36 Burst results for "senior fellow"

Fresh update on "senior fellow" discussed on Larry Elder

Larry Elder

00:46 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "senior fellow" discussed on Larry Elder

"Welcome back to the Larry Elder Show yet, Larry, I really appreciate what you're doing. Um, I have a granddaughter, chief blacks, but, you know, I wish cheers as an American. Her heritage is obviously to be recognized. However, I honestly believe that the Democrats are really corruption and they're on people of color. To go against Trump, and I'm really upset about it and have a lot of black friends and they love Trump, and they think it's a fixed they think of the whole election was fixed. Triple 8971 s a G triple 8 99 17243 Larry Elder, really affected a comp duty as far as using race to get after Trump is concerned police they've been doing this for decades. Remember Maxine Waters called George Herbert Walker Bush races. I thought that was the good Bush. Ronald Reagan was compared to Vinyl records policies were compared to those of mine comped by a black congressman from Missouri back in the day. Half tomorrow. We're gonna have on Mike Lindale, the CEO of my pillow, he received a threatening letter from Dominion. Telling them to see if telling him to cease and desist from making quote, defamatory statements, he says. Bring it on, he says. I have 100% evidence that China and other countries use their machines to steal the election. We're gonna have him on. In the second hour tomorrow. So please stick around for that Triple 8971 s a Gina, speaking of using blacks. Hillenbrand from New York, says the other senator, the senior senator from New York, Chuck Schumer. There's no better person to bring us together. Then Senator Schumer, she apparently is unaware of the allegation made by J. Hom Nick, who said that A young Chuck Schumer running for office. Together a plan to get rid of a couple of buildings of blacks in a Flatbush neighborhood because the races neighborhood neighbors wanted him out and a young chuck Schumer said, Yeah, I'll do that and put together a plan to do just that. And I've been telling you about my next guest for for months. He wrote a piece almost 11 years ago called Race to the top, which appeared in the American Spectator. We have it up on Larry elder dot com. He's a senior fellow at the London Center for Policy Research, Please welcome to the program. J. Hom, Nick J. We haven't talked. We're talking years. Nice to talk to you. Yes, Yes. That was back when we were both young fellow. That's right Now you're a stage. What does that make me? Maybe. Now? Where were you stationed? Are you in London? Well. The London Center for Policy Research is named after Dr Herbert London. Who's the head of the center, so everyone The kind of people I want a full into thinking I'm in London. I don't correct them. Well, Jane, When we talk years ago, we talked about this article that I mentioned called race to the top that you wrote. In January of 2006 for the American Spectator. And you told about an incident Ah political meeting that you went to with your dad. Tell us about it. Well, this was a formative and transformative moment for me. Solidified my political engagement. Yeah, I was just a fly on the wall. Essentially, I was 16 17 something like that. Uh, my father got invited to this meeting. It wasn't that politically active, but he was a prominent figure. And this was in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn on they were introducing Charles Schumer to us on. I think this is before he ran for Congress, he was becoming a state assembly person. So, um, they were introducing, and they were trying to sell it to us. He was not a very impressive figure. I must say it was whiny Nasal didn't seem to have much confidence. And they were trying to put him forward and sell on the basis And, unfortunately that the all the assumptions that went into this are horrible, But they put a phone on the basis that he's going to get the black Off every new case, if you know the Flatbush section It tends to be a white section of single family homes and for whatever reason over the years is involved in that way, But there's a cluster of apartment houses on the Avenue K and where blacks resided. And frankly, they were. They were not violent. It was. It wasn't any kind of fuck the window classes going on in the streets. There was no fear. If there was a problem. I didn't detect the problem I lived in, but to ever had a problem with that It would only been on a strictly racist type of bases and So they brought humored us, They said. This guy's a genius. He's got a plan to get the black so if they have a new case Really? Has he gonna do it? Well, here's what he's gonna do. So he's going to make some kind of Ah, state funded refurbishing of those buildings, so I'm paper to look like he's helping the black And But of course, they can refurbish its with the people living there, so they'll move the people out the other locations. And while they're refurbishing, then the turn it into a type of a co op units. We have to borrow your way back in there were assuming that most of those people would not have the funds necessary to buy back in. So by then they would already maybe took would take a year or two for the construction. They would be settled in the new area anyway. They wouldn't bother to come back. And then there was sell these apartments so white people, and that would be the solution. So he was a man whose career was launched on a racist premise on a manipulation of political power to achieve racist and is absolutely disgusting. Jay, this Chuck Schumer. He was not in office. He was running for New York assembly at the time as I to the best of my recollection it see, I'm not positive on the dates. I have to go back in his. You know Korea. It was either It's his most logical to me that we didn't know him at all. Yes, he would have been running for State Assembly. Now he stood up. How many people were at this meeting roughly You know, this is not the kind of thing you say in front of a large crowd. It was, you know, 10 12 people who had some clout. And I guess it was. Ah, service something that you could, you know, talk this kind of inside baseball talk. I mean, I was very, very uncomfortable with what a lot of The premise is that went into this whole, you know, interaction. I mean, there was an assumption that of course, we want to get rid of the blacks and that this young Harvard educated, you know, whip us that, but it's gonna Come up with a great solution had a compass that it was awful. And it was Schumer's plan. The one that you just outlined about relocating them on the basis that these are gonna be refurbished, and then they get right of first refusal, they wouldn't be able to To afford to pay for it..

Chuck Schumer Senator Schumer Larry Elder American Spectator New York Triple Donald Trump London London Center For Policy Resea George Herbert Walker Bush Ronald Reagan Maxine Waters Missouri Dr Herbert London Baseball Senator Senior Fellow J. Hom Nick Congressman Mike Lindale
"senior fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:00 min | 2 weeks ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A senior fellow with the urban of Brookings Tax Policy Center about how the pandemic continues to affect a local government funding Well, those stories and more this hour just after news headlines, Please stay with us. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Louise Schiavone with a critical runoff vote just five days away. Senator David Perdue of Georgia is now in quarantine after coming into contact with a covert infected person. Georgia Public broadcasting. Stephen Fowler has more producer and fellow Republican Kelly Leffler have been crisscrossing the state to turn out voters in a January 5th run off that will decide control of the U. S. Senate. But now he is quarantining after coming into close contact with the campaign staff for that tested positive produced has regularly been tested on the trail and a test Thursday came back negative. It's not clear how this impacts of planned Monday night rally in northwest Georgia, headlined by President Trump that part of the state, a GOP stronghold, is lagging behind other regions and early vote. Turnout for NPR news. I'm Stephen Fowler in Atlanta Congress is ending a chaotic session, starting with longest federal government shutdown in history. GOP senators are ignoring the outgoing presidents demand to increase the $600 Covad 19 8 checks to 2000. They're poised to override his veto of a major defense bill. Meanwhile, Trump allies Senator Lindsey Graham says that Congress might try again to approve bigger covert aid checks after the new session opens Sunday. But the Senate majority leader says Congress has provided enough pandemic aid, and he responded to accusations from Senator Bernie Sanders, Our colleagues who purport to be the champions of vulnerable Americans now say that what struggling people really need For Congress to stop focusing on targeted relief for them specifically, And to instead send thousands of dollars to people who don't need to help. Experts from across the political spectrum agree that our colleague from Vermont is dead wrong on this. Socialism for rich people is a terrible way to help the American families that are actually struggling. The says the spirit will miss today's deadline for reporting the first set of results from the 2020 head count NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports. The delay could jeopardize President Trump's efforts to alter the count before leaving office in Trump's final days in the White House. The president is seeking to exclude unauthorized immigrants from census numbers that the Constitution says must include the quote. Whole number of persons in each state. Those numbers are used to determine representation in Congress and the Electoral College for the next 10 years, and federal law says Thursday is the deadline for delivering them to the president. Cove in 19 and schedule. Changes by the Trump Administration are forcing the bureau to miss that deadline. There's no penalty, but this delay could mean that it will be President elect Joe Biden and not Trump, who receives the numbers. Azula Wang NPR NEWS New YORK on Wall Street After a radical spring plunge in market value, Wall Street came roaring back on the final day of the year. The S and P 500 the Dow ended 2020 at record highs. The Dow closing up 1 96. This is NPR. This is W When will I see in New York? I'm Shawn Carlson. New Jersey's minimum wage will increase by $1. Starting tomorrow, Workers will make at least $12 an hour under 2019 law that gradually increases the state's minimum wage over five years. Governor Phil Murphy says he knows many businesses are hurting due to the pandemic, but has no plans to roll back that wage increase, He says workers need the extra cash. Now, more than ever. We need war. Federal help to help us help our small businesses and we need to let the minimum wage continue to go on its march toward $15. We have far too many people in our state. Living below the poverty line by 2024. The minimum wage will reach $15 an hour in New Jersey in New York City. The minimum wage is already 15 an hour while on Long Island and in Westchester County. It went up to $14 an hour today. Of course, all this is happening because we're kicking me in the new year here if you're thinking of going to Times Square tonight to celebrate New Year's Eve. Do not traditions like the ball drop and performances will continue, but mostly for a televised audience. No pedestrians or Spectators will be allowed in the area near one Times Square, and the NYPD began closing off some streets, two vehicles and pedestrians at midnight last night. So please avoid the area 41st Street to 49th Street from 6 to 8 avenues. The NYPD says no one will be permitted past police lines. And of course, if no one's going outside tonight, What are we supposed to do? Pop open a bottle of bubbly and Netflix and chill well. Many New Yorkers will be marking year's Eve with solitary celebrations, but door, Matthew says she's making the best of it. She sells incense and crystals on 125th Street. You haven't been in the house Corn team, you know,.

President Trump Congress NPR New York City president Stephen Fowler GOP New Jersey U. S. Senate NYPD Georgia Senator David Perdue Trump Administration Georgia Public broadcasting Louise Schiavone senior fellow Senator Bernie Sanders Kelly Leffler Washington
How To Use Globalization To Fight Disease

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:07 min | 2 weeks ago

How To Use Globalization To Fight Disease

"These two trends can make the world a richer place because they make the global economy more productive more efficient but at the same time because both of these trends increase human contact they connect world historically have also made the world more vulnerable to infectious disease to a pandemic in other words or at least they did until the nineteenth century that's when better sanitation and especially advances in medicines like antibiotics and vaccines started to make globalization and urbanization safer but ironically these advances also increased the amount of globalization and urbanization in the world so that if an infectious disease ever did you know slip through the cracks. The global economy would suffer terribly just like its suffering now charles. Kenny is a senior fellow at the center for global development and we spoke to him earlier this year. Not long after the corona virus had just broken out all across the us. And we are re airing the show today because his new book about the past and future of fighting infectious diseases is about to come out. It's called the plague cycle the unending war between humanity and infectious disease and in his book. He reaches some really interesting conclusions. I think one of the things. That's probably fairly clear by now is. This isn't going to be the last time that find a new disease. So i hope there are some lessons for how to react better to the end of the covid nineteen pandemic also lessons on how to do it better next time and one of the arguments charles makes is especially provocative which is that. Even though globalization and urbanization can spread disease more quickly. They have also become powerful forces in fighting against infectious diseases and rather than trying to reverse these trends. The world says charles should actually embrace them after the break. Charles tells us why and how this message comes from. Npr sponsor avalanche providing cloud based sales tax solutions for businesses of all sizes. Evola automats integrates with more than seven hundred. Erp and e commerce systems

Center For Global Development Charles Kenny Infectious Disease United States NPR
5 charts show what the global economy looks like heading into 2021

The Tel Aviv Review

03:07 min | 3 weeks ago

5 charts show what the global economy looks like heading into 2021

"Our yesterday's professor fluke. She's vice president of research. And the william davidson senior fellow for economic policy at israel democracy institute. She's the former governor of the bank of israel and professor at department of economics at the hebrew university of jerusalem earlier this month Professor flog served as the co chair of the idea is l. e. horovitz conference where the most pressing issues relating to israel's economy and society where discussed professor conflict. Hello and welcome back to the tel aviv review. Good morning. so. When corona virus hit it seemed like we were heading for an economic downturn that would rival the great depression but according to the bank of israel and always estimates israeli economy in terms of gdp per capita on employment growth and other measurements seems to be bouncing back and within a few years to return more or less to the levels prior to the crisis and it seems also that this crisis if everything goes according to plan will even less devastating than the two thousand nine hundred thousand nine downturn. So where the initial estimates and overreaction altogether anything wrong. I think we're still in the middle of a very serious crisis. It's true that recently we've seen some oppo revisions both today. A growth estimates of the global economy and also for the the projections for the israeli economy. But still we're talking about a very deep recession globally. Were talking about according to the most recent projections of the cd. We're talking about a contraction of over four percent this year and hopefully a rebound of about four percent next year. This is just in comparison to the global financial crisis the global economy contracted by only zero point one percent so we're still talking about a very deep recession and that's true also for the israeli economy If we are on the path as described by damore to mystic scenario that was a published by the bank of israel it means to the economy will contract this year by about five percent. And we'll rebound by about six percent next year. If we are on the less optimistic scenario where the corrina is not contained the pandemic is not contain then we will have a somewhat more severe contraction this year but much slower recovery by next year so i would say Were still talking about two very serious crisis. A very severe recession however it's true the israeli economy is doing somewhat better relative to other economists. I

William Davidson Israel Democracy Institute Bank Of Israel Hebrew University Of Jerusalem Department Of Economics Israel Depression Damore
The Big Red Button

Why It Matters

06:28 min | 3 weeks ago

The Big Red Button

"I'm gabrielle. Sierra and this is why it matters today a look inside the rules for nuclear launch in the united states and the risks of giving one person so much power. Hey i'm alex bill and i name is abigail sto thurston. Bell and stow. Thurston are both experts at the center for arms control and non-proliferation an ngo that focuses on nuclear security. This means they spent every day thinking about how to prevent nuclear war. Okay so the only person that is in charge of launching a nuclear attack is the president. There's no stopgap. There's no other people he asked to consult. There's nothing else just his decision. Yes so there's no requirement that the president consult with anyone they can and our command and control system is designed so that he can get in contact with advisers that he wants to speak to but no requirement that he consult with anyone before we go any further. Let's get our terms straight. There are two kinds of nuclear strikes retaliation. And i use. The details are complex but both are essentially what they sound like. Retaliation involves responding to a nuclear attack with a nuclear attack. I use means being the first to use nuclear weapons in conflict. Neither of these scenarios requires the president to consult with experts. So if the scene with the big board and the president talking to all of his advisors doesn't need to happen. What actually does need to happen. The protocol for launching nuclear weapon is highly secretive but the main components are known. Could you walk me through. How a i use nuclear strike would go down. It basically starts with the president deciding that he wants to use a nuclear weapon. He can decide this because he feels like an attack is imminent on the united states. He can decide it because we're in a conflict and he wants to use a nuclear weapon to end the conflict you know basically escalate so far that the other side will back down or it could just decide. He wants to use a nuclear weapon their issues surrounding whether or not it would be a legal order. But i think in the heat of the moment you're not gonna have a bunch of lawyers running into the room saying i don't think this is legal. He actually has a direct line to the national military command center. This facility run by the pentagon is ready at any minute of the day to receive a launch order remember. The president is the commander in chief of the military. All he has to do is pick up the phone. Indicate the target and the number of weapons he would like to launch. He has something called biscuit which is a little card that has launch codes on them. Someone verifies that is in fact the president giving this order. The order goes out and within five minutes from the president deciding. I want to launch a nuke to nuke in the air. That's how easy it is terrifying short amount of time and terrifyingly easy today and you're relying on the person who has the authority to know and have thought through all of those consequences. We take it for granted that that person will have thought about that before they do it. There's no checker balance to make sure that that presidents in the right head space has thought through everything has talked with our allies. None of that's there and has it always been this way. So historically commanders did have the ability in the eisenhower administration at the beginning of the nuclear age to use nuclear weapons on their own authorities. Should they not be able to get into contact with the president and then it was in the kennedy administration that we really solidify the idea that it should be the president and the president alone that the consequences of nuclear use is so massive that it really should be a decision at the top level. The idea being that. The american public would always electa relational and straight thinking president and And so that's why. This sort of very undemocratic process develops was a bit of a nuclear monarchy. So the idea was that this one person who was elected by all these people would have the wherewithal to make the right decision in this situation. Yeah it was theorized that way but not everybody always agreed with it. In fact during the height of the cold war there was a lot of debate about whether or not this was a good structure and it kind of went to macab places at times where somebody was positing that. Actually you should have the launch codes in a pill inserted inside of the heart of military attache and the president would actually have to kill that military attache to get the codes and be able to kill hundreds of thousands of people. Obviously that was not an actionable plan by theorists at the time is sort of making the case about how much you're putting on the shoulders of one person and whether or not that's a good idea when it comes to a weapon that's capable of flattening cities and and beyond the stakes surrounding the decision to launch a nuclear first strike are as high as they get and since the attacks on hiroshima and nagasaki. No president has done so in an ideal world the president would think and hard and hear a wide range of opinions before undertaking a first strike but when it comes to the other nuclear scenario retaliation the president would not usually have the luxury of time for retaliation you have to be able to decide and execute the retaliation and a very short time. Lsu you risk being wiped out neutralize before you can do. so this is richard vets. He's the director of the saltzman institute of war and peace studies at columbia university. An adjunct senior fellow here at the council he's served on the senate select committee on intelligence the national security council and advised three cia director's. How short is that time. Well that depends on where you are between india and pakistan which right next to each other could be almost instantaneous. for the united states and russia the Time was generally thought to be once. The missile age began about twenty to twenty five minutes list for the united states depending on various technical details.

Alex Bill Abigail Sto Thurston Center For Arms Control And No National Military Command Cent Thurston United States Gabrielle Kennedy Administration Sierra Bell Eisenhower Administration Pentagon Nagasaki Saltzman Institute Of War And Hiroshima Senate Select Committee On Int LSU Columbia University Richard CIA
"senior fellow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:41 min | Last month

"senior fellow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"This is Bloomberg Radio. From Bloomberg World Headquarters. I'm Charlie Appellate. We move into the final are creating on this Monday, December 21st back to work Monday, looking at a mixed day for the US equity market. The Dow higher as subpoenas stank lower We are off session highs. Stocks slumped around the world is a new variant of the Corona virus in the U. K on the wave of lockdowns and travel restrictions. Damn spirits, but U. S equities have pared their decline in afternoon trading right now, the S and P is down. 12 dropped their of 3/10 of 1% The Down up 71 hard by 2/10 of 1%. At the worst level of the day the Dow had been down 423 down 1.4% has stacked down 18 a drop now of 1/10 of 1%. Tenure up one 32nd 10 Year Yield 100.93% Gold Down 2/10 of 1% 18 78 Beyonce Ham West Texas Intermediate crude oil down 2.8%. 47 this 74 barrel wt I health insurance company Oscar has filed confidentially with the S E. C four and I Po. The house is released the text of that massive 5500 page package of legislation that combines pandemic relief for the bill to fund government operations just hours before lawmakers aren't scheduled to vote on it. Meghan Green is a senior fellow senior fellow at Harvard Kennedy School, and she was interviewed this morning on Bloomberg. Television Stimulus really is a stopgap. It's become really late, and it's a little lame. Honestly, it's not a big is I would have liked It's better than no stimulus the end of the year it all if.

Bloomberg World Headquarters Bloomberg Radio senior fellow Beyonce Ham West Texas Interme Meghan Green Bloomberg Charlie Appellate US Harvard Kennedy School U. S Oscar S E. C
A Climate Bomb in the Amazon

Why It Matters

04:54 min | Last month

A Climate Bomb in the Amazon

"We read about fires in the amazon frequently. So how are they started. Are they sorta like the california wildfires or is it something completely different so actually quite different from wildfires in other parts of the world because the rain is wet. This is dr. Tom lovejoy a senior fellow at the united nations foundation and a professor at george mason university in virginia. He's worked in the amazon. Since nineteen sixty five focusing on scientific research conservation and policy whitening strikes. Don't start fires. In the amazon people start fires and to give you a sense once. Somebody is cut down some forest. They have to wait for five days without a drop of rain before it is dry enough to set fire to get rid of all the stuff that's between the firebrand and turning it into some kind of agricultural project. Nine countries share the amazon but roughly sixty percent of it is within brazil's borders which means they have a lot of control over its fate and today across this vast territory. Small groups of people are intentionally setting fires in order to dry out the land for logging and to clear it for agriculture way of clearing land for whatever activity you want to do is very damaging to the soil. So what happens is that if later you want to reforest that particular patch of land it becomes very hard to do because the soil changes as soon as you clear it out because it's now sustaining a different kind of environment which is not rainforest like and then you can't really grow a rainforest back in that sort of setting. This is monica to bowl. A senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics and a professor at the school of advanced international studies at johns hopkins university. People refer to amazon a lot as the lungs of the world. But that's not really what the ham was on is what the amazon does is that it keeps a lot of greenhouse gases from getting into the atmosphere. So it's not bad. The forest breathes for the world. It's that once. The forest is standing all of those greenhouse gases which are in the soil there kept. They're they're not released into the atmosphere and as soon as you start cutting down the forest. Those greenhouse gases start to go into the atmosphere started to be released. It's sort of like a climate bomb. And as soon as you start cutting down the rain forest. Bob bob is released. So how big is that. Carbon bomb really big. Scientists estimate that the amazon stores sixty to eighty billion tons of carbon or roughly twice the total amount released from fossil fuels in twenty eighteen worldwide. Losing the amazon would accelerate warming with harmful impacts felt around the world. The other issue is these hydrological patterns so when we say that we're referring to the rain cycles and it's not just local. Because given the size of the amazon again it creates a micro micro-climate but a sort of macro climate within the whole of the south american region even affecting a bit of central america as well given that the amazon is so far north. And so what happens. Is that the rain cycle patterns as you cut down the forest. They change and sometimes they change really dramatically to the point where you destroy people's lives because they can no longer grow the crops that they used to grow because the rain cycles are completely different. That has already happened. In many parts of south america that have felt this direct impact and this is only going to get worse if deforestation continues. Hydrology is the study of the movement and distribution of water because the amazon is so large and so wet. It's hydrology has a huge effect. It supplies water to almost every country. In south america and in fact according to nasa deforestation has already been linked to reduce rainfall in the region and then on top of all that you have the issue of amazon tipping point. So you get to a point. Where if you go beyond that point in terms of deforestation. The rainforest is no longer self sustaining. It's going to turn into savannah. Simply because of the ecological dynamics of how rainforests behave and there's a lot of concern that where the amazon is right now is dangerously close to this tipping point

Amazon Tom Lovejoy United Nations Foundation Peterson Institute For Interna School Of Advanced Internation George Mason University Johns Hopkins University Virginia Bob Bob Brazil California Monica South America America Nasa Savannah
US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

The Takeaway

05:49 min | 2 months ago

US presidential election: A turbulent transfer of power

"Peaceful. Transfer of power is a cornerstone of american democracy. Right now president. Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming biden administration access to key documents funding information. They need to ensure a safe and smooth transition now. The formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the presidential transition act just over fifty years ago. Em things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until two thousand versus the mission of george. Bush is not up for me to accept or reject the legal process. You know. let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon. We'll be ready for transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill clinton cabinet meeting december twelve thirty five days after the election that george w bush was officially declared the winner that gave then president elect bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration course nine months later the september eleventh terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and a relatively new president off guard when the nine eleven commission report came out in two thousand four. It pointed to this truncated transition as a weakness and recommended a more formalized process katherine dunn tempests at senior fellow at the university of virginia's miller center the senior research director at the white house transition project so laws were passed in the two thousands or spin sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kinda they keep refining it and keep refining it but what they did primarily is that they enable the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formerly so that meant that once biden was the democratic nominee. He was eight. He was provided with all space some funding for salaries and the ability to start planning ahead. Talked to us a little bit. About how worried you are or how worried we should be as americans about this as you pointed out the attacks on nine eleven happened not that long after president bush took office. If something happens january or february of this coming year would the biden administration be potentially a unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. Let me back up. Just a bit to point out that There are basically two important phases of the transition. The i i pointed out was after the nominee has been formally nominated by the party and they received some resources the next big transfer resources comes after the head of the gsa has ascertained the next president united states and they use that verbiage. Esser that verb. I'm not really sure why but And that's the point at which the president the incoming president can start to have access to classified material that can start to be part of the president's daily brief with Tells them all the national security issues. It enables the biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now. Is they are preventing the biden from moving to the next phase. And what i would argue is the most important phase at the transition. It's critically important that the biden staff members be able to go to the department of justice francis and to be able to interview. Fbi director the head of the criminal division the head of the national security division to try to get a sense since of. What's the lay of the land where the priorities. What are the crises. That might be boiling over by the time we get here. And that's what they're being denied so. I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The the inability to advance to the next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crises that but we want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as were basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason and were inhibiting our ability to be in the best possible situation. We can be on january twentieth. And there's no reason for that. We have the resources we have the capacity. So why so. Let's talk about the. Why and and the who so. Emily murphy is a name that most of us probably weren't familiar with until now she is a person who is at the head of the. Gsa can you talk a little bit about how her role what her role is. And how much leeway. She has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow the biden team to start integrating with the outgoing trump administration. So emily murphy is the administrator of the gsa. It's a political appointment in the gsa. It's office is largely responsible for all the government real estate so they helped provide office space and oversee office space You know in in most situations would never even hear of the essay in this particular case because the legislation housed it in the gsa. She has the capacity to release the funding and the resources to the party. Nominees and then eventually to the president-elect by law she is the one that has to ascertain the election so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands. I mean she is a by president trump. She must be a republican. Who has some loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably for mark meadows. Probably the chief-of-staff sues weighing on her.

Biden Nine Eleven Commission Katherine Dunn University Of Virginia's Mille Biden Administration George W Bush Bush GSA Donald Trump Bill Clinton Emily Murphy National Security Division Esser Congress White House George
Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

The Takeaway

08:50 min | 2 months ago

Trump is stonewalling Biden's transition. Here's why it matters

"Amy Walter from the takeaway were well underway and the ability for Theo administration in any way by failure recognizes this our wind. Does not change the dynamic at all. What radio peaceful transfer of power is a cornerstone of American democracy. Right now. President Trump is not only refusing to concede this election. He's also denying the incoming Biden administration access to keep documents funding an information they need to ensure a safe and smooth transition. Now the formal transition process is actually a pretty new thing. Congress passed the Presidential transition act just over 50 years ago. Him. Things proceeded from there with relatively little drama or problems until 2000 President George Florida's certification of George Bush is the winner. It's not up for me to accept or reject. There's a legal process here, you know, let's just watch this happen. It'll be over soon and we'll be ready for the transition. It wasn't until weeks after that. Bill Clinton Cabinet meeting December 12 35 days after the election that George W. Bush was officially declared the winner. That gave then President elect Bush just over a month to plan for and staff his administration. Course. Nine months later, the September 11th terrorist attacks happened catching the nation and relatively new president off guard. When the 9 11 Commission report came out in 2004, it pointed to this truncated transition. Is a weakness and recommended a more formalized process. Catherine Don Tempus is it senior fellow at the University of Virginia's Miller Center. She's also the senior research director at the White House Transition Project. So laws were passed in the 2000. There's been sort of three sets of laws that have been passed to kind of they keep refining it and keep refining it. But what they did primarily is that they enabled the winning candidates to receive funding to start their transitions after they were formally nominated. So that meant that once Biden was the Democratic nominee, he was he was provided with office space. Some funding for salaries. And the ability to start planning ahead. Talk to us a little bit about how worried you are or how worried we should be as Americans about this, As you pointed out, the attacks on 9 11 happened. No, not that long after President Bush took office. If something happens January or February of this coming year, would the Biden Administration be potentially unable to respond because they just simply didn't have the staffing and they didn't have the time to ramp up and be ready. We'll let me back up just a bit to point out that there are basically two important phases of the transition. The first I pointed out was after the the nominee. Has been formally nominated by the party and they receive some resource is the next big transfer resource is comes after the head of the G s A has ascertained the next President, United States and they use that Burbage ascertain that bird. I'm not really sure why, but And that's the point at which The president, the incoming president can start to have access to classified material. They can start to be part of the president's daily brief with which is the tells them all of the national security issues. It enables the Biden transition team to have access to all of these individuals, civil servants and political appointees at the various agencies so that they can interview them. So what's happening now is they are preventing the Biden from moving to the next phase, and what I would argue is the most important phase of the transition. It's critically important that the Biden staff members be able to go to the Department of Justice, for instance, and to be able to interview the FBI director, the head of the Criminal Division, the head of the National Security Division. Try to get a sense of sense of what's the lay of the land where the priorities what the crises that might be boiling over by the time we get here, and that's what they're being denied. So I think there should be a lot of concern about this. The inability to advance to this next stage of the transition. It's not to say that it's going to necessarily result in some sort of crisis. I don't know that, but We want a country that's prepared so it strikes me as we're basically just sort of harming ourselves for no apparent reason, and we're inhibiting our ability. To be in the best possible situation. We can be on January 20th, and there's no reason for that. We have the resources. We have the capacity. So why? So let's talk about the why. And the who? So Emily Murphy is a name that most of us Probably weren't familiar with until now. She is a person who is at the head of the G s A. Can you talk a little bit about How her role what her role is and how much leeway she has to continue to refuse to release these funds or to allow The Biden team to start integrating with the outgoing Trump administration. So Emily Murphy is the administrator of the G S. A. It's a political appointment in the GSC itself is largely responsible for all the government real estate, so they help provide office space and oversee office space. Um, you know, and in most situations you would never even hear of the G s a in this particular case because all the transition funding the legislation housed it in the G s a She has the capacity to release the funding in the resource is to the party nominees and then eventually to the president elect by law. She is the one that has to ascertain the election, so there will be no funding going out until she does it. So what's tying our hands? I mean, she is appointed by President Trump. She must be a Republican who has some Loyalty to this administration and is unwilling to buck the advice. She's getting probably from Mark Meadows, probably the chief of staff who is weighing on her. So what happens? The electors meet in mid December, and they certify the results of this election. Is that the time in which you could argue that There just is no formal or legal option for the president to continue to It's sort of obstructed this process. Right? I think the meeting of the electoral college and the electors casting their ballots. And if if the numbers show that you know Biden exceeds 2 70 as he as they appear to now it strikes me that there is she has no justification. To deny the Biden campaign or president elect by and hit the resource is, however. This is a norm, shattering president and we've never had a president who has not conceded. He's lost the election. So normally, I would say yes. You know, that is clearly a decisive moment in American history when the electors cast their vote, And if Biden exceeds 2 70. He is the president. At the same time. I honestly don't know what to expect in this administration. It's very hard to predict many of his political appointees have been loyal to the core. You use the word norm shit or term norm shattering, and I'm wondering how close we are to instead of norm, shattering. Actual democracy damaging, I mean, really, fundamentally undermining the integrity. Of our government and the things on which it is built. I would contend that President Trump along with many senators, who are Denying the facts of the election results and are upholding sort of Trump's Baseless claims of fraud and stealing the election that they are undermining the very tenants of American democracy. In order to have a healthy democracy, the citizenry has to believe in the institutions. They have to believe that the elections that they voted are free and fair. And by actively perpetuating this notion that there has been fraud and some sort of stealing of votes. You are undermining the important tenets of American democracy. And that has long term implications and we are already at important and I would say high level of turmoil in this country. Pandemic has wrecked havoc on the account economy. Various incidents across the country have heightened racial tensions in this country. This is not a moment where we then need to undermine yet another important aspect of American democracy. How

Biden Amy Walter Theo Administration President George Florida Emily Murphy Catherine Don Tempus George Bush University Of Virginia's Mille White House Transition Project Biden Administration Criminal Division National Security Division Donald Trump President Trump Burbage Bill Clinton Trump Administration
Ethiopia's conflict spills over border as thousands flee

The World

04:03 min | 2 months ago

Ethiopia's conflict spills over border as thousands flee

"This week, he sent federal troops into a province of his own country. Hundreds are reported dead in the northern region of Tigre and refugees air spilling over the border into Sudan. So what explains the shift from peace to conflict? Michelle Gavin is a former ambassador and senior fellow for African studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. Ambassador Gavin We're talking about the Ethiopian province of Tigre, where the violence is happening. It's squeezed into the northwest corner of Ethiopia. Figure it straddles the border of Eritrea to its north. What is so important about Tigre relative to the rest of Ethiopia? Well for many years, the Tigre and People's Liberation Front that sort of dominant political and military entity in Tigre was really first among equals in the ruling coalition for all of Ethiopia so to Graham's played an incredibly prominent role in Ethiopian governance, politics, security But with the rise of the new Prime Minister Ahmed There's been a bit of a re balancing in Ethiopia. And this is kind of opened up contest station from ethnicities across this incredibly diverse country. And there has been kind of widespread feeling that for too long, a small minority from Tigre had too much control of the federal government. So there's political tension between Tigre and Addis Ababa. Are there also historical grievances between two grand central government that we need to mention? I mean, is there a back story here? Tigre is now fighting at us. There's a lot of back story Ethiopian and certainly to Gran's were and incredibly, they weren't just dominant, politically and in the security services for many years, certainly under the leadership of Prime minister malice, But they also suffered most in the long and very costly in blood and treasure war with your tria. So there is there's also you know, a sense of probably grievance in that sense. Abby's come to power they feel targeted by new personnel choices by new policy choices. What maybe others in Ethiopia see as a re balancing the Tigre ins can often feel like persecution despite the tremendous sacrifices that they have made for the country. There are reports from Tigre oven. Ethiopian air campaign heavy bombardment at times. I mean, what's at stake here as far as you can tell ambassador Is it a possible civil war between two grands and Ethiopian troops? There is Tigre saying. We've had enough. We want independence. How should we interpret what's going on? We should absolutely be worried about a civil war, which I don't think would necessarily be contained just Teo, the Tigre region, giving all of the other tensions and actors. So what's at stake? You know the wellbeing of over 110 million Ethiopians. Regional stability. Conflict in Ethiopia has a very high chance of drawing in Eritrea. Sudan, tipping the balance of Sudan zone very fragile transition. Ethiopia's incredibly important actor in trying to bring stability to Somalia to South Sudan distracted and weekend. Ethiopia is really quite devastating, Tio this entire horn region which is strategically really significant, and there are a lot of actors external to Africa. In the Gulf, the Chinese and from the West, all of whom care deeply about stability in this region, so the prospect of drawing others in of proxy conflict it's really a powder keg, and the consequence will not be confined solely to what's happening inside Ethiopia's borders. Michelle Gavin, senior fellow for Africa Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. She also served as ambassador to Botswana from 2011 to 14. Ambassador Gavin Thank you very much. Thank you.

Tigre Ethiopia Michelle Gavin Ambassador Gavin Prime Minister Ahmed Sudan Eritrea Council On Foreign Relations Addis Ababa Graham Federal Government Abby Somalia Africa Gulf Ambassador Gavin Thank Botswana
"senior fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:40 min | 3 months ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Also senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, when it's actually time I really appreciate it. Thanks for having me The longer this pandemic lasts, the more likely it seems that those of us who can are going to be working from home forever. Anu S and P Global survey shows nearly two thirds of organizations. Say a significant increase in remote working is going to be permanent. Granted, There are many who love working remotely. No commute more flexibility, pajamas. Marketplaces. Mariel's together, heard from a lot of people who have found it really, really challenging. Richard find began Our conversation with a warning about the hammering sound I was about to hear his downstairs neighbor has recently undertaken some construction. That's just, you know, the joys of working from home. Fine, who talked to me from the bedroom of his Manhattan apartment because his wife and son were working and learning remotely in the other rooms, is an executive at Doc Doc, the doctor appointment booking site we have committed to the full company. That's way will not mandate people to come back until Labor Day of 2021. And find doesn't love working from home. Think it's ah, pretty inferior form ofwork. Remote Working is leaving Nyla con kind, afraid to. She's the head of talent at the health care company eating health and a single mom living in a small apartment in Queens with her six year old daughter, who's doing school online. I feel like I'm a meter mom to her because my patience is immediately low now compared to before, And my stress is incredibly high. And she claps, Doc. Pretty hard, like Mummy. You just yelled at me. That was not nice. She is grateful that she gets to spend more time with her daughter. At the same time she misses interacting with her colleagues in person. So does Kate Adams in Milton, Massachusetts. She's a marketing exec at a tech company called Drift. She has friends at the office. You know, Fridays at four o'clock sent up the bat signal, and we'd go like Joined each other in the kitchen and grab a glass of wine and hang out. And just like decompress like I missed that desperately last, she heard the office probably won't reopen until June. So for now, she and her coworker have come up with this game. We're the contest. Sometimes, Loren zooms like if we can make each other laugh, they even keep score. It's not the same, but it's the best they've got right now. Mariel Segarra.

Doc Doc Mariel Segarra Kate Adams Brookings Institution senior fellow Anu S P Global Loren Richard Manhattan Queens Massachusetts Milton Fine executive
Armenia, Azerbaijan agree on cease-fire

The California Report Magazine

05:02 min | 3 months ago

Armenia, Azerbaijan agree on cease-fire

"Over 10 hours of talks and then a breakthrough. The Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov announced that Azerbaijan and Armenia had agreed to a ceasefire in the ongoing conflict over the disputed region of Nagorno Carol Bock. After lengthy negotiations between Russia, Armenia and Azerbaijan. The parties have agreed on the following steps first a ceasefire is announced to be declared from midday on October 10th 2020 for humanitarian purposes. The exchange of prisoners of war on other contained persons on the bodies of the dead, mediated and in accordance with the criteria of the International Committee of the Red Cross. Talks between the foreign ministers of the two countries in Moscow. REMEDIATED by Mr Lavrov more than 300 people have died and thousands have been displaced since the latest violence broke out nearly two weeks ago. You gonna carry back lies with another by John, but it's inhabited mainly by ethnic Armenians. Ostrovsky is a senior fellow in the Russia and Eurasia program at the foreign policy think tank, The Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, D. C. I think this is a cease fire is important. It is not necessarily a game changer. But we've seen some of the worst fighting between Armenia and Azerbaijan in the last almost 30 years over the last two weeks on DH, the fighting has been really kind of brutal on both sides with large civilian casualties, any sort of small ceasefire, humanitarian ceasefire. Er that will pause. The conflict allowed people to pick up the dead and I think it's important, but there still is a long way to go to resolve this conflict. And I would say that it no. It took almost half a day to get the sides to agree to this and the sentiment in both Armenian Azerbaijan has really hardened, so this is very much probably a temporary cease as opposed to a really long term solution. You describe the the fighting in the past two weeks as brutal? How does it differ from from fighting that we've seen before between the two sides? We've seen, you know the use of drones, the use of really sort of much more modern equipment and the targeting of civilian populations on both sides. Eso we've seen, you know, I think at least 300. The casualties have been reported on the Armenian side. The Azerbaijani side hasn't been as clear on the numbers, but I expect it's equally as high and in just two weeks of fighting. That's a fairly high high number. But I think that the brutality against the civilian populations but has been deeply worrying. Mr Lavrov also said that Azerbaijan and Armenia had agreed to start talks on the settlement of the conflict. Will they be able to agree to a more permanent solution? I would hope At some point they will be able to agree, but they've been in talks to do that. Since 1994 the populations have sort of viewed this latest round of fighting a sort of existential fight for their nation's on DSO. I think that will make it quite difficult to get a Ah long term solution any time soon. Until you sort of check. Try to change those mindsets, which I think is gonna be quite difficult. Particularly if either one of these leaders is perceived as being a little bit weak on this Nagorno car back issue. I think this is an enormous potential implications for sort of domestic stability in both countries, and what role does Russia play In all of this? What pressures was Russia able to bring to bear on Azerbaijan and Armenia? Russia is normally able to summon its neighbors on get them to stop fighting. It wants to do that, but I think Russia had much more difficulty in this. I think Russian Azerbaijani relations have deteriorated a little bit and turkeys insertion on behalf of Azerbaijan certainly made this more complicated. Is a fighting certainly, and brutality and sort of the greater international awareness on DH. The pressure, not just from Russia but from the West is well that has increased over the last several days. I think that certainly did increase the pressure on both sides. Paul Stransky. Let's hear more from our guests to get their thoughts on these developments. Henry Chiu, professor Stransky doesn't sound optimistic about the prospects for long term peace. Do you share his skepticism? Well, I think if you look at the comments from the leaders of both Azerbaijan and Armenia there fairly adamant about the territory being belonging to their respective countries, and it doesn't look like there. Other side is really willing to give an inch on that. And unfortunately for you gonna carry a box, you know what happens with a lot of these small territories is that they become palms for larger conflicts or larger face offs. And so the professor talked about Russia and Turkey well these air to powers that are also having confrontations in Syria and also In Libya. So unfortunately, this area, which is a resource rich area, it's a strategic corridor is also going to be playing out in an arena that's larger than just itself. Actually, What do you

Azerbaijan Russia Armenia Sergei Lavrov Mr Lavrov Turkey Carnegie Endowment For Interna Moscow Paul Stransky International Committee Of Carol Bock Nagorno Red Cross John Ostrovsky Eurasia Washington Professor
Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

Outcomes Rocket

04:15 min | 3 months ago

Shopping for Health Care: How Consumer Can Use Purchasing Power to Get What They Need with Deb Gordon

"Welcome back to the outcomes rockets Sal Marquez here, and they have the privilege of hosting for the Second Time Miss Deb Gordon, she's spent her career trying to level the playing field for health care consumers haven't listened to the first podcasts with DAB. You've gotta go listen to it. It's all about the consumer and healthcare. She's all about you. She's all about your employees and how you can get the most for your healthcare dollar. She's the author of the healthcare consumers manifesto how to get the most for your money based on research she conducted as a senior fellow. At the Harvard Kennedy, School Center for Business and government she's a former health insurance executive and health care CEO. She's an aspen. Institute health innovators fellow and an Eisenhower fellow, her research and commentaries have appeared in USA Today, the Harvard Business Review blog, and on network open. She holds a B A in bioethics from Brown University and an MBA with distinction from Harvard Business School and I'm excited to dive into her work again around the consumer's manifesto deb such a privilege to have you back on. Hey, saw. Thanks so for having me back. Yeah, absolutely. So you've been busy. I have been busy. That's true. I spent probably a year doing research for this book and another year writing a not exactly that split but I spend a good two years of my life producing this baby and it is exciting to come back and tell you about it because when we first met, I was just starting to think about it. I was just starting the research and listening to what consumers had to say. So I'm excited to be back to talk more about it the same here and so dab you know obviously. So listeners goal isn't a DEB's podcast. This you get a deeper appreciation about her time as an insurance executive and what has inspired her work and focus in the consumer sphere but a little bit about the book. Dab. You know what's the focus area? What are the takeaways at a high level? Sure. So I wrote the book mainly to expose the human side of healthcare costs like what is really going on for people when we go to the doctor or were phasing an insurance decision and we have to pay. For it and I was really taken with the fact that so many people of all walks of life come to me and say because I used to work health insurance they know I know something about it and they just say what should I do and you know the most extraordinary people who've accomplished so much in their lives walk into my office at the Kennedy School at Harvard and alike, what health insurance should I buy and I. It just dawned on me that if people like that need help and it's Legitimate that they do. It's very confusing and can be overwhelming like what chance is you know everyone else have of making sense of these decisions. So that's the motivation that I I brought into the book and then in doing my research for it, I heard story after story of consumer. So real people who are trying to get value for their healthcare dollars whether they use those kind of terms or not I say like shopping for healthcare is a thing we could do people don't use those words and they don't even. Know what I'm talking about. But you know I interviewed people about their experiences spending money on healthcare and what I learned is that although it feels really foreign to put that into shopping terms or you know we know how to buy things but we don't know how to shop around in healthcare and. It doesn't mean we're not able to. That's I think the biggest takeaway is that we do actually have more power than we might even realize and that the first step is to just ask the question, what if what, if I could get what I needed? What do I need? Why do I need this? Is there an alternative and just almost like re imagine ourselves as a customer when it comes to healthcare this is Dr is nervous and unhappy by the way, but it's not a slight against doctors. It's just you know what I think consumers need for whatever reason we need permission almost to think of ourselves as entitled to get value for our healthcare dollars.

Sal Marquez Harvard Kennedy Harvard Business School Harvard Business Review Deb Gordon Executive DEB Senior Fellow Brown University School Center For Business Eisenhower Usa Today Harvard Kennedy School
Clean energy transition will strengthen national security, Navy veteran says

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 4 months ago

Clean energy transition will strengthen national security, Navy veteran says

"Dan. Mitch. Spent five years in the navy. When he left for civilian life, a career clean energy was not on his radar. I did not know very much about clean energy or climate change when I got out of the navy. But he got a job at the Department of Energy and as he learned more, he became passionate about the benefits of solar and wind. The clean energy transition is going to strengthen our future national security by reducing our reliance on foreign fuels, diversifying energy sources and our investments in those energy sources and mitigating the worst impacts of climate change today missions a senior fellow at the Atlantic, council and founder of the Veterans Advanced Energy Project, which recruits veterans for clean energy jobs. Most military veterans for one reason or another how a mission oriented service nature to contribute to society and defend their country both while wearing the uniform after they take the uniform off. So mich- helps them understand how working for clean energy can support national security. We hope to help make veterans feel good about what they choose to do in their post military careers.

Veterans Advanced Energy Proje Department Of Energy Mitch Mich Senior Fellow Founder
US unemployment rate falls to 8.4% even as hiring slows

Keepin' It Real with Rev. Al Sharpton

05:57 min | 4 months ago

US unemployment rate falls to 8.4% even as hiring slows

"The blue numbers came out jobs numbers as we do every week, and the Jobs numbers that have come out in for August. The United States are added 1.4 million jobs in August, but it's still down 11.5 million jobs since the covert 19. Virus hit unemployment rate fell to 8.4% from 10.2 in July. It's below 10%. What does this mean? Well, let me get an expert on that. Think it not robbery to come and break it down for us every day. Every week Now. He had done it every month. Even when he was the Deputy secretary of Labor under President Obama. He's now senior fellow at the University of Virginia Millar Centre. Of course, I'm talking about Chris Loo. Chris Thank you for coming on. Always right. Tell us what up and down side of this job of figure for this week mean? Well, I think you put the right spin on it. The right take on it. The context we during the pandemic the first couple months, the pandemic has lost 22 million jobs. We've now gained back about 10.5 million jobs. So we're still 11 million in the hole. So This is an economy that slowly crawling out of a really deep hole. But I think there's a couple things that are noteworthy. One is the pace of job gains is slowing down, and I know that Hard to imagine when you're creating 1.4 million jobs, but that pace is slowing. Ah, and I think that certainly speaks to the fact that a lot of the economic relief that's been verv IDed has stopped. I think what's also concerning in all of this is that we're starting to see Lay off that we originally thought we're going to be temporary now becoming permanent. There's now 3.4 million. Not permanent layoffs on those air jobs that are never coming back, and then we could just look at that. News headlines and you see major companies that rely on you know, travel and tourism, most notably things like American Airlines, MGM resorts and track all saying they're cutting thousands of people, so there's more reason to be concerned about Maur, temporary layoffs becoming permanent. So look, anytime you create a million jobs. That's a good thing. But boy were in a really big hole and again we continue to see these disparities between ah white workers and people of color who are out of work or Men and women, So you know it's it's. It's a good report, but it's not a great report. And what? Uh what is the breakdown? Do you know in terms of the ethnic groups or racial group? So again? This is not surprising. We continue to see that The unemployment rate for white workers significantly lower It was 7.3% for white workers. 13% for black workers. Hispanics 10.5% Asians 10.7% So again, you continue to see black unemployment. You know whether times are good or times are bad being basically double what it is for whites. And I think what is concerning as well. You know, we know that when there are tough economic times low income workers, people of color all are often the ones that are released from their jobs first. They're also sometimes the people that are hired back the latest they have left in general, lower wages less saving, so the impact of this hits them more directly. And again as we look around the country we've got, you know, eviction moratoriums that are That are expired. We've got food bank lines that are getting longer and longer. So this is a tough time right now, For for people of color in this country Now there is no specific Plan laid out by this administration on how they're going to clothe that race. Gabbard? No, I mean, you know, Look, there there theory is always we're going to look at the stock market and you see the president again tweeting this week about You know numbers on Wall Street and and I think it continues to show kind of the disconnect in this administration's policies. I mean, they're the hallmark of what they can claim Credit for economically is passing. A tax cut in 2017 that essentially gave a trillion and a half dollars a tax cut. Most of that went to corporations and very wealthy people. Very little of it has come backto working class people, and they really have no specific Economic plan Right now, on the pandemic of anything you've got. People like Chuck Schumer, Nancy Pelosi, who are pushing for more money, and, you know, oddly, this is the president and Senate Republicans don't want that extra money. Yeah, they passed the Heroes Act in the house. They still have passed no second stimulus bill that would help workers help unemployed people in the Senate and then went on their break like it. It doesn't matter. Yeah, no, And you know the president make it made a big show of signing these executive orders to extend unemployment benefits. But that was just a couple 100 bucks for a couple of weeks. That's really not going to make a meaningful difference is most people and left out of all of this is all of the other things that were being negotiated. Like money for state and local governments so that police and teachers and firefighters out laid off money for school so that they could put safety Hard up to allow them to reopen money for additional testing. So there was a lot of other things on the table. That kind of got derailed when the president decided to go it

President Trump Chris Loo Senate United States Robbery President Obama Deputy Secretary Of Labor University Of Virginia Millar Senior Fellow Chuck Schumer Gabbard MGM American Airlines Executive Nancy Pelosi
Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

04:51 min | 4 months ago

Has Globalization Undermined the American Working Class?

"America's working class has been cheated is an assertion that has been getting a lot of currency lately are last presidential election went deep on that claim in both parties by the way and the culprit most often blamed for that. It's that monstrous five syllable word globalization, the philosophy and the practice of free trade which has been great for companies and for shareholders but has had a devastating impact. It is argued on the American working woman and. Man Well Economist do agree that in the past four decades the American working class, which we're defining tonight as people who lack a four year college degree. They have seen flat wages and a steady disappearance of good jobs. But is globalization a main reason that that's happening to those workers and for those workers is globalization entirely bad. Well, we think this has the makings of a debate. So let's have it. Yes or no to this statement globalization. has undermined. America's working. Class I'm John Donavan, and I stand between two teams of experts in this topic who argue for and against this resolution globalization has undermined America's working class as always. Our debate will go in three rounds and then our live audience here at the Saint Regis Hotel and Aspen Colorado where we are appearing in partnership with the Aspen Ideas Festival will choose the winner and as always if all goes well civil discourse, we'll. Also win a resolution once again, globalization has undermined America's Working Class Jared Bernstein you have debated with us before. So welcome back you're a senior fellow at the center on Budget and policy priorities. You were Vice President Joe. Biden's chief economist. The last time you debated with US interestingly Jason Furman who is your opponent at the other table tonight was your debate partner as a team you were formidable formidable I, almost want to use the French pronunciation. Formula, so are you planning to use your insiders knowledge of Jason's debate battles against him to very much am the way to do that with Jason is to make a lot of sports analogies because they repealing confusing. All right. Thank you and I see you detail to Aspen. You were a to aspen well I. Think the guy with the tie is the guy you want to listen to, but I'll let you decide. All right. Thanks very much. Jared Bernstein and can tell us who your partner is. This someone I've known for twenty five years she's a dear friend of mine and I consider her my mentor in this topic feely gentlemen feeling. Theo welcome to intelligence squared your president of the Economic Policy Institute. You've spent two decades as an economist for the AFL CIO, which is America's largest federation of unions. It represents some twelve point, five, million working women and men. You've spent twenty five years working on trade policy. So what got you interested in trade? Well, when I came to Washington in the early nineties I got drawn. INTO THE NAFTA debate the North American Free Trade. Agreement. And I realized pretty early on that. This was not some kind of a dry text book discussion about tariffs but it was a transnational battle over democracy good jobs, workers, rights, and regulation. So I was hooked because a lots at stake a lot is at stake. Okay. Thanks very much thelia once again, team arguing for the motion. And motion again, globalization has undermined America's working class. We have to debaters arguing against it, I Jason Firm. Welcome back to intelligence squared Jason you're a professor of the practice of economic policy at the Harvard Kennedy School you're a senior fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, you were Chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Obama tonight. As we said, you're going to be debating your former colleague Jared Bernstein on the impact of globalization. So is this the first time you to have debated the globalization issue with each other jared and I agree on I'd say about ninety five percent of economic issues and my goal tonight is to bring to one hundred percent. Thanks very much Jason and can you tell us who your partner is someone I've only known for a few years and every single thing. He's ever told me I have believed James Manica Legitimate James Manyika. Welcome the first time telling squared you're a senior partner at McKinsey, and company you're the chairman of their economics research arm, the McKinsey Global Institute, your first time debating with us. But not your first debate you debated at Oxford I did you studied robotics and computers earlier in your career you were visiting scientist at NASA. So how do you go from very eclectic from robotics and space to thinking about trade policy? In American. Workers I've always been fascinated by the kinds of technologies that drive innovation and growth, but also affects what will people in the real world actually do. So when you put that together with the economy, these issues around trade and workforce become very, very important. Those are the issues that motive a great perspective to bring here and then once again, thank you. Thank you again to the team arguing against them.

America Jared Bernstein Jason Partner Senior Fellow Jason Furman Economic Policy Institute President Trump Chairman Aspen Jason Firm Vice President Saint Regis Hotel Chief Economist Colorado John Donavan Senior Partner
The Trump Administration's Policies in Afghanistan and Africa

John Batchelor

08:10 min | 5 months ago

The Trump Administration's Policies in Afghanistan and Africa

"The foundation for the Defense of Democracies. He's a senior fellow keeps the Long word journal with Tom Johnson and his colleagues. We go immediately to Afghanistan because here during the Republican convention We want to explicate what we can of the Republican intention if it is successful, winning a second term for President Trump and then to remark upon thee. Trump administration's policies in Africa, particularly when it comes to the kind of length organization Al Shabaab on the attack. Billa Very good evening to Afghanistan, you and Tom for many weeks and months now. Have illustrated that the trump policy from the first term was to make a deal with the Taliban and withdraw as much of the American presidents as possible. And hope for the best. I do not expect the Republicans toe have another direction is your sense bill that the military is quit with Afghanistan? As much as the political apparatus is quit, are there of two minds here? Good evening to you, Bill. Good evening, John. Yes. So I agree with you. The Trump Administration is not going to change policy in Afghanistan, Um, barring some type of major events. Um, it's it's just both sides of the aisle are pushing the end The endless wars narrative, which, of course is ridiculous, because the jihadists have a say, and they're going to keep fighting when we leave, of course. We could. You could say something like we wantto end our involvement in these wars. Fine, But the wars will continue our enemies get a vote, and they're nowhere near tired of fighting. The U. S. First the U. S military goes for Afghanistan. Give US military as a whole. Once out of Afghanistan, it's been a drain on their resource is on their energy. Um, I don't. I think they don't see an end. There. They feel again. I'm not speaking for the entire military. And this was the sense I get from millet, you know, from top military leaders. Who have basically signed on signed off on this policy. There's been no objection publicly to this policy of, uh, negotiating with the Taliban and cutting a deal with them, even though they support Al Qaeda. In the meantime, the Taliban and there is Taliban Afghanistan. In several iterations, there's Taliban, Pakistan and several generations the Taliban is preparing for Nearly triumph, but rule I follow from your posting at long word general that Tariq eat Taliban. Pakistan is congratulating the Muslim UMA in general and the Mujahideen in particular on the merger of the two main groups of jihad in Pakistan. Can we regard this as a temporary merger because and they'll be back to fighting over cities or is there some collective push now for the Pakistan, Taliban and the Afghanistan Taliban to work together? So I think there's a push for the Pakistani Taliban in the Afghan Taliban already work close together, Um they Pakistani Taliban fighters have refocused their efforts to Afghanistan. After Pakistani military operations against them. Remember the Pakistanis play a double game? You're You're a good jihadist If you fight in Afghanistan are cashmere, but you're bad jihadists in the fight against the Pakistani state. So this merger that came up really? I found a little surprising because I could point back to a statement in 2015, where the one of the two groups of it's called One of them's Hezbollah, Har. Um, you know, so it had announced that it already merged with the movement of the calibre, or should I say there were ties broken during the turmoil back in 14 4015 with Mullah Omar staffed and when Melissa was alone took over the Pakistani Taliban. Ah, lot of inside baseball, but I won't go into but they had already announced that they had reunited, so something has happened here. Within the last five years. I think this is really sort of There was probably some kind of personality dispute, and I think a lot of this is for propaganda anyway. Really, to just say, hey, look, we're all unified. We're all going to, you know, operate under the same command when I think essentially they were doing the same thing. I go to Africa because you are a U is a long word General have resource is to cover the story of Al Shabaab. We spoke recently of their surprisingly professional looking videos of their recruiting on their training. Now we have a report from long word general of Al Shabaab on the attack hotel military base suicide assault, reminding me that this is a very sophisticated outfit trained with Al Qaeda, Sze Ah complex attacks as Al Shabaab growing and strength to your measure, it does the next Trump administration need to pour more resource is or get out as well. Yes. Oh, Africa has always been fascinating, particularly Somalia. I think some outside of the Taliban Shabbab is the most effective jihadist insurgency in the world. They have They continually take the fight to the rump some Somali government they control 25% of the country despite the fact that you have the African Union and the US and what they could piece together the Somali military and police. To oppose them, and they're there have very good propaganda. As you noted, It's improved a lot over the years and there are very effective at conducting their attacks and keeping their their fighters. Trained and keeping them in the rank and file. Remember, there's been an attempt by the Islamic state to poach from Shabaab, but it's been largely unsuccessful. Not only did they have they conducted major attacks on military bases and hotels, yet another town this one outside of the town of Baidoa, which eyes in sorry the city. If I go, it's probably the second largest city in southern Somalia. Um they took over the town after the Somali military withdrew in the Somali military withdrew from that town because Shabaab was besieging it, so I think Um, I always reluctant to say they're growing in strength. Thes groups have sort of There's an Evan flow to the fighting, and sometimes particularly went outside groups. When the African Union and the US start piling on them. They have some issues, but they're able to await it out. That's the one thing these John, one of the several things that they have. To their advantage. They have the time. You know, that old saying goes, we have all the clocks, but they have all the time While they're very patient in their fight. They're very patient in their jihad. While we have men may have sophisticated military equipment, that's the clocks. They have the time and patients in the will to fight these battles, not enough terms of the US election cycles but in terms of decades Built in general. Now we're at the crossroads for another administration, either, Mr Trump second. Mr Biden's first. Is there any indication pattern worldwide that Al Qaeda is waiting for that decision, or are they staying on the offensive? Matt, no matter who wins. Yeah, I think there are on the offensive. No matter who wins. They do follow the political situation here, but I think they've come to the conclusion that this is just my opinion here. But I think they've come to the conclusion that it doesn't really matter again that end the endless wars narrative and and the actions by the U. S government over two successive administrations. Policies of withdrawn, scaled down and whatnot would look to us is withdrawing troops from Iraq. It just closed that the major based ontology or at least US personnel being at that base. Almost 2000 troops are coming out of there. Um, they see this all and nature there taking it all in, and they realized that the end of our fight in administration is not going to counter act. These measures. Bill Rocha

Afghanistan Taliban Afghanistan United States Pakistani Taliban Trump Administration Africa Al Shabaab President Trump Pakistan Bill Rocha Shabaab Somalia Defense Of Democracies African Union Long Word Journal John Senior Fellow Tom Johnson
Why We Need International Students

Why It Matters

06:18 min | 5 months ago

Why We Need International Students

"And. We've been planning to do an episode on national students visas and the education system for the past few months. It seems like an underreported topic that people should know more about, but then it became part of the news. Students. Who the schools plan to online only classes in the fall, we'll have to transfer or leave the country or face possible deportation several prestigious American universities are now suing the trump administration the trump administration back down but I don't think it's the end for what we might save from this administration. You could be forgiven for thinking that student visas classic partisan issue in American politics liberals pushing for cultural diversity in a more open society while conservatives warn of dangerous to national security American jobs. But the real story is quite different for decades Republicans and Democrats agreed that a steady pipeline of the world's best minds into American. Universities is essential for our economy innovation and competitive advantage. But the rest of the world it was a system that largely worked. The trump administration has taken a different perspective and the pipeline of international students in into American businesses, hospitals and research facilities has begun to constrict as this happens other nations have begun picking up the slack. I'm Gabrielle Sierra and this is why it matters today international students and American competitiveness under threat. All right. So I'm a student in another country. Why do I want to come to school in the United States? I mean if you look at the list of the world's one, hundred best universities more than half of those are in the United States you know if you come here and you graduate with a degree from top American University, that's worth a tremendous amount throughout your life. My name is Edward Alden. I'm a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations I'm also the Ross distinguished visiting professor at western Washington University in Bellingham Washington. All is a leading voice on immigration innovation and US competitiveness. He spends a lot of time studying the contributions of immigrants to the US economy. secondarily, even if you're not coming to the best institutions in the United, states has a global reputation as a dynamic innovative place, and if you were a talented ambitious foreign students, it's a place you wanna be mean finally education is in English and English remains the universal language of business. So. To the extent that you come out from an American education with a strong grass with the English language. That's something also going to be very helpful in your life. There are liberal arts colleges, their research institutions, institutions, large and small that can cater to many different types of learning and covering many different styles. My name is extra Brenner. Director and CEO OF NAFTA THE ASSOCIATION OF INTERNATIONAL EDUCATORS So, bright soon around the world know they can come here and get a great education, and perhaps the most exciting things is the dynamism of the American classroom. That is very rare that idea of having an interactive classroom where students and professors are talking to each other where the learning is shared it's not just the professor lecturing I'll tell you as someone who is a former professor I, love that environment and indeed it something where we even put out a publication on introduction to the American classroom to help students get used to the idea that they will have to defend their ideas. Okay. so you decide you want to come to school in the US how does the system actually work? What are the options for getting a visa? Well you need to be admitted to the university that you wish to attend. So that's the same thing in American student would face. You have to apply to the university and right your admissions essay all the things that American students do when they want to attend a university. So if you are admitted than you need to apply for what's called an F. One student visa, the visa does not allow you to remain in the United States permanently does not allow you to work for income with some exceptions while you're in the United States temporary visa that permits you to come here and study. Alongside the F one, there are also J. One visas and a few other lesser known options together they account for roughly one point, one, million foreign students in the US for anyone who's done it or help someone do it? You know that apply to college is not easy even with some assistance from family or a guidance counselor. For an international student, it also means traveling to an embassy or consulate in their home country and going through a meticulous and costly process to get a visa. And, it isn't as though they get to breathe a sigh of relief once they're accepted or even after they arrive. For many students may be their first time out of their home country. Maybe their family has all saved up their money to send the bright child to the US that's a big commitment by the child in the family when they get to the United States, their institutions, of course, comply with the law and some people may not realize but every international student is actually in effect tracked by institution and there is an official. At each institution that has to know where that student is and be able to file documentation on them. So unlike any other visitor to the United States business travelers only international students are actually recorded and tracked with that level of detail. So the student has a lot of obligations a lot of costs and their institutions have additional obligations as well. It's a big commitment of very big commitment, but it's a life changing

United States American University Donald Trump Council On Foreign Relations Gabrielle Sierra Republicans United Western Washington University F. One Edward Alden Professor Distinguished Visiting Profess Nafta Brenner Senior Fellow Bellingham Washington Ross Official Director
Lebanon prime minister and government step down after Beirut explosion

Here & Now

03:35 min | 5 months ago

Lebanon prime minister and government step down after Beirut explosion

"Lebanon marked a moment of silence today. One week after that massive explosion in Beirut. The blast killed more than 160 people and injured thousands more. It's also broke down brought down the current government. Rommie Corey is a senior fellow and professor of journalism at the American University in Beirut. And Rami, a prime minister and the entire Cabinet resigning seems significant. But what do you think this will lead to real reform in Lebanon? The kind of change that protesters are asking for. The resignation of the Cabinet is significant only in the sense that it was forced by the demonstrations. The intensity of the demonstrations. It's not significant in the modern history of Lebanon because the ruling elite who had their sectarian parties and have run the country like oligarchy click for the last 25 years. They just get together and pick out new Cabinet ministers and new prime minister and they reappoint the Cabinet and the same policies tend to continue. That's been the pattern so far. This is what the protesters want to break. They want to break this pattern. And put in a proper effective, clean, efficient and accountable government that works according to the rule of law and can address the many problems off a country that isn't collapse. So it's significant on one level, but at another level of modern will depend on what happens next. That system that you're talking about that power sharing structure that click as you called it. Has been blamed for the country's past political instability in division. So what happens now? Will there be new elections and well those elections be enough. You're going to get a lot of jockeying for position and jockeying for power and a lot of nonsense being spoken by a lot of people. The bottom line is there's only two really powers in the country and now one is the mass of citizens who are protesting and who demand real change. So the protesters in one hand and then the political power Really the sectarian leaders, mainly Hezbollah, on the other hand, will negotiate. The protesters want significant really change? This is what really we have to keep our eye on. Will the government that's formed? Whoever it is? Will it have the really authority to address the rial crisis issues and we will find that out? I think in the coming month or two, you know, Lebanon has a long history of political unrest that the dates back Decades, and you mentioned the people there. They've been living it. They know it. But I want to ask you about some touch points that may have led to this point. I mean, many people know that thousands of people died and A brutal civil war in Lebanon between 75 in 1990. I mean, did the agreement that ended that war set the stage in a way for what's happening today? The ending of the war was simply the latest turning point that adjusted. The balance of power in the parliament made it 50% question 50% Muslim, But these are just minor points really. Compared to the bigger points, which is that the people who have actually been in the seats of power have been terrible rulers on they've essentially become super rich. Without addressing the needs ofthe the people as the people have become super port, but the the root cause it's both domestic politics. Regional politics, which is mostly Israel and Iran and Syria and Saudi Arabia and other people who Interfere and Lebanon and global politics back in the Cold War.

Lebanon Cabinet Beirut Prime Minister Hezbollah Rommie Corey Rami Parliament American University Israel Senior Fellow Professor Of Journalism Saudi Arabia Syria Iran
Your Pursuit of a Better Body and the Perfect Diet Is Never Going to Make You Happy

Ben Greenfield Fitness

07:52 min | 5 months ago

Your Pursuit of a Better Body and the Perfect Diet Is Never Going to Make You Happy

"Welcome to the show folks I have today. Actually, an old family friend of mine Doug Wilson, who is the Minister of? Christ. Church in Moscow Idaho, Church that I attended through much of my childhood and also during college and still visit quite frequently whenever I'm down in Moscow Idaho which is only about ninety minutes from from my home in Spokane, and so I've I've known Mr Wilson for quite some time and he actually had a stint in the US Navy for a while. and. Then he attended the same university that I did University of Idaho ever while I got a glorified personal training certification he studied philosophy, and since then went on to do quite a bit notably, he he helped found and now serves on the board of Logo School, the school that my wife attended, which is a classical and Christian K through twelve school down in Donna Moscow he's also the senior fellow of theology at New Saint Andrews. College. In Moscow Idaho, which I would consider to be One of the better liberal arts institutions in the country actually end quite close to the coffee shop that my mom actually runs down in Moscow. Idaho and so I'm familiar with a lot of the students that go to that university as well or or that college as well a he has authored many books Mr Wilson is a prolific author and and his books are fantastic. He has A. Books on marriage on on child rearing on on I absolutely love his his titles on raising boys just because I have twin boys myself some excellent books on Christian Education his son Nathan Wilson. You might also be familiar with as as a as a well-known fiction author and all a link to to all of his books as well as everything else that we talk about if you go to Ben Greenfield fitness, dot com slash Doug, Wilson and. Doug also has about a metric ton of grandkids spread across the planet with what seems to be rapidly increasing frequency, and so he has a he has a lot of a lot of children out there bearing his name as. and so it the the topic that I really wanted to get into today is related to a book that Mr Wilson wrote called confession of a Food Catholic. I'm also going to link to that in the show notes as well because I I really really love to get. Your perspective. In by the way, I seem to be going back and forth between Doug and Mr Wilson, what do you prefer for for the show on Doug is great. All right. That's GonNa that's GonNa shorten the syllables I gotta us. All right. So so doug, you wrote this book called Confessions of a Food Catholic and and I know that you've also done quite bit of thinking about how we tackle this. the this relationship between health and fitness and pursuit of a better body and caring for our bodies and carrying for God's Temple but at the same time. Not kind of a sliding into into a selfish obsession with with our bodies and with health or with longevity or anti-aging at all costs, and this is certainly something that's been a a topic on my mind quite a bit lately and so. the this book confession of Food Catholic that you wrote with you say is dedicated all those at church dinners. I noticed didn't have enough protein on their plates and tried to cover it up by noticing I didn't have enough Greens on mine. Let, let's start here what what is a food Catholic and how would you describe yourself as a food. Catholic. Great. Thanks for having me on. This is a great opportunity afoot. Catholic is someone who believes that all foods are acceptable for us to eat with regard to our spiritual condition. In other words, I cannot put distance between me and God through anything I, put my mouth or I. Can't be put right with God through anything that I eat what I've noticed, and the reason I wrote the book is that many people feel they eat they feel a spiritual guilt either they feel if they eat poorly, if they missed the regimen that they assigned for themselves, it's not like, Oh, I failed to do the extra push up. It's there's a spiritual guilt that many people feel. And what I wanted to do was go to war with that sensation of guilt with regard to what you eat now if someone said yeah. But if someone had a a diet of deep fat fried twinkies and that's all. That's all they ate wouldn't that be bad for them or yeah it'd be bad for them. It'd be bad for their physical wellbeing is not healthy, but they're not corrupting their soul by means of the twinkie. Now, they may be corrupting their soul by means of their lack of discipline but that's a different issue. It's a different category. So we have a tendency to blame when we have a moral failing or. A spiritual shortcoming, we want to blame the stuff instead of addressing the root spiritual issue, which is your relationship to God i. think it's far worse to be fighting with someone over what they you go out to lunch with a friend and you spend the time quarrelling over what they ordered instead of just enjoying the time with your friend, right so so you're saying basically, is that sometimes the the legalism or the Self Righteousness That we get with with a lot of these laws that we set up for our self regarding food whether it's you know I'm going to be gluten free or I'm avoiding carbohydrates or I'm I'm not consuming vegetable oils because those aren't good for my body. What you're saying is that is that what you would care more about is not whether someone eats organic or processed food but why they're actually making those decisions exactly. So if What somebody else eats is frankly none of my business they're the one asked to eat it is their lunch they ordered it e if you want a a meal that's higher in fiber are lower in fiber or you need gluten not there or you maybe earth counter countering you order extra gluten. Right. Fixed. Diluting powder but we actually call that soy sauce. So. So you use this term in the book called the Food Pharisee, which is great. The P. H. O. Food Pharisee. And you describe these food pharisees as those who who would be unwilling to bring their food laws before the Bible to be examined and and said, that's a topic that Christians really need to think through biblically and when you get into this whole concept of a food fairs lifestyle, what I'd love you to do if possible is telling, you told me what you would describe a food Baresi. And then get into some of the issues regarding I. Think you break it down into into five different issues that this food pharisee lifestyle could be described as. So if you bring your food if you. Say Okay I want to compare how I eat to the Bible I to bring my food choices in the Bible. There's good news and bad news well, good news and bad news for the Food Pharisee. The good news is that whatever it is you're eating is fine. That's the good news. The bad news is whatever it is. Your neighbor is eating is also fine and the food pharisee is someone who wants to feel superior. They want to look down on someone who's making sub optimal choices right

Nathan Wilson Doug Idaho Moscow University Of Idaho Donna Moscow United States Spokane Mr Wilson Senior Fellow Logo School New Saint Andrews Ben Greenfield Christian Education Greens
"senior fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:39 min | 5 months ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"From NPR and W bur. I'm Jeremy Hobson. I'm Tanya. Mostly it's here and now we're seeing more images of the devastation in Beirut after that massive explosion yesterday that rocked the Lebanese capital. Blast killed at least 100 people and wounded thousands, and the grim search for survivors continues. Rommie Corey is a senior fellow at the Middle East Initiative at Harvard's Kennedy School. He's also the former editor of the Daily Star newspaper, and they root And Rami. You live in Beirut when you're not at Harvard. What's going on through your mind at this point as you watch these horrible images. Thank you. Actually, I live in Beirut most of the year where I'm, a professor and journalism professor. And I'm, a senior fellow at the American University of Beirut. That's my main works on going back from fourth between Boston on Beirut. What's going through my mind is that this terrible tragedy Did not happen in a vacuum. It happened because of incompetence and corruption. And I'm carrying attitudes by government officials over many years and many governments. With the sort of silent the complicity, acquiescence of international agencies, foreign governments, even those who are rushing out to give aid new off with the Lebanese government, another out of governments have been doing for decades and decades. In terms of not serving their people well, and this is just one example of the kind of results that you get from this legacy off, essentially amateurish, incompetent government. We've been hearing a lot over the last few years about what you're talking about about government corruption. We know that there's a lot of violence there is well. Initially, folks thought that this was a direct attack. Now we're learning that this could have been an accident. But you're saying that all of this plays into what ultimately is being deemed an accident. What are you hearing from your family and friends? There? Are they all safe? Well for the 1st 2 tremendous shock at the humanitarian tragedy and human suffering. It's an enormous level 300,000 people now are have been home. Not been able to live in their homes. Their homes have been destroyed, other than the dead than the injured on DH, the destruction of life. The fleet stock report was destroyed. Imports will not be slowed down. Medical requirements are not there so extraordinary humanitarian suffering, and that's what people are focused on now, the second thing that focused on Is we're not surprised. They're saying this is this was inevitable because the government knew this ammonium nitrate was there four years they knew about it. Appeals were made to judges, too. Government officials. Nothing was done. Therefore it's not a accident. I mean, it happened. It was an accident that happened, but it was an inevitable accident. Given the complacency and lassitude and incompetence off the Lebanese government that many levels and the terrible thing is that this is common throughout the Arab world. Not every Arab countries like this, but certainly Maybe 2/3 of them have these kinds of governments, and that's why people have been demonstrating in the streets since 2010 nonstop to change their entire regime, So I think we need to listen to what the Arab demonstrators have been saying peacefully. We need to change the entire political systems of most of the Arab countries because this is the result. Rommie. You mentioned that an ammonia nitrate people have been calling for. For that to be taken away from the port for quite a long time. The port is an important part of the infrastructure and the economy there. Lebanon is a country that was really on the verge of collapse due to an economic crisis. Corona virus is surging there as well. And now this how bad is the overall situation as you assess it now, with thes thousands of people displaced and more than 100 people now, Abed The situation is terrible. It's about as terrible as I can get with the conversions of all of these points that you mentioned the ways of human suffering, all of which all of which could have been avoided. Because they are all a consequence of poor management cumulatively over several decades, that's the real tragedy, and that's why that's why the Lebanese are rebelling and asked me for Better government and you will see it in the a demands to have AIDS fund to disperse jointly but the government and.

Lebanese government Beirut senior fellow American University of Beirut Rommie Corey Jeremy Hobson NPR W bur Harvard Lebanon Boston Middle East Initiative professor Daily Star Kennedy School
Top tech CEOs to testify on Capitol Hill in antitrust probe

Steve Trevelise

00:52 sec | 6 months ago

Top tech CEOs to testify on Capitol Hill in antitrust probe

"Apple, Amazon, Google and Facebook are headed to Washington. Will Reinhardt is a senior fellow at Utah State Center for Growth and Opportunity, he says. When the major tech CEOs testify on Capitol Hill on Monday, competition will be a major focus. And with each of the different companies that are being talked about Facebook, Google Amazon Apple each one of them has a slightly different competitive concern. The hearing before the House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee Is also expected to examine whether existing antitrust laws need to be changed. Reinhardt says the movement to regulate big companies has gained steam in recent years. Really is this big under salt is occurring when it comes to tech platforms and antitrust and will likely Seymour hearings like this. Both sides generally agree that Congress needs to take a closer look, and this really is the first of probably many Various hearings on these sorts of issues with tech

Reinhardt Facebook Apple Google Senior Fellow Amazon House Judiciary Utah State Center Seymour Congress Washington
Russian Hackers Blamed for Attacks on Vaccine-Related Targets

KNX Evening News

03:41 min | 6 months ago

Russian Hackers Blamed for Attacks on Vaccine-Related Targets

"With ties to the country's intelligence services have stolen emails. They've also sow disinformation and worked to influence elections in several countries, so they've kept pretty busy over the past few years. But The latest target for Russian hackers is really audacious Researchers working to develop a Corona virus vaccine in labs in the U. S. The United Kingdom and Canada have all reported attempts to breach their servers. Most valuable data in the world might be sitting in the service of those of actually in researchers right now, apparently Russia's intelligence service once it other hackers. They were busy elsewhere yesterday, too. Maybe you couldn't tweet Laura Galan, say founder and CEO of Gallant Strategies. Senior fellow at the Atlantic Council informally serves the U. S defense intelligence agencies. Laura I guess we shouldn't be surprised to start with the Russians. I guess we shouldn't be surprised that as the world works towards the vaccine that there are hackers out there who are trying to steal their way. Closer to it. Yeah, We should not be surprised. That's right Now this group is one that's pretty notorious in the in the cybersecurity world. They've They've been involved in really high profile breaches over the state Department, The White House even the DNC. And this is the equivalent of Russia's CIA. So this is really top top hackers and they're there to go out and get the hardest target and current vibrant. Research couldn't be a more coveted set of intellectual property at this point. Here's what I don't get. I mean, Russia, officially almost for a long time. Claimed they didn't even have covert 19. So basically you've got the intelligence services for a country that claims it doesn't have a virus trying to steal information for a vaccine. That doesn't exist. I must they needed Yeah, well, well, you remember facts don't matter. It's so consistency of logic here. You know what? As you're saying there was no current virus in in Russia a few months ago. Now magically the top intelligence services after is after the research, But you know, here's what this is. Ratings are sagging in country. His popularity rings are some of the worst been over his long tenure, and she knows that he's playing to a domestic audience and politics are always domestic first. And if Russia gets to Harold that they have discovered the the vaccine, and if they're able to Russia that is such a quiver in on In in Russia in Putin's, You know the pocket that they can, really he can really say my version of politics has produced this. I'm able to take care of you. And this is why I continue to have my almost lifelong mandate. Here is your president. So obviously, if we can detect it, and then the other countries can, too. We have protections in place. But I guess maybe it's not top of mind for everybody that like medical espionage is Is something that can happen. Oh, this has been going on for years. The Chinese military hackers for a long time when after diabetes research and this was back in 2013 2014 and it didn't get the publicity's that this getting today, But Hitting vaccine information has been a target of nations. Kate Hackers Over the years we haven't seen Russia do something quite this brazen though, Onda again leave it to the rest. Hackers do. It s so nothing new that medical aren't is right at the forefront of getting hacked, but I do think this is going to be a wake up call for any organization. Any government that doesn't think that their recruiter if they're going to get targeted, and the right of course, is going to be right in the center of that target. Okay, So

Russia Kate Hackers Laura Galan Founder And Ceo United Kingdom Diabetes Atlantic Council Gallant Strategies Senior Fellow CIA State Department Canada White House DNC President Trump Putin Harold
"senior fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:48 min | 11 months ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"A senior fellow at Yale University in the United States well continues our front what's first of all let's say let's look at let's look at China we were speaking to David Rennie the economist Beijing correspondent about the di Lemah that China is facing at on the one hand trying to contain the spread of the virus but on the other hand continuing to ensure that economic growth targets all home next how difficult is it for them to square that circle well we can't have it both ways Roger yeah certainly the highest priority is controlling the virus the economy will come later and I understand that the leadership is urging companies to send their workers back to to their factories but given the stringent quarantines in this critical who bay province given the draconian restrictions on intercity travel returning some three hundred million migrant workers sugar factories is not feasible under those circumstances so there's going to be a major shortfall in Chinese economic growth in the first half of this year whether the government wants it or not I'm so so I mean what what your outlining of course is the are the indications that the global economic slowdown was what we were all living ways how much should we be concerned then about the current trajectory outline for us kind of key indicators that we should be looking at well you only need to know a few things one by accepted metrics of the International Monetary Fund China is the largest economy in the world is about twenty percent of world output secondly since the financial crisis of two thousand eight China alone is K. accounted for thirty seven percent of the cumulative growth in world GDP China's up flat lining right now there's no other economy stepping up to fill the void Japan's back in recession France and Germany were exceptionally weak late last year and that the U. S. viewed as you know the the strongest economy in the world only grew two percent late last year so without China the world economy is probably in recession right now in the first half of two twenty twenty yeah shocking outcome for investors who believe that that was a largely impossibility are we already seeing a real manifestation of this a physical manifestation of this in the global supply chain given the importance of China sure I mean look no further than the announcement last week by by apple there's a major shortfall in revenues their supply chains clog and they're also losing demand so this is not just a supply shock but a demand shock especially as a Chinese consumers have really stepped up to emerge as a new source of a global demand in the world today what when we look at the the nerves on the stock markets around the world that that seem to be a reaction to the imposition by its heavy of a strict quarantine but well of course we've been seeing drops like this echoing in in the Far East to well in controlling a virus like this is extremely difficult China has really gone overboard in terms of quarantines in and travel restrictions and other countries are sort of following that template but the transmission of this disease whether it's from you know ships of the Yokohama harbor or other unexpected developments that are very very difficult to control man makes it exceedingly exceedingly difficult to limit this from becoming a global pandemic I'm not a scientist but certainly that's what the scientists are most concerned about today Stephen Roach former Morgan Stanley Asia chairman and now at Yale University thanks for joining us we are going to stay with the corona virus and the impact of it in African countries have so far been limited as far as contagion goes with any one case recorded on the continent in Egypt but African countries with close truck trade ties to China have begun feeding the economic impact of the outbreak six continental airlines have stopped direct flights to various cities in China while traders who buy goods from there are now reporting shortages of goods for sale China is Africa's largest trading partner the value of that trade estimated to be around two hundred billion dollars last year Emanuel the guns that reports from the Kenyan capital Nairobi.

senior fellow Yale University United States
"senior fellow" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

06:18 min | 11 months ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hanson the Hoover Institution a senior fellow running in National Review online about the tragedy in China the tragedy that is yet unknown we know it's covered nineteen we know that there are quarantines but we don't know much else because the reporting is spotty your note the news that the Chinese average ejected three Wall Street journal reporters who have been doing an extremely careful job of reporting on the crisis we also know that there have been no officials from the CDC permitted into China for the ordinary testing of the epidemic however Victor's writing about what we are guessing about the failure of huge in paying the president for life head of the Chinese Communist Party victory right that China or shoot in paying of the communist party's an existential threat how so Victor well I mean we as we've seen with trade they have the the ability to destroy other countries and they really harmed a lot of their neighbors and they are about and then as we're seeing with a corona virus what state trying to the stage they have the ability to export this virus and what does that mean it means that when you have a first generation scientific revolution or new post industrial revolution and you don't have the regulations or the culture of all of it or transparency or freedom really allowing these the values of western trained scientists to come back to their mother country and then to do the types of research or not research without any without any freedom are on it and without transparency there the part of the government org so to speak and that's dangerous it's like handing a hand grenade to a seven year old so we don't know what how this virus originated we don't know it's kind of coincidental that was near weapons lab at people mention an open air market there's all of these weird explanations but the one thing that's constant new there's a lot of very sophisticated first generation scientific researchers in China and they're doing things whether it's cloning or biological research weapons research in a fashion that other scientists can't do because it's considered too dangerous in Europe or too dangerous the United States are too dangerous and you're proud and that's why I think it's an existential threat and then trump started this confrontation the showdown with China events sort of took over the narrative and now three years later it's not just China technological appropriation patent copyright that occurred don't be in our currency manipulation it's China or well in surveillance great trying to re education camp with the million waders and that China the Hong Kong protests China China and the more you Paul Walker trying this gap that will no longer need to trick and what do you like it or not trump's view on China now the orthodox we used to be heterodox an eccentric China sort of proved him right the more that we looked at it under a microscope picture our capitalist country made a deal with the devil twenty five years ago China have we learned a lesson or is it too early to tell I think we learned a lesson early on in the west and the idea of George H. W. bush and Bill Clinton and George W. bush and Barack Obama was the more concessions that you give to China on trade and commerce in politics on military affairs the more they're gonna see that magnum energy to be reciprocated when fact they see if his weakness to be exploited and they're never going to turn out like you know the upper west sider Cambridge mass he's not going to happen with the Communist Party in control and that idea that they would liberal arts and I don't know any Communist Party liberal arts bring a lot to me loaded and blew up but I don't know any of that gradually and willingly became more liberal we don't have good information about what's going on inside China where we can we guessing a lot of this but we have sense of history of the Chinese people themselves are using the euphemism Chernobyl for the virus and Chernobyl is a way of of noting that after Chernobyl the Soviet Union fell apart in five years do you sense that China's failing here or they gonna pull themselves together and and close the doors and go back to becoming the manufacturing hub which where they're gonna go Victor we have about a marketing yeah I think it's a force multiplier effect before the corona virus there were already a process of be engaged in the coupling contrivance so a lot of suppliers were going to Southeast Asia Mexico crafter under already started and we turned out to be a lot stronger than China expected and we found trying a lot weaker than we anticipated and that's coronavirus were confirmed out I don't see them coming back and that the chart Chernobyl it's sort of a false comparison because more people are probably died one day China right Darden Chernobyl them Chernobyl but there is some similarities that the Russians were way over there have the nuclear power research and didn't have a protective shell should have never been allowed to do that and yet they in danger other countries Zachary the fact they didn't Victor Davis Hanson of the Hoover Institution China some trouble I'm John Nash numbers mean much to me because of prostate cancer Johnny brags the number two for my step father who died of prostate cancer and my uncle who suffered so much of the prostate cancer surgery the number fifteen.

Hoover Institution senior fellow China Hanson National Review
"senior fellow" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Jim Taylor spoke with Aaron David Miller a senior fellow at the Carnegie endowment for international peace and a former state department Middle East analyst and shader in Republican and democratic administrations what do you make of this first money into it the Saudis have their story although they don't seem to get your story straight and they're sticking to it today's today's verdict I not only didn't indict actually there the three key officials that were implicated according to our own intelligence assessments but the story line that was put out is that this was somehow some role accidental murders that in fact they were questioning Jamal Khashoggi or maybe they wanted to render him back to Saudi Arabia it was a struggle he was killed and then this cover up occurred in the cover up of course and in the Saudi story is completely untethered really untethered from the crown prince himself so just another turning call would you want white wash conspiracy cover up it's centrally travesties what do they do Mr Miller did they actually go out and find five guys that they can just pin this on and and the heck with them no these are these words these were members and again they have an idea of genocide the other problem with this trial it's it there's been no transparency began in January former presented as a limited number were were able to to to attend but they had basically sign around disclosure agreement no these five appear to be five movie eleven or fifteen man Saudi ops team that went to we stumble and actually murdered Jamal Khashoggi no there's there's almost no doubt in my mind that the five that they have sentenced to death with a laundry carried out in let's be clear the Saudis executed a hundred and forty eight people in twenty eighteen so this is really not with respect to capital punishment this is not you know some to reciprocally harsh and severe punishment no big they they're they're they're going to execute the hit men but then again of course and you don't have to be you know a mafia special snow this that'll guarantee their silent so I I I think this is all part of a a not so carefully calibrated cover up what do you think it's going to do to US Saudi relations I assume it was publicized to its improve the relationship between the two entities you have an administration again I work for Republicans and Democrats and voted for them to so this is really not a part of a partisan comment we enabled for the last twenty five years the Saudis in many different ways we flatter than we acquiesced but frankly never have I seen in twenty five years of working for both the Republican and democratic administrations administration that that has taken the Maybelline acquiescing to completely new level the president has essentially given MBS woman in some on for many different reasons huge margin of error and the latitude essentially and support to pursue his policies and unfortunately there's very little reciprocity seems to mean you SRT relationships are no I don't think this is going to affect the with Saudi relationship the media is angry and they should be but business is returning to kind of normal you know the Saudis will host to get ready for this the Saudis will host the G. twenty in November of twenty twenty so the process of legitimizing and normalizing Mohammed bin some minor I use a reformer there's no doubt about it very popular in Saudi Arabia but a very repressive toward during that same time that is Aaron David Miller senior fellow at the Carnegie endowment for international peace yes nine twenty five twenty one sponsored by Shane company sports gambling enthusiasts can place their bets with draft games but soon investors will be able to place their bets on drafting in a series of moves designed to make itself a public company the online sports gaming platform is selling itself to diamond eagle acquisition which will fold it's other gaming efforts into draftkings than registering for an initial public offering wallstreet propelled forward again finishing at new records Dow up ninety six nasdaq up twenty nine as a B. five hundred up three indexes got a big boost from news from China that it's cutting import tariffs on a wide range of goods including food medicine and electronic device components move is not directly related to the U. S. trying to trade war but to investors it signals more openness to companies that want to do business in China another troubling sign for US manufacturing orders for US made durable goods sharply decreased in November biggest drop since may biggest drag was aircraft orders thanks in part to the ongoing seven thirty seven MAX issues at Boeing I Mander O. day Bloomberg business for KCBS.

Jim Taylor Aaron David Miller senior fellow
"senior fellow" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:50 min | 1 year ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on KCRW

"Soon as a senior fellow in technology law and policy at Georgetown University the hype around this technology is enormous and also the hype around needing to speak when a so called race around five G. telecom companies and politicians are pushing the claim that we have to beat China the five G. but Phil apparent Broich policy director the telecom advocacy group public knowledge in DC's as a lot of the country is it wired with the fiber optic cable that networks need for five GB if you live in an area that doesn't have access to four G. LTE E. right now you're not getting five G. anytime soon and wireless providers have been exaggerating how much the country has four G. service right now all five members of the Federal Communications Commission were on Capitol Hill today to talk about a recent investigation that found Verizon T. mobile and U. S. cellular lied about four G. coverage an official filings Christopher Mitchell had a community broadband at the institute for local self reliance as companies tell regulators one thing and Wall Street another and many of us say you should listen to what they tell Wall Street because they're not allowed to lie to Wall Street they are allowed to lie to the regulators SEC chairman archer pies that yesterday there will be no punishment for those telecom companies I mean dealer for market place the generally accepted figure for total outstanding student debt in this economy is something close to a trillion and a half dollars that one imagines was the motivation behind a new proposal from senator rand Paul of Kentucky it would let people use some of their four one K. or IRA savings to either pay for college or pay off student debts without extra taxes or penalties one does not have to be a congressional scholar to know this bill will probably linger for awhile and then just fade away but Paul's proposal isn't the first to suggest that four oh one K.'s might be used to pay for all kinds of non retirement spending marketplace Justin now has more on the retirement account as bank account the penalty for early withdrawal is ten percent plus whatever tax you owe on that money Laurence Kotlikoff is an economics professor at Boston University his appeal the free and tax free withdrawal like the one senator Paul's plan would allow could make it easier to pay off expensive debt and the status investment in the world is the peril of higher interest rate loans federal student loan rates can run as high as seven percent in telecom says you can't count on making that back in a four one K. so paying off expensive loan can be a better decision every year people withdrawal one and a half percent of their retirement assets early is a lease Yemen al director of the center for retirement research at Boston College the implications of that and the fact that happens every year is that people end up with balances that are twenty percent less than they would have been if these leakages hadn't occurred I think it's robbing Peter to pay Paul that's player do canais investment adviser.

senior fellow Georgetown University five G four G four one K twenty percent seven percent ten percent five GB one K
"senior fellow" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

08:15 min | 1 year ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"You'll be able to learn more and also give us a rating and review because that's the feedback that we enjoy hearing so much from you and make it the best to follow up with you on the way. The show is performing for you so without further. Ado I wanNA welcome my outstanding guest. Her name is Deborah Deborah Gordon. She's the senior fellow at most of our Romani Center for business and government at the Harvard Kennedy School. She's had an enormous amount of experience in healthcare some population health but she's also been chief executive officer at boxing as well as served food as chief marketing officer for network health. She's got a wide variety of experience. I'm so happy to welcome deb to the podcast. Welcome deb. Thank thank you so much. Thanks for having me absolutely and so you and I had a chance to connect before the show and you had some really compelling stories but I wanted to ask ask you. Why did you decide to get into healthcare to begin with good question. I think college I took a course called culture and hell and it was like a sociology course or an anthropology course. I'm not really sure it wasn't even my favorite course on sites but it was so oh captivating this idea that hell is not serve a pure science. You know I thought Oh that's biology actually the culture and nuance there's not hard and fast definitions in the way that we think of Ezra scientific facts and I was really taken with that that notion that we serve look at our own our own bodies through a cultural lens and at the same time I was really troubled by the idea that not everyone everyone has access to health care and so when I got out of college and learned you could actually work in the field of public health. I thought that was the greatest thing ever so I felt that and and I haven't really looked back. Wow that's so neat and just you just never know when it's GonNa hit you you know and for you was it was that class and it wasn't even the funnest but it just struck me as amazing this idea that culture is health awesome and so cool that you ended up in this realm of public health because it is basically around a culture right our behaviors our norms our customs and now politics so here. I am at the Center for Business and government where we actually look at the intersection intersection of policy and practice yeah that is so neat when what are interesting journey that you've taken so what would you say. deb. Is a hot topic that should be on every medical leaders agenda and how are you addressing it or thinking about yeah. I think it has to be consumerism or the role of consumers ars and healthcare decision making it's sort of falls into the category of one of those things that people who aren't in the medical field actually can't believe we have to talk talk about more to say out loud. What do you mean the patient is in at the center of Healthcare. Already coup is but if we're honest those of US inside died the industry. It's not always or often the patient or the consumer. We've designed our system around doctors. I'm married to one so you know that's great personally but actually at the patient. There are a lot of challenges with that we've designed a system around insurance payment and financing are employers lawyers are involved for so many of us and I think what's getting lost something. That's gotten lost in in the way the system has served developed over time in the individual consumer and I couldn't agree with you more. You know this idea that the health consumer is at the top of the healthcare organizational chart right right. If you have the organizational I had guests that said we drew on out and were the CEO usually is we put the patient Nice. That's fantastic and I think it'll pave that organization back. You know I think functionally I'm a marketer and marketing bill. Good Marketing starts with the audience Rusi. Who's the audience need. What are they care about. How did they receive the information or the message. You're trying to convey not. How do we want to convey as and I think that missing in healthcare I think that's such a great call out deb and I'm just curious. What are your thoughts for the listeners as far as how can you soot the patient at the center. What do you do. How do you do it well. I think it starts with actually believing that they should be there that they should be at the center so so a value judgement or value placing value on putting the individual at the core. I also think some honest reflection on how has it been you know who are we really designing for and I think some organizations have done a great job of this but most it's not a fault. It's just just a function of historical artifacts and so I think if folks could honestly look at where does I like your analogy. Where does the individual sit in the org chart of that entity or that service model or or whatever it might be to get really honest about that and I I think the best way to stay either get or stay on it is to actually talk to the individual so what I'm doing is research about consumer behavior consumer attitudes specifically typically in purchasing decisions healthcare. So how do people think about sending their healthcare dollars. The very first thing I've been doing is talking to individuals and asking talking them. How do you think about this. How does it feel when you're in that situation. What do you wish were different or that are and I think it really starts is being open to the message knowing you need to ask then going to ask and then authentically listening to what people have to tell you. They'll tell you you know they'll tell what they need and want what they like what they take away from what you've tried to convey and what they haven't dub. I think that's so interesting in your approach you know you've got a very methodical approach and and a very honest simple one which I think ultimately in needs to be simple for it to work today. We have a system that pretty much functions options in such a way that the healthcare providers are really providing services in such a way that hairs pay the majority of it or the government woman pays the majority of it and then the consumer finds themselves in the center without any control but now with increasing deductibles minimums this is starting to change change and so I really find it interesting that you're you're sort of tackling this topic in a time when we're seeing this shift the average deductible plan being about three to five thousand dollars right and forty percent roughly forty percent of Americans are in what's considered a high deductible plan so their deductible as at least thirteen hundred dollars more and that's not even the whole of it you know people are paying more and more out of pocket for Co Payments Dance or co-insurance and so taken together there is this increased consumer financial responsibility in fact I think about a third not quite a third twenty eight percent percent of healthcare spending in the United States coming out of an individual pockets either through out of pocket costs or the consumer share the family's share of the health insurance and we spend more than three trillion dollars on healthcare in the US so roughly a third of a little more than three trillion dollars. I I think it's time to pay attention to individual in the purchasing decision totally agree with you. What would you say an example of how how an organization that you've worked with or how this idea has been applied successfully sure I'll go back in time. I'll go into the way back machine. I had an experience early on in my time at I had joined a Medicaid health plan in Massachusetts of the Director of membership marketing. I grew in that role over time. That's how I started and one of the early challenges I was.

deb US center of Healthcare Deborah Deborah Gordon chief executive officer chief marketing officer Harvard Kennedy School Romani Center senior fellow Massachusetts Center for Business Ezra CEO Co Payments Dance Director of membership three trillion dollars
"senior fellow" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"A senior fellow at the Hoover Institution since nineteen eighty please welcome back to the program. Professor, Thomas soul. Tom. It took almost an hour for me to get through your resume. My goodness. We need to stop slacking. Oh my goodness. I don't know. I'm I I'm hard at work. What right now Tom are we optimistic pessimistic or somewhere in the middle about where the country's going? I am extremely pessimistic. Because. I see so many signs on a deterioration degeneration both in words and deeds. And I see so few. Countervailing forces at work. You know, the previous election twenty sixteen. I saw it as a choice between a. A serious danger on one side and again T catastrophe on the other. And. Voted voted for Donald Trump? Two years into his presidency. How do you feel? I think in terms of number of policies an argument can be made for good things. He's done. But. The characteristics of the man himself. What's your personal thing, which they would be fused with private individual? But there are people around the world countries the leaders of countries. Who have to decide if they're going to stand with us, or with our enemies off stay away from it. All. And when a president of the United States says things that he backs away from later, and he and he. Fritters away. The. Prestige and more than that the credibility of the office that cell. The time may come when the lives of millions of people may depend on whether others. React to some wanna he gives them. I think he's just kidding. And we can't have a leader that people think is just kidding. In a nuclear age. I mean when John F Kennedy. Sit sit the fleet out there into Atlanta to intercept the Russians fleet he knew he was taking us to break up nuclear war and the Russians knew it, and they knew he meant business, and for that reason there was no war. Now at the same situation arises. Similar in principle. Donald Trump does the same thing and issues that warning. The people on the other side may or may not take that warning seriously, and we may get the nuclear war precisely because of that Mike, professor Thomas soul, the book is discrimination and disparities, it's revised and enlarged edition. Tom two years after the election and reelection of the first black president. Did you have any idea that serious democratic politicians would be discussed discussing reparations? I thought about it. But I I I see no reason why they wouldn't given the nature of the vision of the world that they have. Yeah. You talk in your book about how why we have different outcomes disparities and prerequisites one of the things I remember you're saying is that envy used to be one of the seven deadly sins. It's now been repackaged as social Justice. The difference between equal rights and equal results. Two very different things. Absolutely. I it would take more time than we have to go through all the factors that lead to disparities and outcomes. And they've been there for thousands of years of recorded history. And almost every aspect of life, whether or not even the possibility of racial discrimination, or any other kind of discrimination, one of the things that I mentioned in the first chapter free sample is that a study of people who are young people who became finalists in the net for the national merit scholarship. And families with five children. The first one was the finalist more often than the other four siblings combined that was true in the enforce our family and intrigue jowl families get into Giles families. And when you think of all the things that are the same for people who are born to the same parents and raised under the same roof. Just one factor being different should make such a huge difference in the outcome. Just that there was no basis for assuming equal outcomes when the factors are by. No means that that's similar one or the other factors. You say is under underappreciated in terms of thinking about why there are differences and outcomes is geography. Oh, yes. I mean, one one fact is just dominant. If if you if you think through the implications of it..

Tom Donald Trump Thomas soul John F Kennedy Professor president Hoover Institution senior fellow United States Russians Atlanta Giles Mike Two years two years
"senior fellow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Is a senior fellow and senior research at columbia university's center for international conflict resolution was i able to get all twelve into the same room at the same time somebody had walked out somebody had been evicted somebody didn't like something that day so we never got everybody together as a result of which i did a lot of what i would call moving negotiation i would go to their offices individually and see them one group at a time i would have meetings with two of them are six of them once in a while we had most of them there but it was very difficult because of the longstanding hostility and mistrust in the end to their great credit the politically of northern ireland who had spent their lives in conflict took a great risk personal physical risk political risk by entering into an agreement which pleased to say today this year marks the twentieth anniversary of it and the pacers held they remain divided there a great differences of opinion to government is not now functioning because of internal disagreement but the violence has largely ended and to me that's a significant accomplish i'll say so so the issue of the separate northern ireland politics sort of reared its head again with the brexit vote you know there was a vote previous scotland and an island vote to stay in the united kingdom and then they're both very much in favor of the eu and then suddenly there's this brexit vote and everybody seems to be surprised by it.

senior fellow columbia university ireland pacers scotland eu
"senior fellow" Discussed on WLOB

WLOB

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on WLOB

"Ivan eland the senior fellow at the independent institute we're looking at the us north korea agreement and new denuclearization such as one can reasonably expect we might as well bring up as long as you're here also the the trade discussion slash disagreements that were having not only with the chinese but also with the canadians and with some of our european partners at least in terms of defense your your take on the great tariff battle ars leading to this earlier i think trump has the right idea that we haven't gotten a very good bargain over the years but they haven't oh it's true that they haven't most of our allies having opened up their markets to us and we provide their defense however i think the best way to do that is probably too but then take care of more of their defense gradually and for us to worry less about the trade deficit i think people who don't free trade they in their own economies in colonel outta costs and i think you know we hear about the jobs that trump is allegedly say saving in coal and some of the other aluminum and steel industries but what about the ten to fifteen times more jobs that require imported steel and aluminum and what about the prices for consumers so i think free trade is you know it's it's really mutually beneficial william would be mutually beneficial as long as both sides in fact open up their markets but there have been a number of cases in which there was a deal to open up markets and we opened up hours and they didn't open up there's why isn't it automatic policy on our part to say okay the deals off when you're serious call us back well i think iming unilateral freetrader because as i just said it hurts their konami to to put protectionist measures in and i think it helps our economy makes our companies stronger by free trading.

senior fellow us trump william Ivan eland north korea
"senior fellow" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Now a senior fellow and military expert at defense priorities here in washington dc you know this part of the world better than anyone else why do you think north korea now wants to come to the table well if you look at what north korea has been doing ever since kim jong lynn rose to power and the things that he's been saying domestically in terms of you know wanting to transform his country from being basically you know this giudice which they've been calling for light all the time fru the last several decades before his ascension they were very poor and so what he's been wanting to do is is to raise them up their standard of living to make it better to even come close to bring them into the modern world and so he's doing everything he can't do that now part of that plan is that he has been on a just crash course to get nuclear weapons so all during the two twenty seventeen when president trump came into office and you know we had all the famous you know fire and fury totally destroy north korea old daughter firing back all of that until the twenty eighth of november with north korea launched its last missile the nuclear capable missile after that point they claim that they now had a validated nuclear weapon that could reach the united states that gave him him the opportunity i think in his mind that now that i have something to go she ate with unlike the dhafi you know who who basically made a deal in two thousand three with the united states today nikola rise he didn't actually have anything functional time so we had very little leverage and i think that kim jong which is okay i have a functional missile so i have some leverage and i can maybe get some concessions from the united states that he couldn't have gotten so that he can maintain a regime security i think that's the reason why he's coming to.

senior fellow north korea giudice united states kim jong washington president
"senior fellow" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

WRIR.org 97.3FM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on WRIR.org 97.3FM

"Senior fellow back at the world back policy off institute because she's also we don't an editor like having and contributor all to that project heavy syndicate i'm appointed and is at us the so author of the locker it shove is a it a is journey i think into by the gulag all of the definitions russian mind are pretty and hairtrigger a fourth coming situation book is in putin's footsteps well it is can take i mean a brief it station has bracket been back examining just why between the white house press trump corps and tolerates putin the generally sneering contempt who is not that shy the both press secretary to sarah sanders exercise levels at them their daily while mousa flagrantly there myself lying as she defends so he has the been lion absolutely chief a trigger situation and it's it's not getting better so i'm i'm glad that trump cold finally cold putin out but i don't know how far it is going to go and what the results of that calling out calling out would be perhaps if there is a consistent policy towards russia between the president and the rest of the white house or the rest of the american institutions and and everybody would agree that yes they you have need to have a consistent policy with no putin that may result in something but so far the only thing we saw is just one tweet and one mention it and again i'm speaking with nina khrushchev who is a professor in the graduate program international affairs at the new school in the senior fellow at the world policy institute she's also an editor of and a contributor to project syndicate and the author of khruschev a journey into the gulag of the russian minded welcome felt back i'm coming me and masters book is in this in background briefing putin's available twenty four seven footsteps a background briefing dot org and joining us now eric bullet who is a senior writer for you spend share a lotta blue time media recently and in the author russia of lapdogs how the press rolled and over for bush and bloggers on the bus i want how to get the a sense internet changed of politics you know i and the press.

Senior fellow putin press secretary russia president white house nina khrushchev professor eric bullet writer bush sarah sanders
"senior fellow" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on WGTK

"Asked what is the real history of the republican party carol swain has the surprising answer in the new video from prager university cnn prager u dot com where we teach what is wrong hello everybody well i could streak to all three hours early the twoday returns to we have story on senior fellow at the hoover institution we're talking about the foul i think lowly misses the little overstated but you get the idea of those of us in a conservative intellectual world but who are defenders of the president as opposed to the never trumpers i if i have felt victor that from the beginning it amounted to this if you if one appreciates the threat to western civilization that the left and i always distinguish between the left and liberals but that the left composers the constitutes then that's the difference that's the determinative difference brad stevens friend guys made prager you videos uh he he wrote in his last call own on on a recent column how much in fact the president has achieved and then throws in the sentence but i still wish hillary clinton had been elected.

carol swain senior fellow hoover institution president victor hillary clinton brad stevens three hours twoday
"senior fellow" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"I'm senior fellow for media and religion right now my primary duties there are teaching a class that i've taught for years in washington we've now brought that to new york called journalism foundations basically that class the way i describe it is if you're a young christian who's considering going into journalism what are the big three to four questions you need to ask and we spend a semester working on a while i talk to you about that in our in our next and final segment but i want to stay on the story about this shooter in texas near san antonio killed twenty eight people in a church and when we say it church as a hardcore churches the church where they really really believe in jesus this is not just a building where people go to be seen in the nice close bomb is the center of the community literally over half the population of that town is related to this church one level or not i mean imagine if this had been muslims that were killed in a mosque by somebody who is a christian uh harassing them on facebook and saying that islam is wicked you imagine how the coverage would be different this makes me angry because i expect a modicum of fairness in american journalism this is a very far far cry from that we had some institutions again you said i was too generous but we had some institutions that were just really really cautious when we both know they wouldn't have been his cautious if lula there you go so why is it cautiously if siazon it cowardly if were biased if someone had shot up when aboard shen clinic and their facebook page is covered with material screaming about their church and you'll have much they did this for the lord and whatever i think that would have gone on the air rarely look look this on the main point of your whole blog get religion dot org people should go to get religion blot.

senior fellow washington new york san antonio facebook the big three texas shen clinic
"senior fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"senior fellow" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Mercy is a senior fellow to center on budget policy priorities and jeered burn seen you at a piece in the american prospect uh back the end of september that sort of the mel disputed a lot of what we're hearing from chris edwards but these you kind of turned attention the spotlight on kansas can you give us a synopsis of that because it really does apply here doesn't it it does and i'll get to that but let me start out by saying with respect to chris and i have i do have a lot of respect for him there's just no empirical evidence for everything he just said and while i definitely share some of those i was taught some of the same theories he was what really matters is how this stuff works in real life i'll get to the kansas story in a second but first you have to understand some of the basic facts of the case so chris said we have those excuse me say there's no empirical evidence you're talking about supplyside essentially again correct there's no empirical evidence connecting tax cut reductions to faster growth faster jobs faster investments now i can show you periods where we increase taxes and growth in investment went up so that's the opposite i can also show you periods where we cut taxes in and they went up at what i can't show use any consistent linkage correlation causal linkages between changes in the tax code and the kind of outcomes the christmas touting and i'll tell you this this is in some ways most important here's what happens when you cut taxes by this much uh the treasury ends up collecting less revenue and your deficit goes up even if you want to apply some of the quote dynamic scoring the kind of the ferry dust that christmas talking about you never make back anything like the cost of your tax code even in the most i would argue unrealistic sanctions you mike get back know ten fifteen percent but to to say the tax cut will pay for itself never ever in history okay kansas oh first i wanted to see the corporate rates chris that we have the highest corporate statutory rate in the world that is absolutely correct among all the advanced countries but the.

senior fellow mel chris edwards kansas christmas treasury mike ten fifteen percent