito seven now New Jersey one one point five instant weather the big ten July heat on the way as we go through the next couple of days he advisories excessive heat warnings for the inland areas especially the next few afternoons into the weekend in between the heat there could be a couple of gusty thunderstorms at times but as time goes on it is hotter in it is to rire especially towards the weekend tonight's low in a monkey mid seventies a chance of a passing storm very warm and humid on a Wednesday a few scattered strong storms in the afternoon some could have very heavy downpours really occur highs in the low nineties feels like tents inland especially up over a hundred I'm meteorologist mark todo beach haven eighty Wayne eighty seven Howell eighty four download our mobile apps for breaking traffic weather and news alerts sent to your smartphone it's free you from New Jersey one one point five New Jersey won a one point five our own radio station New York Philadelphia proud to be here is the zero nine of Steve traveling first of all one of each other it's the valedictorian the smartest person in the class gets an award goes to make a speech or salutatorian seconds what is person in the class to get an award the get to make a speech my wife.

New Jersey Philadelphia Steve Wayne Howell New York Seventy five percent
"seventy five percent" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Seventy five percent below by twenty forty and net zero emissions by twenty fifty the global warming solutions act requires the state to reduce its carbon emissions by at least eighty percent below nineteen ninety levels by twenty fifty extremely cold tonight with a possibility of snow flurries. A high of nine degrees and a low of four I'm Tim, Don. For WBZ SM news. Warning, the Savage Nation contains adult language, adult content, psychological nudity. Listener discretion is advised. Now, America's most exciting radio talk show, the Savage Nation. Home of borders, language, culture. And here he is author stop mass hysteria. Michael Savage, evergreen. But one day this nation will rise up. Cream? Choose to be self-evident. Created. Green. Maybe. I haven't dreaming. One day living. We will not be. Come back. Welcome.

Savage Nation Michael Savage Tim America Seventy five percent eighty percent nine degrees One day one day
"seventy five percent" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

02:01 min | 1 year ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Scientists in every field and sub-field and found that the the scientists most open to psychic phenomenon where quantum physicists at in the seventy some seventy five percents number seventy to seventy five percent. And the folks who are least open to any of this. We're psychologists, and you know, when you think about it psychology or not even open to each other. Let alone other the ideas about the mind from outside the field. It's amazing work in just tremendous field. Where do you see it in the next ten years? Lloyd, what's going to happen with it? Well, I think because there are more and more people being drawn to studying consciousness itself in parapsychology really may end up becoming part of that whole it already is part of that movement. But he may officially become part of that movement at some point. I think that that's where the the so-called breakthroughs are gonna come through. I think we're gonna learn a lot more because people are really interested on about the nature of consciousness, not just how the mind power behavior. Works a psychologist deal with behavior. These folks are trying to figure out what consciousness actually is. And that's where it's gonna come. Let's go to Walter in Graham Washington now. Hi, Walter, good morning. Good morning. I'd like to ask your guest the question. I nine hundred seventy one night. I I get I'm sure I did. I'm sure I had a heart attack almost your heart attack. And when it happened to me, my thoughts were just going normal. Then all of a sudden they started racing. And I from slows dot the words just took off like high rate of speed next thing. I knew my body was out of control. I it scared me to death. And I said, oh, I'm gone goodbye. And the next thing I know it was black, and I was out, and I remember, and then the next thing I knew was these words implying by again at a high rate of speed..

Walter Lloyd Graham Washington seventy five percent ten years
"seventy five percent" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

The How-To Heretic

05:04 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on The How-To Heretic

"Democrats at shoots up. It's like sixty seventy five percent respectively, right. Yeah. So I think you know your your opinion on abortion is not primarily determined by your political affiliation or your religious affiliation. The opposition to abortion, you know, it's hard to to pin down the exact reason, but a lot of it comes down to controlling reproduction. Right. And why do you want to do that? Right? Exactly. I mean, so the ability to control your own reproduction is you know a passport to opera tune ity to gross two to a world that wouldn't be available to you. If you were forced to continuously become pregnant to not have access to birth control to not have access to abortion. It would. It's, it's a ticket to health. Pregnancy is a stressful time for a woman emotionally physically, financially, enter the ability to control that aspect of your life opens up this this whole new world. Interest in controlling that not only pregnancy, but like motherhood costs a fortune? Yes, just so being able to choose whether you have a child or not seems to me to be a great boon for any woman. Yeah, we did. We did a piece. I don't know if you had a chance to listen to Dr a little while ago that we talked about child brides phenomenon in the religious world. And that was a big part of it was, you know, basically having people who are not done being children, make more children, robs them of any opportunity in life, right? They just and so finding a way to prevent child brides which is not the subject of this discussion, but basically a way to liberate people from a cycle where they're just making more people until they are in a position to choose to do that freely is a good thing. Yes, I think I mean, you completely completely hit the nail on the head. I mean, I think it's about and it's not just about that individual person. It's about our society as a whole children are taken care of the children who do exist. The parents have the capacity to to love and provide attention and to provide for their children. They have the ability also to provide for themselves and to be complete people into be to contribute in their own ways to society, to achieve education to get a good job. I mean, all of those things are tied into each other. So it's not just about that individual person who is pregnant, but really, it's it's about our successes, a society, you know, and it's people who have abortions have them for variety of reasons. The most common reasons tend to be financially. They feel like they cannot support a child or. Another child, you know, two-thirds of women who have abortions already parents. So two thirds two-thirds. Yeah, it's it's not. It's not the teenager who is irresponsible in didn't think to use birth control or the college student who was out hooking up. You know, it's all these preconceived notions that we have about who has abortions. And the reality is everybody has an abortion one out of four women. It runs the gamut, but most of them are mothers. They know what it means to be a parent to bring a child into this world and very informed decision that that's the bulk of his people are making because they've they've confronted it before. Right. Absolutely. I find it Indra. No. One of the things that you that we sort of talked about in leading up to this was the the notion that abortion is is healthcare. This isn't we're not talking about like just a just sort of a a, a whim or whatever. This is something that a lot of women that it's about their health and it's about their wellbeing people. Yes, absolutely. I mean, I think the some people don't wanna believe that abortion is healthcare, but you know, it's on an abortion is on the spectrum of the reproductive-health cycle that that people go through. And so. The two, you cannot, you know, minimize the impact that a pregnancy has on somebody. And so you know, the decision to become pregnant is a big decision, and if it happens and you are not financially physically or emotionally ready to take on tape that on than the best thing that you can do for your own personal health is to choose to not be pregnant because end by making that choice,.

sixty seventy five percent
"seventy five percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:42 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"In a few minutes away now thank you president trump is a new jersey after campaigning for republicans in montana he took aim at many of his enemies the media and democratic senator elizabeth warren abc's janai norman has the recap of his latest rally president trump's rallying republicans in deep red montana taking aim at the media less than a week after a deadly shooting in maryland newsroom because some of the finest people i know our journalists really but seventy five percent of those people are downright dishonest the president reviving what time of called inoffensive nickname for democratic senator elizabeth warren let's say i'm debating pocahontas right over her past comments about her native american heritage i will take you you know those little kids say sell a television for two dollars learn your heritage we will take that little kid and say but we have to do a gently because we're in the metoo generation v very president trump who's been accused of sexual misconduct hitting the metoo movement even mocking in iconic member of his own party ninety four year old george hw bush and his thousand points of light theme for volunteerism putting america first we understood thousand points of light i never quite got that one what the hell is that the controversial comments come hours after his embattled epa chief resigned scandalplagued scott pruitt faces at least a dozen investigations across multiple government agencies and was repeatedly accused of using his position for personal benefit i'm not happy about certain things but he's done a fantastic job running dpa president trump's jab at the metoo movement comes as his administration added former fox news co president bill shine tis communications team shine has been accused by some of covering up sexual misconduct claims against roger ailes and bill riley both men president trump defended janine norman abc news washington overnight president trump's new tariffs went into effect and while we wait to see the impact they have on the global market place here in indiana farmers are worried china has pledged to retaliate with taxes on soybeans and other goods and again is the fourth largest producer of soybeans in the country for ramsey farms in shelby county they make up half their crop and the uncertainty is worrisome uncertain time is is painful i you might say as we're looking towards harvest finishing up taking care of her crop and we need a certain amount of money to pay our bills and keep everything going to put it into perspective one out of every three rows of soybeans planted here and an indiana is exported export into china officials in mexico are investigating a deadly explosion at a fireworks warehouse just outside of mexico city at least nineteen people were killed and forty others injured some of the victims include first responders who were killed after arriving on the scene when a second explosion went off officials say many residents work at the warehouse making homemade fireworks and explosions are common just not on this deathly scale the woman who climbed the statue of liberty on the fourth of july protesting president trump's zero tolerance immigration policy is out on bail this morning forty four year old patricia aku was at the monument protesting with the group when she decided to claim climb on lady liberty's feet she says the decision was also inspired by something former first lady michelle obama said day decor low we go high and i went i called she has pleaded not guilty to the charges she is.

trump president seventy five percent ninety four year forty four year two dollars
"seventy five percent" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on KGO 810

"News update update nikki's going to look out for me my home and what what's going on at moraga all right so the moraga or inda fire department says the buckingham fires it's being called has grown to forty five acres it is seventy five percent contained moraga road is closed to all traffic between saint mary's road in lafayette tarim boulevard in moraga but again be buckingham fire it's forty five acres and seventy five percent contained catchy some were they say seventy five percent contained doesn't it always don't you think of it like a pie chart and they're just leaving that one twenty closing well we'll just get five more people and get the rest of it anyway yeah i don't understand work i work okay okay for a federal judge has determined the federal government is violating its own rules regarding the treatment of people seeking asylum the judge ordered is to stop what opponents called the arbitrary detention of legitimate asylum seekers the white house is declining to name the four candidates who interview today with president trump for the supreme court vacancy and spokeswoman sarah huckabee sanders is trump is not asking candidates their opinions about the landmark abortion ruling roe versus wade says he hopes to announce the nominee by next week a pleasanton woman is drowned trying to save three children at san mateo county beach sheriff's office says the forty seven year old woman was swept to sea yesterday during the incident i cal ranch stage she and others pulled the children to safety and oakland a's catcher bruce maxwell has been sentenced to two years probation on a disorderly conduct charge the charge them from his arrest for allegedly pointing a handgun at a woman was delivered food to his own a home last fall i like that guy i like the way he plays i didn't know that when did that happen last fall as is okay yeah now that to you chip franklin are we are doing this jake right out at the marin county fair in san rafael at easy to find and i wanna tell you if you come we're here to seven now we're in the beer and wine garden and lot growing in here too and if you want if you're here effectively you can hear my voice at the fair or if you're driving and coming in come on by and sign up we'll put your name in a box and we're gonna have a drawing for tickets to go see counting crows this friday night at the shoreline so that'll be i mean they're amazing a concert and it's three so just come to mind do it this is such a great fair for such an inexpensive price let me say and it's like twenty bucks right to get in and the parkin's free and then you get in and all the rides and all that there's no extra charges on any of that stuff yeah they paid for the food but everything else it's cool so i know that i know i'm a golfer and i know that i try to explain this to people this doesn't happen that often on tour but a guy is accused another player in the quicken loans national tournament that happened this weekend of cheating and i'm not gonna get deep into what happened but the guy's name is joel dahmane and he cues song yang soon kong soon king k angie say his name i'm not familiar with this game either but it him of cheating and it's i mean they were so bad they let the group behind him play through that's i mean that may happen to you when you're playing immunity track somewhere in the bay area you know people play through then never happens to these guys there's only one guy i remember in professional golf that was ever accused of cheating there was vj singh we you may recognize that name he's pretty sure he's won a major he's won a lot of tournaments and he's a really successful golfer but that's the thing people remember about vj singh they cheated that's why when i tell people about golf and and again i'm a big enthusiast i the i t program get your kid out there to play early this is a really interesting story this happened so infrequently think about baseball derek jeeter hall of famer you new york yankee oh is right derrick jeeter derek jeter used to say that he would try to get hit if the.

nikki moraga buckingham inda seventy five percent forty five acres forty seven year two years
"seventy five percent" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on 710 WOR

"They just got wider and lighter because that was something they felt that the television couldn't compete with and that's why when those movies went to television they have those horrible pan and scan and you see two noses talking to each other you know that was that was their response to to that and of course also in the fifties they had a lot of gimmicks at the movies three d and all the way in castle type stuff buzzers in the seats and and you know spook shows and whatever it takes to get people to to get in the seats leave their homes lead their comfy television sets and get their get their butts in a warm seat and i think that that it just the the nowadays i think that the same thing keeps happening and i think that the movies have to compete even more and more and you have i max and even still three d and and you know what whatever it takes a lot of money on what they sold in terms of the popcorn and the soda and stuff like that well certainly in the it depends on how far back you go because at one point the the all the the studio's control the movie theaters and so you know then they own dougherty much had a corner corner the market but once the the the the studios were distributing the movies in the theaters were independently run the this the studios take such a big bite that really most of the money made is through popcorn and and candy so so you know sometimes some some movies take seventy five percent of the take so the popcorn and the candy and the soda is really where the money is made to keep those theaters open those old theaters of the past were built like museums they were gorgeous the fox theatres you know that are sprinkled all around the country now they were originally movie theaters aren't they owe their well picture palaces with gold leaf and neon and and just amazing cathedrals they were built to show movies and because it wasn't event and they and again and that was another way of competing with other forms of media people wanted to go to the theater just to be in there because it was such a beautiful glorious place and.

dougherty seventy five percent
"seventy five percent" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"They got wider and lighter because that was something they felt that the television couldn't compete with and that's why when those movies went to television they have those horrible pan and scan and you see two noses talking to each other you know that was that was their response to to that and of course also in the fifties they had a lot of gimmicks at the movies three d and all the way in castle type stuff the buzzers in the seats and and you know spook shows and whatever it takes to get people to to get in the seats leave their homes lead they're comfy television sets and get their get their butts in a warm seat and i think that that it just the the now a days i think that the same thing keeps happening and i think that the movies have to compete even more and more and you have i max and even still three d and and you know what whatever it takes the theaters make a lot of money on what they sold in terms of the popcorn and the soda and stuff like that well certainly in the i it depends on how far back you go because at one point the all the the studio's control the movie theaters and so you know they had a corner corner the market but once the this the studios were distributing the movies in the theaters were independently run the this the studios take such a big bite that really most of the money made is through popcorn and and candy so so you know sometimes some some movies take seventy five percent of a take so the popcorn and the candy and the soda is really where the money is made to keep those theaters open those old theaters of the past were built like muse museums they were gorgeous the fox theatres that are sprinkled all around the country now they were originally movie theaters aren't they oh there will be wonderful picture palaces with gold leaf and neon and and just amazing cathedrals they were built to show movies and because it wasn't event and again and that was another way of competing with other forms of media people wanted to go to the.

seventy five percent
"seventy five percent" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Snapped of two or three of those tablets twice as two bottles a month and no one should to also excuse me take this an active so your brain cells can talk to each other take two or three of those twice as two bottles a month i'd like those by the way yup and you need don't forget those six eggs twice a day we need to rebuild the mile and in your brain now here's the deal parkinson's disease i get people their terminal they have the worst parking disease you've ever seen and in ninety days or perfectly normal if you do this okay your brain is seventy five percent mile in which is the white man of the brain and it's almost one hundred percent cluster all and you cannot have statin drugs you must stay away from all oils doc will let you wrap up with her when we come back and we'll take final calls calls in a minute on coast to coast to coast insiders the new version of the coast to coast am app is now available for iphone and now android four dot org above listen live or ondemand anywhere anytime go to coast to coast am dot com and download it today snoopers dot gov.

parkinson seventy five percent one hundred percent ninety days
"seventy five percent" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"Doug shocker tom do the shocker of bone show doc around the bounty dog show okay amy is now playing today now i mean you already have like butterflies in myself but that's the point of this i feel questions shockers coming i feel about seventy five percent dumber okay hit would you like with the categories these e sports questions holy my wheelhouse would you like easy solar system questions or easy music trivia oh it's one of those will you take oh my god i feel like sports it just totally i would not no i don't know i don't buy questions what was the last one music guys to take a game on and go okay i'm between sports and solar system and not going music wow okay wait should i leave music for to you it's up to you go music i don't know music my elton john sherve music okay i'm gonna go oh man you choose slummy no can't do that come pick one support okay okay do the shocker bone show putting the shocker around her neck mother we don't do this at home no people my kids are listening all those kids it is funny i don't do it at home that's right the little cold metal things you'll new i'm shocked she went sports oh yeah me too would you not go music why don't know music you don't know sports okay got solar system no you've already workout i'm going who works you.

tom amy Doug seventy five percent
"seventy five percent" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on KTCK Sportsradio 1310 The Ticket

"Radio network and ask promised edwin iverson i mean ever numeracy via email he catches seventy five percent of their time nearly series and has won over three million dollars to talking about guys into two million dollar club there's even fewer guys into three million dollar problem in one of them is ebony versus at twenty sixteen classic champion on grand lake so we got to go out to oklahoma talk to him about the upcoming academy sports and outdoors elite at grand lake and he joins us now i'd run welcome to the show how are you i'm doing great thanks so much for having missed i appreciate you taking a few minutes at first things first now it's been a cold damp wet type of year here all throughout the south in in oklahoma as well what i need to know is howard a pecan trees doing you know because i mean that's the key here is we're gonna have a good crop of pecans or pecans depending on what part of the country are you from e you guys really cold yeah we we thought it was we who is spring a couple of you know about a month ago or so it was we had those beautiful days and then all of a sudden we had another cold free so it's pretty pretty much the same type of deal there.

grand lake oklahoma edwin iverson first things first howard three million dollars seventy five percent three million dollar two million dollar
"seventy five percent" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Look into that i mean the simple i can only hi levels of neuroticism problematic in relationship it's probably why seventy five percent of divorces are initiated by women because women are higher in your autism than men and i think the reason for that is that they have to be more sensitive to infant distress and so that makes them more sensitive to distress in general now i don't know that for sure it's supposition but high levels of neuroticism do tend to make a relationship volatile and put a fair bit of negative emotion into it the question is where what the source of the high level of dorada's amiss it might be temperamental but it also might be addictive underlying zaidi disorder depression or or physiological problem because they manifest themselves and high levels of emotion and so there's always the possibility of doing something about that what i usually tell my clients who are high autism is two simple things number one get up at the same time in the morning okay because that it helps stabilize circadian rhythms number to eat a large meal before you stress yourself in the morning and mostly protein and fat based because if you're high under autism and you stress yourself before you eat you you just regulate your your emotional reaction systems essentially and you can't reregulate them till you sleep again so other than that goodwill and understanding is about what you've got.

seventy five percent
"seventy five percent" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

Stansberry Investor Hour

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on Stansberry Investor Hour

"At any year i mean that's the normal mortality for those kinds of ages i don't i don't wish them death i mean i go both very nice people i just think that they have made some very important mistakes and how they've allocated capital and i think the solutions very simple i don't know what will happen because i don't have any insight to the board members at berkshire and i know that buffet would prefer the company not be broken up but i think you can make a very compelling case it would be much better for shareholders if berkshire split into businesses one is a industrial conglomerate essentially an unlevered general electric so the own they own railroads they own car manufacturing they own what do they what's they make all kinds of stuff i don't wanna get into the details they own industrial businesses and that probably is worth something like hundred fifty billion something like that oh they've got the big energy company too so that's a very highly capital intensive very secure business that you would that you could load responsibly not like g did you could load responsibly with long duration fixed rate yet so you could leverage that business seventy five percent to equity so you know you you then you have a very good business because yes it has maybe five percent return on investment capital and it has maybe a ten percent or twelve percent return equity because of the leverage so it's it's a it's a nice very stable business that's growing along side gdp and pays a big dividends so it's the kind of business you'd wanna own if you're retired and you needed safe income fine on the other hand there ferrari is there is there insurance companies and their best in class consumer brands businesses and those businesses are typically owned equities.

ferrari seventy five percent twelve percent five percent ten percent
"seventy five percent" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Lies seventy five percent of the population is chronically dehydrated so there's a very high likelihood the year dehydrated let's set ourselves up for success by taking care of this the night before in an effort to make sure this is really easy for you to consume like to take these tips and apply them i want to just give you four today because i know you can do these four things if i give you ten that's way too many so here's the fourth one schedule and plan your work out the night before now ideally i love your work out to be first thing in the morning and here's why i know you might not be a morning person or maybe you've got to beat a work by four thirty a m so you're like there is no way i am exercising at three a m i understand your sleep is critical that's first like your sleep needs to come really before your exercise so if it's a matter of you know missing out on a couple of hours asleep or getting your work out get your sleep but for those of you who can structure your day as such the you're able to get your workout first thing in the morning you should do so why because study after study after study says that those are the people who are the most consistent have the highest energy the most productivity the greatest brainderived neurotrophic factor which we talked about in a previous episode the stuff that makes all of the synopsis can act it makes you more patient it makes you more confident all of these things happen when we exercise does that mean.

seventy five percent
"seventy five percent" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

CNBC's Fast Money

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on CNBC's Fast Money

"They figured out their problems why do i mention that because in two thousand sixteen target had an awful year and i think target is now we're warmer was about a year ago and i'm not suggesting they deserve the same multiple but in my opinion if you like walmart here close to eighteen times forward earnings having figured out their problems i think you've got gotta like target a thirteen and a half 14times on the precipice i think figuring out their problems go back to their guide it's a week and a half ago that suggests that maybe they could be points pray walmart like break out to the upside i believe i don't i don't know if anybody can be amazon proof and i think that maybe walmart's bouncing back because brick and mortar bounce back me because they bought jet dot com maybe a host of other reasons but ones up seventy percent your date amazon's up 35 percent your date bob alibaba seventy five percent i don't think it's time to go into walmart just yet they'd need a little bit of an investment cycle and their ecommerce business but nobody does it like amazon does it amazon could take about any time they would like to actually think they're going after dig with different segments salaam long walmart part of reason allies was long vault walmart or mlong walmart's because they're punching back against amazon but they picked the different segment so you look at what they're selling when i look at walmart i look at all those stores is distribution centres what are you go in there the by you don't go in there to buy the stuff that you're buying on amazon go buy into the by the big bowl products and where are they taking share to me it's something like a cosco look at cosco stock that's done.

walmart amazon seventy five percent seventy percent 35 percent
"seventy five percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Opportunity but it's the political will on that depends upon at the and i you know judges us bad daughters are more likely to rule for women's rights then judges you don't have daughters i think game rights made huge strides win suddenly every straight american realize that they're brother are chi center best buddy was day it when we had him and face on and i think that one of the problems is that if you have if you were successful in america day you probably don't now a lot of people who were struggling and then becomes easy to carve this narrative about personally responsibility and now sort of and turn aside so white and when you is to help people over the hump story telling you know what seventy five percent of occasion americans don't have a single black friend what percent seventy five percent wednesday and i i think it in that contest if you don't no one eight laughs and it's easy to think of there's no problem with one for smb and but if you actually and i was i was very struck when you know one that trend was telling me how he never he always holds on to receive every time leaves the sorenson me i would never think out what happened ways he he recently married white women and they were make it purchase together a department store and they brought something she tossed out to receive in his like what are you doing and you know it's the but it's right tv i think and when we down to make these connections interim isaac he knows tell fall then tv story telling there's been work that literature opens out bond empathy as well there's a couple really weird things about the brain and and if they so you're saying and one point in about the best people are more willing to give ten individual until group so much so that.

isaac america seventy five percent
"seventy five percent" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"seventy five percent" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"I seventy five percent of people from a quick and of your face using the visual cameras and it the idea of you having danny privacy is endangered by that right now me i sits we have no rules cover name how are image can be captured and how draw ca can be built on us you know we're deep data and i think we really need to think about in a free society are right to privacy versus the rights of the authorities to track down able to hers there is no exact right answer on of the right now we're not even having the conversation and the idea that these cameras right now can identify seventy five percent of us and immediately duo data dive pretty creepy and the capabilities only move up from seventy five percent so i know we have a laundry list things we all get to worry about and i am a huge believer and protecting our homeland and securing up our country from people who might want to destroy us but the truth is we have to be careful that we don't tram paul on our individual rights at the same time steve is with us on the court coward show high steve how are you great thank you very much for having me on.

steve danny seventy five percent