35 Burst results for "scott horsley"

Unemployment claims remains stuck at high level

All of It

00:49 sec | Last week

Unemployment claims remains stuck at high level

"Of unemployment in the U. S. Triggered nearly a year ago, a stretching into another week of 2021. NPR's Scott Horsley has details. Labor Department says about 1.2 million people filed new claims for unemployment last week that includes 730,000 claims for state benefits and another 451,000 claims under the federal program for Gig workers and the self employed. Names were down sharply from the previous week, suggesting a drop in layoffs. All the bad weather and other factors may have distorted the count. As of early February, some 19 million Americans were receiving some form of jobless aid. Many of those benefits are set to expire next month. Congress is weighing a $1.9 trillion economic package that would, among other things, extend emergency jobless aid through August. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington

Scott Horsley Labor Department U. NPR Congress Washington
Unemployment Claims Fell Sharply Last Week

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | Last week

Unemployment Claims Fell Sharply Last Week

"Last week. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. Jobless claims are still very high by historical standards, The Labor Department says about 1.2 million people filed new claims for unemployment last week that includes 730,000 claims for state benefits and another 451,000 claims under the federal program for Gig workers and the self employed. Claims were down sharply from the previous week, suggesting a drop in layoffs. All the bad weather and other factors may have distorted the count. As of early February, some 19 million Americans were receiving some form of jobless aid. Many of those benefits are set to expire next month. Congress is weighing a $1.9 trillion economic package that would, among other things, extend emergency jobless aid through August. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington on Wall Street stocks or lower the

Scott Horsley Labor Department NPR Congress Washington
Biden won't pull Tanden nomination, says she'll get the votes

All Things Considered

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden won't pull Tanden nomination, says she'll get the votes

"Bind today told reporters he is sticking with his nominee for White House budget director despite objections from Democratic Senator Joe Manchin. NPR's Scott Horsley reports matching says he'll vote against nominee Neera Tanden because of her past partisan remarks. Neera Tanden is a longtime Democratic policy advisor who served in both the Clinton and Obama administration's. But it's her sharp elbowed Twitter feed. That's put her nomination in jeopardy, with critics on both the right and the left. Hand and apologize for tweets, comparing Senator Ted Cruz to a vampire and Lycan in GOP leader Mitch McConnell to a Harry Potter villain. But mansion warns her overtly partisan statements could have a toxic impact on congressional relations with the budget office. Given Democrats razor thin margin in the Senate Mansions defection could Sink Tendons nomination unless a Republican senator across the aisle and supports her.

Neera Tanden Senator Joe Manchin Scott Horsley Obama Administration Senator Ted Cruz NPR White House Clinton Mitch Mcconnell Twitter GOP Senate
Some Black-Owned Businesses Are Turning To New Banks For Paycheck Protection Loans

All Things Considered

04:02 min | 3 weeks ago

Some Black-Owned Businesses Are Turning To New Banks For Paycheck Protection Loans

"To help keep workers on payrolls. Businesses owned by black and Latino people were often at the back of the line. Those firms often had to wait longer for money, even though many were desperate for financial help. With a new round of business loans in the pipeline. Authorities are now trying to address that disparity as NPR's Scott Horsley reports like a lot of business sellers. Jennifer Kelly's income took a hit last year when the pandemic struck. She's a clinical psychologist near Atlanta, and some of her clients didn't make the adjustment to online or telephone counseling. Kelly, who has two employees applied to her regular bank for a loan under the federal government's Paycheck protection program. But she says the process was frustrating. It's kind of like trying to get the vaccine. They put my name on the list. And there they finally said, Oh, we all have anymore, And we're sorry that first round of P P p loans was exhausted In less than two weeks. Lots of businesses complained that banks were prioritizing their biggest customers. Bones were especially hard to come by in neighborhoods with a lot of black and brown residents When I needed them. They were not available to man, including. I'm not the big business, but I'm a small business and committed like with the fabric of America. When Congress okayed a second round of P P p loans last year, Kelly applied again. This time through a bank 250 miles away in Savannah, Georgia that specializes in working with black own firms. They were very patient through that entire process, and I didn't get approved for the loan, and I do hope that, especially in the small black banks will survive because We need to have those institutions that second bank Kelly worked with. Carver State Bank was founded 94 years ago with the goal of building financial freedom for its African American customers. 80% of its loans go to black owned businesses. Robert James, who sits on the bank's board, says he received P P p applications from around the country most looking for less than $50,000. Most of our applications are very small businesses individually owned gas station in the neighborhood or restaurants are people deserve a lot of credit for the hard work that they're putting in just to make sure that we get help to the customers that need it. The most According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. Even before the pandemic, black owned businesses were more than twice as likely beyond shaky financial footing as white owned firms. CEO Janine Jake Oak of the Community Development Bankers Association, says that means the extra time it took for loans to reach those businesses could be costly. They had a lot less cushion to start with, which made them much more vulnerable when the economy went south. Authorities have tried to address the disparity in P P p lending in a number of ways. First they've made more money available. They also gave banks that specialize in minority and low income communities, a head start when the latest round of paycheck protection loans was launched last month. Finally, while the loans were designed to be forgiven, some black borrowers are suspicious, a legacy of the long history of discriminatory lending. So education is also important. Carver States, James says he tried to reassure African American borrowers they can use P p p loans to keep their businesses and communities afloat. I've heard a lot of stories of customers who were eligible for these funds, but didn't trust that there wouldn't be some sort of a catch. Craig Gordon runs a company that provides in home nursing care in Georgia about 30% of his business is on hold right now because many of his customers are wary of letting anyone even a skilled nurse into their home during the pandemic. With Carver States help Gordon's just been approved for a second p p. P loan. This will buy us probably three of four months, and I'm hoping that all of those vulnerable folks that we served by again will be well vaccinated. In the meantime, cordon says the forgivable loan will help him keep dozens of people on the payroll. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington

Scott Horsley Jennifer Kelly Kelly Carver State Bank NPR Ceo Janine Jake Oak Community Development Bankers Robert James Federal Government Atlanta Savannah Georgia Federal Reserve Bank Of New Yo Congress America Carver
"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:43 min | Last month

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"To fix the economy. NPR's Scott Horsley joins us now and Scott, these numbers sound. Very crim. How bad was this report today? Body. It was pretty bad. We saw another 19,000 jobs lost in bars and restaurants. That's on top of the 400,000 jobs lost in those industries in December. In person services have really been hammered by this winter wave of Corona virus infections. And even industries that had been pretty resilient up till now, like construction and manufacturing also solved some job declines in January. Even the tepid job gains we saw on the whole last month may have been artificially inflated by some seasonal adjustments. So the real picture maybe even weaker than these numbers would indicate. Congressional forecasters said earlier this week, it could be 2024 before we see a full jobs recovery at the snail's pace of job growth we saw last month it would take a lot longer than that. We heard earlier, President Biden acknowledging that road ahead. How else is the White House responding? The president and his aides say This just underscores the urgency of passing the big aid package that Biden's been pushing. There is some skepticism from congressional Republicans and even some Democrats who think that another $1.9 trillion is overkill, especially on top of that $900 billion that was approved in December. And the three trillion or so that was approved last spring. But the president said again today he is determined to go big. A lot of folks are losing hope. I believe the American people looking right now to their government for help to do our job to not let them down. So I'm going to act. I'm gonna act fast by and he said he would prefer to act in a bipartisan manner, but he's prepared to push the package through Congress on a party line vote if necessary. And both the House and Senate have been laying the groundwork for that this week with budget resolutions that would allow Senate Democrats to sidestep the GOP filibuster and passed by this bill with a bare 51 vote majority in the Senate. Are there any areas of compromise? Well, yes, the president has said he's open to some modifications. One example is direct payments. Biden wants to send $1400 payments to most Americans. That's on top of the $600 payments that were approved by Congress in late December for a total of 2000, which is something Democrats campaigned on. There is a group of moderate Republicans in the Senate who would like to scale that back. They proposed $1000 payments to a smaller group of people. Biden has said he won't budge on the $1400 figure. But he is willing to adjust who qualifies for the money so it would be more targeted to low and middle income families, and not so many people earning six figures and up Speaking of which, what about the minimum wage of $15 minimum had been a big part of Biden's platform. There seems to be some resistance among some members of Congress. That's right. We have seen some opposition in the Senate in particular to raising them in our more age, especially at a time when so many businesses are hanging by a thread during the pandemic. Biden and his team say they are still backing the $15 minimum. Although this is you know something they've been pushing for years. The White House's is marketing as pandemic related. They are highlighting the low wage grocery workers or home health aides who have kept punching the clock during the last 10 months or so at some personal risk, And they say those workers deserve more pay. It's still an open question, though, of this is what whether this is something the Senate could do on a 50 vote margin, increasing the looks as though Congress may take up the minimum wage as a separate standalone measure. That's NPR's Scott Horsley. Thanks for your reporting, you're welcome. The Oscar.

President Biden Senate Congress president Scott Horsley NPR White House Oscar GOP
"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:14 min | Last month

"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I was governors has all schools in the state must open for in person classes. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm nowhere. King. Educators say they'll do it, but they can't guarantee they'll be able to keep kids safe Voting technology companies, Smartmatic is suing Fox News, some of its biggest stars and two of Donald Trump's legal advisers. Alleging lies they told after the election hurt the company and President Biden offers US diplomatic support to end the war in Yemen. It's Friday, February 5th Darren Criss is 34. The news is next. Line from NPR News on Korver Coleman Stocks opened higher this morning as the Labor Department reported a modest increase in jobs. Last month. NPR's Scott Horsley reports, The Dow Jones industrial average rose about 90 points in early trading. U. S employers added 49,000 jobs last month. That's an improvement from December when employers cut 227,000 jobs, but it still leaves almost 10 million fewer workers on business payrolls than before the pandemic. Bars and restaurants continued to shed workers last month. The fast spreading Corona virus has been a significant drag on in person services. Other parts. The economy have shown surprising resilience. Although factories and construction crews also saw modest job losses. Last month, the unemployment rate fell from 6.7% to 6.3%. The share of people in the workforce also declined. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington The Senate has narrowly approved a budget blueprint that lets Democrats advance President Biden's nearly $2 trillion coronavirus relief package. Wouldn't need Republicans support Vice President Harris cast the tie breaking vote early this morning. NPR's Windsor, Johnston says both sides are divided on Biden's proposal. The two sides remain far apart on several provisions, mainly the cost of the measure. Republicans have countered Biden's massive spending package with a much smaller bill that does not include additional aid for state and local governments, a major democratic demand. The amount of direct payments is another sticking point. NPR's Windsor Johnston reporting. The House passed a similar measure on Wednesday, but must vote on the Senate's version. That vote could come as early as today. Pharmaceutical maker Johnson and Johnson is asking the FDA for emergency authorization for its covert 19 vaccine data show The vaccines, efficacy is about 66%. Patients on Lee need one injection not to, as the Fizer and modern of vaccines require. The Kremlin says it cannot accept President Biden's demand to free jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny. NPR's Lucy in Kim. Reports from Moscow. Alexei Navalny was sentenced to more than 2.5 years on an old conviction this week and is in court again for allegedly libeling a World War two veterans in a tweet. Giovanni and his allies have faced a barrage of legal cases since he returned from Germany, where he'd been recovering from a poisoning he blames on President Vladimir Putin. Putin spokesman told reporters in Moscow that Biden's demand for Navalny's release is aggressive and not constructive. Russian authorities have arrested more than 10,000 people since nationwide protests broke out in support of Navalny. Amnesty International says Putin's government is waging a war on Russians human rights. Lucian Kim NPR NEWS Moscow On Wall Street, The Dow Jones industrials are up 83 points at 31,138. You're listening to NPR news Live from KQED News. I'm Brian what Several state lawmakers are proposing legislation aimed at reforming the state's beleaguered employment development department. Move comes a Z, D. D has struggled to respond to a wave of unemployment claims during the recession. Recent audits show hundreds of millions of dollars have been paid out to fraudulent claims. KQED politics reporter Katie or explains. Group of lawmakers says a D D has ignored long standing problems that have been exacerbated during the pandemic. San Francisco Assemblyman David Chu says the department needs both immediate and long term changes. It's my hope that this year as we're dealing with the immediate short term crisis, we're also starting to talk about what's it going to take medium term longer term to make sure That were never back in the situation again. Among the bills being introduced includes one establishing a claimant advocate within the E. D. D another would require the agency to cross check their records in order to avoid paying claims to inmates. There's also a measure that would allow people to receive benefits through direct deposit. In Sacramento. I'm Katie or KQED News in sports. The Warriors beat the Mavericks 1 47 toe 1 16 in Dallas. The two teams face off again tomorrow. Speaking of face offs, the Sharks are back on the ice tonight after a week of Covad related postponements. San Jose takes on the Ducks in Anaheim tonight and tomorrow. College hoops. The Stanford men beat Cal last night 70.

President Biden NPR President Vladimir Putin Alexei Navalny Lucian Kim NPR Moscow KQED News Scott Horsley Senate Fox News Windsor Johnston Steve Inskeep Darren Criss Katie or US Donald Trump Republicans
"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | Last month

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"19 coordinator Andy Slavitt says it's not key to the by administration goal vaccinating 300 million Americans against the virus that causes covert 19 by late in the summer. Congressional forecasters say they expect the U. S economy to rebound to pre pandemic levels later this year. There's NPR's Scott Horsley explains. Employment may not fully recover until 2024. The new forecast from the Congressional Budget Office is rosier than the one issued last summer, although analysts say they're still considerable uncertainty surrounding the economic outlook and the course of the pandemic itself. Congressional analysts say the $900 billion relief package passed in December should provide an economic boost this year. The forecast is not assuming any additional federal aid, although both the Biden administration and Senate Republicans have proposed more help. CBO forecast predicts the unemployment rate will average 5.7% this year. Down from the current 6.7%. Forecasters expect some people who dropped out of the labor force will return as the job market improves. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington Lumbering Winter Storm has dumped snow from Virginia to New England continues its slow motion crawl up coast After dropping several inches of snow in the mid Atlantic. The storm appears to be taking aim in New York City in northern New Jersey Summaries of New York are bracing for us much as 22 inches of snow. Stocks gained ground on Wall Street today, the Dow was up 229 points. You're listening to NPR. This is W. N. Y C. New York on Shawn Carlson. We will have more on that storm in just a moment. NEW YORK City health officials are urging Corona virus vaccine providers to double down on collecting racial and ethnic data for people who get vaccinated. About 40% of people who got inoculated last month did.

New York City Scott Horsley NPR Congressional Budget Office Andy Slavitt coordinator Biden administration New England Shawn Carlson U. S Senate Republicans Virginia Washington
Wall Street stocks open higher Thursday

Morning Edition

00:40 sec | Last month

Wall Street stocks open higher Thursday

"Steep losses on Wall Street yesterday, stocks opened higher this morning, even as the Commerce Department reported that 2020 ended with a slowdown in economic growth. As NPR's Scott Horsley reports, the Dow was up more than 300 points in early trading. The U. S economy grew just under 1% during October, November and December of last year. That's a marked down shift from the previous three months when the economy grew nearly 7.5% as businesses reopened following pandemic lockdowns in the spring, a surgeon new Corona virus infections continues to weigh on in person services like restaurants. All told, the economy ended 2020 about 2.5% smaller than when the year began.

Scott Horsley Commerce Department NPR U.
Stocks Down After Federal Reserve Maintains Rates

All Things Considered

01:04 min | Last month

Stocks Down After Federal Reserve Maintains Rates

"S stocks and the day sharply lower the Dow down 634 points more than 2%, ending a 30,300 to the NASDAQ ended the day down more than 2.5%. SMP lost more than 2.5% as well. All this following disappointing earnings today. Officials from the Federal Reserve wrapped up their two day policy meeting. NPR's Scott Horsley reports, the central bank renewed its promise to keep using all of its tools to support the U. S economy. In a statement, the Fed notes the pace of economic recovery has slowed in recent months, with weakness concentrated in industries such as restaurants, bars and in person entertainment, which are most susceptible to pandemic disruptions. New vaccines offer hope for a rapid rebound this year. But there are still a lot of questions about the vaccine rollout and the potential impact of new variants of the virus. The feds is it will continue to monitor these and other factors and will adjust his policies as needed. For now the central bank's leaving interest rates near zero and says it expects to keep them there until theres return to full employment.

Scott Horsley FED NPR U.
Yellen’s nomination to be U.S. Treasury secretary advances on unanimous committee vote

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | Last month

Yellen’s nomination to be U.S. Treasury secretary advances on unanimous committee vote

"Today to confirm Janet Yellen is Treasury secretary. NPR's Scott Horsley has more yelling, has already led the Federal Reserve and served as a top White House economist in the Clinton administration. While Republicans on the Finance Committee expressed some differences with her policy positions, no one questioned her qualifications. If confirmed by the full Senate, Janet Yellen will be the 78th Treasury secretary and the first woman to lead the department. She's already matched the first Secretary Alexander Hamilton in scoring her own hip hop musical tribute. It only took a couple centuries. The first female secretary yet the change. Yeah. Great Public radio program Marketplace Commission that number from the artist Desa Secretary Element Service the administration's point person in addressing the economic fall out from the Corona virus pandemic. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington A full Senate vote is expected Monday on Wall Street. Today the Dow was

Janet Yellen Scott Horsley Treasury NPR Clinton Administration Finance Committee Federal Reserve White House Great Public Radio Program Mar Alexander Hamilton Senate Desa Secretary Element Service Washington
Unemployment Claims Rise Sharply, Showing New Economic Pain

Morning Edition

01:32 min | Last month

Unemployment Claims Rise Sharply, Showing New Economic Pain

"President Biden promises and aggressive federal effort to get control of the Corona virus. We will get through this. We will defeat this pandemic. Into a nation waiting for action. Let me be the clearest on this point. Help is on the way we will need it. Another 1.3 million people filed new unemployment claims last week. MPR's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley is following this story. Good morning, Scott. Good morning. Well, so we have a new administration. But the same eternal mystery businesses air closing. Millions of people can't get work. And yet the markets are soaring. Why is that? Well, it's always a risky to try to make sense the stock market, But part of what's happening, I think is that investors see an eventual into this pandemic there, also betting that Congress will provide at least some of the economic aid that Biden is pushing for. It's also the case so well that the pain of this pandemic recession has been really unevenly spread. You know, some industries have already enjoyed a strong recovery like construction manufacturing. Tech companies that help people stay connected. They're doing just fine. And the roughly one out of four employees who can work from home have not had to worry about losing their jobs. The workers who have really suffered are those in jobs that depend on face to face contact with customers. Restaurant servers, bartenders, people who work in live entertainment. Those industries lost almost half a million jobs in December, and so long as thousands of people are dying from covert every day. The jobs are not likely to come

President Biden Scott Horsley MPR Scott Biden Congress
U.S. trade deficit in goods widened in November

The Takeaway

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

U.S. trade deficit in goods widened in November

"Trade deficit widened last month as U. S. Consumers snapped up tens of billions of dollars worth of imported goods. NPR's Scott Horsley reports the trade gap in November was larger than forecasters had expected. Imports and exports both rose in November, but the jump in imports was significantly larger. And the trade deficit widened to nearly $85 billion. Surging demand for consumer products accounted for much of the jump in imports. The U. S is now buying more stuff from overseas and it did a year ago while exports from the US to other countries have yet to recover to pre pandemic levels. Exports of food saw some of the strongest gains last month, up more than 4% from October. Food exports of sword almost 20% over the last year, even his exports in most other categories has slumped. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington President

Scott Horsley U. NPR United States Washington
Jobless claims hit a nearly 4-month high as coronavirus-induced layoffs grow

Forum

00:48 sec | 2 months ago

Jobless claims hit a nearly 4-month high as coronavirus-induced layoffs grow

"Deepening. Now. This morning, we learned that first time unemployment claims went up again last week to 885,000 more on that for NPR's Scott Horsley. New applications for unemployment benefits continue to climb as a surgeon coronavirus cases imposes new limits on economic activity and prompts a higher level of layoffs. 885,000 people apply for state jobless benefits last week, while another 455,000 sought help under a special federal program for gig workers and the self employed. As of late November, some 14 million people were relying on emergency unemployment benefits that are set to run out the day after Christmas. Congress is close to a deal to extend those benefits is part of a last minute covert relief package, but that additional help is expected to be short lives. Scott

Scott Horsley NPR Congress Scott
Industrial production increases 0.4% in November as manufacturing is boosted by rebound at auto plants

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Industrial production increases 0.4% in November as manufacturing is boosted by rebound at auto plants

"Stocks opened higher on Wall Street this morning after the Federal Reserve reported an increase in industrial production. Last month. NPR's Scott Horsley reports, The Dow Jones industrial average rose about 170 points in early trading. Industrial production has now regained about two thirds of the ground it lost during the pandemic. Manufacturing output jumped 8/10 of a percent last month, largely driven by cars and car parts. Over warmer than usual weather in November meant less business for utilities. Industrial production in China also rose in November, but Asian stocks were mostly down overnight. The Federal Reserve begins a two day policy meeting that will end with the release the central bank's latest economic projections. Forecasters have to weigh the economic cost of rising Corona virus infections in the short run against the promise of a successful vaccine roll out in the months to come. Scott

Scott Horsley Federal Reserve NPR China Scott
Industrial production increases in November as manufacturing is boosted by rebound at auto plants

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Industrial production increases in November as manufacturing is boosted by rebound at auto plants

"As the Federal Reserve reported an increase in industrial production last month. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrial average rose about 90 points in early trading. Industrial production has now regained about two thirds of the ground it lost during the pandemic. Manufacturing output jumped 8/10 of a percent last month, largely driven by cars and car parts. However, warmer than usual weather in November meant less business for utilities. Industrial production in China also rose in November, but Asian stocks were mostly down overnight. The Federal Reserve begins a two day policy meeting that will end with the release the central bank's latest economic projections. Forecasters have to weigh the economic cost of rising Corona virus infections in the short run against the promise of a successful vaccine roll out in the months to come. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS

Scott Horsley Federal Reserve NPR China Npr News
Biden unveils economic team, nominating Yellen for treasury secretary

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:25 sec | 3 months ago

Biden unveils economic team, nominating Yellen for treasury secretary

"Secretary There's NPR's Scott Horsley reports, a woman will shatter another barrier in her new role on Biden's team. Cecilia Rouse is has been tapped to lead the Council of Economic Advisers where she would be the she had previously served on that council and she would be the first African American to head the council. NPR's Scott Horsley reporting Amazon warehouse workers in Alabama have notified federal labor authorities of

Scott Horsley Cecilia Rouse NPR Council Of Economic Advisers Biden Amazon Alabama
The Dow topped 30,000 for the first time

Morning Edition

00:48 sec | 3 months ago

The Dow topped 30,000 for the first time

"Are taking a breather this morning after hitting record highs on Tuesday. NPR's Scott Horsley reports the Dow was down about 160 points in early trade promising vaccine news and the beginning of an orderly transition to a new president helped push stocks into record territory Tuesday with the Dow crossing 30,000 for the first time and the NASDAQ topping 12,000 for only the second time. As bullish is, investors are about the future. Though current economic conditions are much less rosy Corona virus infections continue to rise, forcing new restrictions on business activity and making consumers nervous. Claim for state unemployment benefits jumped last week, suggesting more layoffs as businesses hunker down for the winter. More than 13 million people are relying on emergency jobless aid that's set to expire just after Christmas.

Scott Horsley NPR
Latest jobless numbers and the state of the economy facing the Biden administration

Here & Now

04:42 min | 4 months ago

Latest jobless numbers and the state of the economy facing the Biden administration

"Reported that another 709,000 Americans applied for first time unemployment benefits last week. That's a lower number than many economists had expected. But eight months into the pandemic, it's still huge. And it didn't to that. Nearly 300,000 people applied last week for special Cares. Act benefits that, for instance, Help the self employed. The jobless numbers come his corner virus case numbers continue to hit record levels and as one of President elect Joe Biden's covert advisors is is floating floating the the idea idea of of a a 4 4 to to 6 6 week week shutdown shutdown to to ultimately ultimately help help the the economy economy with with money money to to help help individuals individuals and and government. government. Let's Let's bring bring in in NPR NPR chief chief economics economics correspondent correspondent Scott Horsley. Hi Scott could be with you, Robin and let's listen to a little of Biden Covert divisor Dr Michael Osa home who spoke with Yahoo finance last night and spoke about the shutdown. Let's listen. We could pay for a package right now to cover all of the wages lost wages for individual workers for losses to small companies to medium sized companies. Or city States County governments. We could do all of that. If we did that. Then we could lock down for 4 to 6 weeks, and if we did, that we could drive the numbers down. Scott does that surprise you to hear that coming from a Biden advisor just a week after the election, which President Trump accused bind of wanting to shut down the economy? Well, you know, Biden did say back in August that he would follow the advice of scientific experts if they recommended stricter limits on economic activity. That's in contrast to President Trump, who has often ignored scientific advice and his push to rapidly reopened businesses and schools, a Napro church that the president has stuck with even after he and his wife and a lot of key White House staffers contracted the virus. But it's not clear that AH lot of Biden Advisors feel that way. Anthony Fauci was on television this morning, saying he's not leaning towards a shut down, He says there's no appetite for it. He thinks there's more targeted measures that could be taken. Another Biden advisor has said. It's It's like a dimmer switch. It's not on off, you know, binary thing. Keep in mind. We we've got. You know, more than two months before President elect Biden will be in control of this, and in the meantime, we are in a world of hurt when it comes to this. This spread. I mean, the numbers are are really frightening. Yeah, we'll also meantime there's a lot of different definitions of what a shutdown is in some states. Stores. Restaurants were ordered closed. Clothes and others. You know, people are told, you know, stay at home, only go out if it's essential for you to do that. But even putting that aside, can bite and get this relief that Astra home was talking about without the Senate. Uh, hard to do hard to do something of that magnitude without Senate help. Now there is certainly in a room within within the credit markets for the federal government to borrow that kind of money we're talking about. Mitch McConnell has been talking about at least ah limited relief package. But certainly the kind of aid that would that would be associated with. That sort of shutdown would would require Senate buy in Yeah. No, we have around a million people looking for jobless benefits last week. But also last week we heard the national unemployment rate dropped last month to 6.9% Square that for us Yeah, it's it's a little hard to square that. It's encouraging certainly that the unemployment rate fell as low as it did in October and it and it felt for the right reasons or it fell even as more people were coming into the job market. Sometimes we see the unemployment rate dropped because people are leaving the job market. That's not what happened last month, so that's certainly encouraging. But we also know that we're only about 54% of the way towards recovering the 22 million jobs that were lost in the spring time. And at the same time with this new spike in Corona virus infections, we're going to see probably more businesses closing their doors, at least temporarily, more people being laid off as you mentioned a million or so People applied for new unemployment benefits. Just last week, we've got 21 million people receiving some form of unemployment relief as of late October. Importantly, about 13.5 million of those are getting benefits under that cares act that are set to expire at the end of December. So at a minimum, Congress is going to have to do something to extend those emergency benefits that were passed back in the springtime. You're gonna have millions of Americans suddenly having their lifeline cut off at the end of the year real briefly. Any

Biden President Trump Scott Horsley Dr Michael Osa NPR States County Napro Church Scott Joe Biden Anthony Fauci Senate Robin Yahoo White House Astra
"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:43 min | 4 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington This is NPR. Live from Kait Q. E D news on Brian What Proposition 15 has failed after an intense and pricey campaign, the property tax reform measure lost by a narrow margin, it would've raised up to $11 billion a year for schools and local government. Education leaders like West Contra Costa Unified Superintendent Matthew Duffy are coping with the verdict. It's really frustrating because it continues to create an understanding that you're only gonna have a good education if you have money. Education funding in California has never fully recovered from the effects of 1978 proposition 13, which capped property taxes, proposition, 15 would have stripped some businesses of those protections and put the new revenue towards schools and local governments across the Bay Area. Voters did approve bonds and taxes to fund their local school districts. A San Francisco faces a surgeon Covad 19 cases, the city is closing down indoor dining, reducing capacity at gyms and movie theaters and pausing any additional reopening of high schools. County public health Director Dr Grant Colfax says the new order goes into effect this Friday. If you do not cause and we do not reverse It is entirely possible that we will face the situation where our health care system could become overwhelms and reverse the current progress that we've made. All these many months, Colfax says. The city is currently averaging 80 new cases a day from 32 at the end.

Dr Grant Colfax NPR West Contra Costa Unified Scott Horsley Matthew Duffy Covad Washington Bay Area Superintendent California San Francisco Director
Unemployed Workers Built Up Some Savings. Then the $600 Stimulus Checks Stopped

All Things Considered

00:59 sec | 5 months ago

Unemployed Workers Built Up Some Savings. Then the $600 Stimulus Checks Stopped

"Now than they were early in the summer. And they're spending is likely to fall further as their newfound savings are exhausted. Kelly Griffin, a night worker in Massachusetts, so her income dropped by about two thirds wants the supplemental benefit ran out. It was hard you don't got to eat. You don't spend things unnecessarily and kind of script unscathed and kind of started the panic like Am I ever going to get a job again? Back in Cleveland. McAfee knows that feeling she's been trying to earn some extra money sewing facemask, but she'd much rather be back in a regular job. It is not A situation that I would wish on anybody to constantly be stuck in this with no foreseeable end to it like I don't know when I'm going to get a job again. Hopefully it will be soon, but Until then, it's just constant stress for everybody. The Senate is expected to consider a stripped down relief package on Monday, but hopes for a new federal help before the election. Are slim. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS

Scott Horsley Kelly Griffin Mcafee NPR Cleveland Senate Massachusetts
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:53 min | 5 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"In a large ballroom in Fort Meyers. The chairs were set up with social distance, but many in the room weren't wearing masks. Trump told the crowd. He's protecting seniors, but you have to live your lives. I'm working as hard as I can see. You can kiss and hug your Children and grandchildren very soon. That's something I missed. Also, I will be honestly. Polls indicate Trump's support with seniors isn't a strong as it was four years ago, and his handling of the pandemic is a big part of that. Tamara Keith. NPR news traveling with the president. And Democratic rival Joe Biden is campaigning in Michigan today with stops in two cities in Southfield. Biden warned a crowd at the United Auto Workers union that President Trump wants to strip health insurance from tens of millions of Americans with preexisting conditions. But mishandling the pandemic isn't enough for Trump. Top of that he's still trying to take away your healthcare. Aiden told the crowd. If he is elected, his administration will build on the affordable care act. Biden travels to Detroit for another rally tonight. Federal deficit has hit a record $3.1 trillion in the fiscal year that just ended NPR's Scott Horsefly reports the Corona virus added a waterfall to what was already a river of reading the deficit for fiscal year. 2020 was more than twice as big as the previous high set during the great recession a decade ago. It's about three times with the government had been expecting before the pandemic struck with businesses shuttered and millions of people out of work. Government tax revenue shrank at the same time federal spending balloon as Congress authorized trillions of dollars in relief payments to keep families and businesses afloat. Trump administration was already facing a $1 trillion deficits even before the pandemic hit. Despite the government's massive borrowing interest rates have remained exceptionally low. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington All street in mixed territory by the closing bell. The Dow up 112 points. You're listening to NPR news, and this is K C R. W News. I'm leery Perella. It's a Friday, October 16th of very good afternoon to you. Here's what's happening in three or four. After initially rejecting the request earlier today by Governor Newsome. The Trump administration approved California's bid for disaster relief funds. This afternoon, The Washington Post reports. The turnaround came after a midday call from Newsome to Trump. Money will assist the response to wildfire statewide, including fires and Ella Sanford, you know, and San Diego County's The Declaration frees up millions of dollars in federal relief funding, including recovery and response to the bobcat fire in the same Gabriel Mountains. Federal government says it initially rejected the request because FEMA determined the state had enough federal resource is in place. The initial denial highlighted the political animosity between the state and Trump, who has repeatedly assailed California's forced management practices. Emergency funding from FEMA can cover as much as 75% of local fire response efforts. A federal grand jury in Texas has indicted former Los Angeles Angels employee Eric came in connection with the overdose. Death of Picture. Tyler Skaggs K is accused of providing Skaggs with the fentanyl that killed the ballplayer in a hotel room in July of last year. Here's case your W's Daryl Saxman. A grand jury charged K with two counts of distributing it controlled substance. The indictment alleges that he'd been selling painkillers since at least 2017, according to the Times, which first reported the story. Authorities have alleged that Kay and Skaggs had a history of narcotics transactions. Kay was a longtime employee of the Angels Media Relations Department. He was arrested by federal authorities in August. The deadline to indict him was extended twice as his lawyers and prosecutors discussed a plea deal that was never reached. Skaggs was born in Woodland Hills and played at Santa Monica High School. He died less than two weeks before his 28th birthday. At his case here, it'll be a sterile.

Trump Trump administration Tyler Skaggs K NPR Joe Biden Federal government Kay Fort Meyers California Tamara Keith FEMA Governor Newsome Aiden president Daryl Saxman Scott Horsley Santa Monica High School
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:44 min | 5 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"People, some of them senior citizens in a large ballroom in Fort Meyers. The chairs were set up with social distance, but many in the room weren't wearing masks, Trump told the crowd. He's protecting seniors, but you have to live your lives. I'm working as hard as I can see. You can kiss and hug your Children and grandchildren very soon. That's something I missed. Also, I will be honest with you. Polls indicate Trump's support with seniors isn't a strong as it was four years ago, and his handling of the pandemic is a big part of that. Tamara Keith NPR news traveling with the president. The Biden campaign, meanwhile, says the Democratic presidential nominees tested negative again for Corona virus. He's campaigning this hour in Michigan Whole show former vice President Joe Biden with a growing lead over President Trump's so far with the administration's handling of the Corona virus. Foremost on the minds of many voters next Wednesday, just a week and a half before the election. Former President Barack Obama will make US first in person campaign appearance for the Biden Harris ticket in Philadelphia. Another concern in the middle of a pandemic. The federal deficit NPR Scott Horsefly reports it hit a record $3.1 trillion in the fiscal year that just ended A deficit for fiscal year. 2020 was more than twice as big as the previous high set during the great recession a decade ago. It's about three times what the government had been expecting before the pandemic struck. With businesses shuttered and millions of people out of work. Government tax revenue shrank at the same time federal spending balloon as Congress authorized trillions of dollars in relief payments to keep families and businesses afloat. Trump administration was already facing a $1 trillion deficits even before the pandemic hit. Despite the government's massive borrowing interest rates have remained exceptionally low. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington This is NPR news. In friends. Police have shot dead the suspect in a shockingly brutal attack Today in a small French town about 50 miles northeast of Paris. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports. The incident appears to be related to the ongoing trial for the terrorist attack on satirical magazine, Charlie Hebdo. Ah, warning this report may not be suitable for young listeners. Police are treating this as a terrorist attack. A man was slain in public on the street in broad daylight. Decapitated by another man with a knife. French media are reporting that the victim was a history teacher from a local high school who had shown his students pictures of caricatures of the Prophet Mohammed. Such caricatures are central to the ongoing trial of 14 people accused of helping the terrorists who attacked the magazine in 2015, killing 12 people. Charlie Hebdo recently republished the caricatures to mark the beginning of the trial. Three weeks ago, a Pakistani migrant attacked a woman with a knife near the former offices of the magazine to avenge what he said was the blasphemy of the cartoons. Eleanor Beardsley. NPR NEWS PARIS The number of American troops will be leaving in Afghanistan in the coming months is still in dispute. National security adviser Robert O'Brien says President Trump and Secretary of Defense Mark Esper have already signed off on drawing down forces to 2500 by early next year. But this week General Mark Milley Told NPR. True production still depend on conditions on the ground. So far, the Taliban have been violating the terms of their peace agreement with United States Taliban attacks in Afghanistan. Have risen. I'm Laxmi, saying NPR news. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include focus features and MSNBC films. Presenting the way I see it and inside. Look at President Obama and Reagan through the eyes of White House photographer Pete Souza.

President Trump NPR president Tamara Keith NPR US Eleanor Beardsley Barack Obama Charlie Hebdo Joe Biden Fort Meyers vice President Paris Taliban Biden Harris MSNBC Scott Horsley Pete Souza
Stocks drop after Trump tweets stimulus talks are over

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

Stocks drop after Trump tweets stimulus talks are over

"Up much of the ground they lost Tuesday when President Trump abruptly pulled out of talks aimed at crafting a new Corona virus relief package. NPR's Scott Horsley reports. The Dow Jones industrials rose more than 340 points in early trading. It's been a dizzying 24 hours for investors trying to make sense of the president's conflicting tweets. Stocks tumbled late Tuesday after Trump pulled the plug on stimulus talks until after the November election. Then, late last night, the president reversed course again tweeting that he would go along with more limited Corona virus relief, challenging lawmakers to pass on Ly the part of the package he likes. Restaurants and retailers complain that without more help from the federal government, it could be a long, cold winter for many businesses. Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell also warrants of tragic consequences of inaction with a slower and more painful recovery from the pandemic recession. Scott

President Trump Donald Trump Scott Horsley Federal Reserve Federal Government NPR LY Jerome Powell Chairman
Economy plunges 31.4% in spring but big rebound expected

Morning Edition

00:38 sec | 5 months ago

Economy plunges 31.4% in spring but big rebound expected

"Revised GDP figures from the Commerce Department show. The second quarter downturn was not quite so disastrous as initially reported, though the economy still shrank at a jaw dropping annual rate of 31.4%. A revision show consumer spending in the quarter was somewhat stronger than first reported, while exports and business investment were somewhat weaker. The economy has enjoyed a partial rebound in the third quarter, which ends today. But there are signs that recovery is losing steam as federal relief payments dry up negotiations over a possible new round of relief payments continue in Washington, but there's been no breakthrough yet. Scott Horsley.

Scott Horsley Commerce Department Washington
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:07 min | 6 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"Lie from NPR news. I'm Korova Coleman. President Trump is preparing to visit Kenosha, Wisconsin, the side of a police shooting of a black man killings of protesters and violent unrest. Democratic leaders, including Wisconsin Governor Tony Evers, have asked Trump not to visit. Wisconsin State representative David Bowen is a member of the state's legislative Black caucus. He told NPR's morning edition. He agrees I think the president is only coming to fan flames. Hey, started this division. He wants us to be torn apart as Americans and I don't see his presence in Kenosha. Actually healing the community of Kenosha healing to state of Wisconsin. Republican officials say they're looking forward to Trump's visit. Wisconsin Republican Senator Ron Johnson says Trump is providing decisive leadership. September is off to a mostly positive start on Wall Street after a heady month of August. NPR's gone horsefly reports, The Dow Jones industrial Average shows little change in early trading. Despite a mostly down day on Monday, August turned out to be the best month in decades for major stock indexes. Both the Dow and the S and P 500 index gained about 7% during the month, while the NASDAQ soared nearly 10%. Gaines continued overnight in Asian markets. A new report shows factory activity in China surge last month, thanks to a jump in new export orders. Market still face considerable uncertainty over the path of the Corona virus. In a White House conference call with governors, Dr Anthony found, she warned, it's important that people use caution over the Labor Day weekend. To avoid the kind of infectious outbreaks that followed gatherings on Memorial Day and the fourth of July. Scott Horsley. NPR NEWS Washington Tens of millions of Americans air facing eviction notices this month as they struggle to pay their bills amid the pandemic. NPR's Windsor Johnston reports, federal and state moratoriums on evictions are expiring in many states starting today. Renters who were shielded from the eviction under legislation passed by Congress earlier this year are no longer protected against losing their homes for being late on the rent payments. Ellie Thaxton works with families facing evictions in Georgia. I think it's going to be the most vulnerable that are going to be impacted and that's going to be single mothers, Children, people of color. Single black mothers are the most common evictions that we normally see. Tens of millions of Americans have lost $600 in additional weekly unemployment benefits that expired in July. The federal government has extended some eviction protections through the end of the year. But the extension on LY protects a small percentage of renters. Windsor Johnston. NPR NEWS Ah House Committee plans to subpoena Postmaster General Lewis to joy. Democrats say he has failed to provide them with information about slow mail delivery after changes at the U. S Postal Service. On Wall Street. The Dow is up 33 points at 28,463. It's NPR from the David Burnett Foundation News. Her make a C R W I'm Cherry Glazer. The California legislative session came to a chaotic and last night for the year, a state lawmakers raced and sometimes failed to beat a midnight deadline for passing bills. Several Corona virus related proposals did squeak in under the wire and are heading to Governor Gavin Newsom's desk, among them new labor protections for hotel, janitorial and airport employees. Another bill would allow can strap Californians to borrow more money from the retirement accounts with tent without tax penalties, And yet another would've wore a high school diplomas to students who were unable to finish the final months of the school year due to the pandemic. Newsome has until the end of this month to decide whether to sign the bills into law. Among the measures that failed to make it out of the Legislature were a number of police reform proposals that were introduced in response to concerns about police brutality and systemic racism. Case here. W's Darryl Sanson has this roundup. One measure that did pass and now heads to Governor Newsome would require the state Justice Department to look into fatal shootings by law enforcement officers. Attorney General Javier or Bezerra opposed that bill, saying that his office lacks the resource is to oversee all police shootings. And it's not clear if Newsom will sign it. Newsome has vowed design another bill that reached his desk that would ban police officers from using chokeholds in karate. It holds a chokehold applies pressure to a person's wind pipe, while a corroded hold applies pressure to a person's corroded artery. X closed the flow of blood to the brain. Both can be deadly, and there have been calls to ban them nationwide. But many far reaching police reform stalled. Those included a bill that would strip officers who commit misconduct of their badge and hold them financially responsible. If Sude Another measure that would have established strict rules about how and when law enforcement could use less lethal projectiles. Such his rubber bullets also failed to pass and one bill had the support it needed but still failed to pass. That bill would have made it easier for members of the public to see disciplinary records of police officers accused of racist or discriminatory actions. It passed both houses but time ran out before the bill could return to the Senate for a final procedural vote. For Casey Ar w I'm Darryl SATs meant more than a million acres in California have burned this summer. The short term cause for the wildfires is running into the millions of dollars and his cap radios. Ezra David Romero reports, the price tag could continue to skyrocket. Madame Rose is an expert in the economics of disasters in climate change policy at USC, he says the probability of fires costing more than a pandemic is very likely unless something is done to curb climate change fast while fires in one year not his biggest cove it but What we should do is look at the probabilities of occurrence. I think it's fair to say the fires could be just a cz devastating as code 19 to prevent future fires and their negative economic impact. He says. Forrest need to be cleaned quickly with things like prescribed burns. A state in the federal government announced a plan last week to Finn. One million acres of force.

NPR Governor Newsome President Trump Wisconsin Kenosha Governor Gavin Newsom federal government Windsor Johnston Wisconsin State California Korova Coleman Ezra David Romero president Tony Evers David Bowen Congress
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:54 min | 7 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"The National Economic Council and Special assistant to President Trump and NPR's Scott Horsley is still with us. Scott What stood out to you from what we just heard from from California? Well, Mr Pneumonia is right that we did see a rebound in the economy. Mork quickly than a lot of forecasters were expected expecting. We saw job gains in May that a lot of folks didn't think we would see until June because, frankly, the economy did reopen. More quickly than a lot of people expected. We may, however, be seeing the the ill side effects of that with the surge in Corona virus cases, and as we've said many times, we are not going to get a sustainable economic recovery in this country. Until we get a until we're able to get a handle on this virus. And while some of the economic indicators have been better than some forecasters thought, I think that health metrics has certainly been far worse than most of us fears. And so as we move into late summer and early fall, what economic numbers are you going to be watching to see if there are signs of the US pulling its way out of this historic economic tailspin? We are certainly going to be watching those July spending numbers that Mr Lorna mentioned. I think those air out later this week will also of course, continue to watch. As we always do. Job gains. The job gains in July were much lower than they had been in June. And we'll we'll we'll see where that Tran goes. And then we'll also be watching for, you know measures of economic hardship. We do have more than 30 million people collecting unemployment benefits right now In this country, those benefits have shrunk a lot in the last couple weeks, they might get a little boost of the president's action. Over the weekend, but we'll be watching for signs of distress. Whether it's evictions or late rent payments, Missed car payments, Miss credit card payments, that sort of thing. What is NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley. Thanks as always, good to be with your.

Scott Horsley National Economic Council NPR Mr Pneumonia Special assistant to President Mr Lorna US California Mork Trump president Tran
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:07 min | 7 months ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"News. I'm Corbett Coleman, Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden Sound Foran interview Tuesday with the National Association of Black Journalists and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists. Biden says if elected, he would not reverse President Trump's tariffs on China. He says it will take a multi layered approach to get China to change its behavior. Stocks opened higher this morning. Despite worrisome signs about the U. S. Job market. NPR Scott Horsley reports the Dow Jones industrials Roves about 200 points in early trading. A rebound in the labor market that began in May appears to be losing steam, the payroll processing company, ADP said. This morning, private employers added just 167,000 jobs last month, far fewer than forecasters were expecting. That could be a warning sign. The government's official jobs report out on Friday, may disappoint. US lost more than 22 million jobs in March and April and regained on Ly about 1/3 as many jobs in May and June. Timecard trackers Kronos in Homebase suggest Job growth slowed sharply in July as the number of new Corona virus infections took off. Stalling job market would spell trouble in an economy where unemployment still tops 11%. Scott Horsley NPR NEWS Washington A gigantic explosion in Beirut Tuesday has left many people homeless in the port city. The BBC Sebastian Usher says at least 100 people were killed in the blast and about 4000 were injured. Those Lebanese who managed to get to sleep last night in Beirut, woke to a scene described in the local media as apocalyptic. The epicenter of the blast in the port shows buildings flattened with just the bare cliff face of a large structures still standing by the sea. The financial damage to a country already in economic collapse is being measured. In billions of dollars on with grief. A cold rage is also rising among many Lebanese against their seemingly eternal cast of political leaders with renewed demands for them to be swept aside the BBC Sebastian Usher. Republicans are calling former Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates to Capitol Hill this hour. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports they will ask Yates about investigations of some of President Trump's allies. Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham plans to focus on three main areas of questioning Why Sally Yates signed off on surveillance warrants for former Trump campaign adviser Carter Page. The Justice Department's probe a former Trump National security advisor Michael Flynn, in an Obama White House meeting about the Flynn investigation. The Republican led hearing is part of a broader effort to scrutinize actions by the Obama administration before and after the last presidential election. Democrats in Congress or give the hearings a waste of time. Instead, they saying lawmakers should focus on threats to the 2020 election by Russia, China and other foreign adversaries. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington On Wall Street, The Dow Jones industrials are up 246 points. You're listening to NPR news from the David Burnett Foundation newsroom a K C. R w I'm Cherry Glaser come to Mayor Asia Brown, another city officials are calling on California Attorney General Javier Becerra and the U. S. Justice Department. To investigate allegations of a deputy gang at the L. A county sheriff's station in Compton. Ah claim fall against Lake County alleges that a clique called the Executioner's said illegal arrest quotas sport matching tattoos of Nazi imagery and retaliated against a deputy after he reported an alleged gang member for assaulting a colleague. Here's Mayor Brown, speaking at a news conference yesterday. They terrorized the community and in the cover the phrase it is unacceptable that take this Attorney General Javier Santa to stand up for the black and brown people, something it is unacceptable for us to be terrorized in this community. Members of the community shared stories about their personal experiences with law enforcement. Restaurant owner Jemele Henderson says he was recently pulled over handcuffed and placed in a squad car by Deputy without cause. You.

Trump Sally Yates Joe Biden China Scott Horsley Sebastian Usher Carrie Johnson BBC Beirut President Washington Mayor Asia Brown National Association of Black Deputy Attorney General US National Association of Hispan NPR Corbett Coleman
"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Scott Horsley reports regulators have a simple message for customers who might be tempted to pull money out of the bank during this anxious time as a kind of security blanket your money is safe as they say when it's in the back there have been anecdotal reports of people making large cash withdrawals Janak Williams who chairs the FDIC says even if a bank branch closes or shortens its hours customers will be able to put their hands on cash ATMs are functioning as as usual payment systems are functioning functioning as always I know anecdotally that we heard from several banks that they're actually using extra caution in cleaning the ATMs and sanitizing them some banks are getting extra deliveries of cash from armored trucks the people who drive those trucks are considered essential workers Scott Horsley NPR news Washington this is NPR and this is W. NYC in New York good morning I'm Richard hake governor Cuomo says New York is still working to get the medical equipment it needs to handle the surge of covert nineteen patients the governor said finding more ventilators is the state's single greatest challenge right now no one has a stockpile of these the federal government has to acquire them the same way we have to acquire Cuomo says the state's still needs about fifteen thousand ventilators to meet the projected number of patients New York City is closing some streets to traffic starting tomorrow the more is the move is an effort to give more people more space to give social distance in order to slow the spread of covert nineteen in Manhattan Park Avenue between twenty eight and thirty fourth streets will not allow vehicles between ten in the morning and seven at night there will also be closures on Bushwick Avenue in Brooklyn thirty fourth Avenue in queens and the grand concourse in the Bronx the NYPD will be on site to ensure safety and social distancing officials are considering additional closures in the future governor Cuomo says New York is still working to get rather no well he's also saying that we're looking to get them the for them we're gonna move on to the next door because my computer froze up theme restaurant chef Floyd card does has died of complications from covert nineteen is companies that car does died earlier this week at morning side Medical Center in Montclair New Jersey he was admitted a week ago with a fever Carlos was the winner of the third season of top chef and had a hand in numerous Indian restaurant in his hometown of Mumbai and here in New York City he told WNYC back in two thousand sixteen that he always aim to mimic his family's cooking for the longest time I still get people asking me when you get the best Indian folk and they ask every Indian person there no way to get the best Indian food and ninety nine point nine percent of the bill would stay at home Carlos was fifty nine years old and new York city's top athletes are dealing with the emotional toll of the postponement of the Olympic Games Natasha Hastings is a two time Olympic gold medalist in track and field from Brooklyn she gave birth to her first child last year and has been training to get back in shape for the summer she says while the delay is necessary to save lives she's still needed to process her feelings the night of the postponement I hear that some of my girlfriends and was like Hey I need you guys can we do a happy hour we had a a facetime group chat we all have a glass of wine I will just stop Hastings is spending her stay at home taking care of her newborn and recalibrating her training schedule for twenty.

Scott Horsley
"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Scott Horsley reports regulators have a simple message for customers who might be tempted to pull money out of the bank during this anxious time as a kind of security blanket your money is safe as they say when it's in the back there have been anecdotal reports of people making large cash withdrawals Janak Williams who chairs the FDIC says even if a bank branch closes or shortens its hours customers will be able to put their hands on cash ATMs are functioning as as usual payment systems are functioning functioning as always I know want to totally that we heard from several banks that they're actually using extra caution in cleaning the ATMs and sanitizing them some banks are getting extra deliveries of cash from armored trucks the people who drive those trucks are considered essential workers Scott Horsley NPR news Washington this is NPR two million Americans without access to clean running water have become some of the most vulnerable to the corona virus on the Navajo Nation forty percent must hold water and use outhouses from member station KJZZ laurel Morales reports Sheila yes he drives fifty miles for her drinking water groceries and other necessities since health officials have encouraged frequent hand washing her family's using more water my mother was asking but what are we taking the trash out we have four bags of trash and we have to try to get to the city to do that doing laundry I'm scared to go to lunch right now we have a small line you might hear a community kind of risky for us right now in two thousand nine American Indians and Alaskan natives died from each one and one at four times the rates of all other racial and ethnic groups combined that's according to a study by the national institutes of health for NPR news and more more Alice in flagstaff the suspect accused of killing fifty one people at two mosques in Christchurch New Zealand last year has unexpectedly pleaded guilty to all charges the shocking attacks triggered new gun laws in New Zealand critics called for changes on social media roles as the government's live streamed his attacks the FBI says a man suspected of plotting to bomb a hospital in Missouri has died after agents attempted to arrest him the suspect was the subject of a long running domestic terrorism investigation the FBI says he was a potentially violent extremist motivated by racial religious and anti government hatred I'm korva Coleman NPR.

Scott Horsley Janak Williams FDIC Washington laurel Morales Sheila flagstaff Christchurch New Zealand FBI Missouri NPR New Zealand
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:11 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"Update you're welcome NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley has been with us throughout this day all right let's talk about testing after weeks of delays and shortages officials now say that nearly two million corona virus tests will be available and labs across the country will be able to test thousands of people a day starting this week the White House also said this will include drive through and walk through testing sites set up in the hardest hit states but this is also the same White House the promised millions of test kits weeks ago and was forced to admit that there was a supply shortage so how and where can people get tested for the coronavirus and peers global health and development correspondent Jason Beaubien joins us now to help answer that question hi Jason Hey good morning so where are these new tests going to come from where they going I mean how are they going to get to where they need to go you know in it's going to be different in different places some of it is going to be sort of put on top of what it is already been rolled out in some states but we are expecting to see testing popping up in parking lots all of walmarts and Walgreens and people having the ability to go online find out where a particular testing site is make an appointment go in and and get tested the government is saying however that they really are gonna try to prioritize this for first responders health care workers and the elderly particularly the elderly who are showing either some symptoms or have some underlying conditions initially they do know that there's a huge pent up demand for testing all they want to make sure that that the people who really need it the most get access to it but it is this entirely new model that they're gonna try to roll out to get testing to thousands and thousands of people after you know last week the only be able to test out a few thousand people a day the idea here is that each individual location could do two to four thousand people a day right which is still we should say south Korea's been testing fifteen thousand people a day so the United States is way behind on this way behind playing though what difference this is going to make when we talk about flattening the curve so to speak so you know in terms of attacking this outbreak in in this country if you don't know where the the flare ups are happening you can't really put the resources they are you can't isolate people you you're gonna have people still wandering around who are infectious so by testing you can really identify where the hot spots are up try to get those people if the care that they need and and get people isolated also make people more careful in those particular places so knowing exactly what's happening with the spread of this outbreak it is one of the the keys that will come out of more testing at least that is the hope again they're starting to roll this out the equipment is gonna start moving out it could still they're saying they're going to do this this week you know it might not be till the end of the week that we really are getting set this thing up and running okay so we've been talking a lot about how US hospitals are really vulnerable they just don't have the capacity to deal with this pandemic what are you hearing right now from folks on the ground hearing at hospitals that they are very concerned about getting inundated with patients and that's part of the reason that they're trying to to do this testing in parking lots to the testing part of it can be outside of the hospital to the hospital can focus on actually helping treat the people who are actually sick hospitals are also very worried about the amount of protective equipment that they have on on hand and with the different have enough in the coming days if they do get thousands and thousands of people showing up at emergency rooms all across the country with with this this disease so that's a big concern for them we also heard that US Surgeon General announced in recent days that hospitals surgeons because should think about canceling elective surgeries so just another another change afoot and here's Jason Beaubien we appreciate it you're welcome just a few days ago it's still seemed fine to go to restaurants now several states say it's not Illinois governor JB Pritzker explained why he put out a statewide order I tried earlier this week to appeal to everyone's good judgment to stay home to avoid bars not to congregate in crowds it's unfortunate that many people didn't take that seriously the time for persuasion and public appeals is over the time for action is here a bit of frustration there same in New York City and Ohio Washington state Massachusetts Kate Grossman is a senior editor with member station WBEZ in Chicago and I guess you won't be eating out today I will today well but starting tonight I will definitely not locating out okay was there some specific event that made the governor act well there sure was this was clearly prompted by early St Patrick's day celebrations here in Chicago over the weekend in particular on Saturday afternoon and into the evening this is the you know the big weekend this was a big weekend before St Patrick's day and it is famous in Chicago for partying and the governor Saad took the big crowds and on Saturday he I'm you know tried to say I am appealing to your good judgment please don't do that but by Sunday he said I'm not playing anymore and we're shutting down how much trouble are restaurant owners and their employees and now well there's a deep deep concern we had our reporter out yesterday at a group of chefs got together to listen to the press conference where the governor announced this news of the closing for dine in customers and we have this picture of them congregated with their heads all hanging low as they're listening to the press conference you know it's it's gonna be pretty devastating you know they're talking about you know closing down this to to be you know take out and drive through but you know we have an alderman for example Chicago who owns a longstanding restaurant here and he said eighty percent of his revenue is dine in customers so I think that's pretty common so there's a really deep concern about how this will impact them although I'm glad you're specifying this is a ban on dine in customers that means the restaurant can stay open they can serve to people are doing take out is that right that's right they can do what they're calling curbside pickup and they can do drive through so so hopefully they'll still have some staff and they're obviously in in their kitchens making food this must be part of a wider shut down the schools are closed in Chicago right I that's right well effective I am tomorrow morning no school for two weeks in not just in Chicago but the whole state of Illinois so how quiet have the streets better are they going to be getting in Chicago in the next couple of days well you know it's funny so I was the corona virus editor this weekend and I was furiously up my computer and working all weekend and then I went out for a walk and they were actually like tons of people outside kind of acting normal and I thought wow how are you acting normal things are so crazy but the people of people are definitely you know social distancing and staying at home but it was a sunny day yesterday people are we're outside you know I sensed in Washington DC that maybe people are getting out for a final weekend before things really close down maybe that's what's happening in Chicago too yeah I would imagine people are getting getting some sunshine cholesterol okay thanks so.

Scott Horsley NPR
"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"S. will happen on a large scale soon that comment came in a tweet this morning Dr Anthony Fauci who heads the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases made similar comments to reporters yesterday it's not gonna be months it's going to be a week or so we gonna get many many more a test that will be available she acknowledges the current system of testing is inadequate the trump administration says those who can't do their jobs because of the virus may be eligible to collect unemployment insurance here's NPR's Scott Horsley the labor department is giving states the green light to offer unemployment insurance Danny worker who gets sick with corona virus has to care for a sick family member or whose employer is quarantine or shut down the administration's promise to offer financial support to those workers so they don't have to choose between going to work sick and possibly spreading the virus or missing a paycheck labor secretary Eugene Scalia says the ministration will use all available tools to assist workers who were adversely affected by the pandemic the new guidelines did not extend to workers who are already eligible for sick leave or get paid family leave from their employer Scott Horsley NPR news Washington house speaker Nancy Pelosi says Congress is close to an agreement with the White House on a bill to help Americans affected by the virus this is NPR news from Washington this is WNYC in New York good morning I'm Richard hake New York state is banning public gatherings of five hundred people or more starting today at five o'clock Broadway shows also will go dark the state is making asking hospitals to find more staffing as well governor Cuomo says these are necessary steps to fight the spread of the virus we're asking former doctors and nurses to reconnect with your old hospital your old health care employer to be on an on call basis the governor says the states also preparing to meet the expected demand for hospital beds nursing homes across the state of also been directed to forbid visitors all schools and places of worship within a section of newer sheller close for two weeks in an effort to slow the virus thirty four year old Selena Perez white says her children are students at one of the shuttered schools and she's trying to keep them home and inside as much as possible I'm to keep the ball in the hole I know that my house is clean disinfect every day every morning in between everything that we do the right thing down spraying the people when those goals and just keep the disease and tenant advocates are calling for a stop on addictions because of the worry of the spread businesses say many workers will lose income now that the city and state of an ounce regulations to limit large gatherings eva Farkas is the executive director of the met council on housing she says that officials need to make sure that people can stay in their homes people are going to lose income and that's gonna really hurt people's ability to pay rent the New York City Housing Authority says it will stop issuing warrants for evictions and it's CUNY schools prepare to move classes online for the rest of the semester campus food pantries are planning to stay open WNYC she made about soup has more it's the number one question campus food pantries are getting right now will you be open this year and we're here to serve our students in the best way we possibly can that's Carol Brower director of student life at the college of Staten Island she says they've stocked up with more food than usual and they're planning to stay open unless directed otherwise in a survey of CUNY students conducted last year nearly half of the respondents reported feeling unsure about whether they'd be able to afford or access healthy foods.

Dr Anthony Fauci National Institute
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"January NPR's Scott Horsley says the latest jobs numbers are due out in about an hour forecasters are expecting the labor department report another solid month of job gains but the news may be outdated as soon as its published reports based on surveys conducted three weeks ago that was before the sharp jump in reports of coronavirus outside of China where the epidemic began since then growing fears about the virus and the damage it might do to the economy have triggered a sharp sell off on Wall Street major stock indexes tumbled again on Thursday industries that could see job cuts as a result of coronavirus include manufacturing and hospitality factories have already had trouble getting parts from China travel and tourism could also take a hit Scott Horsley NPR news Washington at least twenty states are now reporting cases of the corona virus Maryland is reporting its first cases all three related to overseas travel the virus is blamed for at least twelve deaths in the U. S. all but one in Washington state vice president pence acknowledges there aren't enough test kits to meet demand nationwide he says the federal government is working on that president trump is expected to sign the bill allocating more than eight billion dollars to combat the virus this is NPR news from Washington president trump is canceling today's visit to the centers for disease control and prevention in Atlanta the White House is offering no explanation later today the president will be in Tennessee to get a look at the damage done by Tuesday's tornadoes they left twenty four people dead the Taliban are denying responsibility for today's deadly attack in Afghanistan's capital at least twenty seven people were killed and more than fifty wounded when gunmen opened fire at a ceremony honoring a former Shiite leader and P. ours did the deed says one of the country's former presidential candidates escaped unhurt special forces rushed to the area where gunmen opened fire on the ceremony from a nearby building under construction according to local news outlet tolo the chief rival of the president his name is on Dunlop Dunlop was bundled away but his deputy described the attack as suspicious that's because of the law doesn't recognize I should've honey as a legitimate president of Afghanistan but a spokesman for honey condemned the attack the tensions in Kabul complicate an already tricky deal signed between the United States and the Taliban that would see thousands of American forces withdrawal by the middle of next year that's because the deal calls for negotiations between the Taliban enough guns to settle the country's future but I've gone to divide it and they have to reconcile for those talks to go ahead do you have date NPR news Islamabad Dow futures are off more than six hundred points this morning I'm Dave Mattingly in Washington you're listening to morning edition on KCRW I'm Evan Kleiman on.

Taliban NPR vice president Washington Evan Kleiman Dave Mattingly United States Kabul Dunlop Dunlop Afghanistan Scott Horsley Tennessee president White House Atlanta trump federal government pence
"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Some Chinese subsidies and pure Scott Horsley forces warnings got thanks you're welcome it's morning edition on WNYC I'm Richard hake the backlash continues against new York's new law that ends most forms of cash bail and it's Karen dewitt reports Republicans in Albany are ramping up the pressure on Democrats to change the law New York ended most forms of cash bail on January first Republicans who are in the minority in the Senate say they are concerned about the growing number of instances of repeat criminal offenders released without bail well then gone on to commit yet another offense Senate GOP leader John Flanagan says Democrats need to act to restore cash bail for some more serious crimes and to give judges more discretion to set bail if the defendant is believed to be a danger to the community they are tone deaf they're not listening to people back in their districts between last week and this week there's been almost a hundred bills introduced through the powerful rules committee not one not one on criminal justice not one on anything that we've talked about not one on anything modifying a law repealing law from last year the Republicans are also objecting to new proposals by some Senate Democrats they would allow people in prison to become automatically eligible for parole review when they turn fifty five senator Fred action are is a former Broome county deputy sheriff today is just another step in the wrong direction but to think that just because someone is fifty five if they're a serial murderer or a serial rapist that they would get parole I think every New Yorker needs to know just how bad a piece of policy that is equally as bad as before some Senate Democrats from Long Island have proposed bills to modify the bail reform laws senator Jim gore and has proposed a bill that would add manslaughter and some terrorism related charges back to the list of crimes that would be eligible for cash bail senator Monica Martinez his bill would give judges more power to hold the defendant in jail before their trial if they're deemed to be dangerous to themselves or others Senate leader and restored cousins was non committal well we will certainly look at those bills like we look at any number of bills store cousin says no one should interpret her comments as a lack of urgency but she says the law needs to be given a chance to work before changes are made I try and keep it all in perspective changes hard change around this system is particularly hard and it's been two weeks and I want to be able to sort out the facts from fear mongering I want to be able to look at reality and data as opposed to just reacting to you know whatever people are saying who are not necessarily trying to reform a system that we know has been broken family members of crime victims were planning a rally on Long Island to advocate for changes to the bail reform laws in Albany I'm Karen to wet support for NPR comes from member.

Scott Horsley
"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KCRW

"The BBC's Nick fake reporting the US Supreme Court is scheduled to take up its first major gun rights case in a decade NPR's Nina Totenberg reports the justices on Monday will hear arguments on now defunct gun regulations in New York City several gun owners and the New York affiliate of the NRA challenged regulations for having a handgun at home in New York City under the regulations as they existed when the case began a license to have a gun at home only allowed the gun owner to transport the weapon to seven shooting ranges inside the city limits that meant these pistol owners could not transport their guns to a home elsewhere in the state for instance or the shooting ranges in competitions outside the city this year the city change those rules to be more permissive but the gun owners are pressing the Supreme Court to lay out yet more permissive rules for gun ownership and transport Nina Totenberg NPR news Washington nearly six out of ten companies in the S. and P. five hundred index are at risk of losing assets because of climate change and PR Scott Horsley reports that's according to a new guide for climate savvy investors the guide evaluate some fifteen thousand companies around the world to see which are most exposed to a changing climate many of those companies have assets a growing risk of physical damage from wild fires hurricane droughts or other problems associated with rising carbon in the atmosphere analysts also flag businesses that could be adversely affected by regulatory changes such as a carbon tax those risks are higher in the US and Australia than in other countries which have already adopted more aggressive policies to combat climate change even companies in the same industry often have widely varying exposure to climate risk the assessments were conducted by true cost which is an arm of S. and P. global Scott Horsley NPR news Washington you're listening to NPR.

BBC Nick fake US Supreme Court NPR Nina Totenberg NRA New York City Washington Scott Horsley US Australia New York
"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:17 min | 1 year ago

"scott horsley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"R. Scott Horsley reports investors will be listening closely for any hints of upcoming changes on the central bank's policy on interest rates the federal reserve's interest rate setting committee meets later this month and many observers expect the committee to lower rates for the first time since the beginning of the Great Recession more than a decade ago that appear to be moving in that direction last month would emphasize growing uncertainty with both the US and global economies the feds calculation could change however after a better than expected jobs report last week president trump is standing by labor secretary Alex Acosta make calls for a constitutes that down over his handling of a sex trafficking case in Florida involving the wealthy financier Jeffrey abstain trump is praising Akon stuff but also says he will be looking closely at a cost as role in the plea deal under scrutiny as being too lenient the Emmy winning actor rip torn is died towards publicist says he passed away peacefully at his home in Connecticut he was eighty eight for many made his film debut in nineteen fifty six and turned to comedic roles later in life appearing in movies men in black and Dodge ball in which he played a legendary player turned teacher you've got to learn the five these love wall nods two one one is in before a key role in the Larry Sanders show you're listening to NPR news United Nations nuclear watchdog the I. A. E. A. is preparing to hold an emergency meeting today the meeting is set to get underway in a couple of hours with Iran's nuclear program on the agenda U. S. called for the meeting after you run twice preach to the twenty fifteen nuclear deal at the trump administration withdrew from a year ago Iran says it is responding to the economic sanctions the ministration reimposed Delaware could soon see its first openly transgender state senator Sir McBride is currently the national press secretary for the Human Rights Campaign Serra Mueller from Delaware public media reports on big brights run for a seat in the Delaware Senate to twenty twenty Sarah McBride is a Wilmington Delaware native with a long history in politics at the twenty sixteen Democratic National Convention she made history by becoming the first openly transgender person to speak at a major party convention but big bright says she's not campaigning to make history she's campaigning to make a difference I'm not running to be a transgender state senator I'm trying to be at I'm running to be a senator who was born and raised in this community and I'm right who cares about my neighbors he fried says expanding access to affordable healthcare tops our agenda her passion for the issue comes from caring for her late husband who died of cancer for NPR news I'm Serra Mueller in Dover Delaware and you're listening to NPR news trying to adopt a child in the United States is complicated expensive and sometimes heartbreaking most of my friends have tried and had terrible experiences several of them have actually ended up pulling out of the foster to adopt them entirely your stories and how one journalist experience sheds light on a broken system that's next time on the take away from W. NYC and P. R. I. that program heard of.

R. Scott Horsley