35 Burst results for "seven percent"

interview With Meagan Crawford

Main Engine Cut Off

04:11 min | 16 hrs ago

interview With Meagan Crawford

"Well. Megan welcome to manage and cut off. This has been a year overdue at this point. An entire pandemic overdue. Maybe i'm happy that you're here talking to us. I'm really thrilled to be here. Thank you for having me anything so to start. I want everyone to meet you. Because you're awesome So you are a member of space fund. You also have this podcast mission eve. That is fantastic. Can you tell everyone a little bit about you sure. Yeah co founder and managing partner of space fund Where venture capital firm investing exclusively in the new space ecosystem so very kind of targeted fund And then i also have my podcast mission eve which I interview the most amazing women in the space industry. It's just been a thrill and just so much fun to do. And in the hopes of inspiring more women to join us here in the space industry So that's that's a project that's near and dear to my heart I'm also on. The board of several nonprofits needs to do a quick shout out the space frontier foundation. The center for space commerce finance mars initiative and the earth light foundation Spend an inordinate amount of my time helping those at nonprofits. So i think that's probably about it so we're gonna talk about a bunch of different angles on the finance side of stuff which i occasionally touch on but probably not as deeply as i should in many cases there's some fundraising that has happened. In the past year that has been particularly notable for the size specifically spacex relativity. Been getting gargantuan amounts of money there's some acquisitions that have happened recently. And then There's a whole trend of holding companies. That i find quite interesting as well as a trend that i find interesting and more shady. Which is this whole special purpose acquisition friend. Those are the things. I want to pick your brain about. Is there an order. would you like to start with fundraising and then get into what happens after. You've gotten a bunch of funding and actually accomplish things. What's the right order there. Yeah well I think i'd like to start with this kind of startling statistic that that i i like to I like to bring up a lot. Is that One and it's it's one of the reasons that spaceman was founded. Actually is you know. Currently launched comprises less than two percents of the global space economy yet has received seven percent of the venture capital. Today right sounds crazy but it. It makes such intuitive sense to like you know somebody watches the markets but exactly crazy. Yeah that's crazy. Yeah i like it when you hear that you're like oh yeah that seems right but holy crap. That's crazy just hear those numbers right and now the one question i would have is. Does that. include any space x funding as launch. Yes that includes spacex funding and includes the you know that big relativity rounded includes all of that. So i guess that's my that would be. My stipulation is like how. How do you separate out. What of that is going to starlink. zach satellites. Then does that skew it or is it not big enough to actually skew. Anything no matter how you classify either couple billion. Yeah so you know the regardless. It's it's a huge number even if he were to try and take starlink out of the kind of the space x portion of that. They're going to be forty percent of the venture right number exactly exactly and so you know when When my partner. Rick tomlinson and i were contemplating a founding space fund. You know this was one of the things that was really bothering us. We were kind of looking around the industry at all of our our friends and colleagues. Who are these brilliant entrepreneurs going and down sandhill road and couldn't get any funding and meanwhile while all these other. Vc's are just pouring good money. After bad into launch company after launch company because all ilan has launched company and basil's has launched company and jared. Leto is invested in in relativity space so i need a launch company. Right and base fund is currently tracking a hundred and sixty two active launch companies around the world.

Space Fund Where Venture Capit Space Frontier Foundation Center For Space Commerce Fina Megan Spacex Spaceman Zach Satellites Rick Tomlinson Ilan Leto Basil Jared
How Netskope is Refining Edge Security

IT Visionaries

05:09 min | 4 d ago

How Netskope is Refining Edge Security

"Today we have sanjay beri. He is the ceo and co founder of netscape sanjay. Welcome to the show. Thank you great to be here all right so we always give all of our guests an opportunity to tell us exactly what their company does. Your the ceo and founder of netscape. What do you guys do absolutely so. Our focus is making sure that organizations enterprises across the world can leverage the new way people work remote for example and do it securely star focuses protecting enterprises from threats theft of data while enabling them to work the way they want to liberty in cloud leveraging the internet working remote in so on and so our category as making would call. It is something called secure access services edge. It's a redefinition of the market of data security to a new cloud security edge. All right so. Explain that to me without using the your industry buzzwords. Because i think this because i'll i'll let me frames up my perspective on this. I've worked at different companies. Or let's say remote i so or maybe they're even cloud native i so we didn't really depend too much on too much. Enterprise security everyone just kind of logged into public cloud. If they were developers they would have me. Vpn are asa access. So that would get them to their development instances so there's a lot of audience that doesn't quite understand exactly why enterprises needs connectivity. Security solutions like netscape kind of framing for me like what's happening in the marketplace. What's happening with your customers. And why products and services like yours are needed to begin with totally totally so just if you step back. The single biggest market insecurity people spend close to thirty billion dollars a year on. Is this market call data network security and what is that. It's the stuff that you heard of like wham. Gateways firewalls data. Loss systems proxies. They're all boxes Somewhere near network so biggest. market insecurity. the problem. There's problems with that market. The world has moved on meaning one sixty seven percent of people work remote and people don't want to go back and bp another corporate network anymore they want to go straight to the internet straight to cloud and so one. The location of those boxes wrong It's forcing inefficiencies performance problems too much expense and so people are saying. Wait a minute. I don't want these boxes. Mike perimeter. I want this edge in the cloud. Where no matter where i am. I have great fast access to my resources in. I have this security on ramp right that is everywhere in the world and you know with us. Fifty milliseconds away from anybody in the world doesn't matter what country would city and is this virtual clouded so one the change in the way that people are working remote partners accessing things assessing the change in location if your security in this market to the language has changed and so important point every ten years maybe fifteen. The language of the internet changes so reality is remember way back when paolo to networks came out and and they said hey we're going to beat cisco juniper and all these folks and it's because the language internet has changed it's all about application identification. The reality is that that has happened again. Ten years later and now the world and the language and internet is. Api's it's j. It's you that's how applications are built. The internet is built and so as a result all those systems that you spend thirty billion on that. Sit in the wrong location. They don't understand the language. And so i'll give you this great example. Send with his so and she said to me. Hey sanjay Okay is about four years ago. she goes I got these systems. I got these proxies. I got this firewall. In what more do i need. And i said what are they telling you. And she goes water all their bill. You know five or cave data amazon. And i go to her will. What are you gonna do with that. I mean i don't know a quarter of the internet goes goes to actually. I don't know what to do that. And i go well. It speaks the wrong language stickers in sticks his in and i our system tells her actually that guys on slack gonna public channel sending credit card by the way it is fighting. Mccabe data amazon. They're both right and i go. What do you want which one she goes. I want the second one data this point. The language internet changed and so this concept of mexico is put your security where you want in the virtual edge no matter where people work there and speak the language that the internet speaks so you can set in protect your data in a much better way to. That's a short summary for you.

Sanjay Beri Netscape Sanjay Netscape Mike Perimeter Sanjay Okay Paolo Cisco Amazon Mccabe Mexico
Is Student Loan Forgiveness A Good Idea?

Money For the Rest of Us

09:16 min | 5 d ago

Is Student Loan Forgiveness A Good Idea?

"Right now on the. Us government federal balance sheet there's loan receivables over a trillion dollars of student loan debt sitting there as a receivable for the fiscal year ending nineteen total assets of the federal government worth three point nine trillion of which one point one trillion was direct student loans. But here's the thing. Three point nine. Trillion in assets twenty six point nine trillion in liabilities. The difference the deficit is twenty two point nine trillion dollars. The us government is effectively insolvent. It does more than its assets. And if the us government road off four hundred and forty billion dollars of student loans it would just increase the level of insolvency. It would not sink. The government by any means the education department according to some private consulting work that they contract it out understand what the potential losses are on their student loans found. According to a report by the wall street journal that losses on the one point three seven dollars of student loans outstanding at the time this report was compiled would equal four hundred and thirty five billion dollars. Only nine hundred and thirty five billion would be paid back and that didn't include about one hundred fifty tonnes originated by private lenders that are guaranteed by the government each year. The government lends a hundred billion dollars to students to cover tuition to more than six thousand. Colleges and universities doesn't look at credit scores or the field of study or whether students will make enough after graduating to cover the debt. The wall street journal article reported that between two thousand five in two thousand sixteen four intent student loans. Most of them federal went went to borrowers with credit scores below the subprime threshold. That's assuming they actually had a credit score. Which at the time. That i took out my first student loan which i'll talk about a little later in this episode. I didn't have a credit score. Nor frankly i know what i was doing. But here's the thing. The consultants found out that a major driver of those losses were students. Who went on some type of income driven repayment plan. An income share to wear they only had to pay a percentage of their income and ultimately the loan could be forgiven after a number of years. If a loan isn't paid back in full because the payments are based on income in income isn't growing and ultimately the alone is written off after twenty years or so then that will lead to a loss in addition that study found that there are millions of other borrowers that would default on smaller amounts typically less than ten thousand dollars after the drop out of a community college or a for profit college one of the comments in this wall street journal article on the private consultants conclusion regarding the potential losses. For the us government. Student loan program is that taxpayers would be on the hook for this if the government off four hundred and forty billion dollars of student loans. Us government would receive less interest income and principal payments annually interest if we assume a five percent interest rate on one and a half trillion dollars of student. Loans is is only about eighty five billion dollars. now. I say only because total. Us government revenue is three point four trillion dollars. Interest income from student loans is only about two and a half percent expenditures in fiscal year. Twenty twenty six and a half trillion dollars. The deficit was three point. One trillion fourteen point seven percent of economic output or gdp nominal gdp and fiscal year. Two thousand twenty was twenty one point two trillion dollars. This deficit was fourteen point seven percent of that number the highest since the great financial crisis where the deficit was nine point. Eight percent the highest deficit ever was in nineteen forty three at twenty nine point six percent of gdp. The us ran three point. One trillion deficit in twenty twenty and the federal reserve increased the amount of treasuries on their balance sheet essentially funding that deficit. Two point two trillion dollars is the additional treasury bonds that the federal reserve bought so two point two trillion of the three point one trillion dollar deficit. These student loans are tiny percent of what the government is spending much of which the federal reserve financed indirectly. Veterans are didn't just give the money to the treasury. they went through the county mechanism of buying treasury bonds. But that's what happened. The federal reserve created the money out of thin air to purchase treasury bonds to plug the deficit now when i started hearing about forgiving student. Loans cancelling them. My impression was the student loan. Burden is as high as it's ever been. That students are struggling tremendously compared to when i took out student loans in the late eighties and early nineties. What i found was the average student loan and again this is based on data from marc canter wits. This is just the average student loan balance for graduates with bachelor's degree when they leave school in one thousand nine hundred nineteen ninety-three. It was ninety three hundred dollars. Forty six percent of students had student loan debt. That's about how much i had little over ten thousand dollars in student loans. When i left graduate school today. The average student loan balance is twenty nine thousand nine hundred dollars just for students. With bachelor's degrees sixty nine percent of graduating students have student loan balances. That amount going from ninety three hundred to twenty nine thousand. Nine hundred was a four point. Six percent annual increase. Now that's a burden no doubt and if it growing at four point six percent it's growing faster than inflation yet if i look at what students are making when they graduate in nineteen ninety-three or year after they graduated so in nineteen ninety-four an engineer. Starting salary was thirty thousand. Nine hundred dollars. A humanities graduate was making twenty one thousand three hundred dollars so if we compare that salary to the amount of their debt engineer made three point three times. The amount of student loan debt they had and the humanities major may two point three times the amount of student loan debt they have if we look at what engineers typically make coming out of university. Today it's close to seventy thousand dollars or about two point three times the amount of their student debt back in one thousand nine hundred. They made three point three times the amount that they owed now. It's two point three times so they own more relative to their salary but the interest rates are lower now. So they're able to handle that. But it's not this huge change that i had expected for the humanities graduate. They went from earning two point. Three times Student loan balance to one point eight times now. Part of that is pell. Grants which are grants given to low income students to essentially pay for school. I got a lot of pell grants when i went to school. That program has only grown about three point nine percent per year the maximum payout amount per student so it has not grown as fast as student debt levels. Now we can say well may be. College graduates are able to find jobs. The unemployment rate for recent graduates was five point one percent in nineteen ninety-two it was three point. Nine percent before the pandemic hit in february twenty twenty and so a greater percentage of recent graduates had jobs in early. Twenty twenty then back in nineteen ninety-two now. The unemployment rate at least in september was nine point one percent according to some data from the new york fed which suggests that yeah Graduates are struggling to get jobs. It is harder today than it was in nineteen ninety two but not that much difficult. And i don't recall calls to cancel student. Loan debt back in the early to the mid ninety s

Us Government Wall Street Journal Federal Reserve Treasury
Tesla gains 4% after previous day's losses

Yahoo Finance Market Minute

00:12 sec | 6 d ago

Tesla gains 4% after previous day's losses

"Tesla was one of the better performers on the nasdaq. One hundred tesla gaining more than four percent after being down yesterday more than seven percent ending. Its longest winning streak. Amber

Tesla
Going big: US dispensing shots at stadiums and fairgrounds

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Going big: US dispensing shots at stadiums and fairgrounds

"The strategy is to go big in the distribution of the corona virus vaccine Texas governor Greg Abbott says it's all a work in progress what we were able to quickly learn over the course of the first ten days is we needed to find a way to accelerate the process of providing those vaccines convention centers fairgrounds in sports stadiums are now sites of mass vaccinations San Diego's chief nursing officer Denise foster is at petco park their schedule twenty five hundred but we're looking to ramp that up to five thousand per day the CDC says about nine million people have received their first shot two point seven percent of the population experts say as much as eighty five percent of the population will have to be inoculated to achieve herd immunity and vanquish the outbreak I'm a Donahue

Greg Abbott Denise Foster Petco Park Texas San Diego CDC Donahue
Despite The Pandemic, Transit Service In Houston's Harris County Reaches Major Ridership Goal

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:47 sec | Last week

Despite The Pandemic, Transit Service In Houston's Harris County Reaches Major Ridership Goal

"Since two thousand and eight harris county transit has grown from two routes to twelve serving places in the eastern half of the county like baytown. Crosby the agency says. It's now reached a major milestone recording one million boardings on its buses david jones agencies. Deputy assistant director. He says for a lot of people in east harris county. Who don't have a vehicle. The service is a lifeline. A lot of it is medical. We have folks that need services. They can't drive anymore. We do a lot of dialysis patients in baytown because of the pandemic harris county. Transit isn't collecting fares right now and it's also limiting capacity while pandemic ridership has fallen dramatically on some other transit systems. Jones says air numbers are only down by about seven percent. I'm gail water in

Harris County Baytown East Harris County David Jones Crosby Jones
REMAP CAP | COVID-19 Clinical Research

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:21 min | Last week

REMAP CAP | COVID-19 Clinical Research

"In california's los angeles county. The hardest hit area of the country. Many hospitals have no more room in their intensive care units so even as vaccines are developed and deployed to prevent covid nineteen cases. The remains an urgent need for drugs to help treat those. Who have it on seventh. A study called re map cap which is conducted in england and other countries report results from clinical trials of hugh drax which are currently used to treat. A chunk of is our healthcare correspondent. Do you results which have not yet been period but will be soon are very promising. They show that these drugs can reduce the death rate among styles to barely. Ill covid nineteen patients by around a quarter. And why is it. That drugs normally administered for arthritis would be a help in covid. Nineteen so these tracks tau cillizza mab and surreal. Ma'am there normally used to reduce inflammation in patients with arthritis and inflammation is a big problem with covid nineteen. It's actually one of the ways that actually kills severely. Ill patients and what happens. Is that the body's immune system calls information. It's usually helpful. That's how it fights off an infection but with covid nineteen in some patients. Information just goes overboard so it has been surge going on for over year for drugs that can prevent a hyper inflammation and so far we've had on the one drug. A steroid called exa medicine which was proven to reduce dramatically death rates. And how did these two drugs emerge as good candidates them. So dixon mechanism dampens the immune system across the bharat was and surreal. Map are a little bit more targeted. They are both made the antibodies that block they affect of a specific protein called interleukin. Six that is known to stock. They mean response and has been particularly prominent in patients with covid nineteen so they're really targeting proteins. Which is a big problem material patients. And so how did we come to know that these two drugs are so good. At reducing inflammation the clinical trial enrolled eight hundred patients. Who are customized for covid nineteen. Who are all ill enough to require. Transfer this carry units in. The results are really striking in the group of patients who received the standard treatment. Which already includes dixon on a standard of care. Nearly three six percent died in the group that receives the standard treatment and then on top of it one of these two and inflammatory drags only twenty seven percent of patients died. So that's a mass effect and another very important. Finding from the trial was the patients who received these tracks recover faster. They were discharged from hospitals seven to ten days earlier which also is a mass effect because normally covid nineteen patients in hospitals for a very long time and so with that knowledge in hand. Then how soon might we see it. Sort of put to use and wear. So does eliza map. One of the tracks is already being used here in the uk. There already suffice. In hospitals guidelines for treating covid nineteen patients already been changed and it will be attracted will be used in other countries soon. I'm sure but unlike some medicine which is a very cheap drag. It costs a couple of dollars for a course of treatment. The cost of these hugh anti inflammatory drugs is an issue in britain of course of treatment. Which is intravenous. Infusion costs around one thousand pounds. So that's really expensive for developing countries and although in britain it's probably very cost effective because a day intensive care in hospital costs the national health service here around thousand pounds per patients so compared to one thousand pounds for the drag. It's a good deal to say nothing of the lives. say so. It seems that we are finding more more treatments. more drugs. more things that are already clinically approved. Is there more in the pipeline like this that can give us a bit more hope about treating covid nineteen yes absolutely many more drags which are being tested around the world sam in very large clinical trials here in the uk where probably around the corner of covid nineteen patients in hospitals are enrolled in one trial another. Some of these trials have shown that some drugs are not effective which is also useful knowledge because they are rigorously. Conducted randomized trials with very large patient samples. So you can be very confident in the results but there are several other drugs. That are still being tested than we may. Well find more drugs. We can add to the treatment protocols. Thanks very much for joining us

Hugh Drax Arthritis Dixon Los Angeles County Inflammation England California Britain Eliza UK Hugh National Health Service
Trump remains defiant amid calls to resign

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last week

Trump remains defiant amid calls to resign

"President trump remains defiant amid calls to resign and plans to spend his last days in office playing offense trump has not taken any responsibility for his role in inciting Wednesday's violence amid a rebellion from members of his own party and ongoing efforts to remove him from office he said no public schedule but on Tuesday he'll travel to Alamo Texas to highlight his administration's efforts to curb illegal immigration and border wall construction and ABC news Ipsos poll released Sunday found that sixty seven percent of respondents said trump deserves a good amount or a great deal of blame for the insurrection and fifty six percent believe he should be removed from office I'm Julie Walker

President Trump Donald Trump Abc News Ipsos Alamo Texas Julie Walker
Who is underpricing Roblox?

Equity

04:10 min | Last week

Who is underpricing Roblox?

"Which filed to go public last year was going to debut as any said before the year some. Ipo's went out that were rather exuberantly received. And is that it. Whoa whoa whoa hold on. Because robots was going to let a lot of shareholders sell their shares at the ipo price in the offering and they didn't those shares me miss price fair enough so what they've done is they have raised a five hundred twenty million dollars series. H at eight twenty nine point five billion dollars valuation effectively replacing what they would have done in the ipo raise. And then they're going to direct list. So everyone will be unburdened in able to sell their shares. That they'd like to their experience the traditional ipo process and into the blocks brand a sufficiently large drive interest in the company. Now guys we've all heard ad nauseam complaints from adventure. Classes danny's old stomping grounds. That banks mismanaging. Ipo's underpricing them and rewarding their clients essentially with free money. Here's my question now. Roadblocks us at a price for itself thousand nine point five billion. What do we say out. And it's worth thirty five billion the first day won't they also have yet again mistrial. Peo- does this situation. This new solution actually fix anything. I think one of the big challenges. They faced the raises past brown from driessen. In february twenty twenty it was valued at four billion and they raise one hundred fifty million bucks with tiny percentage. and what. you're seeing the exact same thing this time with the series h five hundred twenty million at twenty nine point five billion valuation one point seven percent solution. So it's very tiny. But i think what they wanted to do was sent a very strong signal to the market of. Here's where we see the price. Today there are investors who are investing at this price. Last price was four billion. This is thirty. And i think they wanted to market support for the argument that they should be valued at this price. I don't think they looked at a lot of the other things on the market. And like wow. It's really hot. That was the story line. And i just. I'm very skeptical. But i think this is a proof point of saying look. There is actually market depth at these prices. And it sets the tone of the ipo more strongly than if they had just gone out. Kind of blindly. When we're i want to get into take on this but like we hear a lot of complaints from these about bankers mispricing. Startups andriessen bought a bunch of shares from roadblocks earlier in twenty twenty out of four billion dollar valuation. Now it's worth thirty. That's seven and a half times as much. Who's underpricing roadblocks. Here is that the bankers. Or is it andriessen horowitz. I have a suspicion. That it's the bbc's. I think it's amazing that we never talked about that. We always say. Oh the cow. Well the vc's did not dramatically underpriced screwing the employees who are doing the work out of equity and a fair representation for the show when you see these numbers. I know you're more early stage person. But how does this make you feel one. That's awesome framing alex. So i love that. I thought about snowflake when i saw robots giving that twenty nine point billion number when snowflake was planning to go public at its last raise it was valued at twelve point. Five billion obviously one of the most successful. Ipo of twenty twenty its market cap on. A went out was thirty three point. Seven billion a huge difference. And i think maybe roe is feeling in some ways. Like snowflake miss price. Let's just feel that confident about ourselves. I don't know if that's a fair enough. Compared because i'm sure they're very different businesses but if robots is misplaced and a lot bigger it will also be one of the most successful. Ipo of all time. The new price for robotics is crazy over you. I think one of the big questions we have to ask what's flow the ipo. Look at this. And i got his ms price. Well at a certain point of you're only doing one point six percent solution like of course you want to get you want to nail it perfectly. But the reality is if you're only bloating one point six percent who cares the question at the. Are you floating fiber shares ten percent of the shares thirty percent of the shares. Because that to me is a huge difference compared to some of these earlier rounds where the delusion is much smaller. Yeah for sure. And one thing we've seen just circle back to the point of ipo's being cuoco. Mis-priced is a lot of companies have had a very thin flow and start to trade and so you've seen asymmetric demand from retail investors compared to very very limited shares available which of course ratchets up the initial trading price feeding fodder into the argument. That bankers are better pricing. And this is not to defend bankers. The point is this. it's not like everything is as cut and dry as fits into a tweet. That's what i'll say just to be clear. Andriessen is making the most noise about myspace. Ipo's it's actually benchmark. Don't want to conflate everybody in my head is just vc's but it's worth noting that girly for border a bit worker less active invest. Whatever he is america's area go.

IPO Driessen Andriessen Andriessen Horowitz Danny Brown Snowflake BBC ROE Alex Myspace America
Uninterrupted Power Supplies protects your Apple devices

Mac Minutes

07:50 min | Last week

Uninterrupted Power Supplies protects your Apple devices

"I've got to admit buying a. Ups to me is about as interesting as getting socks for christmas or going out to replace my water heater. It's something we need take for granted and makes our life better but you know what without a ups you're nice powered apple devices and accessories are vulnerable especially with the electrical grid being so vulnerable to natural disasters. We experience it here every few weeks. And i'm sure you do too elsewhere so this is a serious talk. We need to have as fast having a ups. It often guarantees power and protection for your electric's in your home and business and many of us are working from home with the covid. nineteen epidemic. I commonly hear from people losing data from their devices or suddenly stops working after the power went out or after it has just returned it believers me how a person can spend hundreds or if not thousands of dollars on a new mac book or a new electronic device such as a computer or gaming device and put it at risk of a devastating incident. This is especially true in areas where there are frequently power outages due to maintenance whether and accidents as those who listened to mac minutes. No i live in krige alaska where we frequently lose. Power do one or more of these causes in areas such as interior alaska which is frequented by lightening. These ups offer another layer of protection. Incidents like these are becoming even more devastating with the decreasing capability to repair these electron devices and back one name brand manufacturers selling computers now have reportedly no serviceable is so a damaged power supply would mean a catastrophic loss when it could have been befriended by a ups ups provides backup power during outages and unsafe voltage fluctuations such as damaging surges and spikes and is the perfect choice to protect your data and keep you a typical then can be viewed on the evening national news any night of the week resulting in an unplanned power outage whether you attribute this to climate change is not for debate here on the mac podcast but the fact that appears to be happening more frequently is a concern of this podcast. We've all seen it. The power goes out or flickers. The unprotected computer shuts down potentially damaging the power supply. Along with hopefully saving the document with a ups power continues to flow to your computer on notifying you of an audible alarm. Another scenario is during a brown out when the ups will switch to battery power when they incoming power drops blow a safe voltage level. In either case you will have a limited time to save your work and power down depending on the ups and the power requirements from electrons. This could be a few minutes to an hour. In any case your data and trucks will be safe. There are different types of ups supplies from various manufacturers to choose from depending on your power requirements. The more power capacity of your ups the more expensive most ups cost between thirty five and one hundred fifty dollars and are available from several retail stores often on sale on the start of new year. In fact i picked mine up at office depot. Who had them on sale to decide on which model to buy. You first need to figure out how large of a volt ampere or va capacity. You need every ups comes with the a rating like an inexpensive three hundred and fifty va. Some are more expensive. Ups's exceeding one thousand a this is a way of describing the total power capacity of the battery manufacturers will usually display the va rating prominently on the listing or packaging the higher the rating the more power the ups supply for a longer period. And the more it will likely cost when purchasing a ups. Be sure the va specifications for the equipment. You plan to connect are used. The figure is normally one point six times or a hundred and sixty seven percent of the power consumption in watts. So if you have a device that needs one hundred watts you will need a one hundred sixty. Va rating ups now. This backwards from va to watts. You can multiply the va rating of the power of supply by point six or sixty percent to get a good idea of its power delivering capability and watts for most users. Anything more than six hundred. Va will give you a few minutes of power in which to shut your computer off safely. You'll only need to spend the money for a higher. Va rating if you have a large power drawing device and if you want the ability to run your devices for many minutes while the power is off this might be necessity. If you use a health device which needs to keep running such c-pap the higher end. Ups models offer more outlets increased power along with protection for data and full nines. Buying ups online can have high mailing costs due to their weight and sometime non-availability due mailing restrictions on batteries. This is especially true for those alaskan mac minutes listeners. Furthermore if the ups is defective after the sale the mailing expense would be substantial. I've personally used. Abc ups made by schneider electric for many years without problems and have worked as intended. There are many good manufactures out. There i had to replace batteries after several years. I would say if you stick to a common manufacturer the easier it will be to find replacement batteries the tendency to plug them in and forget them exists for date marking and testing. Ups every year or so is recommended. Some ups will even indicate when that battery needs replaced. The model i use offers battery and surge protected outlets and search protected outlets i used the battery outlets for my computers and just the surge outlets for my less vital devices on the battery side. You will need to power outlets for your computer and your monitor as a minimum. I would also recommend for your cable modem and router this is because the internet connection will be offered operational even when the power goes out so four battery and surge outlets are recommended remembered. The more devices you plug in the less time your ups will be operational for the search outlets would attach computer accessories such as scanners digital phones and other items which need protection but probably aren't needed during an outage before we get too far into twenty twenty one. Spend the extra money and get the peace of mind. The device will be iran for awhile or that school report or work tasker. Which is almost finished isn't lost.

Krige Alaska VA Apple Office Depot UPS Watts Schneider Electric ABC Iran Tasker
Iran Is Escalating Its Nuclear Program

1A

03:05 min | Last week

Iran Is Escalating Its Nuclear Program

"Iranian government has resumed enriching. Uranium in one of its underground facilities. The order reportedly came from president hassan ronnie and it again breaches the terms of the thousand fifteen iran. Nuclear deal agreed on by numerous world powers. President trump withdrew from the deal in two thousand eighteen. Nancy walk us through. What's important here. What is the significance in. Help us with this idea that it's increased its levels to twenty percent purity. What does this all mean. Sure so under the twenty fifteen deal. It had a three point six seven percent cap and now the running governments said that as soon as possible. They want to get to twenty percent. The reason that's significant is to build a nuclear weapon. You have to be ninety percent now. Ninety percent sounds like A big gap. But it's much more difficult to go from three point. Six to twenty once you get past at twenty two ninety is easier or so say the experts i will defer to them and so the reason. This is caused such anxiety because this is the biggest breach of byron its commitments under that deal and so the question becomes. Why are they doing it. Part of it one could argue is that this is in response to the assassination of its top nuclear scientists. This is when the running government purse. Pass this law. It appears to be A way of building negotiation leverage ahead of the incoming biden administration as you recall president elect biden has said that he wants to Enter into that deal again. Assuming that iran is willing to comply. And i also think that there's an element of Answering to domestic audiences. This came at the same time that there was the anniversary of the one of the death of qassem sulamani by us. Drone strike and bag died in their heightened tensions between the two countries and congratulate you that this was a way of sort of iran. Reasserting itself that. It wasn't gonna be bullied by the usa in its To keep a carrier strike group in the region to send b fifty two bombers and so the totality that has led to A really major escalation in terms of capabilities towards an a nuclear weapon. So nancy. this is the million dollar question. What is all this mean about what we know of how close iran is to creating a nuclear weapon or do we assume it has one already well. The the challenges we don't ha- they didn't announce a time. They they said as soon as possible and they alerted the Of its intentions so the question becomes whether it Can do it in a in an until what time now to be fair. One could argue that they can turn this back just as quickly. So if this is towards reaching leverage vis-a-vis the incoming biden administration. You can see this pulled back almost as quickly as a as the announcement was made the challenge becomes if you start to see countries seeing this as a real threat or real movement towards building nuclear weapon particularly israel remember a decade ago when the writings were moving towards us they hit there was almost a strike campaign that was triggered by this. Then you have a different situation. So it's if it's a move towards leverage it's a very risky

Iranian Government President Hassan Ronnie President Trump Iran Biden Administration Qassem Sulamani Nancy Byron Biden USA Israel
US loses 140,000 jobs, first monthly drop since spring

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

US loses 140,000 jobs, first monthly drop since spring

"The U. S. economy posts its first monthly job loss since the spring the labor department says U. S. employers cut one hundred forty thousand jobs in December the first monthly loss since April Wells Fargo senior economist Sarah house says nearly five hundred thousand leisure and hospitality jobs were lost your restaurants hotels and really the things that consumers have have had to pull back on how says the fact the jobless rate stayed at six point seven percent the first time it has to drop since April doesn't tell the whole story about unemployed Americans about four million more people outside of the work force not even being counted the economy still has nearly ten million fewer jobs than it did before the pandemic struck in March my camp in Washington

U. S. Sarah House Labor Department U. Wells Fargo Washington
US loses 140,000 jobs, first monthly loss since spring

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last week

US loses 140,000 jobs, first monthly loss since spring

"The U. S. economy shed jobs last month the labor department reports employers cut one hundred and forty thousand positions in December it's the first monthly job loss since April when the corona virus pandemic corrupted however the unemployment rate for December remained unchanged at six point seven percent as did the number of unemployed at ten point seven million people well far below April highs those numbers are nearly twice the pre pandemic levels of February the report shows job losses in leisure and hospitality and in private education but since they were partially offset by gains in professional and business services retail trade and construction in Thomas Washington

Labor Department U. Thomas Washington
Pandemic Pricetag: U.S. Employers Cut 140,000 Jobs In December

NPR's Business Story of the Day

01:10 min | Last week

Pandemic Pricetag: U.S. Employers Cut 140,000 Jobs In December

"This pandemic is absolutely hammering. The american job market a report out from the labor department this morning shows. Us employers cut one hundred and forty thousand jobs last month. Now that's the first time we've seen a net loss of jobs. Since the early days of the pandemic last spring the unemployment rate though is steady six point seven percent. Npr's chief economics correspondent. Scott horsely is with us. Good morning scott good morning oil so forecasters predicted. It would be bad. It's even worse than they expected. What's going on. This is the price tag of a runaway pandemic Know yesterday was the deadliest day we've had so far infections are still spreading rapidly. That's led to government crackdowns on business activity and it's also just made consumers nervous about going out and spending money The job losses we saw in december were overwhelmingly concentrated in businesses. That depend on face to face contact like bars and restaurants. They lost three hundred. Seventy two thousand jobs. They're also job losses in entertainment and recreation. These are often low wage jobs to begin with so as we've seen throughout the pandemic the people suffering most are the ones who can least afford it.

Scott Horsely Labor Department NPR Scott United States
Hampton Lintorn Catlin Co-Founder and CEO of Veue, 'It's So Much More Than Gaming'

Ruby on Rails Podcast

04:14 min | Last week

Hampton Lintorn Catlin Co-Founder and CEO of Veue, 'It's So Much More Than Gaming'

"I'm curious. What are your ambitions with view view. Sorta it is a live video. Commerce company so sort of focusing on a lot of these companies are doing sort of like. Qvc from home kind of thing. We've actually sort of. It's turned into more of a say in art form so it's a live video platform so think twitch or something like that and trying to make it much more than gaming so you know my my ambition that people can connect around their interests around the world and feel like they are sharing something together even though their remote is the world becomes increasingly separated and i really want to sort of build a positive feeling. Yeah glue is. The word used to bring people together about the things that they love. And so that's what. I'm trying to do with view it's video streaming which is a the wild west to be honest partly cargo cult. I could talk about that for a long time. But on the other side of the product rate video streaming is coming in the maturation business rules around logging in or comments or test. I wanted to to make those as you know. The the risks should be on the things that are different about your business or your technology so obviously the rails app is not handling the video streaming. Because that's not what it's focused on. That's not one of the powers of rails but everything else all the business logic all the rules and moderation and all that all those things you have to build in with the platform. That's that's where. I think rails once again really shines. So what does the tech stack look like. So it's rails for the web sort of layer using stimulus. Which i sort of i've been doing a lot of people react for many years now and decided to give stimulus to try and have definitely more. I've really enjoyed it but it it is. It does have its quirks. I guess would say and you know really what we're trying to do is use. The power of web. Ep is so there's been an this. Were stimulus comes in. One of the strengths is that like react. Tends to have the opinion that it wants to isolate you from the browser as much as possible. Like even when you're writing. Html you're not writing html you're writing a representation of different down that gets you know computed and dipped in kind of trying to isolate you from from the browser. And i think it's interesting about stimulus and specifically take on. This stuff has been. The browser has good stuff in it and he kind of missed that whole train. Which i don't think this really good but coming out the other side like i think these things all come in swings almost like of fads. I usually browser no the browsers. Great come back to it. And i think we're definitely gonna swing back. I think i've been discovering just how much you can do in the browser web amazing audio context and you know even css these days horrible anymore or still a little bit. But you know it's much better than it's been in the past. I think there's just you know just even the video like web. Sorry the power of web components. The video tags and i just indian is filled with so many presents that the w3c's been regular for years and browser vendors have been working on all pretty stable. And if you if you want to target the ninety seven percents browsers that support all these things and you don't care about the three percent as much. There's just so much cool stuff to do there so honestly the stack is rails with post grads pretty straightforward these days. We're using a service called mucks to help with the actual video pipeline itself and then mostly stimulus controllers and a whole lot of cool stuff going in the browser.

QVC
One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

Short Wave

09:46 min | Last week

One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

"So today. We're speaking with just weighed in experimental. Physicists at college. London and every night for the past three years just has written a wikipedia entry about a woman or poc scientists. And if this sounds like a big commitment that's because it is. But what motivates. Just keep with. It is the possibility of using wikipedia to combat the bias. In science. We see it in who gets through peer review. We see it in who gets big papers. Cited we see who gets big grants. We see it and who wins awards. And that means that the people that we celebrate and champion incredibly homogeneous and when wikipedia launched the internet was a very small space and it was very dominated by particular types of people. This kind of you know. Tech bro attitude that we still see in silicon valley and places like that majority white majority western a lot from north america some from western europe and those were the first people to start using it engaging in contributing to wikipedia backed according to a twenty twenty study. Eighty seven percents of wikipedia. Contributors are men with media includes wikipedia wick wicky quote a bunch of other platforms and for just this bias in. Authorship creates a bias in who gets a biography so this huge systematic bias against women against people of color against people from the global south against people who are from any kind of particular marginalized group. So it's kind of two things when we have a very diverse editorship and to the things they writes about a not very diverse and this is obviously impacted by the way that science celebrates people and who took about who we define as notable. Right right just to confirm by. Now you've written what nine hundred articles for the site. Oh no no. How many i've written i've written one thousand two hundred one thousand two hundred whatever so sub usually get a bit excited so obviously that's not three hundred sixty five times three so sometimes i get a little carried away but in general i try and stick to one a day sometimes. Yeah yeah. I mean. I've been going for three. Yes so i've done a pretty good job that in those i. We thought a lot about how to ask you this question. Because twelve hundred articles is an extraordinary accomplishment as far as contributing to this encyclopedia. And so the question we're going to go with is if you could build a quarantine bubble with some of the people that you've written about living or deceased who would you include and why should question so so for sure. I'd have to have some of the people developing vaccines enough air. The person who created the oxford vaccine which is is the vaccine this just been approved for use in the uk. A viral vector vaccine is a phenomenal professor. Sara gilbert sara gilbert has had this kind of fascinating rich directory working on the development of a whole bunch of different vaccines that can walk in different corona viruses and kiss kubat. I don't know if you've come across any of your reporting. She's she's a young african american women who is at the national institute of health and had walked back scenes for for sars and mers. So has this really great legacy but also alongside. I kind of scientific research. An extraordinary publication list works to support people from undeserved communities and walks to really amplify the voices of scientists who too often overlooked but also to support young people and getting into an ethic about science. So that people at different ends of that curric- his kizzie is still very young. Where saratoga established professor but both of them have this kind of extraordinary pathway to really ultimately creating the thing. That's going to save the entire world so suddenly. If i if i had according to about they would be in it. I think that. I mean how many people might out in my quarantine babo because i could keep going. There's no official guidance but the often cited wisdom is less than ten. I'm so primed and ready to tell you stories about everyone. I'm so excited about them. So mainly because i have been. She's someone who i wrote about right at the beginning of my wikipedia. A mathematician who gladys west. She was born in virginia in the thousand nine hundred and she went to college. She went to a historically black college and university to study maths. She goes off in becomes the teach She then eventually what the us government. Wes she did the early computations and calculations for gps so for all of the technologies that almost everything that we do day to day relies on. Now you know you get in your car keys your phone. You try and navigate took particular location. You use the technology that gladys west created. And when i made gladys west page in two thousand eighteen is really hard to find. Information about. Her book is what for the us government so lots of things are adopted. A couple of months. After i put the page live so after i'd finished writing it and put it onto wikipedia. She was selected by the bbc is one of the top one hundred women so she went into the kind of top one hundred women in the world for any intentional creation. Contribution ebba and when you're on a web page like fat when you're on a page so much traffic and insight people hop over to the wikipedia page really quickly so you could just see the numbers of page views of of the wikipedia. Page going up and up and that meant that more and more people contributed to it so grew story grew. How did that make you feel. I just loved it. I was reflecting on this a lot with with my parents lockdown wife. I kept going live. I kept doing this. And i find nothing more rewarding honestly than seeing other people get recognized then champion for what they've done so absolutely love to have quarantine bubble that so many things that i want us. Yeah and you're collecting. I suppose historical information across different websites and books to write these biographies. Has it ever feel like time travel. Yeah completely does feel like time travel. It's it's so it's so interesting. The things that i find kind of thrilling and exciting now feels such a kind of privilege in a rush to be able to get access to all of the resources that we can do. Now you know online libraries. Nine archives sites archived magazines scientific journals extraordinary places that that turn to for this and there are times when you just feel like fantastic achievement. So so if you see in a lot of the world's when women get married they take their partner's name so sometimes it's quite difficult to find out things about their lives if they got married and all of their publications in this new name. And when you find that one link that one connection that tells you that maiden name and then you can go back and find their phd thesis or who was there examining all this extra level of information. So when i get to that. I'm like jump off the sofer like this is great and say yeah. It's completely like a portal into another world. Right i mean. I've chills just listening to you. Talk about this kind of forensic reconstruction of people's lives and who they were outside of who. They married or other kinds of societal markers of that. Yeah a big part of it. I think a big part of my efforts wikipedia. Who i've met the people that we've trained editor phones is to not just make pages about women no make pages about people of color but to make them as good as the comparable page would-be about a white man. Yeah yeah you've been amazing way of connecting all these dots. I really appreciate hearing that I wanna ask you one one last thing. Which is i know that in a lot of ways just talking to you. It sounds like this project is part of such a bigger desire to see science really include nbc driven by all kinds of people. And what do you think it will really take to bring more women and poc's into science so that they stay. Oh such a good question and such a huge one. I mean they're very preliminary simple things that low hanging fruit. If you will know why we don't already have in place you know proper care and support for people who have caring responsibilities so whether that's you know elderly parents or sick parents or especially now in the pandemic who seeing the importance of the childcare and how that skin influence women scientific careers if they're having to work from home but i think more than that we need to really look a scientific institutions and ask really critical questions about why people are leaving. Why do we see. So few black professes. Why do we see so few women in position of leadership. Why do lgbt he. Plus scientists not feel comfortable being out when they're in the scientific workplace and then really put money to and take action to address those individual needs. But i think from a kind of how you get more diverse people into science. I really honestly think the answer is improving our education systems and really support our teachers better. Pay them as well as we pay are bankers so that they stay and so that they create kind of inspiring science lessons. Then go out and got this next generation to come in who keep pushing for this change that we want

Wikipedia Wick Wicky Sara Gilbert Sara Gilbert Kubat Gladys West Us Government Western Europe Silicon Valley National Institute Of Health North America Saratoga London Oxford WES UK Virginia BBC NBC
TSLA is The Chosen One Says Morgan Stanley, Price Target to $810

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

05:29 min | Last week

TSLA is The Chosen One Says Morgan Stanley, Price Target to $810

"Everybody rob power here and today. We're talking about a new note on tesla's stock from morgan stanley. They have increased their price targets significantly. Today after hours. We also have some news on the full. Self-driving beta report on monowai gross margins from china and some news that riven may be raising some more capital taking a look at the stock tussle. Today finished up zero point seven percent to seven hundred and thirty five dollars eleven cents that actually did trail the nasdaq which was up about one percent. But hereafter hours worth. Things have started to get more interesting. After morgan stanley released their updated tussle note. Tesla has jumped by about ten to fifteen dollars. One and a half two percent to read around seven hundred fifty dollars per share otherwise news on tesla was fairly light today. So we're gonna spend most of our time here looking at that note. And as i always say when we look at analyst notes a lot of this is just contextual and it gives us good jumping off points for discussion and things like this also gives us good perspective and insight into the kind of information. That's being circulated around the street. So right off the bat here. This morgan stanley note comes with a great headline. They title the no quote the chosen. One tesla industrializes internet of cars target two eight hundred and ten dollars and quote. That is a huge fifty percent increase over the previous price. Target of five hundred and forty dollars per share. They write quote. We update our forecasts and long-term assumptions. Following better-than-expected cue for deliveries sixty one percent year over year growth and five billion dollar capris raising twenty thirty volume to five point. Zero million units versus three point eight million and taking the price target two hundred ten dollars. Tesla is richly valued for a reason reiterate overweight and quote. Okay so what has changed. Here with morgan stanley's assumptions that has led to this fifty percent price targeted increase while they say they had better than expected volume this year. You four specifically. There's been a significant capillaries. And of course tesla was added to the s. and p. five hundred. So they beat morgan stanley's projection. They have risked and they've been added the s. and p. five hundred which has reduced the float effectively reducing the supply of tesla shares as for the actual changes to their model driving this higher price target. They say that quote the majority of the price target increase comes from the impact of our higher volume assumptions in our model and quote as i said they have increased their twenty thirty delivery forecast from three point. Eight million vehicles to five point two million vehicles and they say that they have now added to factories to their forecast for twenty thirty bringing their total tesla. Plant count to ten. I think that factory count is actually probably pretty close but that would only be you know. Five hundred eighty thousand vehicles per factory by twenty thirty. But it's become very clear. That tesla actually has ambitions of producing two million vehicles or so per factory per year. At least in the case of texas and dig your berlin shanghai. They've said one million plus so even just those factories plus fremont if can hit their production targets in those factories. Gets you to more than five. Point two million that jonas projecting here for twenty thirty as for their earlier year forecasts for twenty twenty one they have increased their projection from seven hundred seventy eight thousand previously now to seven hundred ninety two thousand and as a reminder just as recently as july they had actually been projecting just six hundred and twenty thousand four twenty twenty one so they've actually up that by about thirty percent in just the last six months for twenty twenty two the forecasting one point one five million. I'm not sure what that was previously for. Twenty twenty three. Then they are up from one point. Three five million previously now to one point seven million the fun thing about these increased volume targets from morgan stanley. Is that a few months ago. They did what they called. A great tesla rating. They started including things like mobility services as a recurring revenue from autonomy in their price target. So they're sort of having this ongoing opera moment this year. That as they now add vehicle volume into their forecast they now have to add additional services and revenue margin as well and that is where the game changes in terms of valuation for tusla. And the thing is you. Don't even need a fully autonomous robot taxi type of service to start adding that services revenue in when tesla's starts offering full self driving as a subscription. I think that is going to open a lot. Of analyst is to how tesla's business model is structured and will be increasingly structured going forward leveraging software. It's already easy to say. As i've said in the past that if you want to compare valuations show me another automaker that is selling a ten thousand dollar software option then we can make those comparisons but because that is all sort of right now lumped into the same revenue the same margin line on tussles earnings. People just aren't willing to recognize that yet as a separate line of business when tesla's starts offering full self driving a subscription even if they don't break that out on their earnings that forces a change in how analysts are forecasting and modeling tesla they have to start forecasting recurring high-margin revenue right. Now that's basically all just being pulled forward into that simple ten thousand dollar option which is great but it also makes it easier to ignore the other factor making it easier to ignore right now. Is that a big portion of that is still currently deferred revenue. So it's not actually showing up in earnings. But as tessa delivers more features this year less of that is going to be deferred tussles valuation in and of itself is playing a role here too because it has become so massive analysts have to cover this. They have to cover well. They're getting more and more resources to cover it. They're getting more and more questions as tesla's been added to the s. and p. five hundred those benchmarked funds managers. They need to know what to do with the stock so the coverage is just getting more and more intense and again because the evaluation hide they're going to be a lot of analysts running numbers sort of back testing against that valuation. Saying okay to justify this. This is what needs to happen for the company.

Tesla Morgan Stanley Rob Power
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Test RSS - 1

01:42 min | 7 months ago

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Farner JAY Spain Asia Pacific Asia Shanghai Hong Kong China Hsbc
"seven percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"seven percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

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seven percent fifteen percent Seven percent twenty years
"seven percent" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"seven percent" Discussed on KTOK

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Derek Seven percent one K
"seven percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:21 min | 1 year ago

"seven percent" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

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"seven percent" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"seven percent" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Seven percent each year compound for income purposes. And also get bonuses of up to seven percent on you Nishel deposit. Some of your accounts can even increase your income up to one hundred percent if you need it for long term care. My number's eight six six seven four nine seven two three three if you'd like my free safe-money information kit and one hundred fifteen page safe-money book, call me now, eight six six seven four nine safe, and I'll handle it to you. I know many of my listeners right now are thinking I've never heard of safe-money products from the financial cable shows, my financial planner also might be thinking this must be too. Good to be true. I hear you. I understand your concern. But let me assure you, the reason you have not heard about these safe-money products is not because they don't exist is because they don't pay agents commissions out of your pocket from high fees year after year, I get paid once from they redid companies, and I never get paid again. And nothing comes out of your money. These products. Also, don't make very good television. They go up at the market gains, and they never go down with market losses. These products are way too boring for TV TV personalities can't get paid their huge salaries unless they can fool their audiences into thinking that they really know what they're talking about. You only need lots of makeup in hairstylists to convince people to risk their money in the market. My approach is much different. No fancy office. No, suit and tie. No Mercedes-Benz pulling up to your driveway. I'm not here to impress. You. With me. I'm here to simply show you product that. Nobody else is going to show you and give you guarantees that..

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"seven percent" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"seven percent" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Once a week forty seven percent say every other week. That's you guys. Seven percent, do not clean the bathroom. Time in my life where he'd probably didn't wash very much in the beginning. But Bradley, you know, better. So you do better. It's true. That's nasty. Okay. Now, listen, either made people feel better. Okay. You probably should when we come back. We've got celebrities behaving badly and one of these celebrities is getting a rebate for the exact same thing. Everything. Entertainment. Hey, guys, Bradley here for my good friends at California closets. Californiaclosets lick release saved our home. Why? Well, look, you know, hold homes, especially in south, Minneapolis. There wasn't a lot of closet space old people didn't have closets. Why much they knew something? But things have changed changed and tastes change. The good news California closets is here to help. In fact, they were able to give us organizational systems in our home and five different spaces really increased the amount that we could store in those limited small awkwardly shaped spaces, so an extra bedroom closet. We were able to triple the amount of stuff. We I would honestly say we probably really of shoes coats were able to now get in that. 'cause it on believable. But only California closets was able to do it and do it professionally and do it. According to our taste in style. And do it in.

California closets Bradley California Minneapolis forty seven percent Seven percent
"seven percent" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"Eighty seven percent of them voted for him. He has basically saying to them you gave it to me not belongs to me no longer responsive to you. You may want that you may want me to go. But I won't because it belongs to me. Right. So that that is a very personal choice that he's making superseding any discuss from other black legislators in that in in in Virginia. And also, I believe from black voters in Virginia. And I think that blind voters have to look at that very seriously and say, this is what happens, right? So that that that you the people can racist who hate you. Also this wants to help you. I've been writing a book it I've been reading a lot about people who you know, abolitionist who also white supremacists. They did not believe in slavery whatsoever. And in fact, many of them in the war put their life on the line. So that there would be no more sleighs. And they absolutely did not believe that you were the same as them. They you not deserted say respect is them. Do not deserve to live in his community as them at all those two things exist, and that is a kind of a walking reality that black people find themselves in in America, whether they under kind of open, the express it or not that it's not just the people hate you who can be insensitive to you. And now you have to start going to the polls and making kind of specific demands about how you expect people to respect you at how much this closure you expect for them to have it when it comes to offending you care..

Virginia America Eighty seven percent
"seven percent" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

WCBS Newsradio 880

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on WCBS Newsradio 880

"Seven percent, south west wind, the ten minute upper forty s for this afternoon. And if you're getting a bit seasick or maybe heartsick watching what's happening on Wall Street these past couple of weeks, we can tell you right now. Dow futures are pointing to an open close to three hundred points higher the mix of makeup and trains of New Jersey transit is unleashing. A new round of outrage writers are wondering why empty coaches are running in front of locomotives NJIT is explaining that cab cars equipped with positive train control are being run at head of locomotives like PTC, but riders are fuming the doors in those head end cars are locked forcing them into the jam packed cars at the rear of the train still one writer tells CBS he's happy that NJIT is using the new stuff. It's good to know that they're trying to do something to the safety of mass. Transit because I don't take it much. But when I do take Alex know that I'm safe NJIT says for safety and operational reasons. And they words these PTC quipped cab cars that are being run in front of the locomotives will be running empty for the time being w CBS news time nine twenty two. Not a genetic outlier. I'm Pat fine act with the WCBS help wellbeing report sponsored by valley health system enhancing, the health and wellbeing of northern New Jersey. We hear a great deal these days about how genetics don't have to be destiny. That's the message and workout Queen Jillian Michaels new book, the six keys, six body processes that either work for you or against you. They can turn the key, and you have Alzheimer's cancer, gray hair, wrinkly skin, a big belly. How do we turn these keys in the opposite direction? So that we're aging. Wow. I mean at forty four I have no gray hair. I wake up with zero aches and pains, not a genetic outlier. The reality is. That there is a lot that we can do no matter who you are no matter how much money you have no matter how much time you had to turn these things around. So that you look and feel great well into your forty fifty sixty seventies..

NJIT New Jersey PTC CBS Jillian Michaels Alzheimer Alex WCBS writer Seven percent ten minute
"seven percent" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Seven percent on you Nishel, deposit some of your accounts, can even, increase your income up to one hundred percent if you need it. For. Long term care my number is eight six? Six seven four nine. Seven two three three if you'd like my, free safe-money information kit and one hundred fifteen page safe-money book call me now eight six. Six seven four nine safe and I'll handle over to you I know many of my listeners right now are thinking I have never heard of safe-money products from the financial cable shows or my financial planner y'all so might be thinking this must be too good to be. True I. Hear you and I understand your concern but let me assure you the reason you have not heard about these safe-money products. Is not because they don't, exist, is, because, they don't, pay, agents, commissions out of your pocket from high fees year after year I get paid. Once from they rated companies and, I, never, get, paid, again and, nothing comes out of your money These products also don't make very good television they go, up at the market gains and they never go down with market losses these products are way too boring for TV TV personalities can't get paid their huge salaries unless they can fool. Their audiences into thinking that they really know. What they're talking about you only need lots of makeup and hair stylists to convince. People to risk their money in the market My approach is much different no fancy office no suit and tie no Mercedes-Benz pulling up your driveway I'm not here to impress you with me I'm here to simply show you a product that. Nobody else is going to show you and give you guarantees that nobody else will, tell you about. I understand that the first step. You take with me is just to, get information may save, money information kit is yours. To keep and if what I, have to offer you doesn't, interest you then we'll depart. His friends that's why always. Have to say, I don't sell safe-money. Counts, people buy them from me This is your retirement money and don't let anyone else convince you otherwise I've helped my clients move millions of dollars year after year and not. One of my clients has ever lost a penny due to market downturn they have, all made the. Choice to take control of their. Retirement future and retirement income for the, rest of their life, and stop rolling the dice. On their financial future isn't it, time you base your retirement..

one hundred percent Seven percent
"seven percent" Discussed on WRKO AM680

WRKO AM680

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on WRKO AM680

"Safe Howie, Steve what's, the poll, question what are the results less far who. Will be the democrat nominee in, twenty twenty. Willoughby Kamala Harris Bernie Sanders Joe Biden Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker, Kirsten gillibrand or someone on that list I'm gonna say Elizabeth well, I'm, gonna say former Senator Elizabeth Warren them hoping she. Loses in the fall seventeen. Percents Elizabeth Warren. She's the front runner amongst the candidates. That we've listed out ten percents. Say Kamala Harris nine percent say Biden seven percents a Sanders seven percent say Cory. Booker just three percents a gillibrand forty-seven percent. Think it's going to be somebody else on. That who's not on that, list. Somebody under the age? Of eighty some are seventy-five all right let's take a couple of calls here eight four four or, five hundred. Forty two, forty two, bell you're, next with, Howie Carr go ahead bell Yeah I just wanted to thank you for having the most intelligent. Stowed today on Newsmax TV with Pat Buchanan and I would hope that all the other shows on Newsmax, would take a cue from you and put him? On there because he had the most intelligent thing. To say, on Newsmax TV today so I want. To thank you again, for having. A great, show thank. You, and this is, the best column I think Pat written in months and he, goes down, that whole. Laundry list of stupid moves that we made that just kind of antagonize, the Vladimir Putin, the Russian bear and you, know Glen Grunwald. The the left winger who, was on another show earlier. Today he made the point to between the US and Russia that's ninety percent of the. World's nuclear weapons now isn't it. Better that they're. Talking to. Each other we're talking to them and they're talking, to us you know he's Trump said this before. He left he said he. Said better relations With Russia is a good thing not a bad thing I mean it seems self. Evident isn't that what the Democrats told us for all these years. And now. Now they now they see that they can, they think they can, score political points I don't think they can so they they're they're willing to to bait the bear thanks for the call bell Arthur you're. Next with time, okay we'll keep going with us we come back eight four four or. Five hundred forty two forty two we have a guest on the way but the traffic is really bad, in this monsoon this afternoon so we'll just keep? Going with us we got a lot more stuff. To get, to eight four four five hundred forty. Two forty two I'm, Howie Carr.

Elizabeth Warren Willoughby Kamala Harris Berni Glen Grunwald Howie Carr Pat Buchanan Cory Booker Kirsten gillibrand Kamala Harris Trump Russia Vladimir Putin bell Arthur Steve US forty-seven percent ninety percent seven percent nine percent
"seven percent" Discussed on 790 WAEB

790 WAEB

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on 790 WAEB

"You up to seven percent guaranteed annual growth and income that you can never outlive so if that doesn't give you hope i don't know what will for some of you it's hard to have hope and i feel for you i have spoken with many a person who wished they would have been my clients fifteen years ago many a times i have some of the it says where were you ten or fifteen years ago instead of instead of today so they feel like failures but they shouldn't they were simply misled by the promises of brokers friends neighbors and the media telling them the work hard put your money in a mutual fund diversify and everything's gonna be just okay okay you're going to be in talk on what failed is a promise that never should have been made in the first place you know sometimes failure is like an elevator so i'm sure you can remember times when everything seemed to be going great with your retirement maybe you feel that way right now it's so it's like riding an elevator heading straight up to the penthouse every day you wake up and you're on a higher floor in fact your retirement money is doing so well you don't even pay attention to what floor you're on by then all of a sudden you had that sinking feeling you know what i mean we we we've all felt that feeling when the elevator i starts to drop and our stomach goes into our throat so when you're elevators starts going down when it's supposed to be going up it's really not a feeling that anybody likes it's kind of like the unexpected turbulence on an airplane flight and we all know what that feels like it's not really great it's very disconcerting so before you know.

fifteen years seven percent
"seven percent" Discussed on Wall Street Business Network AM 760

Wall Street Business Network AM 760

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on Wall Street Business Network AM 760

"That on for them for themselves and we'll just sort of the low server story in that regard you know because we do that our default rate is point seven percent which is in our industry is extremely low in the microfinance world you know that the typical default his fourteen to fifty percents and so the point seven percent is significant is happening and so it's a one thing that's happening is know we're basically acknowledging the social trust they know that that comes with this communities and they're really trusting us nonprofit dr services loan and so because of all of that you know everybody's sort of falls through with a commitment to paying dina japan that the lows forward and how much scepticism if any did you encounter jose when you went to the credit bureaus and said we've got a little bit of a different take here did they immediately embrace it or did you have to sell them on it you know one of the things is that this activity there's a lot of people that benefit from it you know one banks financial institutions benefit from this because we're expanding the pool of eligible bars for them and so they wanna see more even the credit bureaus they actually benefit from this because we essentially you know bringing light to an activity that was invisible for them and we're standardizing it took so that actually fits into the credit bureau you know system and so so there wasn't any any pushback at all i mean we had to sort of formalize it right so we had to come up with a promissory note in every legal document that clearly dictated exactly what was happening and in through that promissory note you know we we made this as a former loan for that it could be reported to the credit bureaus so there really wasn't auto pushback from them i mean really a conversation intellectual conversation with a lot of lawyers they didn't understand what was happening but how to clarify except in any great detail you know this this was bonafide financial activity you know that maybe they didn't look exactly like the way we traditionally do it you know but but it but it still was bonafide financial activities.

jose seven percent
"seven percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Krill oil sixty seven percent more krill oil so fantastic for the joints you get the high omega three fish oil vitamin d and there as well as this anthem for extra antioxidant power and protect that rain protect your memory facilitate that quick that youthful thinking that's so fun to have when you when you feel shark when you could bring his working great you have that brain energy it's more fun it's more fun to be in a conversation you feel better you'll wake up a bit you have that energy you feel mentally alert you feel alive that's the way i wanna feel that's the way young people feel that's why we put this in this krill omega fifty plus we want people to feel younger we want people to maintain their youthful vigor and attitude and that's what this krill omega fifty plus he's all about i gotta tell you doctor levin i take the krill omega fifty plus and one of the things that i absolutely love about the pills and it's so small i mean it's so easy to take and so much better than trying to swallow one of those omega three horse bills the bigger ones anyone can do these with ease and that's what's great about it tell us how did you supercharge this formula while at the same time shrinking the capsule size how do you do that it's so so amazing this is really a breakthrough stephen i mean her those of you that are picture during this huge omega three pill it's not like that these are tiny they're so small anybody can swallow these my son corey has trouble swallowing pills he gets he's down like they're nothing they're much smaller they're easy to swallow and now with our lemon lock flavor system which i didn't even talk about before you open the bottle up stephen smells like lemon we.

corey sixty seven percent
"seven percent" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Krill oil sixty seven percent more krill oil so fantastic for the joints you get the high omega three fish oil vitamin d in there as well as this anthem for extra antioxidant power and protect that brand protect your memory facility quick that youthful thinking that's so fun to have when you when you feel sharp when you could bring his working great you have that brain energy it's more fun it's more fun to be in a conversation you feel better awake at a bit you have that energy you feel mentally alert you feel alive that's the way i wanna feel that's the way young people feel that's why we put this in this krill omega fifty plus we want people to feel younger we want people to maintain their youthful vigor and attitude and that's what this krill omega fifty plus is all about i gotta tell you doctor levin i take the krill omega fifty plus and one of the things that i absolutely love about the pills and it's so small i mean it's so easy to take and so much better than trying to swallow one of those omega three horse fills the bigger ones anyone can do these with ease and that's what's great about it tell us how did you supercharge this formula while at the same time shrinking the capsule size how do you do that right it's so so amazing this is really a breakthrough stephen i mean for those of you that are picturing during this huge omega three pill it's not like that these are tiny they're so small anybody can swallow these my son corey has trouble swallowing pills he gets these down like they're nothing they're much smaller they're easy to swallow and now with our lemon lock flavor system which i didn't even talk about before you open the bottle up stephen smells like lemon we lock in the freshness.

corey sixty seven percent
"seven percent" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Krill oil sixty seven percent more krill oil so fantastic joints you get the high omega three fish oil vitamin d in there as well as this anthem for extra antioxidant power and protect that brand protect your memory facilitate that quick that youthful thinking that's so fun to have when you when you feel sharp when you could bring his working great you have that brain energy it's more fun it's more fun to be in a conversation you feel better you'll wake at a bit you have that energy you feel mentally alert you feel alive that's the way i wanna feel that's the way young people feel that's why we put this in this krill omega fifty plus we want people to feel younger we want people to maintain their youthful vigor and attitude and that's what this krill omega fifty plus is all about i gotta tell you doctor levin i take the krill omega fifty plus and one of the things that i absolutely love about the pills and it's so small i mean it's so easy to take and so much better than trying to swallow one of those mega threehorse fills the bigger ones anyone can do these with ease and that's what's great about tell us how did you supercharge this formula while at the same time shrinking the capsule size how do you do that right it's so so amazing this is really a breakthrough stephen i mean for those of you that are picturing this huge omega three till it's not like that these are tiny they're so small anybody can swallow these my son corey has trouble swallowing pills he gets these down like they're nothing they're much smaller they're easy to swallow and now with our lemon lock flavor system which i didn't even talk about before you open the bottle up stephen smells like lemon we lock in.

corey sixty seven percent
"seven percent" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

"Today it is now seventy seven percent now those numbers could improve but guess what they were done without paying a single die of pay for play you've heard from the opposition fair value of college athlete so you will how 'bout focusing on value we education fairly for people of color particularly black athletes education is resistance what better going to agree to help you prepare and resist the ravages of racism in a world that essentially as hostile to you because of the color of your skin it's time we've you'd pay for play as a sarcastic deterrent and pay off to deter that type of resistance the corruption and college sports than we probably will touch on has its roots fueled by money but rather than destroy those routes for played deepens them every ill that has been mentioned and we'll be mention by the proponents have pay for play can be cured by controlling spending continued academic reform and assuring that directs commercial success in yours to the benefit of the college athlete first and foremost their health safety and welfare not by substituting a fix in amounts that probably will have less impact than an earned agree on the lives of these athletes and for that reason i urge you guys to vote no on this proposition thank you leno mark i'm john dunn van round one of this intelligence squared you estimate continues in just a moment andrew reminder of where we are we are halfway through the opening round of this intelligence squared us debate i'm john done then we have four debaters two teams of two debating this motion pay college athletes you've heard the first two opening statements a now onto the third here is jonas sarah he is bloomberg view columnist and co author of indentured the inside story of the rebellion against the nc aa ladies and gentleman jono sarah.

seventy seven percent
"seven percent" Discussed on KGAB

KGAB

02:38 min | 4 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on KGAB

"Can provide you of up to seven percent guarantee daniel growth and any income that you can never out late of if that doesn't give you know and i don't know what will for some of you it's hard to have hope i feel for yeah i've spoken with many a person who wish to they were my clients years ago instead of today some of them feel like failures but they really shouldn't they were simply miss led by the promise as a brokers friends and the media telling them that to work hard put your money and mutual fund diversify and everything's going to be okay well what a held is a promise that never should have been made you know sometimes fail years like an elevator i am sure you can remember times when everything seems to be going good with your retirement maybe you feel that way now it's like writing on an elevator heading straight for the penthouse every gate you would wake up and be on a higher floor in fact your retirement money is doing so well you don't even pay attention to what floor you're on but then all of a sudden you feel that sinking feeling you know what i mean we have all felt it when the elevator for starts to drop are stemming goes into arts wrote when year elevator starts going down when it's supposed to be going up it is not a feeling that anybody likes it's kind of like the unexpected turbulence that you have on an airplane flight so before you know what you're elevators dropping so fast it's all you can do to hold on your brokers telling you i don't worry the market will hit a bottom you might also year this is a great buying opportunity well guess what this is the same thing they taylor clients every time the market drops so the good news is that the elevator rarely drops without stopping on a few floors along the way the problem is that hardly anybody gets up the elevator maybe they hope it will start going back up it's kind of like they game blur that's waiting for the next big and he sees his stack shrinking but thanks you know how if i can just hit the right cards everything's going to be okay so isn't that when you're brokers telling you to do he is not saying it in those words but nevertheless he's tell you know wait for the next hand.

seven percent
"seven percent" Discussed on KGAB

KGAB

02:41 min | 4 years ago

"seven percent" Discussed on KGAB

"Can provide you of up to seven percent guarantee daniel growth and any income that you can never out live if that doesn't give you know and i don't know what will for some of you it's hard to have hope i feel for yeah i've spoken with many a person who wish to they were my clients years ago instead of today some of them feel like failures but they really shouldn't they were simply miss led by the promise as a brokers friends and the media telling them that to work hard put your money and mutual fund diversify and everything's going to be okay well what failed is a promise that never should have been made you know sometimes failures like an elevator i am sure you can remember times when everything seems to be going good with your retirement maybe you feel that way now it's like writing on an elevator heading straight for the penthouse every gate you would wake up and be on a higher floor in fact your retirement money is doing so well you don't even pay attention to what floor you're on but then all of a sudden you feel that sinking feeling you know what i mean we have all felt that when the elevator first starts to drop are stemming goes into arts wrote when year elevator starts going down when it's supposed to be going up it is not a feeling that anybody likes it's kind of like the unexpected turbulence that you have on an airplane flight so before you know what you're elevators dropping so fast it's all you can do to hold on your brokers telling you don't worry the marketable hit a bottom you might also year this is a great buying opportunity well guess what this is the same thing they taylor clients every time the market drops so the good news is that the elevator rarely drops without stopping on a few floors along the way the problem is that hardly anybody gets up the elevator maybe they hope it will start going back up it's kind of like they game blur that's waiting for the next big and he sees his stack shrinking but thanks you know how if i can just hit the right cards everything's going to be okay so isn't that what you're brokers telling you to do he is not saying it in those words but nevertheless he's tell you know wait for the next hand.

seven percent