35 Burst results for "senior manager"

"senior manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

04:32 min | Last week

"senior manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"That came out of it yeah. I think that we redesigned our entire accelerator. Because it wasn't really working for the type of business that we were driving and so when we think about you know how we do our own business. We always have to continue to reevaluate our value proposition. Just like we're coaching all of our startups to do and so it. It felt like in the old model. You're just kind of repeating it because it was kind of successful you know. We had success stories but we didn't really have a lot of framework around how that was happening. Or how we were driving that exactly And so the whole process of re formatting. The accelerator was definitely addressing. The fact that we kind of got into the routine and we we made things happen but we needed to really refocus on our business. dislike we coach oliver startups to seduced. So i think another example of a setback is more on the one on one relationship side. And so you know we're always trying to provide a way for the start ups and the the house systems to come together around a relationship but sometimes you know. We don't provide the right advice early enough on how to make that happen. So for example there was a startup that went in asking for a pilot relationship with one of our systems that was paid but it was an area that they had never done before. And it was really a better opportunity for co-development but because they went in with a paid pilot. I than the health system was not as interested in continuing the conversation around the co-development so it was a mess for us that we are always needing to really refocus our efforts and make sure that were. We're not making any future opportunities to miss that same way because that was a relationship that really could have been developed if we had Kept kept our guard up on on how that relationship was progressing at the time So that's that's where we really see. The mrs is is when you know the startup comes into hot and and we don't have enough time to to help them understand why a different approach might end up with more success that they end. So that's what we're always trying to do better with for both parties to find that success and you guys are the ultimate coach really in between both right absolutely so with the health systems. We are trying to help them understand without previous. Traction actually means how that business is likely to be viable based on the funding that they have and the funding that they're likely to get you know so we are trying to to support the health systems to understand that the startup is going to be successful and the startup is going to be committed and this is why we know that and then with the start up of course really around gino. Okay this approach might have worked with your you know smaller medium size customer. But it's really not gonna work with this larger system and then of course in between systems. It's really different so. Md anderson is a state run institution and they have a lot of different requirements on them as a result of that Compared to houston methodist compared to texas children's they all have very different Motivations or or frameworks that they're working in just because the stakeholders that are involved And so most of the time. The efforts that we're using to coach the startups are on just putting yourself in your customer's shoes and really understanding that And and were providing some insights as to help them do that more quickly than otherwise they would be able to do on their own. Oh and it could be months a year before. They actually learned that on their own. You know and it's just frustrating. You're waiting for an answer and you don't hear back and you follow up and you don't hear back and then you figure out that you just lost six months absolutely. We're trying to get to a quick answer if it's no that's fine. Everyone can handle that right. So we're we're definitely trying to get to those knows sooner and so and help demystify. Why did this halt you know is is this unknown. It's like no it's just not right. Now there's something else going on behind the scenes like hold tight mullahs in another month or so. So yeah it's definitely hopefully really valuable for them to have that partner with with us. And that's where we see in a accelerators kind of an overblown word right now. And and nobody really knows what it means actually to be accelerated at this point but i think for us what we're accelerating. Is that time to a relationship a meaningful engagement with the health system. And we do that through those insights around what those customers are looking for. Love it now. What well said and folks if you don't know so up to this date..

Md anderson oliver gino houston texas
What Is The Summer Marketing Slump With Hubspot Senior Manager Pamela Bump

MarTech Podcast

02:12 min | 2 weeks ago

What Is The Summer Marketing Slump With Hubspot Senior Manager Pamela Bump

"Pamela. Welcome to summer slump. Week on the tech podcast. Thank you. i'm really glad to be here excited to have you as our guest. Always a pleasure to talk to someone from one of our most important sponsors hub spot. Thank you in advance for helping to support the martic podcast and also thank you for joining us. You're the expert on what. I enthusiastically called summer slump month but i probably should say summer slump month. Talk to me about what the summer slump is. So recently i worked with my editorial team and some hubs by content analysts and we did some deep data research into the potential of summer slump. So the idea of summer slump is that businesses occasionally see seasonality and issues with getting high engagement high traffic high deal closing rates during the summer. These things tend to dip because a lot of people are kind of unplugging we see a lot of people taking time off a lot of teams might lose some motivation and productivity during the summer which is a natural thing to see but we wanted to do some deeper research to see how it might be different this year compared to twenty nineteen which was the last recent year that was uninfected by the pandemic since the pandemic did impact summer related data and data in general last year so we did some deep data to look into summer slob and we learned a bit about which industries were seeing some of the biggest dips and the biggest rises and business upticks in the summer this year. A lot to unpack there. Let's start off with the reason why there is a summer slump. You mentioned that last year was a little bit of a unique snowflake for reasons that do not need to be rehashed covert but this year is kind of a little bit more of a regular old year. People are out and about doing things but we still see some softening in the summer. I know who i blame. It's children they don't have school so parents have to take care of them. So they're away from work so we all get

Pamela
Wendy Hallett MBE, Managing Director of Hallett, Talks Working From Home

Woman's Hour

02:21 min | Last month

Wendy Hallett MBE, Managing Director of Hallett, Talks Working From Home

"Government is urging people to return to the office. What impact is that going to have particularly on women. Many of whom have been working from home for over a year. We've had such a huge reaction from our listeners that we wanted to hear more. Boris johnson's called for a gradual return over the summer. The chancellor and some business leaders are calling for people to taper off homeworking for the sake of their prospects the economy and their wellbeing but research for the bbc art today shows that in an increasing number of jobs are being advertised with the option of working from home where we're gonna hear directly from listeners with a range of us and experiences all on all of this but i i'm joined by wendy hallett at wendy was a senior manager retail group arcadia and she oversaw top shop on street in london are on twenty years ago they. She founded her own retail company to create a flexible working environment for herself. When her children were young and nice she advocates this for her entire staff. Wendy welcome went very invited me on wendy earlier this week. We heard this suggestion. That civil servants should get their pay docked if they continue to work from home and the times newspaper has the story today. That tech companies. Google is planning something similar. I wonder if you think a financial penalty is the way to get employees back to the workplace and indeed if they need to be going back to the workplace at all. I definitely don't think that Starting off with looking at financial penalties to get back in the office is the right way to go. I think the fact that that has been so much more working from home so much. More flexibility for men and for women. It's not just a female Issue gives us a huge opportunity to look at how we do work so i think to come coming on a negative which he shall we pay is totally wrong and i do think that we should be looking at flexibility. I wouldn't advocate everybody working from home every single day but i think there should be now a flexible approach. This is a huge opportunity to narrow. I think the pay gap of anti changes the way we look at working going forward.

Wendy Hallett Boris Johnson Arcadia BBC Wendy London Google Times
Blogger Couple Harassed by Ex-eBay Employees Sues Company

WBZ Midday News

00:59 sec | 2 months ago

Blogger Couple Harassed by Ex-eBay Employees Sues Company

"Native couple is suing eBay over claims that its employees targeted and harassed them back in 2019 on China and David Steiner say that the scheme began after the to criticize the company in their online newsletter. Here's in a speaking in court today we were doxed. We were sent intimidating packages threats. The couple says that the packages that they received included a range of items, including things like life, insects, a funeral wreath and a bloody pig face Halloween mask their attorney, Rosemary She PTO says that the workers involved need to be held accountable for what they do now we'll do the investigation. Now we'll hold the depositions will write the interrogatory and they will answer for their acts and the employees allegedly involved include eBay's former senior director of safety and security, a senior manager of global intelligence and a senior manager of special operations and more

David Steiner Ebay China Rosemary
"senior manager" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

Jazzed About Work

07:33 min | 3 months ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

"From my native point. Be which this can facilitate and potentially in by but inequality way and then convert then it converts to solve into. Wow i never thought about how hiring managers are people to our never really thought about that. This is good for us. Aso brought in the perspective. Even if the initial Draw is you know is is our goals in our aspirations and what we're looking to achieve So i am excited out of that respected which was hugely shaped by a mentor of mine. Dr jane dutton whose research on compassion is prominently featured in knock and her one on one interactions with me and mentoring. Conversations opened my eyes to to the impact that this mentality can bring to all of us so if each of us is coming to relationships with this broader view in mind of. How can we contribute. We can help each other. We can partner for a greater impact and help more people that that the the ripple effect is much reiter than simply you know. Had we get a job and and meet some people in my network. Well a lot of people probably do know. That relationship building is so important in their lives as well as their careers. I think many of us know. But sometimes it's a little scary to try sometimes People are reluctant to reach out. Not because they don't think it's important but because it can be a little frightening. Do you encounter people who are sort of struggling with a fear of reaching out and do you have any suggestions on how people can work. Pass that yes One individual. I spoke with to set. I have a debilitating fear like i just can't get past this fear right and we just talked about how. Here's a guy. Here's a literally a template on how to write a message to someone you haven't met before which by the way requires you to that kind of go back and do more research on than pick out the commonality in figuring how you wanna crap the message but all the sudden if you go through something like that again. Your confidence will emerge Side slowly because you have you prepared. You feel like you know what you're coming coming. You're you're coming up against. And i don't actually see it as against anything. It's just you kind of know what to expect. And then there is another individual. I spoke with who who said under so afraid that of rejection. And i said we'll of the people that you've reached out to you how many have have said flat out. No in the. He thought he said nobody. Like maybe there was one or two just. Didn't respond other busier at competing priorities. This happened all the time. It's human interactions here that we're speaking about. But when he thought about it it didn't it hadn't actually laid into. I think it's like fear of anything is we. We have these years for whatever reason and it. You know if we if we break it down into manageable pieces than we have some action small actions we can take to get there. It also takes practice and so maybe reaching out to people is sort of putting this into practice with individuals where the stakes are so high. It's not really not a job that you have to have it might be informational interview coffee chat someone a family friend that you've always wanted to know what their careers than like are tested out with people where you don't feel as as nervous and maybe it's more familiar and the more you do it. I do think ambit confidence bill. So i've reached out to some very prominent people throughout writing the book. I'm using the knock rapid in being intentional doing preparation almost every time. It's been favorable even if they couldn't help me at that time. They've at least responded. Or if i had to follow up once or twice but each time every time i was still shocked but i did hear back and then i said i could do this like okay. The next one got a little bit easier and each one is unique opportunity to connect with someone new. I think that when you see the what comes event that the outcomes and where it leads than than it looks from fear to excitement that you can open the door you can partner with new people atten bring value to individuals or organizations that you maybe wouldn't have had the opportunity to to to connect with had not put forth after all i think you've described A couple of good strategies to very good tips that we might leave our listeners with today. One is I've noticed what you've noticed that the fear of rejection is often much worse than a negative response from some person. You don't even really know any way. It's so the fear is is probably. It may be the problem more than the activity and a way to get past that the the other point that you made it so important issue could practice. Wherever it's easy you can practice Talking to somebody next to you in the coffee line. If we're back in coffee lines again you can practice in situations where you're comfortable and the more you practice the easier it gets right. Absolutely anna just reminded also of quote from one of my favorite new authors. Alex carter her. Book asked for morris phenomenal about negotiation. Not necessarily salary. Negotiation is more about sort of steering your direction in your life and she says that no is not about you. If the other person's either busy they have other priorities. Oreo is possibly the kind of see the value. They don't understand what it is. You're trying to communicate which case you can hopefully have the opportunity to sort of reframe it or go back in your message. But that takes the pressure off of us like we tend to think like oh. They didn't respond because i did. Xyz in righteousness that they have some other busy thing happening in their world and so and so understanding that takes little russia and learning that. There's no need to take personally. I just is seldom about you. Well rebecca thank you so much for sharing all of this again. The title of the book is not the whole title is knockout open doors and built greer relationships that matter i wish you well with the book and i wanna thank you again for being with us here today these for having me. I really enjoyed our conversation today. We've been talking with rebecca leader about how to methodically build mutually supportive relationships. I'm your host. Bob jones author of think like an entrepreneur. Act like a ceo. Today's tip is that when you feel awkward about networking you could build confidence by doing some research and practicing in situations where you already feel comfortable. Thank you for listening. If you enjoy our show. Please tell you friends.

Bob jones Alex jane dutton rebecca today two twice Today each once anna each time each one One One individual one Oreo think like
"senior manager" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

Jazzed About Work

07:21 min | 3 months ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

"Commonality is is a great way to signal that you're interested in the person and that you're interested in maybe a longer term or at least a more real relationship and it's it is as people practice it. They get more adept. I think in triggering That sense of connection that another pe- person might feel when you signal that you have something in common One of the ways to do that is with Signaling that you're in the same kind of community Like you went to the same school or you lived in the same city. Is that something that That you practice a lot as is trying to have perceived people in communities that might be shared this at work for you. That does work for me. I find that there are several benefits to doing. Not one is that the other person is immediately says. Oh we have this shared interests know. We're going to have at least one to talk about. We can act and the other is that. I feel more comfortable because i am coming from a place. That's familiar so your community can be just can be very broad. It can be in this industry or uncreative right. It doesn't have to be a role or city or a small community volunteer. This particular organization it can be but you can think broader And that can be commonality to is. You know. I noticed that you on a really creative with the content that you put out on your instagram channel. Did you know that. I'm a photographer right like you. Can you can say i'm i'm creative to. I'd love to get your thoughts on. How do you. How do you create your context. These are just examples kind of throwing out there. But you know your commonality can be a community in your community can be very very big. Yeah we're all part of so many community. Sometimes we're not even aware of so looking for those communities can help but it ends example You gave their When you you notice that somebody's focusing on some kind of content or something like that. You're doing something else that helps build connections and that is your leading the other person. Know that you've seen him. It's not just that you've done research but we go through life. I think often feeling kind of invisible lots of times and anytime a person can let us know that they see us or they've noticed something. You've listened to my podcast. I've read your book it. It is A sense of of commonality and that can go quickly to a real feeling of connection. I mean just in seconds. isn't it. yes it's it really is amazing. I agree with that. I think people say the ideas answer the question of why me why are reaching out to me specifically and so i'm people may not ask that question if you could answer that upfront. That means you've done your research but also you being selective with who you're reaching out to you because you think there's something you can contribute to each other there could be a mutually neutrally beneficial valuable interaction and potentially relationship there and trying to figure out where the commonality isn't how you can help is sort of part of the process keep giving is so important and it's really kind of a mindset. Isn't it that you you go through life kind of looking for things that other people need or want and just trying to be aware of how to help is is that sort of a mindset that in your when you're working with say maybe younger professionals are in your workshop you're trying to help people develop a mindset that giving just is a way that anybody can connect. Because it's not about you. It's about the person and everybody else needs something right. Yes i mean there meetings where i met with leaders In asian and they were having a rough day and he's just started talking about problems. They were having you know. And i said well maybe i can help you know it was just like. Oh they're like. Oh i'm just complaining. Now maybe maybe you have seen urine. I can help you with it or we talk about compassion. I talk about her passion in the book to Which is responding to suffering war and so in a given example where a coworker gifted me a book about healing When i was was healing from from a difficult situation and then weeks later another colleague told me she was dealing something similar in. So i after the book i made notes. When i thought she'd be i'd help hold because i knew she didn't have time to read the whole thing and i send it to her in the mail so that was another form of giving and there are so many ways to give. I'm give to our network recently. I have a one on one which we call one on one sort of virtual coffee with a colleague i used to work very closely with day-to-day and we just sort of kept it on the calendar to catch up. See how other is doing and you know that particular day. I just thought oh. We'll we'll just have hungary. Has we kind of thing turns out. He had applied for another role and right before like right before our call found out that he wasn't going forward in the interview process and all of a sudden giving was sort of listening and then and then giving him some reassurance that you're gonna find the next best thing in the feedback. They gave us can lead you to the right opportunity at the right time and and it was friendship. It wasn't really a work exchange. It was a friendship exchange of giving take so many forms even in a professional contest and giving and having those kind of connections like the conversation. You describe you you point out that it's not just about getting a job or moving ahead in your career. Although that's context that you've been talking about relationship building here. You make the important point that having a social network having relationships with real people are part of your lives is is incredibly important for health and wellbeing of all sorts. It's part of the benefit of this relationship-building may be it puts you in better healthier shape to do well in your career if you want to take it back. It's do you find that people who you're working with in workshops and elsewhere are are really focused on The the job search or the career growth or is part of what drives people to this is just an awareness that we're happier and healthier. We have relationships. I think the initial interest is is sort of the career aspirations which is great because everyone's inspired at that point. They were looking for direction or looking for inspiration tools to figure out how to get.

asian instagram One weeks one each ways
"senior manager" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

Jazzed About Work

05:59 min | 3 months ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

"Willing to learn and this is why i'm here. I'm going to bring this kind of value to the table. So it's okay to share your weaknesses in your human. You're human. That's a word but who you are as a person. Your your personality should shine through the last few steps. Commonality is really about shared. interest I find that even with people who are very different levels In action or years of experience at difference commonality really unlock that door and make it a lot more personal and also take that sort of edge that defense mechanism. That comes up when it's like. Oh someone's reaching out to me. What are they want. And then lastly keep giving generosity gratitude. You know give to your to your relationships in. it doesn't have to be in a professional way. You might be in an interview when someone says oh. I'm traveling to your city next month. And you say oh great restaurant recognition for you like. it doesn't have to be so transactional all time. So how can we help. People out along our journey and not only receive. We'll have some questions about some of the points one of them. You just mentioned the word transactional. And i think that part one of the things i liked about your book is that you made it clear that there's a difference between something that's totally transactional in something. That's really about relationship building and that it's good to have the relationship always in mind. Can you talk a little bit about the trap of falling into transactional thinking when you're making connections and and how to keep focusing on relationships why that's so important. Sure i i'll say there are situations that are transactional in nature. Especially in professional world enact would make difficult to bond in that trap because looking for a job it is transactional company has a need. You have skill set. You have something to contribute and you are looking to make a living presumably right so there is a bit of a transactional exchange there however the knee is you have something to contribute and i think a lot of times when we go into something like an interview on so concerned what are they gonna like me are they. Hire me right which That's what we want right. We're excited to have that opportunity. That validation and mickie's is we need that onto our livelihood and you know i was in a workshop with with some emerging professionals young professional and we talked about this notion of connecting on a human level and commonality mesa. I never really thought about hiring managers. People like i never really thought about what they do on the weekends. Right and it because we get that transactional mindset into. That's natural so. That's the first piece is totally normal to think that way and and some situations are that way I think where you can counteract. That is a good place to start is is in our language in our cover letters when reach out to someone for an informational interview. Maybe we're deciding if we want to apply for an opportunity or maybe we're reaching out to a client or prospective client and. We think they might be a good candidate to be one of our clients but we're not sure yet and so we should leave the door open or tried to open the door a human level. Like you know what can you bring the forefront that's commonwealth wiry reaching them in the first place presumably. Did some research said a notice that your company's growing in this direction we're also we have some new services to help companies who are growing this direction. Would you be open to a conversation. A where we live in the same city. Or you know we have a similar background or so and so our mutual contact said that you might be interested in this kind of thing. So how can you bring commonality to the forefront to open the door and then the trick is it's a bit of a balanced it takes some practice. How do we open the door. And and be curious and say i'd like to learn more about your business in your challenges are right now because what might happen is when they answer that question they could have a completely different challenge that you had expected in your mind but that gives you an opportunity to come to the table with a different solution. That might be better for them. So sometimes we pigeonhole ourselves into an opportunity when we think we know the answer upfront. So it really is about getting to know the person and coming from a place of curiosity and this is happened to me countless times. Where i had you know. Sort of a rough agenda or thought of where i thought the conversation would go an turns out They asked me a bunch of questions. And then i said. I'd like to learn more about your business. And all of a sudden they said well you know actually looking for xyz and it was totally different than what we originally connected when so. Wait being You.

next month first piece first one part one
"senior manager" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

Jazzed About Work

06:40 min | 3 months ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

"On the website and so a lot of this is about discovery in research is also about preparation. And so on. You know you've mentioned some people may feel like it's too methodical and it doesn't feel authentic and that i would say a lot. The reason why i developed a knock method was to build confidence. And i've noticed in my own career experiences and in others in workshops and events where people ask questions is they're overwhelmed and we don't know where to start and we just kind of frees up so it really is sort of to to give us guide Start and i noticed that when we feel we're more prepared. We feel more confident so for example i started my full time job at might Goal -nology company over six years ago. Remotely i started remotely and i joined this huge company. I think it was maybe forty thousand employees at the time all over the world i was thinking. How am i gonna build the network here right. How am i gonna know people. When i i'm not gonna meet them in office and this is a place to start so preparation research gathering information connecting on a human level. It can just be you enter a room and you don't know anyone there were it can be that you're trying to figure out what your next move is in your career and connecting with individuals. Who can help you. You help light the way for you and your and create half can be really valuable. I agree and i think a possible audience for your book might be workers who've been around for awhile. Maybe there are ready to transition out of their pete career and they're thinking of an alternative to retirement. There seems to be a lot of that. Going around these days for pupil starting in their fifties the want to shift gears and they're not comfortable With the idea that they're going someplace where they're not experts at and i saw that your method with its emphasis on research and Kind of knowing yourself and knowing your audience might be a really good book for them so so let's get into it i. It's kind of you to go through your methodology for us. I love your five points. Would you just kind of walk through. I bet we have listeners out there who would love to get a sense of how the bethune works and appreciate it. If you'd go through the five points yes thank you. So i'll give a little little taste year So the first letter of each step spells out the word knock Made hopefully makes it a little bit easier to kinda carry with you and remember when you when you're in a moment of me but the first step is about knowing yourself and knowing knowing your contact or you're contacting this could be a potential company might want work for but first we need to do some research to figure that out It could be as mentioned your manager could be a potential mentor. Could be your mentality so many types of relationships and so we really wanna know who. These people are for instance. I listened to your podcast before i came on. So i know more about how your conversations go know more about your your background and the book that you have coming up this year. Congratulations thank you again. We can you. Yes yes we can connect on those things. Because i'm walking into a conversation with that knowledge. And i also feel more confident because i knocked me blindsided right by speaking. It's a conversation so knowing yourself and knowing your contact and also knowing your topic so it's just like any Any angel sales experience where you know you have to know your product because you're going into a room in someone's gonna ask questions you have to know what you're talking about. Of course you don't know all the answers on a second. Let me follow up on. That are off to get back to you but we want to know what it is that we are going to talking about and so having some answers in our back pocket in advance prepared for that individual specifically for that individual what will they be interested and so kind of preparing Those i like to say those. Faq's frequently asked questions. Have those in your back pocket. So that's the first step. The next one is is about not about me. That's about focusing on other people and other organizations in what we can do together. It's about impact so instead of you know. I'm looking for a job in this industry might be. I noticed you've been in this job for about five years in this industry. Would you be willing to share your career path. Maybe have some shared interests. So it's the same message but you're shifting the conversation to be about the other person it's also about If you're coming from the same experiences how you can partner to make an impact on customers or am. I create something new an even bigger impact together. So that's that's about shifting focus off yourself and the oh and own it is about authenticity. It's also about poor your energy into that preparation and investing in relationships upfront. So again. I listened to to this podcast in advance and i wanted to really understand what would be a meaningful conversation today. Similarly with individuals. I had the privilege of interviewing for the book i am. I went to their talks. I went to their conferences. I you know bought their books and it's not always about about that with high profile speakers but if you're meeting with a manager or meeting with an executive on can you get a sense from their team what's important to them or what their personalities like. One time i had a conversation with someone i they were kind to make time for me and i said a meeting with your executive today what should i expect what what am i walking into. What is going to be important to them. And this individual said sometimes they ask a lot of questions and people think that they you know that that they they're quizzing them in in that there are they're not they're not able to get their point across or they don't understand them and it's truthfully this person just that's how their their styles they ask questions about it and you'll see towards the end. Something's going to click and that's exactly how the meeting let but it prepared me and i felt much more confident going into it so investing in relationships early upfront and also being able to say you know what never done this before. But i'm.

five points today forty thousand employees this year each step first step first letter about five years fifties six years ago Goal -nology One time first over second
"senior manager" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

Jazzed About Work

07:40 min | 3 months ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Jazzed About Work

"Were becca. thanks so much for being here today. Networking is a topic. That i love and that we often have guessed who loved to. It's such a an important theme for anybody who's really interested in career building and but not everybody can be is Methodical and articulate about it as you. So it's it's a pleasure to have you here. I and we're going to get deep into your book. But but i could you. Just tell us something about your pass. And how you got so interested in networking yes. Thank you have asks for. Having me. And i will say that i think a common theme throughout my career has been a relationship building so i kinda swapped the word networking with relationship building which actually requires us to slow down. Sounds a little bit nerdy. But but i've also moved several times as a young adult and as an adult and i think living in different cities in sort of thrusting myself into new environments is Has opened my mind and given the confidence to be in a room with people that i don't know and try to find a bit of a common ground than a casual vibe to sort of break down those barriers. That might be you know in a professional setting when you first enter a meeting or it. enter resume. So i think moving and and being exposed to lots of different situations personally and professionally Really inspired The interest in learning. Not only how to communicate effectively to what i say open doors that may lead to partnerships in career opportunities but also to cultivate relationships that can lead to places that we could never imagine. Well i agree with you that it's sad. That working is all built on relationships. And i think a lot of people find the term networking creepy and icky. And they don't wanna do it because it feels manipulative. So i keep using the word. Because i know we're going to go on and explain how you are absolutely right. It's about building relationships that might start with Connections of all sorts so connections is another word that creeps people out sometime because it sounds inhuman but It's not it's it's a way of talking about a big. You use the word connection. So what do you mean when you're talking about connections in the book and it in your own professional life yes so connections. I talk about my work being at the at compassionate connection at work and It really can take so many forms so connection can simply be just brief meeting that you had with someone or a quick exchange you had at the beginning of zoom or at the end of assume but it could also be a deeper connection with a mentor with a manager with a team member with a colleague with clients with a prospect with startup investors. There so many types of career relationships so connection to me is broader Similar to you mentioned networking does feel if either the research that says people feel like they need to take a shower after number because it just feel. There's this agenda behind it. But that's why. I think the focus on relationship building and julie connecting to me is about bringing business you level so not about the jonah. It's about a working to that individual as a person and what. What experience do they bring to the table to the room. In addition to or above and beyond but their role title is or you know they came to the meeting for today so So i i tend to start a take off those. It was pressure points of view networking with an agenda. Where connection might have to make a connection and just think about. How can i get to know this person as a person and in the in the career study which Which doesn't always happen because we're in a professional setting there might be some you know. Obligations are standards expectations that we have to appear a certain way or or speak a certain way and there are cultures in organizations where we do sort of follow those norms. But how can we just connect with other. Humans is really how i look at peace. Well that is really what it's all about when when we're talking about connection sometimes we use it in the context of an online platform or email or things like that and those Ways of talking can sometimes sound kind of went one sided and it's easy to forget that we are really trying to build a bridge to another human being so any kind of communication that reminds us that we're connecting with humans. It really Makes a lot of sense. I think another thing that people are sometimes a little bit creeped out about. Because they're afraid that networking connecting relationship-building. All of those things aren't a authentic if they're intentional. They're they're a little. They feel a little shy about being methodical and how they build relationships in their career. But i think anything that you manage is more likely to be succeed in including the way you connect with other people so i liked it. You've come up with a very methodical Specific kind of framework that people can use in the context of their career to kinda keep themselves on track. So before we get into your your methodology which you tell us about the kind of situations That you found it to be helpful. I know you do a lot of workshops and things who are the people who are have been exploring your methodology and finding it useful and what kinds of situations so. I see that the knock method is for career growers career builders and career changers so the growers those who are developing their career. Maybe you work in a company. You wanna grow within the company or within that realm or that industry the careerbuilder our students and entrepreneurs. They're building something from the ground up from the beginning and career changers people who are sort of at a junction or they're making some sort of adjustment to their career path. They're making a change in direction. And so those are the points where i find. We are on meeting more support. That's where relationships and building truly a network of individuals that we can contribute to. We can help each other out and also a great source of information and an insight so a lot of of where i think. This methodology is applied. Is when we're exploring and we're gathering information informational. Interviews are a huge of a valuable knowledge. That we wouldn't have otherwise because we can speak to human. You speak to someone else to learn more about their industry their role you know what is what is the role that's listed mean beyond the job description or what is the culture like that. You can't see on.

today first becca one julie
3 Arrested in Italy Funicular Crash; Clamp Deactivated Brake

BBC Newshour

00:19 sec | 4 months ago

3 Arrested in Italy Funicular Crash; Clamp Deactivated Brake

"Three people have been arrested in Italy over a cable car crash that killed 14 people on Sunday. They include the owner and two senior managers off the company, which operated the cable car. They've reportedly confessed to knowing that emergency brakes on the car had been deactivated nearly a month ago to overcome

Italy
Google Unit DeepMind Tried and Failed To Win AI Autonomy From Parent

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:40 min | 4 months ago

Google Unit DeepMind Tried and Failed To Win AI Autonomy From Parent

"Back in twenty fourteen. Google bought a company. Called deep mind specializes in making advanced a it systems to mimic the way human brains work. It's an approach known. As deep learning now for years senior managers there had tried to negotiate more independence from the parent company. And now we report that last month. Google ended those talks. Permian basin broke the story for us. And she's here to talk about it. Parmi thanks for coming on the show. My pleasure so parmi. Let's talk about these negotiations over deep mind. You've been speaking with people close to this situation. What did you learn about what the people at deep mind wanted. so what. I learned from speaking to people who were familiar with what happened. Was that deep mind. Had been proposing for some time to google that they could have some measure of independence from the company and this went back actually quite a many years back to around the time of the acquisition so google bought deep mind in twenty fourteen for about five hundred million dollars and actually the year after that. Google restructured into alphabet. It became more of an umbrella company with so called bets that it was managing and that came up as kind of opportunity for deep mind to get a new measure of independence and it was from around that time onwards that deep minds founders started telling staff at the company that there was this possibility to become more independent from one of the reasons for doing that was relevant to deep mines long-term goal which is to create something called artificial general intelligence. Now you probably heard of artificial intelligence. Artificial general intelligence is like this next level of ai. Which is much much more humanlike. Ai right now is very good at doing things. Like nizing voices or a face or typing text for you but it can't do all the different things that the human brain can do. And that's what artificial general intelligence. The theory that it will be able to do that become almost sentient is almost as kind of science science fiction style. Way of looking at a i but the people at deep mind are seriously working on trying to build this. No one's done it yet. But they are they take it very seriously and they they call it solving intelligence and the view in the company of the founders was that hey if we actually built this should be controlled by a single corporate entity

Google Permian Basin
Lawsuit accuses Amazon of racial discrimination

Atlanta's Morning News

00:19 sec | 7 months ago

Lawsuit accuses Amazon of racial discrimination

"Minorities and Amazon employee file suit alleging racial discrimination. Charlotte Newman claims There's a pattern of Amazon paying black employees less in their white counterparts. Human who is black, says she was hired at a lower pay grade, though tasked with the work of a higher level senior manager. Lawsuit claims that's routine she seeking damages in the millions. AMAZONS

Charlotte Newman Amazon
Lawsuit accuses Amazon of racial discrimination

Gaydos and Chad

00:35 sec | 7 months ago

Lawsuit accuses Amazon of racial discrimination

"Amazon Facing a lawsuit accusing the company of racial discrimination, Charlotte Newman said she qualified to be a senior manager in Amazon's corporate offices, but was offered a lesser position. Her lawsuit accused Amazon of routinely hiring people of color at lower levels than their white co workers. She also alleged a systemic pattern of insurmountable discrimination that opened her to harassment by co workers and supervisors. Amazon said it's investigating the allegations but does not tolerate discrimination or harassment of any kind. Newman's attorney, Duguid Door said. Amazon treats black employees like second class citizens. Erin Qatar SKI ABC News, New

Amazon Charlotte Newman Duguid Door Newman Erin Qatar Abc News
The Power of Humor

The Indicator from Planet Money

04:18 min | 8 months ago

The Power of Humor

"Jennifer occur a named by donuts or a professor and lecturer respectively at the stanford graduate school of business. They've just written a book called humor seriously so gentle. Why don't we start by well. Why don't you start by telling me the value of humor in the workplace. I in leadership when people use humor at work the are twenty three percent more respected and are seen as more competent and more confident. It doesn't even need to be good humor. Just not inappropriate humor. The bar is so low and for employee retention employees. Read their bosses. As having a sense of humor any sense of humor they were to be fifteen percent more satisfied and engaged in their jobs and even in sales studies show that people pay on average eighteen percent more if the seller includes a lighthearted line as part of their final offer like my final offer is x. And i'll throw in my pet frog again. The humor doesn't have to be good and just anything. So what do you think is the cost of not using humor. If you're recuperation well not only would it reduce creativity it also reduces engagement and retention so the koster significant All right so. I was thinking to myself as i read this book. If i was a corporation or a senior manager in a corporation and i was thinking i was wondering what the return on investment might be and i think touched on a couple of things. Creativity better relationships with clients productivity. Is there any other other any other things that you could think of. That would provide a decent return on investment for an investment in humor for companies. So just to be clear you want more than retention innovation leadership selling products. You want more from us. Pat coty. we'll give you another one. We'll give you a health that the cost of of health mental wellbeing physical wellbeing are enormous for companies and humor actually makes you not only healthier. It makes you live longer so one. Large-scale norwegian study conducted over the course of fifteen years. Found that people with a sense of humor. Happy thirty percent better chance of survival if severe disease strikes and they live eight years longer so laughter literally makes us more physically. Resilient has bottom line effects for companies. I know. I've met so many people in my career my careers in fact who are just not fans of humor that like look i just wanna do. My job paid and go home. But how do you deal. If you're a manager. How do you deal with someone. Who has that kind of vibe and feeling about them. Well you're hitting on one of costello's biggest pieces of advice the former. Ceo of twitter. Dick says if you wanna have more humor at work. Don't tell jokes. Don't try to be funny. Just look for more reasons to laugh. It's this idea of actually being human not about being humorous And this is the reality is right now that this is more important than ever because you know our work is much more technology mediated and therefore the harder it is to be to bring out our humanity and a sense of humor at work we subconsciously adopt to our medium and we're constantly communicating through technology. It's easy to sound like a robot so it's more really in a way it's more by sense of humor than being funny absolutely and it's also about being more generous with laughter so not trying to be funny just looking for moments to laugh generously and the entire texture of life changes when you're able to live this way And another thing that we try and tell people to do is to try and create small moments of joy for someone else and especially. If you're having trouble finding it in your own life right now just looked to create a little moment for someone and it can be a really small gesture not a joke by changing your virtual background to a picture from fun shared experience or You know leaving a nice posted on your fridge for the person that you cohabitate with But this focus on creating joy for someone else help. Take the pressure off. You know. I need to be funny. I need to look funny myself. And it's more about. How can i focus on someone else in. Elevate them

Stanford Graduate School Of Bu Pat Coty Severe Disease Strikes Donuts Jennifer Costello Dick Twitter
An Apple/Hyundai Car?

Techmeme Ride Home

03:29 min | 9 months ago

An Apple/Hyundai Car?

"Hundai has confirmed that it is in early discussions with apple on collaborating to develop a self driving car. But in case you're jumping ahead to apple may be buying hyundai or anything like that. This seems to be just a partnership right now and also hyundai says apple is talking to several carmakers about a bunch of things right now so quoting. Cnbc we understand. That apple is in discussions with a variety of global automakers including hyundai motor as the discussion is at its early stage. Nothing has been decided a representative from honda motor told. Cnbc's cherry king. The statement followed a local report from the korean economic daily. That said apple suggested the tie up and honda motor was reviewing the terms. The report said both electric vehicle production as well as battery development were included in the proposal. And that the car could potentially be released in two thousand twenty. Seven apple declined to comment on the report and quote at the exact same time in bloomberg mark. Gurman has a piece up saying yes. Apple is developing an autonomous electric vehicle. But the timeline for release. His sources say is five to seven years. Also this quote a key. Differentiator would be apple's ability to integrate. Its driving system a pricey initiative that has spurred the company to develop its own software sensor hardware chip technologies. The goal is to let a user input their destination and be driven there with little or no other engagement. According to the people familiar with the project apple doesn't manufacture its own products and it will likely take the same approach with a vehicle. It's unclear which company would assemble the car. Though in its first attempt about five years ago apple worked with engineers from magna international a major auto industry contract manufacturer apple has continued to investigate building. It's self driving car system for third party car partners rather than its own vehicle the people said and it could ultimately again abandoned. Its own car. Efforts in favor of this approach in assign it has now rebooted development of a vehicle apple in recent months shifted in executive known for his work on vehicle interiors and exteriors to its car team in twenty nine thousand nine apple hired former tesla engineering. Vice president steve macmanus but he initially worked on projects unrelated to the car. Now mcmanus leads a development. Group was several employees focused on car interiors fabrics car testing and vehicle manufacturing people with knowledge of the matter said he reports doug field a former top tesla vehicle engineer. Who runs the apple car project. Day to day apple also recently hired jonathan seve a vehicle engineer from bmw ag tesla and alphabets as a senior manager on the car projects in two thousand nineteen apple. Tapped michael schwer kuch tesla's former vice president in charge of drive systems adding to a growing list of former tesla employees working on the vehicle effort late in two thousand twenty apple also hired another former tesla vice president stuart bowers. According to a person familiar with the move. He led tesla's self driving technology team until mid two thousand nineteen and was an executive in residence at venture. Capital firm grey lag partners until july. According to his lincoln profile apples car team is filled with dozens of other x tesla hardware and self driving car. Engineers in total apple has several hundred engineers working on the project with most of them developing the self driving car system rather than the full fledged vehicle and

Apple Honda Motor Hyundai Hyundai Motor Tesla Gurman Cnbc Vice President Steve Macmanus Magna International Bloomberg Doug Field Jonathan Seve Bmw Ag Michael Schwer Mcmanus Stuart Bowers Alphabets Grey Lag Partners Lincoln
What drives trust in news and what can be done to rebuild it

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

02:17 min | 10 months ago

What drives trust in news and what can be done to rebuild it

"The public. Understanding of newsgathering and verification practices is persistently low. What does mean for the issue of trust so one of the things that we aired quito frequently from journalists and senior managers and newsrooms and talk to you for this report Were a lot of efforts around Communicating with their audiences about their newsroom standards journalistic practices emphasizing You know their conflicts of interest policy their crashes in various policies around the way that they collect news in information unfortunately most of the public meet but we know from a lot of existing. Research must've does not understand very much at all about newsgathering says much less The details Along these lines and so we want to. If what we know from enormously perspective what we think is organised for audiences to disarm differentiate between different news sources available them on the basis of the quality of information or the the rigor of the reporting You know we. We'd hope that they'd be able to Know a little bit more about what what's actually going on behind the scenes and basically we. We know that that doesn't really happen. People just don't have a basis of knowledge of what what goes on in terms of journalism and reporting information is is really really low in. That's most of our understanding of that is based on a full countries. And so we really don't very little at all about how this plays melissa's like India especially as brazil. And so you know. I think that's as a starting point for this product. Is you know for for news organizations for him This is a core part of their strategy around addressing trust They have to really be more cognizant of the fact that people are starting from a place where they really just don't have very much understanding about what goes into What differentiates their source from. All other information that they might be seeing in their social media feeds versus

Quito Melissa Brazil India
interview With Emily Reiser

Outcomes Rocket

04:54 min | 10 months ago

interview With Emily Reiser

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez's here. And today i have the privilege of hosting emily riser. She is the senior manager of innovation community engagement with the texas medical center. She supports clinicians and administrators at the tmc member institutions as well as hundreds of startups and other corporate partners engaged with tmc innovation. You guys have probably heard some of the healthcare entrepreneurs we've had out of the center. They're doing such incredible things in her previous role at emc she was a strategist for two tmc x. Cohorts she contributed to the redesign of the tmc axe program for twenty twenty and started the tmc alpha program for local innovators prior to joining tmc innovation. She led and venture a nonprofit organization supporting entrepreneurship training and company formation in the life sciences. She has directly contributed to business development projects with dozens of local life startups and supported the formation of four new companies. So her heart is totally in healthcare. Emily earned her bachelor's in biology from emory university and her phd in bio engineering from university focused on drug delivery for cancer immunotherapy. So you can imagine that. It's going to be a really cool conversation and emily Really really grateful that you Carved out some time to be with us today. Thanks for thanks for being outcast. Thank you so much saw so excited to be with today. Yeah and so you have such a cool experience right you've been in the healthcare startups and you know you've kind of gone pretty far in your formal education with bio engineering. And now you're in this area with this like incubating these cool really forward thinking companies that are changing the game. so what is it that Inspires your work in healthcare. I think a lot of us in healthcare are looking to have an impact on how patients are being cared for and that certainly inspires my work as well. And i always knew that i wanted to be in the healthcare space but didn't know how to do that while also making the most impact that i could so when exploring -nology that took me into research which you know if you can develop something that s- impacts you know thousands of people then really feels like you've done something meaningful to impact patient care but of course you have to pick something good you can spend your whole life Working on something. That doesn't end up doing that. And so i've moved more close to the patient closer to the bedside throughout my journey and now i have the privilege to work with folks that are directly saving lives. Impacting how how systems are ryan and making things easier for clinicians hospital administrators and then of course the patients to access the care that they need. So that's what. I love about my job right now. Is being able to work with somebody different kinds of people within the community you know. The house systems themselves clinicians entrepreneurs so every day is different but every single person is working toward making patient. Care better love that you're so mission oriented in that love their by two as you as you think about the work you guys are doing. Tmc is texas medical centers innovationlab. And so i think it's a good opportunity for folks that don't know about it to educate them about it but then after you tell us about it let us know a little bit more about how you're adding value to the healthcare ecosystem absolutely so the texas medical center is that's really interesting. Nonprofit organization that was started seventy five years ago through a gift from the md anderson foundation and we don't provide health care so we're not a health stem but we provide infrastructure that sits under md anderson texas children's houston methodist small herman and twenty one other different clinical institutions as. Well as you know. Other research institutions universities rice university of houston etc and so our role is to be the connective tissue and dr collaboration between and among all of the different institutions. So right now that looks like data that we publish every day around You can go to our website. I you and see how were clobbering across all these institutions to share updates on hospitalizations and other things that are relevant within our hospitals or doing a lot of work behind the scenes to try and make sure that everyone is cloud reading and and sharing best practices. And there's been a lot of really cool work coming out of that but five years ago we also started this great innovation initiative which combines space talent physical resources that all come together to provide different actors to entrepreneurs that can work with our health systems. And so it's an incubator. We have a partnership with johnson and johnson j. labs and body and other corporate partners to create density around making startups possible and always relevant tied back to the clinical application clinical outcomes. And

TMC Emily Riser Texas Medical Center Marquez Emory University EMC Emily Md Anderson Foundation Cancer Rice University Of Houston Ryan Houston Texas Johnson J Johnson
The Key to Successfully Managing Remote Employees

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

04:02 min | 11 months ago

The Key to Successfully Managing Remote Employees

"A lot of managers for years have fought having remote employees because they just didn't feel they could keep their no with their employees redoing. They didn't trust their place. And i think we're we're going to enter a whole new era of This trust relationship trust and transparency transparency. Towards that i think will hear a great deal more of going forward in in management. Because we now you're right you can't see people you can't see what they're doing but you certainly can know whether or not they're they're they're at productivity is working. They're working whether they're at home or whether they're sitting in your office if the communication issue i love some of the great stories that i've been hearing about how successful managers have been using all kinds of ways to keep in touch with their employees including a hurt wonderful examples of senior managers owners of companies or high level vice presidents or executive directors nonprofit to actually make an individual phone call to an employee just to check in to see how they're doing and this is having a tremendous effect on productivity and engagement and loyalty and all kinds of things. It sounds really. You know hokey to say that you need to pick up the phone which nobody has used it a long time. We're all used to using email text. I am in dmz and whatever but the phone calls now. I really having a very very profound effect. So i think we're all going to be learning as we go. It's it's there's lots of lessons that we can learn canopy done. I think there was some very great examples of organizations that are being very successful with managing remote workers. And we'll all get better at it as we go Now i think one of the bigger issues as we're going through all this is managing the stress levels and and just the difficulty of of Families and people with with children and having to teach as both. Do you work at all of these other issues that are are hugely impacting right now today in twenty twenty absolutely and i like what you mentioned is the senior level managers actually calling employees. Because it's a two way street. It's not just about you know management being able to monitor productivity but. I'm also hearing that employees. Want to know that they still belong. That it's not just the zoom call is over and now okay. I'm in my four walls. got my computer. But i'm wondering if the next email or text messages says ohana you're highly qualified but your services are no longer needed. You know. i think there's that fear fear and that financial insecurity about how secure is my job. When i could get axed any moment in an uncertain economy so somebody reaching out by phone who can call and say hi barbara. How are you doing is everything. Okay i mean to know your name. Oh my gosh. i don't very powerful. I've i've heard wonderful stories of a senior people who've done it. And their first of all they are blown away by the response they get which is encouraging as a senior manager director. Vp or even the ceo to get that kind of feedback wonderful but the impact. It has on the employees and you cannot measure that no that that's huge. It's not only they know who i am but they come across as caring so when say those is is really important but making it in the first instance is just really as you said incredibly

Leadership Business Remote Employees Management Barbara Mitchell The Big Book Of Hr Hanna Hasl-Kelchner Business Confidential Now Ohana Barbara
Interview with Khalifeh Al Jadda, Director of Core Data Science at The Home Depot

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

05:42 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Khalifeh Al Jadda, Director of Core Data Science at The Home Depot

"Hello and welcome to the AI Today podcast. I'm your host Kathleen Mulch. And I'm your host bottled schmelzer Our Guest today is Kelly fellow who is the director of core data science at the Home Depot Hai Khalifa. Thank you so much for joining us on AI today. Hi guys. Thanks for having me. It's my pleasure. Yeah, welcome Khalifa and thanks so much for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background and she current role at the Home Depot. Sure. So my name is Kelly fell Jetta. I have PhD degree in computer science. I started my career in data science back in June 2013 as a PhD intern at Careerbuilder, which is one of the largest job boards in the US and the my career with Career Builder actually took extended to until 2018 during that I was actually leading the search and recommendation data science team where I was lucky actually need to get involved early enough and building the semantic search engine for the company and after that building an AI based recommendation engine dead. So the semantic search engine actually is the one that has been leveraged by the company for their be to be sort of business and the day I guess recommendation engine which we built their home is now serving millions of job-seekers on the BTC side of the company. So very proud of that Journey with Career Builder in 2018. I joined Home Depot and I joined as a senior manager, of course recommendation data science team under the online business of Home Depot, I build the team and we actually worked very hard and the last two years to build again state-of-the-art e-commerce recommendation engine for Home Depot, very proud of what we accomplished as a team found in May this year twenty-twenty. I was promoted to director of course data science in my organization. Now, I have the court search data science team called recommendation wage. Science team and the visual AI team our focus our my route Focus now is as the name suggests to improve the core functionality of homedepot.com home from search and documentation perspective. So we work to improve sexual even see we work to make our recommendation more and more personalized and relevant to our customers and guide our customers and kind of give them the experience which they get in the physical store as part of our interconnected experience initiative. So that's overall. What am I roll includes now at Home Depot and I'm very proud and excited actually about the team that we have built for the core data science at Home Depot on the work that we have done that for the e-commerce, you know, that's that's fantastic. And you know, I I really have to give a plug for the talk that you gave at the data for a i week online conference because you you showed you age. And about thirty forty minutes really walking in Fairly good detail how the Home Depot actually does its product recommendation system. We showed how the system works. There was some math in there, which is great all the time a little bit of code more math than code showing how it was the song and it was fantastic. I mean and so, you know for those who are listening if you really wanted to to dive deeper and see this the presentation you can the the conference is available for free. So if you go to data a icon did a i c o n f c o n f, and look for a Khalifa's presentation page, it's on the e-commerce system and talks about the recommendation system. It's just fantastic and I love seeing it because you know, I have to say I'm you know, probably like many of us here in the United States now have a big Home Depot customer feel. I feel like I go there like every other week, especially, you know, we're all at home these days so you can't help but notice the things that you need to write a fix and repair right and they even do some stuff outside job. And it's it's it's the season of the deer kind of eating everything and Wrecking everything. So so I think it's fantastic what maybe maybe for our listeners here? If you can provide a little bit of insight you talked a little bit about the recommendation system. I know that it's really hard to we don't have slides here on a podcast that's going to be hard to share. But you were talking about solving challenging e-commerce problems using the power of data science as a Todd the title of the talk. So maybe you can share some of the insights that you shared at the conference around the recommendation system round recommendation systems in general maybe around the relationship between data science and e-commerce, which you know, maybe people haven't thought about that deeply Yeah, sure sure. And first of all, thank you for highlighting the talk. Absolutely. It was actually a great conference overall. So I congratulate you guys on the success of the conference just enjoyed being part of it. Thanks for having me back to the question about the talk and the relationship between the e-commerce and and the data science absolutely data size is transforming retail to the boss really on the e-commerce side and how we do things and the e-commerce and they use cases I presented in my talk. We're actually real use cases of things that we implemented at Home Depot on faith and that changed actually How We Do recommendation on our websites to make them more relevant and to make them as they mentioned earlier and more personalized to our customers need. So

Home Depot AI Khalifa Kelly Director United States Career Builder Kathleen Mulch Intern Careerbuilder Senior Manager Todd
Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

Scientific Sense

59:58 min | 1 year ago

Prof. John Flood, Professor of Law and Society at Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we explore emerging ideas from signs, policy economics, and technology. My name is Gill eappen. We talk with woods, leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest. Scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation. Be Color a wide variety of domains red new discoveries are made. and New Technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society. And help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation. V seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide unaided content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do. A companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense. Dot. com. And displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics, guests at other ideas. Please send up to info at scientific sense. Dot Com. And I can be reached at Gil at eappen. Dot Info. My guests today's facade John. WHO's professor of Law and society at Griffith University in Brisbane Australia. He's also adjunct professor of law at Queensland University of Technology and Research Associated University College Under Center for Blockchain Technologies, he who suggests on the Bloomberg professional globalization of law and the technology in law. But come John. Hello. Thank you. Sure. Yeah. So I want to start with one of your recent people, professions and expertise hog machine learning, and blockchain redesigning the landscape of professional knowledge and organization. In invite you say machine learning has entered the world of the professions. The different impacts automation will have huge impacts on the nature of work and society. Engineering architecture and medicine or early and enthusiastic adopters. Other professions especially law at late you say at in some cases with leptons adopters. could you talk about you know sort of the landscape all? Of Law, profession and. They today in terms of opting these technologies. Certainly Louis interesting because it's a very old profession is. Often considered one of the. Original traditional professions along with medicine and the church. And in a sense law has used different kinds of technology might say I mean does it? Based around writing. And then the printing press and So on yet that. It's always being based on a craft. A skill which the individual person is that enables them to do, whatever is quote if you like and. said, there's never been a lot of room for any kind of automation. Certainly, the has been space for using. A people who are not fully qualified as low as about as paralegals, people like that, who will do a lot of repetitive work document checking and things like that and so on. But what will get into now is the situation where automation through machine learning. There's other kinds of artificial intelligence. is able to start constructing documents example contracts. Check dollop a documents for particular clauses and things like that mature they're up to date and this incense is. Replacing now, the kind of work that noise will do. So I think in some ways more more of of the profession of law is gonNA be subject to automation, but distinction I would many because I think it's quite important here is that A lot of what lawyers do. Is actually quite. Active that that that that the drafting contracts overtime or or they're reviewing documents to some sort or another or they're getting through particular. Negotiation. And so you know a lot of it is the same, but they build up the expertise through doing these same kinds of were over and over again and What we're now finding is that instead of having young lawyers coming in and doing what you might call the grunt work of checking documents and going through discovery applications where he goes through the size boxes of evidence to decide. which are the appropriate documents you want the emails, the invoices order, this sort of stuff that is the kind of work which is lending itself to automation. And, and so that his taking away a lot of the work which is used for trading purposes with young lawyers and is just doing it much quicker. will quickly I mean More efficiently in many ways and probably expensive much much expensive a Lotta. This work is being outsourced to you know legal process outsourcing India or Philippines South Africa places like that. So yeah, that's that's right and so in some ways, the group of lawyers who do the work which requires the skill, the judgment. Is Reducing in some ways. That pool is getting smaller. Yeah Yeah it's it's interesting. The the distinction that you make between automation. And in my job and let's call it decision making right which is you know a lot of work in the business side of this. So for example. in the nineties in large pharmaceutical company So you think about you know rnd. People might think it has really complex selection of programs that design of them, portfolio management, risk management, all those decisions. Genuine companies be say well, senior managers with lots of experience and intuition make those decisions really well right and so that's statement would automatically implied that machines can really do much there. But what we find in the mid nineties says that is systematic analysis of data make those decisions. Don't better. Actually, I've Tom to humans humans. Always seem to make decisions. These are typically bonding the decision. So if you go back and look at it, alternative experiment has not been wrong. So we have no date to say it was a good decision at typically. So human scaffold, fifty percents of making good decisions So do you know just throwing a coin or letting monkey make those decisions so? Yup We found that even complex decision making that humans hold. you know close to their you know kind of domain I'm not necessarily. So we have machines That could do that much better than I. Don't know there's an analog of that in in law I I. Think The may be actually I mean Two three years ago the royal. Society in England decided to arrange a working party on machine learning. One of the things that they put together a a roundtable on machine learning professions resolved to talk about that night and I talked about the history of professions in technology and. and. I think one of the peculiar things that came out to in relation to law is that law. Has always been a sort of on its own. If you think about medicine, for example, medicines always had the teacher hospital institution that sort of straddles the academic quilt and the practice walls and brings those people together and as a result. INCORPORATES loss of, scientific, work. Engineering work as well computing work and things like that. And that's been the first teaching hospital king into existence in in the French revolution in Seventeen eighty-nine. A long history of that. If you look at law, there was nothing equivalent to that whatsoever and there is in fact, actually a big gap between what academy does on what the practitioners in your do so that As a result as before law has come to this a quite late but what we are. Finding I think is that Certainly the management consultancy finding is that because of the nature of a lot of what goes on in legal office a remarkable amount of it can be automated. So what we are getting now is companies setting themselves up to do this automated work. So. We have companies which do nothing but contract our instruction formation sort of company. The typical lawyer would would say to a client Do you WANNA contract classes. Yes I want this for this. And loyal galway draft contract back with it, and then in the con- comes back against as I need another contract, you go through the same process. which is good for the lawyer but not necessarily good kind. What we're finding now is the company's not can think of a few of them that will, in fact, go into the company's show order contracts. Let's see the entire. Corpus of contracts you've got there and they will analyze them. And basically say, all right. We can create a new contract in automated way fairly easily it may need some modification according to special circumstances but on the whole, it's fairly standard and and they can do that INNOVA systematic world meaning the contracts are reviewed that checked. If they're going to expire marketing, you want an unable just the system will cope with that if you're. Yeah. So yeah. No No. No so I was just going to say yes. So that the distinction you make, you know in terms education sort of systematic graduate level education that because as you say, it is low in one sense of soft proficient. You say in called professions like made it to text reengineering this team has a strong concern ensuring that expertise applied in the public interest when as low little bit different from from bad and economics in some sense sort of in the same same vein we have now made economics at really odd. of mathematics you know north of analytics there. Whether they are actually useful from policy making perspective is left to debate but at least it has been an attempt to make this make economic video hard. So so I don't know A. Fascination has been in in law I very much that will happen in law. Oh there things are beginning to happen I mean let me just boob. At. One example I learned in that workshop that I mentioned the Royal Society held. With somebody from the engineering profession talking about. The difference in skills between people who above forty I'm below forty he said. If he he was about Forty Years Austin design an aeroplane, takeout pen and paper Pencil, and paper and. I don't know anyone under forty could do that would know how to do that go onto a computer program undecided there. So you can see that the incorporation of technology into the academy through to the actual. Occupation. Than phones and things is is already a standard and they're in law. It isn't law. As you said, it's still very much a soft skill although I will argue that there is a difference between the way nor is viewed in different parts of the world. So in the United States A law is I think more tilted towards the sciences. So low in economics is one of the big things in the. US. So you got a lot of people working in the of lower economics who might go onto antitrust work no competition work and things like that which across a lot of economics, mathematics and Statistics and so on. In, say a Europe Australia and so on. Law is more allied towards the humanities. And the classics. So it doesn't have that kind of scientific underpinning in that way. So anything that's going to change in these parts if you like is going to be something that's going to be imported from outside. And is going to have a very dramatic impact when whether it does An and I think that's yet to happen. I don't think there's been sort of Cambrian explosion. If you like in in law, the will be one I'm sure but but law has an advantage over engineering economics or the other areas you might. That's With the nature of the rule of law and absent justice is since law as a a way of ordering society is absolutely crucial to everything else. Then, Law and lawyers will say will look you know we have a special status here is different amid leave engineer. We certainly want to make sure bridges stay up. We don't want down but we can design different kinds of bridges. We can design different kinds of legal bills, but they're also the fundamental rules If you want to you know if you're an engineering company and you want to build a bridge in a different country, you're going to have to do it on the basis of the legal rules, which will be just vise by the lawyers according to the country's there in so on. So in in that was what? I might put in a special category if you live. Yea. Yea. Let me let me push NBA John. So. The. The conference that you mentioned you know the Internet is under forty and engineers at. So so one could argue you know from an engineering perspective could argue e- It sexually dangerous. To not use machines to build aircraft the goes you know all the technology that cap today actually help us make the trap lot safer. granted. If you sit down with a blank sheet of paper and Pencil, you might get the principal right. But, but the technology has advanced so much that you really have to use. Technology to do so in some sense, engineering is pushed back. that. I argue this myself then they were naive engineering school. I had a V exposed at my daughter bent to school. She used the same physics book. Twenty, five. meter. I argue that that is sort of backward because data speed no need for an engineer to really learn Newtonian physics anymore because it is prescriptive, it's deterministic can make machines, learn it very quickly and so why spend all? Right. So so then you know if you think about the the law field. I wonder if there is a senior argument that is to say Dan and tape really good lawyer casts lot of intuitions dot expedients to crap something Contract or a discourse, but then maybe the machine scan actually do it even better We haven't really tested that hypothesis yet. Right be almost have this idea that humans are always dominant. Or machines but that the not be true as technology lancers. So what do you think about that in the in the? It's a very important point actually because the. American bosses. being modifying its ethical rules recently to say that lawyers have a duty and obligation to keep up to date with technology. So we already know the technology is now a an important part and I have to say when when I say the word technology, I mean this at all kinds of levels from what you can do with Microsoft word for example, it strays plug ins all the way up to artificial intelligence IBM, Watson, or something like that So that if if lawyers become. A. Uses of technology whether this small firms or big firms or what have you a under the Aba now they they actually have an obligation to make sure that they are up to date. They can't just say we didn't know what we were doing. So I think in that respect, there is a there was a move. The other move that is taking place is actually the push from from the clients. Now, this you have to look into ways one is with corporate clients. The corporation seen US lawyers have to use noise if you'd like want their work done. PHILOS- money on Chiba they wanted to more efficiently They don't want the best piece of work every time they want something that works and they want officiant. UTA A and so on. So it was interesting I think a few years ago. The General Counsel Cisco. Actually made a speech. Saying that he expected his. Lawyers Law firms who worked for the company to be reducing their fees year on year. Now, that's the opposite of what lawyers normally do, which is to raise them year on year. So say that that's one push which is. Very profound push now, coming from the client himselves who are using the beginning to use their procurement departments in in the companies and things like that to help purchase legal services the other aspects which is just as important in this is if you look at the role of lawyers and individuals. So if you is what access to to legal services, it's expensive lawyers are not cheap they charge our money We don't know how to judge the quality of their work and so on. because. There was a credence which we just know that So. On this is where technology can begin to step in and provide services which are. Efficient and often quite. what very well for the individual saying that this. Technology can be seen to be improving access to justice a Lotta people. Yeah. Yeah yes. I want to come back to this. John. I think this is a very important point. So bent on put has a lot of uncertainty. Uncertainty maybe not not the right term, but it's called deterministic. It shows beatty ability and so the determination of quality it's not as easy as hard media India nearing or. Right business economics legal all sorts of well foreign that category and the application of technology sort of a different different meaning there but I want to touch on one of the things that you say in the paper, and that is you mentioned this before and that's about training training the next generation. So you savior regulating bodies professions are involved in the collection and reproduction of knowledge intended to be used by the entire body professionals, and so there was an expectation here that you know seeing it professionals. Is Providing the wisdom that knowledge mission to train the next generation now in a technology driven. regime. discuss vacations right. Our expert is going to be a computer engineer in the future. And so so how does that work from from cleaning and knowledge Asian will I think this is This is a crucial issue in it's one which the profession hasn't. Really. Got To grips with yet I think because you think of technology in terms of Predictive analytics a document review and things like this most law schools are not preparing students for this they may be a a a a causal to on some aspect of technology, but it's not something which lawyers themselves are learning. So I think what is going to happen is we're going to find a blending of skills occurring. So law firms will be sense having to bring in a range of technologists who perhaps have. A scales a straddle, both sides of the lines, the lawyers like this too I think I think we're going to find an avangard Who will begin to develop skills that allow them to talk to both sides of the line, the tech people and? Below people if you likes and there will be people who will acquire develop these skills as well but that's that's still some way down the line I didn't think we're anywhere near there yet, and part of the reason for that I think is that you know law is still a very highly regulated profession and and the regulators themselves are in the same situation they are unsure about what is going to happen and they also feel they have an obligation to. Not only ensure that. Customers clients and consumers are protected but in some ways, the profession is protected to if you like so. You know it's it's a it's a fine balancing. There I. Think. It's a fight balancing act and you'd say if the changing changing things. So going back, you know you care as an individual eighteen status of expert. Some form of encapsulation of knowledge and analysis occurs enabling professional experts, derived diagnoses, decisions, and conclusion wrapped late. and you make some distinctions. Type of learning that. Human? Beings. That the distinction between doing drive and become a gift and laster Yes yes. Yes I think that's important. So the the the the principle behind this is that Individuals can acquire a lot of knowledge in in various areas. So as I say learning how to drive a car, you learn how to change gear you though with the speeds. Braking different rates, conditions, and things like that. So. If you WANNA take that further and become a formula one drive or something like that. Then you have to undergo a very different kind of training and that kind of thing becomes a lot more collective rather than individual because you start to you're you're going to be in a group that is gonna be doing a particular kind of our driving. If you like everybody in the group has to understand what each other is doing that group, you can't have people going right a racetrack at two hundred miles an hour or thinking individually feel like they have to have a collective consciousness. About. How to drive in that situation? That's nothing like how? You and I might drive. I'm not saying we bad drivers just saying spreading very different. So I think professional work is not. That different from this in a way. So once you you can go through school and you can do your law degree and you can learn your low. We can learn you engineering's this applies to or professions really. But in order to become a professional in order to become somebody who can operate function within that. Group if you like you then have yourself have to develop collective consciousness and and one way of thinking about it is that we we can kind of tacit knowledge. This assorted knowledge you learn on the job from people, which is not always articulated in a precise formulate kind way but it's something you pick up from the way. Somebody does something you just recognize aw that that's how they've done that might not be. Written down anywhere or anything like that. But you know that's different from now exiting differently from the way that wise doing I think X.'s doing it better I and you and you just, and you can absorb that. That's what I mean by this kind of tacit knowledge and that comes about from the professional context. As how the professional context develops becomes absolutely crucial to how you introduce new ways of doing things new my daddy's new skills new outlooks if you like and I. Think this is where we're on the cost of of this beginning to develop I mean we we know it's got to be done quite how it's going to be done. is yet to be. So. So let me make a statement John and I want I want your reaction to it so eat in hard sciences eight years against again medicine. Expertise has about a consistent happy of remorse. Whereas enor- economics and business in general, let's say expertise is not about the ability to apply rules but to deal with. and at and if that is true, it has lot of implications rate. It has implications as to how we might divide work. Between. And machine in the future. And the skills that universities need to impart on on on new graduates are also quite different. So I always argued in the business. engineering contexts that universities having changed the dog they get mentioned before they're using the same. Using the same. Out Thirty four years without asking the question are those skills relevant, anymore or more importantly watch. Really relevant for a human being in the future rate. do you agree with that that expertise assert more about dealing exceptions apply? Putting it actually. I. I can see the logic behind what you. Saying I think what distinguishes? A good professional whether it's a good engineer good architect or good lawyer or doctor is is somebody who has a certain? This may sound strange but it's the. Imagination. Creativity. about. Kind of flare that allows them to function on the nausea they they've got and developed over the years and the experience. Gathered from Nova pitching what they'd be doing over the years and so on, and it allows them to see around things in ways which they perhaps would. I can give you an example if you like a law. So I'm in in Germany and some other countries. For example, there's a particular way of bundling together mortgage securities I I won't go to detail about this, but this statute that enables you do it. And then you can sell these securities and get money. In certain countries, the UK, the US, and so on. This, NICI. So in a sense to put this kind of a a deal together it. Couldn't be done if you live. So a bank came to one of the large English law firms and said, look we wanted we want to replicate this in in the UK, want to set a market this we're not the statues off there. What can you do and what was interesting was that the law firm then went back to first principles lawyers who were looking at this went back I suppose they looked at some vape basic areas of law matter your trust. And contract from what have you? I'm from that they constructed elite supplement that looked very much like the one in Germany, but without stat sheet and they tested it and it worked. Out To be credibly successful. So much so that the German government started German legal profession started to complain because they said. You can only do this by statute and these we find a way of doing it three. I suppose using law and there it is an they were vowed shops by but that was a particular example if you like of of what you were talking about, they took the exceptions they went back to first principles and said you know or How would we get? This is where we gotta get to, and this is a way right at the beginning what are the steps we need to take and and? And that's what a good loyal will do if you. Right right? Yeah. So that's very important point. So you in your paper dawn as the DREYFUSS and rice note that the proficient performer immersed in the world of skillful activities sees what needs to be done. But decides how to do it. So as we move into a and other technologies, I think it's important point it is. Right from Dad benefactor culture we have been using humans as you mentioned before in lots of with meted activities big not designed for humans I would I would contend enjoy doing things over and over again, and if you had thought of doing that, yeah, because they have to do it for living right and so so we should be moving to word It would where anything that is with pita on delegated to the machine at automation in the bottom of that and Appealed autonation you can have intelligent automation you can have you know reinforcement learning those types of things you have some aspects of intelligence into the into the two. And deploy humans Don't Miss. They're really good at in some case. I'm. So you know we've been studying the green for ages be our no close. It feels to understand mother. Heck it does You know it's not neat learning it. Oh, BBC of. thirty years ago as see that person again, you could see you could you could have a feeling. Then you've seen that before and and what the brain has done actually not only as he that pattern but also age that matter intuitively for thirty years and say, yes, that face I, guess before. and. So there are some superpowers the brain has reaped have been applying the all all. So for a technology might allow. Look I. Think Technology will allow us to incredibly complex things without having to think about too much I. Mean if you look at the way a port functions, for example, any major port these days they've got millions of containers and ships going through them all the time. So there's a lot of paper going through the you those charter parties, bills of lading guarantees. So the lot of legal work that's being done it, it's all quite standard stuff. I mean everybody. KNOWS, what needs to be done and so on. Now, some people are beginning to think while the best way to handle a port if you like I for everybody should know is to put everything that's going on in the poor into a blockchain so that you can see the whole supply chain. You see when something comes in, you can determine when the goods are being offloaded. When they're being shipped, you can stop making the payments as a result of the. Operation of the smart contracts if you like, and the whole thing would be just one quite seamless. In some ways without that much human intervention really just need oversight Some bits of coordination so on. But at the moment is still a a lot of humans are vote in that shipping people, law people, all sorts of things which is. I think insane. That's a waste of resources. We know that there are people who have all kinds of problems that require that creative flair she like as so why waste money on the routine stuff when you could develop skills to the the real need if you like in that way? Yeah Yeah. So I, want that some that bit that John Blockchain, for example, as you mentioned. So so one reason especially in the professions like law and business humans have an advantage justice dimension of trust. and you know at least our generation we don't really. At eighty level, right. So so having that. Human human touch is still extremely important for us. Now, technologies like Blockchain, for example, actually allows that trust to be tensely decoupled, right? Yeah, and I think I think you're right. Look I. Think I mean one of the reasons we make contracts is because We, don't trust each other. So we we devised these documents with all the conditions in them. Something goes wrong. This is what will happen things like that and so on. What are the interesting things? You know people really rely on contracts are met you. You draw up a contract. And the to business people stick him in the drawer I never look at again less something really really fundamental goes wrong but they know sumit doesn't that never look at that again. So you say value of the contract, what did it actually do if you look at some of the Asian countries say like Taiwan or parts of China, you have a assistant coach Guanxi, which is where people developed effective relationships by knowing each other over a period of time around business that allows them to develop trust it. So You know there are different ways of of handling trust, but we we seem to spend a lot of time on trying to minimize something You know which we don't really do a lot of if you like. So I think one of the advantages of of blockchain is that it just it removes a lot of this from from the equation if there's certain things you know that can happen. as a result off if this thing that systems. Lead happened And you know. As, long as you've got oversight and you can see what's going on than. You don't need to be too concerned about it. It will just do what it needs to do in that way and So. Again. That's still very much in the early stages, but we are seeing situations where supply chains A shipping goods from one country to another can actually be done under smart contracts through a blockchain. Technology if you live. That that is now happening I associate goodful dealing with things like gum counterfeiting if you're. Producing. Particular high-quality could site move our phones or particular pharmaceutical products and so on you know it's one way of guaranteeing the quality of the product is you couldn't I say look you can examine the whole supply chain or the data is there. And you know his Eq- code look at it and you get the whole thing going all the way back The. Again, issues around that if you're dealing with the digital. Is Much easier once you start dealing with physical products then you have. A question of how do you get that first initial digitization of the physical if you'd like to goes on so though some people I know here in Australia who? Run A company called Beef Ledger, which is trying to export beef straight beef to China using the blockchain supply chain, which will. Guarantee the security, and the quality of the goods to the Chinese consumer APP because having problems with this before. But I will tell you now do doing something like that does require that the people you are dealing with. You're going to set this up with You have to have a trusting relationship with you before you can set up a technology that will do away with the So we're still in that. That's really early days. I think another a lot of time way to go right Yeah, but the technology works it. Clean potential one could argue contracts exist because they probably known performance if you have a technology that drives that probably the of non-performance zero, then you can actually get rid of for contract. Yeah limit. It is. Not. Goes back to that earlier point I made that. Most most contracts are fairly standard. You know a routine things they're there to. Record a series of transactions payments that have gone on between people without the to do much. If you like you know once you you're you're doing the business, the contract just kind of records that in perpetuity. So the small contract just takes that into a different area and an an actually does the whole implementation and execution without people to be involved in that too much and there's something goes wrong. But if it if it all goes right then back it is done you need to you don't you think about it Right. Yeah. Hasn't been jumping to another are forthcoming people globalization law at. A time of crisis in the? Global Lawyer and so in the say Nikolai Condom Nieve a Russian economists in the nineteen thirties believed the worst economy operates long sixty year cycles Then he called K. Braves. And you safeguarding coronavirus analysis, the fifth psycho young's from nineteen eighty to twenty thirty. It's you save twenty, nineteen forthcoming John You might have. I think so I think say because I, tell you off the what's happening this year I thought my good I couldn't My God. I was just. Owners because you know a contract device these waves up into into what he calls four seasons spring summer or winter at, and we're in the winter off this fifth cycle if you like this is. All the bad stuff happens and he's news war. Famine Disease I think wait a minute that sounds Yes yes. That's exactly right. A. But one of the interesting things about contractors was that you know he he a because he's A. Solid economists are installing a dip executed. By the way you know he he got fed up ninety that was the end of Nikolai unfortunately but he. He said instead of know if you like the ownership of the means of production are being the determinate for changeover from system system, he said it's it's technology and and that the technology will drive you out of the downswing of the last cycle into the upswing of the new cycle, and and the way that works is the win. You're in this kind of winter period because of the kind of economic. Gloom pervades if you like people tend to hold back in subsurface vestment in terms of technological innovation of what have you and so a lot of energy resources, resources, money capital if you like builds up to a second point when people say we're GONNA go for this is this is it? And that's when if you like technology comes to the fall on, really drives it forward. So from that perspective, what he's saying is that you know come right about twenty thirty. If. Things are going slowly now regarding technology they're going to speed up. In. This period and that's when it will. You know really also take take off and people have looked back over our preceding cycles and they've you know it works if you like not just their. Fantasy theory there are also the people who do Cleo dynamics in history these the quantitative historians and they've done a similar kind of analysis of historical periods and said, yeah, you know there are all these citrical. Processes that take place even revolutions occur and big upset occurs and what have you and and. One of their Perspectives which I find quite interesting is that they say one of the reasons for revolutions come about is caused a lease beginning to compete with each other and and an an I look at say trump in in America and I look at the Democrats and I I I would say Modine, India I look she in China and different groups of elites who are engaged really profound struggle for the future of their countries if you live. Out which again is leading to this kind of potential eruption of activity and a new ways of doing things. Yeah. It makes a lot of intuitive sense gone. So one way to think about this also. There are a lot of excesses. So innovating go good their excesses in the system people to believe that invincible they changed assumptions about. because they don't see any. and. Financial markets to right. So these cycles and real real mass that uniquely talking about you can see the. Happening in the financial markets more clearly. But what he's saying is that he happens mortgage and you ask in this paper in two thousand, nineteen for in many ways go. Crystallization off the settling ketone economic forces lost throat ear Kublai doomed as populous. Separates nationalism and lead clients and I think they have that we have probably the answer to that. But you see I think. One of the points I was trying to make an in in this paper walls that Global Law. If you like is is, is the a kind of synthesis off chaos? How do we bring some kind of order to chaos now once you start seeing the undermining? Of his global institutions, you see trump was withdrawn from the W. H. O.. He's he's are criticized NATO he he won't have the do with the International, Criminal Court and so we've got this kind of real life tension now between a an international legal order that's being built up since the Second World War both Ekit economic and legal order is Global And so we can't just a radical globalization I mean even even with covert, we can't eradicate mobilize ation we've got to. Handle covert the Kobe pandemic on a global basis. Otherwise, we'll. We're lost it retreats to a national. Approach is not gonNA. Work? We'll be defeated in that race is going to be global. Might. Be One of my questions in in paper was will who are the people who are going to be doing this? Kind of bringing the the order to chaos if you like and that made argument that it's got to be the global lawyer. And this is a person who not only understand their national legal system but also able to communicate with lawyers and officials. From around the world if you like. To be able to develop a kind of common. Language common discourse that enables them to stop putting these things together are, and it's not just a simple massa of saying mathematically, it works this way or not. It requires the kind of pulling together of people, but it requires that sort of common understanding which. Comes out of what I was saying about this idea of testing knowledge you know as you got this kind of professional consciousness you know how people ought to behave and how they will interact with you, and then that enables you to be out of bizarre to predict how you can do things and so on and so on. That basis I think we can operate kind of global order. It had a a below the institutional level if you're not kind of private. As opposed to the public according and that will put three. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah you know I the limit John I don't know if you think this way I limit one could as. Want to stay need for. Countries what does the need for legal system differentials? We set this up with the premise that it's easier to manage small chunks. one could also argue with Edmund Affect. -nology that you don't need to segment this debate that we have done. which might make these types of issues you know. See where you're coming from and I'm going to say yes or no? Yes, I think the home range of of questions that can be handled by the technology the ones we got pay I don't chain, etc. I don't I didn't see any issues there but there are a lot of decisions that needs to be made a book in terms of putting things together and resolve disputes that can only function at a human level because it's not. These are not decisions that are simple binary decisions. If you'd like, it's yes or no it's it's often a lot more nuance than complex about I mean, one of the resources in the World Kiva Zero System, the world amendment which is being fought over if you like is water, a water is probably one of the most valuable resources anywhere and it's you often find that rivers and things like that sort of flow between countries, they form borders. And and you are you know people if you look at the Nile, ESL start stopping in Sudan throwaway down to the Mediterranean. So he goes to countries all three countries, east European and then into Egypt's and so unwell well, who has the right to put it dime at a particular place and things like that all of that has to be cooled in act. You see a not going to be done at a human level that that's what caused the skills in negotiation judgment interpretation understanding if you like of the other people, no machine can do that I got. Yes before we conclude, I want to touch on one other thing So in the paper, you say as technology and culture intersect more and more. Ethical conundrums will intensify these raising questions about the rights and obligations of robots. And go beyond as moves. Three laws of robotics in two issues of rights of all moon. Algorithm, stem serves. So this is this is an area that be Kevin babies even even really form some notions allowed rights of all modes at rights of a are. Sai, gets more sophisticated. Yes. Yes. I do. I, mean I think this is one of the issues we already know some of the problems with algorithms and and you know can we can be are they transplanted from you see what's going on the ethical issues around the construction and implementation of algorithms and things like that. But I I I think looking into the future we all going to rely on things like robots. And various kinds of machines so much more so that if you look at a country like Japan, which is a a an aging population such that it doesn't have sufficient younger people to look after the people who need looking often. So machines, I'll be part of that, and that means people will stop forming real relationships with machines and and so that's when I would say. Okay. So let's think about how we View a potential rights of machine that we give. We give rise to humans. Yes. We know that we give rights to animals. Now we've also given rights to viz in forest in some countries as well as so machines I think our. Next logical step you know do we do we treat them with respect Let me give you one. Very classic example yet the production of. Robots for sex if you like is a major industry at the moment, some manufacturers say they want to program them say that people can act out rape fantasies will do we want that I? Mean you know should we be at first of all? You know? We should be having people behave in this particular kind of way, but even an uncertain if you do it against another human being, you'll be punished for it and you say we'll a machine is a piece of property you should be you should be doing that but I'm getting to think that maybe a machines should be treated with dignity say that we are treat ourselves with. Dixie. This a kind of reflexive situation here what we? Do to machines we do to each other, and they may again due to US depending on how they evolve and and move forward in that way is a very contentious issue. A lot of people would reject that right out of hand I agree I think we've got to stop thinking about stop dining forward because I. think we're going to at some point again. I. Don't know when. But at some point we will be having to deal with that. It's a it's a very important point. Joan. So if I understand you correctly, you know that the rights to animals the rights to inanimate. INANIMATE things like Lubers The recent those exist is because of its effects on humans and can see video a clear link in the future we would see a very clear link between a algorithms and robots ended affects on human. So this is not me You know each not fantasy in the sense that yeah, robots should have rights, but rather it's a more conceptual question. Any fraud did not have rights each going to cabin negative I I think that's absolutely true. I mean just to highlight that if you like this firm called Boston Dynamics that produces. Robots and they produced these videos of these. Now, these robots are resistant being pushed over and things like that, and it was quite interesting because a lot of people say all you can't treat them in this way. This is awful and so what I mean that that's the answer for more fighting to to the extreme extent. But it I think you know on the basis what you're saying, you know how we Oakland. Hold human beings accountable to each other in an increasingly complex world machines have become part of that. We can't just have them all sitting on the edge as though they're not part of who we are, what we are and how we do things. Right. So. Incursion Johnny fuel sort of look forward five years. At. The intersection of law and technology. But you think people see sort of the biggest. I. Think you'll see it two wins. On the you know for the individual The individual, you're going to see a lot of them just interacting. With artificial Tennessee, say lost questions about what my rights for this how do I deal with a tendency agreement? How do I complain against a producer company or something like that or that's going to be automated? is fairly straightforward to do and and it will only need A. Minimal. Amount of human inside of. An intervention if you like. At the other end at the. In I think we're GONNA see more and more technology coming in because as those basic functions that are. Being, carried out by junior people or or paralegals or things like that are the ones which are going to be increasing, automating creasing. I'm. We will replace the humans and just let machines do that because there's no point in wasting human resources on that whether that means we need fuel or more lawyers That's an open question I think it will that we need different kinds of lawyers We will need Roy Moore to logically aware much more sophisticated. They don't it's be programmers or odors or anything like that, but they need to have a quite a a a a strong understanding and gross what's going on in technology in that way if you like so. Yeah. We can definitely see an. Yeah, so I, think you mentioned the so from a structure perspective in all forum DC law firm sprucing to word. It a group of equity partners. Around it by machine so to speak well, I. Think. I was in that paper or another one I. I'm S-. Forecast. Law. Firms. Being. Distributed decentralized we'll tournaments organizations running on a blockchain with with the various people. into setting when they will no I. Think the law firm is still a very strong and powerful is Shutian, that's not gonNA disappear straight away. But certainly the numbers of partners who control things will shrink. They'll that will get smarter as proportion and yes, they will be surrounded by machines and they surrounded by people who are servicing those machines. Your excellent. Yeah. Thanks for doing this weekend. John really enjoyed the conversation. Thank you very much. It's been great fun and very

Policy Technology Economics Science Blockchain John Gill Eappen Eappen Queensland University Of Techn Blockchain Technologies Australia Griffith University India United States German Government Innova Bloomberg Inflammation Royal Society Brisbane John Blockchain Chiba
2 former eBay employees plead guilty in harassment scheme

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

2 former eBay employees plead guilty in harassment scheme

"Former ebay employees have pled guilty to the roles in what Massachusetts prosecutors call a campaign to terrorize a publisher and editor of an online newsletter critical of the company with A. Scheme that investigators say included live spiders and other disturbing delivery center their home. Stephanie Pop. The former senior manager of Global Intelligence and Veronica Zia a former ebay contractor but guilty to conspiracy to commit cyber stalking and conspiracy to tamper with witnesses. The scheduled to be sentenced in. February that amongst seven former ebay employees charged in the scheme than other anonymous delivery center. The couple's home three others were expected to plead guilty later. This

Ebay A. Scheme Stephanie Pop Veronica Zia Senior Manager Stalking Global Intelligence Massachusetts Publisher Editor
Ellen DeGeneres makes on-air apology, vows a 'new chapter'

NBC Nightly News

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Ellen DeGeneres makes on-air apology, vows a 'new chapter'

"Ellen DeGeneres. Began the eighteenth season of her talk show today with an apology. Here's Cathy Park. Everybody summer good yeah. Mine was great. Ellen degeneres kicked off her new season with more than just laughs. I. Learned that things happened here that never should have happened. I take that very seriously and I want to say, I am so sorry to the people who were affected. I know that I'm in a position of privilege and power and I realized that with that comes responsibility and I take responsibility for what happens at my show her on air apology in front of a virtual audience address allegations of toxic work culture at the show reports published by Buzzfeed this summer allege senior managers engage in ramp rampant harassment and sexual misconduct. We have had a lot. Of conversations over the last few weeks about the show place what we want for the future, we have made the necessary changes and today we are starting a new chapter. The changes following an investigation by Warner media degeneres was not part of that review. Three of the shows top producers were eventually fired. Now, her longtime DJ twitch will help lead the daytime series, my co executive producer. The host also addressing claims that she hasn't always lived up to be kind mantra. Means that truth is I am that person that you see on TV I am also a lot of other things I. Sometimes I get sad I get mad I get anxious I get frustrated I get impatient and I am working on all of that. I am a work in progress today generous acknowledging Joe is to

Ellen Degeneres Cathy Park Harassment Warner Media Executive Producer JOE
Episode 53: mediUSA Reduction Kits with Christopher Miles

Lymphedema Podcast

02:50 min | 1 year ago

Episode 53: mediUSA Reduction Kits with Christopher Miles

"I'm so excited to introduce today's guest. Christopher Miles is the senior manager for clinical services at many USA he's trained as an occupational therapist and a certified in both limping Dima and wound-care. He has been working with patients to assist in managing chronic Dima for over eighteen years and currently his role as managing a team of clinical educators for many USA and also completing clinical education to direct hospital systems national and International Conferences Hi Christopher. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you so much, Betty I'm excited club join your pot cow. I am so excited to talk to you about the reduction kit. So many of my patients in the clinic won a single garment that can do it. All is the reduction kit, their answer. You know I wish that there was a magic pill for lengthy Dima. I've been working Olympia for a long time and I think everyone spent hunting for that I. Wish I could say the reduction kit will do everything I'm not gonna I'm not GonNa say that it can but it certainly can do lot. It's a phenomenal bandaged replacement system. So. Can you tell us how the product came to be and what inspired it? Absolutely. I would love to and it's always a great story share. So the reduction Kit is part of the circuit product line The cirque aid product line has been around for over fifty years in a way it was inspired. It was actually invented by a individual who was trying to find a solution to help his wife who suffered from chronic limping Dima. Anti came up with this idea when he was at the San Diego Zoo he noticed that drafts are very tall yet for some reason, they never have swelling in they're very skinny legs. In the reason they don't have swelling in their legs is because their skin is inelastic it won't stretch. It doesn't have the ability to give to excess pressure or fluid. So there's no swelling or. So we've that. Concept he wanted to create a garment that didn't stretch because up to that point all compression garments had been made out of elastic that we're very stretchy. So key. The first inelastic product actually a very crude on product that he designed was actually out of leather belts. But over time he designed and created the circuit blind, which is the combination of an inelastic product with inner juxtapose spans to allow patients to automatically adjust and apply their compression.

Dima Christopher Miles USA San Diego Zoo Senior Manager Betty
The Post-COVID Workplace: Will Employees Be Safe?

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

The Post-COVID Workplace: Will Employees Be Safe?

"Of Corona virus continued to surge in many communities. Some companies air starting to bring workers back to the office. But it appears workers have reservations and Edelman survey of 3500 employees in seven countries finds on Lee 51% believe office spaces air safe. And even fewer trust their senior managers to keep them safe.

Edelman LEE
"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Engineer. But I'm still just getting started on being a woman. Ceo I'm still getting started on you know Having a relationship right or I give advice for what I know. So far but I've only been with my fiance for four years versus someone who's done it for twenty five years you know so acknowledging that you know to have different people that you tap into for different reasons There's even people know where I'll have three or four mentors for the same thing but the house foreign different perspectives of people that you say that I respect their opinion but I know that they're giving different suggestions. Helps me get a better gauge? Rather than Oh you know. Susan's that I need to do this. And this is what I should do. And it's like well Susan said a little bit of this and Hector's at a little bit of this and he said I had suggested altogether a totally different suggestion. So kind of having that collectiveness you know. It takes a village. And that's why even know psychologists say it's important if you have two parents you know because they bring different perspectives to different humans. Raising one individual So you the Madigan tapping into different resources. Different mindsets Different people of experiences to help it give that advice or to help support. You need the and I think Again if we actually. I commend you for taking an hour a day for personal development. That that's awesome. I think that investing that timeline books on podcast and listening to Konkan like this a think of people like Rian and people that come to the show as your mentors and again the beauty of podcasts thing is the eve you're an introvert or maybe you're shy of reaching out to people like you is that Hey you don't want me to deal with that because I'm the one that brings people in so you don't think of me almost like a proxy for you like I as questions for you It and again. Is there anything else I forgot to ask you? That you wanted to mention anything else in your mind about being an ally how can be better allies for women in some? Yeah I think use made a great point of again like introvert or if you don't know what type of questions to ask Again obviously thank you for having me but this is exactly the type of things in these type of conversations that I feel are really necessary of why even created my own personal brands So almost like micro blogging on instagram. You know with the picture and just kind of what's going on what I'm facing like you said my own kind of conversations that I'm having with friends families my own personal mentors In so even just creating the people engineer. Podcast having a personal website Again having his youtube and facebook just kind of post it was it was just acknowledging that a lot of people started sharing nine of these SICOM Kind of conversations their expectation on started kind of seeing this women stem Hashtag grow and creating that online community and so again a lot of people that had questions. They'll ashamed or they weren't afraid of asking the wrong things I really to me and you and I know right like in the DMZ. I'd get blown up all the time and I'm by no means INSTA- famous and it's not you know what I'm showing. I'm shooting for Cycle of space to have these conversations. I'll never be once he condemn. Anyone say like how dare you asked that I just want people to feel safe To ask those questions for me personally. I'm really passionate about the life career and growth. Because I feel like a whole person you know. No one really gives us a hamburger life right how to be an adult to be successful how to make decisions how to even deal with our emotions In so kind of again being that whole person is very important and obviously love what you're doing with the gas and all the great you interviewed so again I just think it's having that story of again being allies simply supporting one another Again if you have insecurities or you have your own projections like really just dealing with what you're doing first and foremost obviously you and I both are here for those conversations for that type of community But again I just feel like. It's something that we shouldn't be afraid of I know that there's very such colour I WANNA say opposites oppositions happening in our world today and To my point again if you're coming from a place of good hearted intention you make your Wants and needs known of. Hey I want to learn more I don't think that there's anything wrong with that but again like you're you're mentioning earlier. Just be very conscious of how when and why you're asking on people obviously are wanting to come from a good place you Wanna learn and support each other But again just just be conscious of what you're doing how you're doing it And again just come from a place of love writing if you are very kind Coming from a place of of love and and wanting to be understood as well as understanding others. Don't really think there's any place you could go wrong you know. Maybe you could say something wrong or ask something different on a different way But again if you come from a place of I want to understand. I want to be better. No we're all growing we're all we've all made mistakes. So that kind of place of vulnerability and authenticity goes a long way awesome. A now we know where you are get people in Guinea Problem. So yeah we linked to your show day on the show notes or just check it out. Website all the thing. We'll do good stuff I know that you're putting out some great content out there so I definitely want people to find out more about it than who you are and what you do. The things. Thank likewise a very much appreciated. This effort has been wonderful to follow in participate in so I really appreciate all the great things. You're doing my pleasure. Thanks for coming to the show. Absolutely thank.

Susan Ceo Engineer. Madigan Konkan engineer youtube INSTA Hector Rian facebook Guinea Problem
"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"You know a again from those two or three people that listen to this a probably two of them happen to be men so imagine that you have a a younger remain T- Happens to be male and you want to give them some advice again and they ask you know Rian what can I do to make the women in my team feel more heard included more respect that so they feel that they're an integral part of my team? What can I do every day every week? You know what the what do you think I should. Yeah I would say again. Obviously we're talking about kind of listening like you said. GotTa stretch out empathy muscle again. Be Self aware I doing that. Inner work is is a huge one But then again kind of that back to the seek to understand part. The very practical part is very Simply just don't try to be a knight in shining armor right so again if you see that Maybe have a conversation one on one with the woman to better understand Oregon. Lgbtq or person of color whatever it is as you feel like this person again is either marginalized or being you know. Walked over whatever it is. I'm just saying like Hey I noticed this You know and let me know if I'm making this up. But it was something that burroughs brought to my attention. I feel like you know X Y and Z. Or you know someone had mentioned something in. I felt uncomfortable for you. Is that something that you WanNa talk about or does this happen often again? Just acknowledging someone in Sharing your own experiences of what your thinking or saying is sometimes especially as me. Personally I would say man. Am I making this up lake? You know people are telling me I'm to direct people are telling me I'm too aggressive or I'm bossy and it wasn't until like another coworker of mine was okay. I noticed like so. And so you know your boss seems a little impatient with you like. Are you getting vibe to or is it just you know? Is it just me? I'm like I'm really glad he said something as I got. I was going crazy like I wasn't trying to make up a story on for me. Personally I never want to be a victim of that but know if someone else notices it. It helps me saying okay. No there is something here right so even just bring that to the forefront. So that's something again one of just sharing from them not saying like. Hey you're you're over talking her right because then you take that power from her or again that person to stand up for themselves Another one is obviously man's planning And I know it's different ways about it again like you're talking about early. I know there's good intention there but a lot of times I would say something and even my fiance again like we're both serving and ship roles both volunteers before I was working fulltime. And I have you know this really great idea or feedback from other people and I would mention it and kind of like would fall on deaf ears and so then he would bring it back around two minutes later to be like oriented really great point. He wouldn't say brand really very point he would say rick reiterate what I said and everyone was like this is just so great and afterward like it became very frustrating to me because what they did you realize all you did was reiterate what. I said he was a cab but like you know no one picked up on it and I thought it was really great idea and like Abbie. You didn't give me credit either. You know what I mean. So it's that type of thing of even though you may be trying to do something again well or make sure that that ideas heard is really Kind of narrowing down on making sure you give credit to wear. It's do And if someone is trying to talk and she gets talked over or you see someone that maybe even more introverted. It can be again. You know man on man and someone just not as aggressive as someone else in saying no I thought so and so had something to say like in. We hear him out Again making kind of space for everyone to talk at the table Another thing that I've actually been trained on to be a facilitator is you do. Have these powerful voices that they always have opinions or they're always willing to speak up. There's always usually someone that's were quieter. They take more time to think out. What THEY WANNA say? Or they're good and so when you kind of notice around the room. Hey David you haven't said anything today. Is there anything you'd like to say or bring to the table In kind of one. I want to be careful that you know. You don't put people on the spot that they're like all you know. Embarrassed or nervous But kind of making sure that you're being very inclusive making force that effort And then well that kind of third practical. Just make sure that you educate yourself right if if you're aware that again there's not many women in your fielder in a male dominated field or you notice that there's not You know any type of resources or education or these type of training. You're mentioning you know. There's articles all over the place like just do a couple of research you know. My thing is at least do some type of learning registration one hour a day. And it's been mind boggling just to listen to a podcast or You know just just look up articles right. Even Google just sends me all kinds of random stuff like saying we noticed you like learning about this time of being And those type of things and just really being cognizant Putting forth effort makes a huge difference. Because then you're kind of expanding your self awareness your life experience outside of just what you know and considering other options. That's all great and the I would actually challenge people to either are considering having tea or a mentor. A actually trying to seek out a one that happens to be the opposite gender from them or somebody bad a happens to be. I think I'm when you when you recommend for you want somebody they have you know some skin in the game or somebody that has the job. Do WanNa happy ten years Somebody that went through some similar struggles do it But I would actually encourage people to. Hey why not try to actually look for a mentor? That happens to be a woman offers. Leeann where T was. I find that when you WANNA practices conversations and you wouldn't you want to actually Seek out though. The limits of your assumptions. It's helpful you know dog. Somebody real right that it's not somebody that they from an article from a podcast of Youtube video. There's a an electoral petition. The show as well as I showed it article so much Man's planning article. It's actually no chart join Nuha. I'm sure you've seen it strong you how to if it's manslaughter or not. And he basically it comes down to this. She Accu to explain it. Is She dead? Man's land you're you're you're saying so Yeah I mean that's A. That's a huge staying over the phone east tough particularly tough and You know if you've gotten this far in the podcast in a week part of her job it's to Khomeini's over the phone on some things. We can't league with people in their end of the line. So it's tough you know so leveraging things like I am or things like that and actually ask people a brand. Is there anything else you want to mention or is there something else that we want to share something on this topic? You know so like sticking out there. Quieter People Benza. That stuff wow but yeah I will be super frustrated too. We've somebody to credit for one of my idea probably know that was like the mentor And I would even challenge to the next point of Sangley. Yes get someone different even more so like have a variety right so you know I personally advise my own. Mentese to have like a personal board of Advisors. I'm your personal board of directors in so different types of mentors for different fields for different things you know I have a personal life mentor and then a professional life mentor and then Entrepreneurial Life Mentor. It's all like there's so many different I I wanna say as a human a and we're so round right like we're a big round character. There's so many pieces in facets to us to just think like. Oh you're gonNA have all the answers to everything I need in life. That's kind of silly so I could give great advice on again being a woman.

Rian Oregon burroughs Sangley Accu Google Youtube Abbie Mentese rick Leeann David Khomeini
"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

08:41 min | 1 year ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Build that own emotional intelligence within yourself really start painting the picture because then you realize what you are and what you're not the thing that you are versus the things that you're not there are other people that are opposite. Maybe some people that are three quarters. You know maybe the people that are just a quarter of what you're like in so kind of understanding the bigger spectrum and then kind of acknowledging what those differentiator are really kind of played them perspective. Oh these are the things I'm you know not privy to that. I need to be aware of or any. Need to slow down and be considerate of been your for for input. Actually Funny Enough. You were talking about values and those one were values. Who Actually did this assessment that? What am I France My friend Peter he actually quoted it up and essentially a list of the fifty a more common values so things like learning family relationships health. Annul those things and essentially think almost like a campaign board I know you're during throughout guile rights or anything ties Andrew Love. That's so essentially. Those are the fifty but then beneath the big your top ten and then you need to move them forward And then you need to move it to your top five and you can only be like pig five. Any Mike might five are learning kindness convenience passion on freedom of the things that a value the most and the one were values that I have and funny now like Like wealth are not there right or things like health you can also then after the this assessment. I took As actually many retreat. You know idea. I live in California right so I actually I over a long weekend. I went to the beach and I was thinking about okay. So what does this mean anyway? And I realized that that explains a lot of things sooner because I do it all these things like I. I work long hours and On sometimes there's a project in Europe when you get to fly to mild pound two weeks and concessions for customers. I'm in was yet again because I don't you know again. I don't prioritize my my health as much as they probably ship or things like. Well write a story. I was at visa conference at work. We sales conference and the people are going around these top till our asking. You know just having a nice nice conversation when somebody asks me. Hey what are you into right now? And I mentioned that I'm really to walk casting and I mentioned that attack and the very next question got asked me was well. How do you make money? Yeah so so I clearly know what they value right there in sales right so curious about you know. How do you make the sustainable So it's a funny enough I'll I'll actually L. Go ahead and put on the show notes people. Can they have fun doing it? And maybe find out about their values. Maybe they're blind spots because these these games might my blind spots. Are Those things that I'm looking at? Muslims like my health. Or maybe another one of your values. Maybe THAT WE DON'T SHARE. You know so yeah. Yeah and but if I did a similar assessment and so I kind of just started in junior point. I kind of just started from the list and I would check off things that like. Oh this you know seems like really important to me I find myself. Doing more of these are also picked about like ten to fifteen then like you said I narrowed them down the five so my five our gross also concerned I guess encompasses learning adventure inhabits Authenticity is huge for me Even just to put a name to it like mental resilience that includes extreme toughness Servant leadership is a huge one for me in that encompasses impact compassion meaningful work. And then my last one is acknowledgement and even back encompassed compass. I kind of recognition achievement. Fame influence respect success in wealth. And it's like we were saying right away. I think wealth but it's more so it's not even about having the money or you know the money to do things it's more of the acknowledgement to say like I met a certain level or you know to acknowledge the work that I've done so again like you're saying kind of the more you narrow it down and really get to the root of it. It's like oh it's not really like having the money part it's more about the recognition you receive you know because you have the money or because you are invited places or you know what I mean. It's that kind of your legal holding the trophy like that. It's not more of the trophy. It's more of the acknowledgement of the work right. So that's why the the servant leadership right the impact the meaningful work getting the recognition of kind of that legacy. Because you did this. This is the result of it So in a trophy is kind of like that outward facing it's much more for me like hey these are the lives you impacted or because you did this work. This is what this equals. Got It so asa aspiring ally on the I need to ask you again so you mentioned you know an ally is the behavior qualities are looking for but maybe a the have any stories or a guy examples of people that were Alex to you like how they help you and And again I want to give the two or three people that listen to this an Ivy L. O. Maybe I should do that. Yeah I think it's a really good point especially to your point of examples For me I'll say I I didn't have as many as I would like I do think a consistent behavior or effort that I've seen that helped is You know what everyone needs and we talk about it especially through ship of needing a mentor. A sponsor in an advocate So I would openly readily seek out anyone who is willing to give advice willing to sit with me especially You know women of leadership or people of Color and higher leadership Because I felt again like. I'm an anomaly. Your arm anomaly. Like I can talk to you about things more openly and again. I'm not afraid like I said. I don't mind being confrontational very in touch with my feelings. And I wear my heart on my sleeve so me knowing that about myself I always went in just very vulnerable authentic and honest and that has always served me really well granted. I kinda catch people off guard. Sometimes they're gonNA expect me to be forthcoming but I would say again. I've been very grateful. And quite frankly into starting to blessed and honored enough to have people that have served as mentors sponsors and advocates You know of one in particular was a director of engineering and he took a chance on me when I was an intern at the international aerospace company and he was a higher again director of engineering a white male but he really saw in me and so I would say that. I know I'm really eager to change things. It's really hard for me to be patient so just having those type of conversations where I feel like my bosses and understand me or I just need some type of project to really make me challenge me to make me feel like I'm growing In so he would help me kind of maneuver through ways and I would go through them with my list of tasks and say this is boring. This is boring. This is boring. I like more of this kind of stuff In so just putting forth kind of this is what I'm interested in. This is what I WANNA learn. Ended up Helping me oversee a five hundred thousand dollar three D. Printer and it was the first in the entire company All the others. We were the first pilot for all the other locations and three D. Printing you know jigs and fixtures and assembly jigs and tools and so it was really cool because it is essentially became inspector gadget on top of being near at the time. And so it's those type of things we're just sitting down having someone there to listen to understand to hear me out helped me kind of create this unofficial role or responsibility that I was really interested in And so it's those type of thing kind of seeking out one again as a woman or an ally to kind of be that for someone In additionally again just talked about it earlier but listening part Much more is actually having an effort to seek to understand. It's one thing to hear someone out but it's another to really put forth effort.

director of engineering Europe Andrew Love California Peter D. Printer Mike Alex intern
"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Welcome to Latinos who tech. My name is Olga Casinos. I'm an engineer. And I work in Silicon Valley I am originally from Kaz Venezuela a navy calling the US home for the last ten years when it comes to Latinas in the US. We are sixty million people. But we're only three percent of the workers in science or Engineering Profession. Silicon Valley of had the opportunity to meet some remarkable professionals. That working attacking Lebanon's like me with this podcast. I want to bring you a collection of their stories. And how they got the job in tech in the first place and if they have to start all over again what would they do differently? I want to share with you career advice on how to get a job in tech dealing passer syndrome. How to find your drive? When you're the only one in the rump. This Latina so attack. This episode of Latinos attack is brought to you by audible. Audibles the world's premium platform for audiobooks with over one hundred and fifty thousand. Titles if you're like me you're passionate about learning new things but finding the time to read maybe difficult. All your books are great alternative. You can get a free thirty day. Trial plus a free by going to audible trial the COM slash Latinos. Gosport them since they support us. Thank you so Briana. Welcome to Latinos attack. Thank you. I'm excited to be here so tell me your story. Oh Wow aren't even start I guess for me. I grew up a by a single mom. The oldest of three kids and I like that really shaped me. I'm super grateful to be four generations that Hannah so to be raised with You know my own independence to like. Live your own life. Do Your own thing. I'm so grateful my Mama said you know. Go as far as you can dream big. You know I'll live vicariously through you and support you in any way I can And so it's very I want to say kind of the opposite of how we hear. The story of most women are taught to be calm and quiet and collected in. My mom was like go out and play in the rain and get dirty and I'm super grateful for having such a wise woman. Raised me to be so strong and independent and to be raised and dream big I know when I was growing up like any little kid. They say you know. What are you going to be when you grow up? But now it's going to help people. I want to be a doctor and you know but I've been seeing since I was three so I just I would have entertained. People and I want people to feel like loved heard and seen how I love pictures and I love that you can capture moments. You know and I would love to be a photographer. I really WANNA teach early and I love learning and I'm obsessed and so even the growing up both my mom and grandma on older my memorial with semi not the kitchen table. And saying well you can. Actually you know. Go to school to be a doctor. Because that's the highest degree. You need on spend time doing now. You know invest in yourself. You know you'd be a doctor from Monday through Friday and then you can be a singer on the weekends right Friday night. Gigs on the weekends at your home. But whenever you're traveling around the world helping people you can teach them about the cultures take pictures of where your ads so they kind of just helped me understand that you know you're only limited by what your own beliefs are Insiders always thought like anything is possible in so intern with as my life continued to evolve continued to keep pushing myself and challenging. And I would notice that I obviously would score high in math and science and it was those two fields really just challenged me whereas I love writing stories. I love being creative. But that's funny. Came easy to me so math and science. It was just something that I had to climb that mountain to achieve and that sense of accomplishment when I finally got that problem really meant a lot to me and so I continued on I guess I've been seeing on threes on a chose a path to go in high school. I took a hand instrument. Draft class absolutely fell in love. I can't draw. Stick people to save my life but I draw three dimensional isometric view of something Wish we kind of blew me away after that. I kind of just started asking questions. Know what. What can I do to do this? How does this relate to like any kind of career choice And My hand instrument drafting teacher had ended up telling the engineering is really. I was really obsessed with cars and engines so curious about how things worked levers police years. I'll go crazy for it all Towards I started pursuing mechanical engineering at ended up having to go to college. I want it thousand miles away from home. Put on academic probation And but even that like I've done a lot of internships so I'm a very hands on Learner You know conceptual learning was very difficult for me. And so I knew I wasn't GonNa get straight as in college and I continued to pursue more internships and Co ops and so by the time I graduated I had already about three three and a half years of experience in different industries but Iowa's really drawn to manufacturing how things were made the process improvement manufacturing engineering industrial engineering and ended up finding my way through again different avenues Essentially grading rotational program for an International Aerospace Company got laid off ceremony consulting firm Then went into automotive manufacturing and then kind of found that transition of doing exactly what I love to do between kind of the idea and concept of new industry new technology implementation to actually assembly lines and what that looks like so now. I'm doing it fulltime for non profit from against essentially. How do we train people? What's the ideas? And then how do we actually get that Down to the local level so again like my passion for people in processes and really challenging myself continued to be a consistent throughout my entire life and not for any non for profit Checked which way the two people that listen to this are well acquainted with chat and how much I am you know. I think that the whole the lifetime members like us. We are the ship cheerleaders. If you will because a every time that I meet somebody that happens to be Hispanic Latino whatever you WANNA call it at work on. They mentioned that. Oh Yeah what is this shop thing or these ace ace HP thing? Oh okay. I need to I a couple of causing coming. How much time do you have? A best kept secret you know. I wish I would have known about it sooner. Beato that this this awesome. Thank you for sharing that and So so you need mechanical. In school he asks. And that's why I said if I would have known. What manufacturing or national engineering was. I wouldn't have had to torture myself with you. Know he transferred thermal system designed but I made it through long in turmoil path but I made it dissolve them. Yeah and then. Once you're ending donaire you know nobody can take that away from you. That way of thinking analytically and You know ruining running towards the problems instead of away from them. That's that's pretty unique so yes very much so even just a way of thinking. Yeah Yeah it's like You know and again we can be something as simple as okay. I gotTa do my laundry and tried to figure out like okay. How can minimize the number of trips down to the that's really cool and I know I have to bring you in because There's the old being an ally and the you know again you know we. We know that mentoring important. Also having not being a sponsor where people but there's been an ally and the ultimately I think that a lot of people are linked with myself is that we hear this word ally being thrown around at our workplace battle. Yeah we need to be better allies for you know a underrepresented minorities in especially in stem. Well women people of Color You know it'd be Q. People so what have you so I wanNA exploiting Savio. You know asked the asa man as I I was like. How can they be better ally to those women around me gene check because again full disclosure? I was actually invited well workshop for Shipping Conference and the in the beginning. That workshop was straightforward. It's about work. Mike balance how to say no and I bring my say. Note the people everyday including.

US Olga Casinos Kaz Venezuela engineer Lebanon Briana Savio Hannah intern Mike Iowa International Aerospace Compan
"senior manager" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Year and I'm a senior manager with my company and my wife and my wife has a half million dollars in a four oh one K. that doesn't help the negotiating noche negotiation process that X. rays the expectations of the kidnappers so we typically recommend is is you don't have financial conversations at all with that with your your captors that's how you daily says your instincts that you want to trade away everything just to get your life back you'll do anything you have to understand if it's a kidnapping for ransom my son and I was still alive it's a business deal and they need you alive to make their money and usually dances you're gonna get out just a matter of coming to a price after member that you have to remember that your role in that business deal is to beat the hostage to do what you need to to survive to avoid panic what WBEZ Chicago it's this American life I'm IRA glass today on a radio show held hostage we have three stories for you of people who are forced by circumstance to be the hostage and how they cope with what that means we're gonna begin with people held in the traditional way nav the ticket to the jungle but we also have people in our show who are taken hostage in much less literal ways one man can't get out from under the thumb of one of his neighbors the man held hostage by love and I know it sounds really corny but believe me it is not what you think stay with us headline captive audience so it is it is it is a re run.

senior manager kidnapping Chicago million dollars one K
"senior manager" Discussed on Accelerate!

Accelerate!

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Accelerate!

"Time during the day. But it makes the senior manager so nervous thought that somebody's. Focused on house. Yeah. Get my imperials right now. SQL's right now, I need more activity. It's so funny. I mean, obviously, we work with hundreds of companies every year at wide variety of different stages from companies with thousands sales people to, you know, twenty some even less, and we cannot get over volume. I mean, I see it sales leader after sales leader after sales leader, they cannot let go volume we have to let go like it is there it is not affected nece not volume volume is like a portent thing to look at. But not the, and I mean, it's like it's like does not compute in only have these conversations about what if we tracked meaningful conversations as the first step as opposed to any other activities. No can't do it. Can't do it. You know, we have track calls activities like fine. Sure. I think this is still point. We started the conversation, which is that for many leaders who might not otherwise have done this the veil ability, the technology giving them the visibility into this level of activity that they didn't have before is, unfortunately, encouraging this bad behavior. Because we're not. Yeah, you're right. Because what we're doing is. We're we're trying to use it. We're trying to adopt the technology to our process as opposed to figure out how to create like a better process than how the technology to enable it. We're just trying to say cool now, I can do more this sales. I mean, obviously, we've done hundreds of sales engagement overhauls Implementation's. I think we know more about this than I would argue anyone except the companies that are actually building the software and word we've got to start to view these are workflow management tools. They're not emailed tools. But most people they still think Email or call tools. It's like not a workflow front. Just allows you to create a workflow the sales team can then execute against in. We can track it we can optimize it. But but instead whenever we most teams when they made these verges, they didn't view it as a workflow tool. They viewed it as way to do more as opposed to and hopefully be more effective in the process. But it's just that we can't get away from this. More mentality. And that's what the pots can do more better than any of us can absolutely with all, but more of the bots will do it way more. Yeah. And the thought of doing things better as just absent, unfortunately from most most sales leaders at least once I've been engaging with recently is is like. Tell the story all time. But the CRO that spoke to, you know, his ID for growth all about Moore at the top of the funnel. Nothing about more at the bottom of the funnel. Right. It wasn't like don't you? But but look the book says if we get. But the technology enables that behavior in it just all works out. Well, yeah. Well, the pro it shouldn't though the technology wasn't every I mean, maybe it was originally because here's the thing to this is the other thing that that nobody don't think talks about enough back in twenty fifteen twenty fourteen twenty fifteen twenty sixteen when these tools are relatively new you could just send a bunch of emails in meetings, and it was like awesome. And guess what? That's exactly what you should have done in twenty fourteen twenty fifteen twenty sixteen fast four to twenty eighteen twenty nineteen and guess what? Now that everyone's doing it it doesn't work anymore. Now, we gotta go find something else. Right. And I think the problem is were still we're still looking back at the days twenty sixteen when I knew my emails twenty seventeen. Yeah. We made it early investment in those tools, and they just don't they haven't changed the playbook. They haven't realized like, oh, yeah. That's cool that worked for a while. And now, it's not. So we've gotta go, dude. You know? I don't know whatever the next cool thing is, you know. Well, yeah. And also. Rep fortunate rolling along. But it's been a fun conversation. As is. The bridge. I think for for tools companies that they have to our span the gap. They have to span is..

senior manager Moore
"senior manager" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

03:09 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"I mean folks think about what I'm telling you right now, the lead investigator for the FBI. In this case, a senior manager at headquarters who is making contact daily with not only the, the rector, the deputy director, but it cadre of upper level officials, senior management of the FBI who is investigating Donald Trump is texting his love interest who's an FBI lawyer about a coordinated DOJ media leaks strategy. Now to give you both sides of this, if you saw Sean Hannity less Andy McCarthy, who's a former sun and district in New York assistant United States attorney who have a lot of respect for he urged caution a bit and said, just to be clear on this, he said, we don't have all the facts yet, and I don't want to get, you know me. I don't like to get out ahead of stop because if you're proven wrong, you know, obviously hurts your credibility. I refused to do that. It's a simple calculation on my part about getting you the facts and not putting you in a bad spot either. So I do want to give you both sides and I'll tell you, I feel. That's a bad tax. Joe. If you're investigating me and you're texting your girlfriend at the time about a coordinated strategy to release information about a Pfizer warned about Carter page ladies and gentlemen, you know how sensitive that information is. We could be talking about potential criminality here, serious criminality among stroke in page depending on what exactly they leak. This could be very, very serious this revelation. It also brings the Justice department into the fold, and the argument that this was just a few rogue FBI agents here now goes out what you could throw that argument. I when it's silly, but the left always has an excuse, right, right. But McCarthy did say this and he is right. There is a strategy in law enforcement in general, and he brought up, he's right. He's even the terminology uses right? They call it tickling the wire where sometimes information will be leaked out to the media in an effort to maybe tease out who the bad guy is. You get what I'm saying. I mean, I'm trying to think I'll give you an example from the protection. And when I was a secret service said, and I was doing a motorcade and I'm not going to say what country, but we had gotten information that these media people had gotten an advance hold of our motorcade route, which is obviously a bad thing because if a terrorist is it was not a particularly dangerous country, but it was a country I was concerned about because of some past there that the media had gotten a hold of our motorcade route. So I worked with some people. Let's just say to leak information to the media through channels that was actually inaccurate was the wrong and sure enough. They printed the wrong motorcade route news, which was great. Everybody was like, hey, look at a motorcade. I was the wrong one now. That was done intentionally dumped to throw any potential attacker who would think about setting up at advance on our motorcade route off the set. So tickling the wire there is he's right. It's not. It's not common, I wouldn't say, but it does happen. So McCarthy says, listen, everybody take a breath for a second. And let's find out if that's, in fact what they were doing now, again, much respect to and the alum. I disagree with them, but I actually, he's not even saying, I think he skeptical to, he's just saying, take a breath. So I agree with him on that. We should always take a breath. I'm just saying, based on the available evidence, I think it's pretty clear what happened here. Why Joe?.

Andy McCarthy FBI Joe Sean Hannity Justice department Donald Trump senior manager investigator New York deputy director assistant United States attorn Carter
"senior manager" Discussed on Inside the Spa Business | Spa

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Inside the Spa Business | Spa

"Word to describe these current relationship that i have with my car mental or frankly any of the mentors that i've had over the course of my life but i do believe that as you grow involve this essentially different mental qualities and attributes become important depending on what stage of your life you're at that usually means that you need a different person to fill that mental role so it's kind of half to identify any one person that is being that big influence on my life the reality is i think there's four professional mentos in life intels really that have guided me and got me to the point where i am today all right that's great so what was your most difficult or your worst business decision well that's another interesting question trent i guess the most difficult and ultimately what turned out the probably be the best decision that i've made was to demoted a senior manager in my division at the sydney two thousand olympics now this is a guy that was twenty years my senior he was a former olympian himself he had lots and lots of political connections thought with just a few months to go before we went into games time i knew that he wouldn't be able to get his job done bring in someone new at such a late stage of course was going to be pretty risky but i figured that finally was pretty much guaranteed if i didn't make the change so there was a risk if i bought someone else in that they would fail but i just felt if i kept going with this guy that finally was pretty much assured now as it turned out i was able to find elissa role for him in the village so he was still part of his home olympics which i think is a really important thing because you know working at his home olympics meant the world and if if he had not been able to be part of that it would have absolutely crushed the guy oh and incidentally the guy that i board in did a fantastic job and it was very very tough decision at the time because again this was a guy that was he was an olympian he was part of our national team once upon a time and this was his home olympics it's the dream of.

senior manager sydney elissa twenty years
"senior manager" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"This these programs were to the best of your understanding approved by the commander in chief legally approved by the attorney general and supported by the director of the cia who i point out at the time was the former democratic staff director of this committee is that correct that's correct senator you said that you were not a senior manager when those programs work right is that correct that's correct was john brennan a member of the senior intelligence service and the deputy executive director at the time a senior manager in your opinion senator i believe mr brennan was the deputy exter of the agency at that time and you'd consider that i senior manager physician at the cia i believe it's the number four position for john brennan who was confirmed to be the director by the following members of this committee senator warner senator feinstein center heinrich senator collins center kings and or mansion senator wyden and senator rubio let's turn the question about the tapes that were destroyed in two thousand five did any lawyer at any time in any organization of the federal government say there was a legal prohibition to destroy this types senator they did not they were very consistent that there was no legal requirement to preserve the tapes because of the written record and it's your it's your testimony that there is a written record that fully documents whatever may or may not have happened senator yes and there were two reviews done of the written record by the office of general counsel and the office of the inspector general in other words the cia has record no different from the federal court system which keeps transcripts and allow sketch drawings but does not allow video recordings and federal courtroom is that correct.

cia staff director senator senior manager deputy executive director john brennan senator wyden federal government general counsel attorney senator warner senator feinste senator rubio
"senior manager" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"So not only to mccabe not recused himself from the clinton investigation he was a senior manager at the fbi while they they attempted to go through the pfizer court to spy on american citizens with information they never verified and he acknowledged the transcribe testimony right folks this is incompetence at at at a pakalitha level joe if this were you and i in the private sector you know is good as i not only would he bit as well as i do not only would andy mccabe been fired his salary probably would have been clawed back to you think gosh finally the flint prosecution andy mccabe is an upper level manager at the fbi when mike flynn is prosecuted by false statements despite the fact that the f b i agents interviewing flynn acknowledged along with jim komi that flynn was not lying that he was likely truthful during the interview flynn is then subsequently prosecuted for lying to federal agents how is that either said he was being truthful or he wasn't they said on the record he was being truthful jim qomi said it himself well it turns out mccabe and flynn have a past flynn snuck up for someone who he felt was being targeted by mccabe for various reasons and mccabe doesn't like flint i wanna know his role in that as well mccain's role in the flint prosecution i want to know mccabe's role with the fbi agents who interviewed him did he influence them what did he tell them to say did he tell them the same thing.

senior manager fbi pfizer court mike flynn jim komi jim qomi mccain clinton andy mccabe flint
"senior manager" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"senior manager" Discussed on Risky Business

"That was at him while or they with a check of the week security news okay we have one announcement this week at last season is hiring two rawls one in sydney and one in mountain view they're both security engineering leadership roles one with a local skirt and one global they are looking for a security team lead for sydney it is a small but growing team you'll be exposed to massive scale smart people big personal responsibility conferences and you'll get to travel the bay area gig is in mountain view it is for a senior manager of global security engineering this role is the global late for the entire product security team that includes the bay area austin and sydney help shape at lessons capability work with smart people get support from the sea to your and executive visibility if you are interested in that more information on these roles do email shawntel parma see palme at last in dot com that's the p i l m e r at a blessing dot com cp i l m e r at at lesson dot com of also linked through through the job ads in this week's show notes and you can check them out there okay it is time for this week's patriot of you now and this is about as bread and butter infosec as a gets travis mcpake is a senior security engineer on the net flicks cloud security same and he's been doing the rounds recently talking about a tool named repo kid it's a tool that he developed that helps organizations aws permissions amazon web services permissions are sorry complicated that it's quite difficult to know where to even start when you want to lock them down sowed netflixing came up with a simple approach give development teams all the privileges that they likely two years and then just nuke the ones that are left unused after a certain period here's travis talking about repo kit aws has a really powerful role based access control system identity and access management for those familiar with aw.

rawls sydney senior manager palme travis mcpake engineer aws executive two years