35 Burst results for "scientist"

Climate Action: It's time to make peace with nature, UN chief says

UN News

00:51 sec | 2 d ago

Climate Action: It's time to make peace with nature, UN chief says

"National goals to tackle climate change. Nowhere close to where they should be to reduce global warming u. n. chief. Antoni guitarist said on friday. The secretary general's comments a publication of the un framework convention on climate change report researchers examined national goals ahead of the climate summit in glasgow in november and. They said that their findings were red. Alert for the planet. Governments are nowhere close to the level of ambition needed to limit climate change to one and a half degrees and to meet the goals of the paris agreement. Mr guitarist said in response to the reports conclusions. He insisted that twenty twenty. One is a make-or-break year to confront the global climate. Emergency scientists clear to limit global temperature rise. We must cut global emissions by forty five percent by twenty thirty from two thousand ten levels. He added before calling for countries that produce most greenhouse gases to hit much more ambitious emissions reductions targets by twenty

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WIRED Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks 'Wild Tech' Built Into Perseverance

Gadget Lab Podcast

06:21 min | 2 d ago

WIRED Correspondent Adam Rogers Talks 'Wild Tech' Built Into Perseverance

"So adam. Let's start with a couple of notable things about this rover one. It's collecting and to you. Just wrote a story on wired dot com this week about the cameras on perseverance and how they actually perceive imagery much differently than we do. Tell us about this. And why this is significant for this mission will. there's something almost philosophical. You have to address if you're going to send not people to explore another planet but robots which is you're trying to acquire like sensory information and some of that some of that can be quantified can be sent back as data. You know the numbers for certain for certain analyses that you can send an instrument to do and i. I can talk about some of that but some of it. Is you want to send a robot that can look at stuff that can hear stuff in this case they can sense this world. And then that that information through the sensory organs the mechanical sensor organs the technology. That you send the microphones and the cameras and the sensors instruments and then it has to get home has to get back to us somehow. Us not wired reporters but jet propulsion laboratory and then the whole vast team of humans who process all of that through their own machinery and then it becomes something that they can that they can look at. Its this this. Arc of how data becomes information and then becomes knowledge so we humans send these robots to mars to some extent to learn how to send better robots to mars a lot of the instruments on perseverance. That's the rover that's there now are versions of instruments that went up on other missions and now they kind of the scientists that jpl and are all these universities. Nasa know how to make them work to do more what they wanna do which is to look at their surroundings in ways that that we humans would would. Would i be able to identify easily as looking at stuff to to see things in the colors that human is also see we were standing there and also to look at them multispectral hyperspace literally and other parts of the electric spectrum that human i wouldn't perceive but the eyes of this rover is in scare quotes that i'm making on a on a screen even though this audio medium so that's not helpful at all. The eyes of this rover can see into the little bit into the ultraviolet partway into the infrared. And and also can see x-rays and have an are using a laser project light outward to obliterate some bits of rock. And see what what happens when you do it. And to listen with microphones that that might be more sensitive than human ear. Then all of those things get get reduced transformed or changed in some way into meaningful knowledge so that we can understand more about what what's on this other planet where humans have never been but humans have sent a lot of our stuff. You're saying that each brand has gone up tomorrow. At least the ones that we have had progressively better technology on them with each version. And i think it's kind of interesting that this rover that just went up now. Perseverance is essentially the first rover of the iphone era. Curiosity launched in two thousand eleven and it was designed for a period of five or six seven years before that so the imaging technology on it is very representational of like that time in imaging technology the imaging technology that we have now and the imaging technology that we have on. Perseverance is pardon the pun astronomically better than the tech that we had ten years ago. I mean if you think about like how bad your instagram photos. Were in two thousand eleven. And how fantastic they can be now. You can see just like as far as mobile technology goes and just imaging sensors. The leap has been huge. That's a it's a really interesting observation. I think that's right. Although i will also say that like one of the one of the instruments that i wrote about is called the masked kim z. And so it's this. This binocular camera to cameras linked together left and right eye on top of the tower. That's on the rover so sits up a little. Bit high zina's presume because there was a mass cam on curiosity the z. Has zoom capability and it does a bunch of stuff. It's there to identify targets of interesting scientific potentially interesting scientific value and also to be able to look around and navigation and take pictures and do a whole bunch of other stuff. The the ccd the charge coupled device the optical sensor the to in mass are off the shelf kodak cds and they have the they have in front of them the bear pattern of pixels. The probably gonna get this wrong but like the red green blue. I think that that's that would be familiar. That if you if you could look into your phone you would see it. And then mass games does what. The experiment instrument is take advantage of some capabilities that our phone cameras. Don't really do to do much more. Because because the also can see into the infrared a bit and so if you put the right filters in front of them you can do even more science with them so there is some sense that we send up a camera. That would be the same camera that a lot of people have in their pockets right now sitting on their sitting on their desk. I can get sort of derivative about but there's something important i think in the pictures that are starting to come back already. That include parts of the rover itself and people will describe those as celsius as mars selfie camera taking pictures of itself and and nasa among all agencies is very very good at At its own promotional work saying like. Here's the thing. Here's the picture of the thing we're doing. There are pictures. There's video of the landing which was dramatic but also like the video of the landing. Is there to video of the landing has engineering value but also publicity value. But but i think the calling it. A selfie also includes the recognition of the the. It's not personal because of course it's not a person of the machine hood of the individuality of the humanness of the technology that that we sent that has to do a thing there. That's doing technological work and and seeing mars through a kind of filter that's akin to but slightly different than the filters that if mike if you took that billionaire ticket up tomorrow how you would see through the visor of your of your back suit

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Atlantic Ocean circulation weakens, sparking climate worries

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 2 d ago

Atlantic Ocean circulation weakens, sparking climate worries

"Change underway in the Atlantic Ocean circulation pattern. War from reporter Really in cough. Scientists in Europe say the system of currents in the Atlantic Ocean is in its weakest state in over a millennium. Those currents include the Gulf Stream, which carries warm water to Europe, helping to moderate the climate there. Climate change is making the ocean's water less salty, which makes currents more sluggish, also threatened rising sea levels along the eastern Seaboard of the United States. Saito seven. Now

Atlantic Ocean Europe Cough Gulf Stream Saito United States
J&J COVID-19 vaccine could get FDA approval within days

Up First

03:45 min | 2 d ago

J&J COVID-19 vaccine could get FDA approval within days

"The fda is getting ready to authorize a third covid vaccine emergency use in this country. This one this vaccine is from pharmaceutical giant. Johnson and johnson. And if it's authorized it would join vaccines from pfizer and madera in the us vaccination campaign. But here's the thing those other. Vaccines require two doses. This vaccine from johnson and johnson needs only one single dose to be effective. Npr science correspondent. Joe palca is here to tell us how effective good morning joe morning. well one dose. that's exciting. How good is this new vaccine. Oh it's good. It was sixty six percent effect of overall in preventing moderate to severe disease and eighty five percent protective against more severe diseases. Now for people with good memories. They'll say wait. A minute i heard that madonna and pfizer wasn't that closer to ninety five percent effective and the answer is yes they were higher but those vaccines were tested before. Some of the new variants began circulating and prevent any five percent of severe critical. Disease is really good since the goal of the vaccines is to keep people out of the hospital and keep them from dying and the other thing about this vaccine is mentioned in the intro is that it's one dose which makes the logistics of getting it to people a lot easier to remember to come back so public. Health officials are looking forward to being able to distribute the j. vaccine. This is how anthony fauci chief medical adviser to the president. Put it on. Nbc's today show to have them come in and be in the mix with the other. Two is is nothing but good news. Nothing but good news. Foul cheat now. The process usually is before a vaccine gets authorized in advisory board has to approve it right. Well yes well. Though he has to is probably an exaggeration. It doesn't absolutely has to. The fda can approve things on its own lookout but like the other two vaccines. The the fda wanted to be extremely transparent. There were some questions about whether they were rushing the vaccine to the market before they knew it was safe and they want to assure the public that this was being looked at carefully so that committee has been around for a while. it's known in the trade as burg. Pack the vaccines and related biological products. Advisory committee i love that name ver- pack made of scientists and doctors with a variety of specialization relating vaccines before the meeting. Fda provides the committee with its analysis and they also make that analysis of the public So i asked. Bruce gallon president of global immunization at sabin vaccine institute. What he made of the analysis of the johnson and johnson vaccine. I didn't see anything in it. That i would think is going to be a show stopper for packed. Wanna recommend that. Fda act on so gallon is predicting the ver- pack will give the vaccine a thumbs up. How many doses. Johnson and johnson have ready to ship out. Well not as many as people had hoped a year ago when started trying to make these vaccines they all said. All we're gonna do this at risk manufacturing which means we're going to start making vaccine before they even knew it was going to be authorized even if it worked. And then they'd throw away if it didn't work and the government gave the money to do this but even with that company's still don't have the kind of inventory. The country needs in the case of johnson. Johnson they have about four million doses ready to go out the door and expect to have twenty million by the end of march and one hundred million by the end of june and remember. This is a one dose vaccine so one hundred million doses is one hundred million people vaccinated which is very big. Deal leslie and briefly. What is the timeline here. When the fda issued the emergency use authorization it could be any minute. I mean they knew it right after the meeting. They could do it tomorrow. That could do it in a few days. It'll be soon. I think if the committee gives a thumbs

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Petrified tree up to 20 million years old found intact in Lesbos

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 3 d ago

Petrified tree up to 20 million years old found intact in Lesbos

"A tree has been found in Lesbos, Greece still intact despite being petrified by a volcanic eruption 20 million years ago, the 64 ft tree, complete with branches intact and a root system was uncovered during a recent excavation. Unlike modern trees in the area, this one is said to be sub tropical and could help scientists study the effects of climate change on an ecosystem.

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Johnson & Johnson's single-dose vaccine is effective and ready to ship

Steve Scott

00:50 sec | 3 d ago

Johnson & Johnson's single-dose vaccine is effective and ready to ship

"Scott 5 31 at WCBS. Johnson and Johnson says it is ready to ship four million doses of its covert vaccine just too soon as it is granted emergency use authorization from the FDA, and that could happen as soon as tomorrow. Scientists say the one does shot is safe and effective and appears to work against all variants. Your CBS News correspondent Natalie Brand, the FDA review of the J and J vaccine, found it to be safe and 85% effective at preventing severe illness. 66% protective overall, taking some new variants into account. It does show very, very good protection against serious illness, hospitalization and death, and Madonna says it has sent candidate dose is specific to the variant first detected in South Africa to the National Institutes of

Wcbs Johnson Natalie Brand FDA Scott Cbs News Madonna South Africa National Institutes Of
Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

Daily Coronavirus Update

07:10 min | 3 d ago

Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine deemed "safe and effective" by the FDA

"And johnson. It's been shown that they're vaccine is effective at preventing hospitalizations and severe effects of covid. Nineteen this from scientists at the fda we're seeing about. I think it's sixty six percent effective when it comes to moderate to severe cases of covid nineteen so matthew. Tell a little bit more about what we're hearing with. His johnson and johnson vaccine right so what happened. Is that johnson. Johnson released data about a month ago. You know press release but the process for evaluating these vaccines is that they go through the fda and the fda really unique in the world independently looks at the data and re analyzes the data that the company produces and its own report and then hold a public meeting which will be happening friday and so the documents before the public meeting came out and they had some good news both some really clear data on hospitalizations and a general sense of approval from the fda researchers. Sometimes they're not as positive so it looks like this may be another option now. The big plus is on. This is one. It's a one shot dose. So you don't have to go back for a second jab in the arm and also doesn't need to be kept frozen like the pfizer derna vaccines do so shipping and handling of all of this will be a lot easier much easier to transport and that's a big advantage. It does not look like we're gonna have a huge amount of supply the start off with so it doesn't dramatically change how fast we're going to be any shots into people's arms but for a lot of people i think in a lot of experts i talked. You think this'll be a great option. It's one and done. I think some of the numbers. I saw the might have about four. That are produced right now. Ready to send out so it gets approved. They can get those out really quick but it wouldn't be until april possibly where they can really ramp up production to start distributing that right and will also be getting over that where they're hundreds of millions of doses of the two vaccines have the madonna and fayza biontech vaccines. That are expected to arrive in the us by july. So there's gonna be a lot more vaccine available. The jj supply will ramp up and we'll be getting more of those other two vaccines that leaves. There's a vaccine coming from nova vacs. We don't really know about how much will getting the early results issued press. Release again good and we're waiting for. Us results on the astra zeneca vaccine. Now some good news. With his johnson and johnson one is its effectiveness against these variants. That we've been hearing a lot about so it fared better than expected when it comes to those. I the way to interpret. That is we'd seen some results and the new results that they showed today look a bit better than what we'd seen in terms of variants. There's still does seem to be decreased. Efficacy against the south africa variant. Three five. Which is really the one that we're all worried about but it did look better than what we've seen previously and what j. j. has said it seems like with those variants. This vaccine is still preventing severe disease and hospitalization. Which are the key things. We've always wanted from vaccine here. The idea that you'd prevent a symptomatic infection or mild cases kind of bonus compared to just making sure that people end up in the hospital hospitalizations numbers were good on that front. What did we see when it comes to side effects. I saw that there were a few unexpected side effects. Although these are very rare you know but The expecting side effects the kind of pain in the arm the headache fatigue. That's pretty much in line with the other two vaccines. We have that right now. There were some rare events that occurred more often in the vaccine in the placebo group. Keeping in mind that forty thousand people were in this trial. There were fifteen serious blood clots including some. Dvd's in that exciting compared to ten in the placebo group. That's something the fda plans to monitor there was also some rini ears in the vaccine group and not in the placebo group. So that's kind of an odd one that will wanna watch again. This is really a prelude to friday win. Some of the top experts in the world are going to gather on zoom call and go over these data that the fda assembled we'll be live blogging that stat. That's when we really find out a lot about any medical product. It's it's one of the amazing things. The fda does now an interesting thing in all of this so public health officials might have a messaging problem when it comes to pumping the johnson and johnson. One out when we're seeing guys like pfizer maderna's say that their vaccine is ninety five percent effective against corona virus. Just listening to numbers right. This says sixty six percent. So what are they going to have a challenge in getting people to want to take this one over the other or you know how how to work out. It's really important to realize that particularly between those three vaccines. The getting vaccine is much better than not getting a vaccine. The change vaccine may be on par after a second dose and that study is being done but unlike visor during the second dose is going to be months after the first and then also slows down the study. She gotta wait right for people to get their second dose. So we're not expecting those data until kinda summerish but the big thing is for a lot of people. There was also the appeal of a single dose here. And i don't think we should understate that. And the effect on severe disease is big so the problem is gonna be the in the initial rollout. You really want people to take whatever vaccine. They're giving because being vaccinated is so much better than not being vaccinated. And that is part of the path to get in the world back to normal and public health. Authorities are absolutely going to have to articulate that now again because there's not going to be that much supply of this initially. They're going to have time for a learning curve right now. the demand for vaccines clearly outstrips supply. That's why you're hearing so many stories of people desperately logging on trying to get vaccine. What scott gottlieb used to run. The fda has raised the issue of you know. We're we're going to reach a point where the people who wanna get vaccinated we'll have been vaccinated and we're still going to need to vaccinate more people and that's when convincing people who are less sure to take vaccine in to take the vaccine that's available is going to become more of an issue last question briefly pfizer moderna vaccines are based on 'em a. What kind of platform is the johnson and johnson. When using this like theatrics annika vaccine is called an ad no virus which is a kind of virus that is used to the same kind of ideas marin a the instead of traditional vaccines were you inject the protein that your immune system sees and then learn to recognize an attack. These sneak something into your body that makes a lot of proteins. You make a lot more protein and then the body recognizes that an attack it in this case they're using this virus which is kind of a cold virus to sneak some genetic material in and that makes the spike protein from the sars virus which your body then learns to recognize and thereby has antibodies that attack the virus

Johnson FDA Astra Zeneca Pfizer Pfizer Maderna Matthew Nova Rini United States South Africa Headache Scott Gottlieb Marin Cold Virus
The Legacy of Trauma: Can Experiences Leave A Biological Imprint?

Short Wave

04:02 min | 3 d ago

The Legacy of Trauma: Can Experiences Leave A Biological Imprint?

"Okay so we are talking about epa genetic. Stay where do we start areola. Well we gotta go back to the basics genetics minus the abbey part so most of the time when we think of genetic changes. We think about dna mutations be squeezed changes in the actual sequence of dna. Yeah and it turns out. This isn't the whole story. Our dna is covered in small molecules. That tell her body had a use the dna. Brian dies gave me a great metaphor to describe all this. He teaches at the university of southern california school of medicine. So within you. And i is a book of life which is our dna and that dna needs to be read. And if our dna is a book of life than those small molecules i was talking about our punctuation marks and depending on what punctuation is where the book is going to be read very differently. Meaning those markers can amplify or down certain parts of our dna so when we talk about epigenetics were talking about how these molecules around our dna affect our dna is read exactly and we can see this really clearly in different parts of our body. How well every cell in our body has the same blueprint the same dna. But we know that not every cell in our body is the same we don't have. We don't have is growing in our fingertips. Speak for yourself over there so look even though ourselves all have the same dna. The dna is being used differently in different cells. And i'm guessing epigenetics has something to do. Yes our ib genetic markers vary in different parts of our body in the i for example. There's certain markers that say you become an i cell and suppress everything will make you a tooth. And here's the thing. Our environment and behaviors change our genetics. All the time not enough to make peace start growing out of your eyes. I promise but still changing. Yeah and i. I remember learning about this discovery in grad school and it being revolutionary like oh our environment can affect our genetics in real time without actually changing the sequence of our dna at all. Yeah and of course. It's more complicated than that. But this field is a really big deal. It's shown us that different environmental factors like diet and pollution can change our epi genetic markers and now people are trying to figure out if trauma and stress also cause genetic changes and if they do can. These changes be passed down like the dutch hunger study. We talked about earlier right. Yeah among others now look. We can't assume too much from these human studies. They have small sample. Sizes are tons of confounding variables. Right right i mean. Isn't it possible that these descendants are more likely to have these diseases due to social factors. Yes i asked bianca the same question she said. I sure that's a problem with human studies. it's really hard to separate the learned experience from the biological one. It is hard to say that a parent who has starred will now then treat food in the same way apparent who is not starved. And what we're interested in looking at is if we remove the parent from the situation and we just have the sperm cells and the exiles doll the work. Do we still see these changes and one way to start to figure that out is doing animal studies. Right so brian. The scientists who gave us that cool metaphor earlier did some of the first groundbreaking research on this. He basically introduced male mice to a particular smell. And when we exposed the meister smell we administer a very mild foot. Shaw that we i are selves at. We know it's not painful but mildly annoying to the mouse and as a consequence that particular smell becomes stressful to the parental generation.

University Of Southern Califor EPA Brian Grad School Bianca Shaw
Johnson & Johnson's single-dose vaccine is effective, FDA says

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

01:42 min | 3 d ago

Johnson & Johnson's single-dose vaccine is effective, FDA says

"Today says Johnson and Johnson's single shot Corona virus vaccine Meets emergency requirements. ABC is Mark Rommel are joins us on the co Moh news line. What's this going to mean? Mark and how effective is this one shot vaccine compared to the others? Yes. So this is another step in the process of getting an emergency use authorization for this. The FDA and then they're scientists of essentially looked at the data and said exactly that it appears safe and effective. Now it will go to an independent review board on Friday who will scrutinize the data and make a determination or a recommendation to the FDA about what they think if they think that this vaccine should be approved or given some kind of Emergency authorization and then finally, the decision rests with the FDA to make that call. But what we understand from the data from Johnson and Johnson, as well as what the FDA said today is that there appear to be no major safety concerns with this, that the common side effects or what we've heard with other vaccines who like beavers, fatigue, headache pain at the site of injection, and then it's 66% effective overall at preventing moderate to severe Cove in 1985%, effective at preventing the most serious illness from Covert 19. And so while that does not reach up to the levels of the fighter and Madonna vaccines at 95%, effective at preventing you from getting covert 19 that even in and of itself could be significant in reducing strain on hospitals and the health care system, Because even if people could get this one does, and you know, maybe you get mildly sick from covert 19. That's still a lot better than ending up in the hospital or potentially dead from covert 19. So it does appear to meet the standards that the FDA is looking. Before in terms of safety and efficacy.

Johnson FDA Mark Rommel Headache Pain ABC Mark Madonna
Johnson And Johnson's Covid-19 Vaccine Is Safe and Effective

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 4 d ago

Johnson And Johnson's Covid-19 Vaccine Is Safe and Effective

"Grant an emergency use authorization to Johnson for its Corona virus vaccine As soon as this weekend, documents released by the FDA showed the vaccine is safe and effective. White House Covert response coordinator Jeff Zions obviously the prospect Of a potential third approved vaccine is very encouraging. And we'll help to increase the overall vaccine supply, which will allow more Americans to get access. She Oh, back to getting vaccinated sooner. FDA scientists confirmed the vaccine is 85% effective against the most serious illness research is

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J&J single-dose COVID-19 shot poised for FDA decision

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 4 d ago

J&J single-dose COVID-19 shot poised for FDA decision

"An analysis by U. S. regulators finds Johnson and Johnson's single dose vaccine does protect against covert nineteen the Johnson and Johnson vaccine is considered easier to use than the fines are in McDonough shots those must be kept frozen watching chase can last three months in a refrigerator and it only requires one dose food and drug administration scientists have confirmed overall it's about sixty six percent effective at preventing moderate to severe COPD nineteen Friday a panel of FDA experts will meet to debate whether the evidence is strong enough to recommend the Jane J. shot for use even if it receives approval however it won't boost vaccine supplies much right away only a few million doses are expected to be ready for shipping in the first week Ben Thomas Washington

Johnson U. S. Mcdonough Jane J. FDA Ben Thomas Washington
Fixing The Problem Of Regulating Algorithms

Solvable

04:06 min | 4 d ago

Fixing The Problem Of Regulating Algorithms

"So nathan. tell me what's an algorithm algorithms can be thought of as a recipe. A series of steps often programmed into a computer that determine how machine behaves but the challenge as any cook often fines. Is that when you put them out into the world especially something of sufficient complexity. They often behave in ways. That are different from what we expect. Can you just take a minute to explain how that's problematic. And why why should we care. That algorithms are deciding which piece of content you see on facebook or which which video you're being recommended on. Youtube algorithms happen at all levels from exactly how the electrons go from one point to another on the internet to the much more high level things that we think about in our direct experience for example an algorithm determines what your email inbox decides is spam an on twitter decides which faces to show when it's displaying a photo and algorithms also and critically make decisions about what information to prioritize when showing us feeds on facebook on twitter when determining which adds we see which adds we don't and those are often some of the uses of algorithms that people worry about in society and policy circles. Youtube makes a recommendation system to help us find the videos. We like and suddenly were worrying about recommendations of extremism. Microsoft makes fun chattan that will have interesting conversations with you and now we're worrying about it learning racism and hatred so we find that although we have these simple building blocks of an algorithm that an engineer can imagine they often grow to be something larger than we might admit initially imagine i've written and others have written about the problem of algorithms on facebook favorite is ing or preferring content and posts that are emotional that are negatives that are divisive. There's been an argument. That that's one of the reasons why we have so much division and polarization in our societies that we are being fed more and or excitable an angry content because the algorithm tests and guesses that. That's what we're gonna wanna see or anyway. That's what's going to keep us online or keep us using facebook. Is it accurate. Is that how they work. We do live in a world where many of the systems that determined what we see. And to give our attention to our learning from our behavior our preferences and from the collective behavior of many others some of who are paying some of them have motivated coordinated campaigns to influence those our them's and they're adapting in real time and so because we've never really faced a situation like this at such scale. People have a lot of concerns about how those algorithms are behaving and what they're doing to society one of the fundamental challenges. I think scientists are still wrestling with. Is this challenge of influence. Typically if a car crashes because there's say a faulty drivetrain we can point to the engineering and say there's a problem with this system. With these adaptive systems they're reacting and learning and responding to human society and human behavior and we're still developing the scientific tools to understand what it means to have those feedback loops and in the meantime we have to live in a world where these things very real power

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Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

04:43 min | 4 d ago

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"Mary frank johnson. Welcome to technician. It's great to speak with you. Thanks so much. Peter i always enjoy talking with you. I do as well so please on the record at this point. I'm i'm as somebody who is a luminary ao space. You do not need a big introduction with my audience. I don't imagine but you are perhaps best known. As former editor in chief of cio magazine the the moderator of the cio leadership live broadcast which is just a phenomenal phenomenal series of interviews with with leaders in the tech space x os with a healthy dose of course of chief information officers as the name suggests and a prolific writer. Somebody who's wisdom. I know my team. And i have have gained mightily from across the years as well so i'm so pleased to to have this more formal conversation after many many informal ones with you okay. Well thanks very much peter. I we've got a lot of great stuff to talk about indeed indeed wipe. We begin at the beginning at least as relevant to the cio space. You're not somebody who grew up with immersed in technology You are somebody who The written word came the more easily to the dentist too many others. Perhaps and and you were focused on journalism. I wonder what was what was the genesis of your time In focusing your skills on the cio. Space okay thanks. Exxon question and i love telling the story because i think that it reflects so much of how many of the it leaders cio's that we both know today ended up in the positions that you know they were music majors or they majored in english literature and history and then they got really interested in data side of things for me. I had started out. I spent ten years at daily newspapers. In florida and ohio in washington state and i reported on everything from city and county commission beats to k twelve education to police even state politics when i was two bureau chief for gannett news service out in columbus ohio and then we were moving to the boston area in nineteen eighty nine. My husband was an atmospheric scientist and he was taking a job in cambridge and so naturally i went reached out to the boston globe and to the boston herald and the it was. Nobody was hiring. So i was. We were arriving in the boston area. And i had heard about a very vibrant technology publishing world here and so i had examined it somewhat and made some phone calls A lot of this was so far before the days of regular emails. And you know we weren't living on our phones. Then so i was just applying my reporter skills to it. And i ended up getting a copy of computerworld mailed to me and sat there. I remember sitting there in my living room in ohio looking through it and feeling somewhat reassured that i could understand about what have the stories were about And then on the drive from ohio to massachusetts. I basically grill my husband One side down the other about the computer industry. Because i was coming into it only knowing that ibm made typewriters and the rest of it was kind of a big mystery. But i had been using some of the very early unix. That was vi editor on unix. That you could use to do work on. He had some sun workstations and very early versions of sun and unix workstations at our house and so i used that a little bit. And i remember when i was in my interview for the computer job with The executive and executive editor in the editor chiefs of computerworld. I think they were very impressed. That i was referring to things like vi editor in youth so but computerworld at always hired. They hired reporters who could learn the beat. And i think that's pretty much the way almost everybody on the tech journalism side got into it. They were journalists bite training. Then they do. They dove into their beats. Because one of the things we discovered trying to hire people over the years if you try to higher in a technical person and hand the technology beat they wouldn't know the story angle with fell on them so it was really important if you were genuinely out there reporting And then i found enjoyed it. I just enjoyed it so much and by the time i was a couple years into my job at computer world when the boston globe was to interview people and hire all. But i wouldn't left for anything at that point it just it was such a. I just enjoyed the way. The story kept changing and advancing and moving forward.

CIO Mary Frank Johnson Ohio Cio Magazine Boston Globe Gannett News Boston Exxon County Commission Peter Boston Herald Columbus Cambridge Florida Washington Massachusetts IBM SUN
NASA releases Mars landing video: 'Stuff of our dreams'

AP News Radio

00:59 min | 5 d ago

NASA releases Mars landing video: 'Stuff of our dreams'

"Scientists have been thrilled by this stunning video images to perseverance rover has sent back from Mars but they're also pretty pleased with the audio they're getting that is the sound of wind on Mars recorded by microphones on the perseverance rover and courtesy NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory at Caltech and wall alone it's hardly a striking is the landscapes we've been seeing the head of the entry into sent camera team Dave gruel says it's still pretty amazing close your eyes and just imagine yourself sitting on the surface of Mars and listening to to the surroundings so the gentle world that happens in the background that is the noise made by the rover but yes what you did here ten seconds and was an actual wind gusts on the surface of Mars and grew explains that words important to something engineers keeping the mission going can use basically detect the health of of moving systems gears and actuators and things like that I'm Ben Thomas

Dave Gruel Jet Propulsion Laboratory Caltech Nasa Ben Thomas
James West on invention and inclusion in science

Short Wave

09:04 min | 5 d ago

James West on invention and inclusion in science

"James west was born in nineteen thirty one and grew up in prince edward county virginia in before we dove into his research and work as a mentor. I wanted to know more about little kid. Jim and his relationship to science the desire to know how things work and why they were was my biggest motivator and i Completely forgot about this on purpose. But i took my grandfather's pocket watch support hundred and five pieces zenit. But i couldn't get it back together which resulted in rather severe punishment but it didn't tear my desire to know and understand how things work and so i was told that i could only take things apart that weren't working and that was the wrong thing. Say to me. Because if i could break it i did so i could get it. Why caesar now you're you're breaking stuff you're like look it doesn't work so right. Okay i mean were you. Were your parents. Supportive of your interest in in engineering and science absolutely not i was going to be the doctrine brother the data stove. I swear versa. They didn't care which would went. Only that it went in one of those two directions and When i told my father that i was changing my major from biology to physics He introduced me to two black men who have. Phd's and chemistry that were working in the post office score poem order on the railroad because the best job they could get was teaching at high school. And that didn't pay enough to support their families and he thought that i was well on the way to becoming one of them because You could be a preach at teacher lawyer doctor. But that was about it and terms of professions or black people and prince edward county virginia but in the face of all that jim stuck with it he graduated from temple university with a degree in physics and then went on to work at bell. Labs for more than forty years and his big invention with gearhart. The foil electric microphone didn't come from trying to solve one specific problem. I didn't. I don't think sat down and looks invent a better microphone. That was not the motivation at all. The motivation was why does nature behave in the way that it does. And and if i can understand that then how can i apply my knowledge to improving or to make things work better or lasts longer in this case. Oh to increase lifetime right okay. So so mu- because my understanding of this gym and you can. You can grade me. And i'm i'm worried about my grade but so basically this is really basic but microphone convert sound into an electrical signal right and it needs power to do that and you. Youtube found a material that you could basically be kind of permanently so you know basically permanently charge so instead of like necessarily needing an extra battery in there you know. You've you've got it without that. And that material that you found was essentially teflon foil urinate less. Okay okay. well now. That i've got my a plus in science. Let's let's talk. Let's talk more about bringing people new stem the thing. It's the thing that you're passionate about thinking that i'm passionate about so you know in your experience what works or if you feel like it's more importantly what doesn't when you're trying to bring people into snap well i think honesty is is The the very important role. It's not all roses so we get some thorns to nature. Doesn't always behaving the way that you you'd think it should. And and i think honesty's important because you want to succeed and and if you know that nature is not always going to work the way you'd think it works this gives you the fortitude to continue to your investigation will continue looking for a solution to a particular problem. In other words. There are two sides stored the glory side. And then there's the the grunge side but even more important science and technology got us to where we are and it's the only thing that's going get us further or out of whatever difficulty that we have a global warming all these problems. We need more diverse teen stem. diversity has been shown to be have an advantage. I used to worry about brainstorming sessions. Where all the white guys over here. And i was over ear but guess what solution west somewhere in between. And this is what. I learned that. Even though i taken same courses you know the same disciplines. I think differently as the black man than white males to yeah but this diversification is what makes this country great and what is very disturbing is that were not taking full advantage of our natural resources in human beings that can work and be productive in the field and this is the reason that i continue to push to make it available in. Jim's been pushing for a long time you can trace his efforts back to nineteen seventy at bell labs. Winning helped form the association of black laboratory employees all the way to jim's work today with his graduate students at johns hopkins university and nonprofit called the end genuity project. They offer math and science programs to students in baltimore public schools. Jim told me a story about joining their board of directors. Back in two thousand fourteen. When when i was asked if i would be interested in joining booed i wanted to know what the program's really all about and what i found. Was that the majority of students in the program mayhem and that. This did not represent the demographics of the city of ballroom. So i said looking. Put me on the board. But i'm going to make some changes. I am a change agent here because this does not represent city baltimore and not enough black people and women in the scrotum but today the program is eighty percent underrepresented naarden winning big shift. Not only that are the last time i looked two years ago. We graduated one hundred students all of them. Fellowships and scholarships seven were admitted to johns hopkins. And by the way these changes were made without ever touching the requirements for the permanent. Okay so what does this say to you. The says that they're talented people out there that we're not taking advantage if we can make that kind of change in the city of baltimore within a finite number of years with this is certainly an indication to me that there are underrepresented minority and women who are in love with science and really really look for opportunities to get in and and genuity project made that offer and they they took us up on it and i'm so glad they did. Okay so jim. I hope you don't mind me sharing this. You just tell me if you don't want it in the episode but by the time this interview comes out you will of turned ninety congrats birthday. Well thank you. So what's your advice for young scientists for young inventors who may be see themselves in you. What advice would you give them. Well there's so many things that i can think of. But i but more importantly is to follow your star you know. I'm pretty sure that whoever made me said make a scientist and a not fulfill that responsibility us. Oh i think that the happy people those people that are doing what they love to do. And if it science gray but in many cases you don't know whether it science not because you haven't had the exposure right that would tell you whether the something you think you would be interested in doing so Museums of books on and on and on learn. Learn as much as you can as early as you can. And the only major major advices learn all the math that you possibly can because it

Prince Edward County James West Virginia JIM Gearhart Temple University Association Of Black Laborator Baltimore Youtube Bell Labs Johns Hopkins University Genuity Johns Hopkins
IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

WSJ Tech News Briefing

04:27 min | 5 d ago

IBM's Watson Illustrates Why Applying A.I. to Healthcare Is So Hard

"About a decade ago. Ibm rolled out watson. One of the earliest artificial intelligence systems out. There watson was a big deal for ibm. You might remember that even went on and absolutely crushed the human competition it was a milestone in how we think about our relationship to computers and ibm wanted to take that technology and apply it to helping doctors diagnosed and cure cancer. But things didn't exactly happen that way and last week we reported that ibm was exploring a sale of its watson health unit. So what happened. And what does this tell us about the challenges of applying ai to healthcare for answers we turn to our digital science editor daniella hernandez hate mail. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. So whereas watson now and what happened well i mean the struggles at ibm with watson. Been around for a little while. We reported in two thousand eighteen that the technology was really not getting the market share and adoption that it needed to make good on all the investments in all the acquisitions that ibm made in order to make watson a leader in the ai in healthcare field and so three years or so later it signals that you know the technology maybe wasn't working as well as they would have hoped. I think more. Broadly points to the fact that you know just having data or collaborations with leading scientists around the country. That just isn't enough and the reason is you know. Healthcare is complicated. So there's a lot of human issues at stake here. You know people do things differently. Like depending on which hospital you're at louisville depending on which doctor you're you're you're seeing but also the data in healthcare is messy for some of those same reasons you know you might input into a medical chart differently than me and for an i i might as well be two completely different things and so just that standardization of the information is really critical but also really hard and so when ibm started making these huge investments in watson they started buying up all these companies that had a lot of seemingly great data and the data might have been perfect but those data were basically styles from each other. They couldn't talk to each other and they never quite figured out how to meld them together. So they were cohesive data set of product. That really could make good on the promise that they that they saw. Fortunately has never materialized. And of course we should note here. That ibm says that watson has had some successes and that they're still believers in that technology we've been talking about. Ibm's new ceo. Arvind krishna on the show and following. He's been trying to of revitalize this legacy company how the sale of watson health fit into his efforts. Well i think one huge thing that has changed since the birth of watson. If you will is that you've had these other huge not legacy players come into the field. You've got google facebook amazon even microsoft right which you might consider a legacy company but they really rebranded themselves to. They weren't as big when watson. I came on the scene. And so now you've got this against storied legacy company competing with these new players. Who when they started making investments in. Ai were a lot more nimble and so they made investments in what at the time seemed like really experimental ai technology and now looking back like deep mind. Google investing hundreds of millions of dollars in that that technology just basically took over the world and ibm didn't really invest in that technology at the time and now is behind because all the talent is has been sucked into google facebook amazon apple And so they're they're behind.

IBM Watson Cure Cancer Daniella Hernandez Arvind Krishna Louisville Google Amazon Facebook Microsoft Apple
E-Eggs Track Turtle Traffickers

60-Second Science

03:51 min | 5 d ago

E-Eggs Track Turtle Traffickers

"Take note. If you're thinking about stealing eggs from the nests of sea turtles on the beaches of costa rica. well you may wind up getting more than you bargained for because researchers have combined. Gps technology with three d. printing produce. Decoy eggs that look and feel like real turtle eggs but can track where traffickers go when they swipe these endangered embryos the egg saving efforts are mapped out in the journal. Current biology some finds sea turtle eggs to be a delicious seasonal treat. Others think they're an aphrodisiac. Which has produced a thriving illegal market the mock turtle eggs were crafted in response to something called the wildlife crime tech challenge a program sponsored by the us agency for international development. Scientists led by kim williams kyanne of paso pacifico conservation organization device the decoys. They drew their inspiration in part from popular tv. Show says paso pacific executive director. Sarah ostrom kim's idea to put a tracking device into the league came from an episode of breaking bad where the police hit a. Gps transmitter in a shipment of raw materials for methamphetamine lab. The first challenge was getting the eggs substitute just right. We started with the size and dimensions of the turtle. Egg trying to figure out. How much do they weigh. What's their texture. How often squishy are they. What's their color then. The sorted out the electronics cell phones very widespread throughout the world. And we realized that if we could just use a sim card and a gps gsm technology. That's used in cell phones that even if a beach was remote from a cell tower if it was headed to a market somewhere would eventually pass by a cell tower. And the decoy aches could transmit to one of these cell towers. Finally it was time for a field test. I was actually the person who put the eggs in the nests. Helen physi- of the university of kent. And so it was really a case of deploying decoys into the nests and seeing if they Happens when they as you get. Taken fiji planted a decoy egg. In one hundred one. Sea turtle nests on four costa rican beaches about a quarter of the decoys got snatched some malfunctioned but others gave trackable signal. One wound up at a bar about a mile away but another traveled an impressive eighty five miles from its nest. Physique kept an eye on its progress from her cell phone and basically was moving further and further inland And eventually it. Stop so zoomed in on on the like google maps basically and it showed me very very clearly that it gone behind a supermarket like some sort of akali seep market loading by kind of area which was pretty suspicious is now really re not reason to really be there unless you unless you're up to up tonight good. The decoy hung around the loading dock for a time before making its way to a nearby residential property the fact that it spent two days in so waiting suggests that it may been handed over to a trafficker who sold it to someone else perhaps even the consumer that really fits we what we know about the illegal trade of xing. Costa rica reunited fanatic. Total information from interview information that exists old door to door and it seems likely that this is what's happened so yeah. We're very happy with that result. We've we've proved the concept that you can actually use these x. fee says. She hopes the decoys which they've dubbed. The investigators can help to really crack down on the illegal poaching of sea turtle eggs and reduce such operations to shell of their former selves.

Us Agency For International De Paso Pacifico Conservation Org Paso Pacific Sarah Ostrom Kim Costa Rica Kim Williams Helen Physi Costa University Of Kent Fiji Google
Fault Tolerant Distributed Gradient Descent

Data Skeptic

06:36 min | 6 d ago

Fault Tolerant Distributed Gradient Descent

"Hello my name is native. And i'm a computer scientist. Gay as opposed to grow researcher at ebay university switzerland. I work on distributed computations. Specifically i work on. Algorithms concerning distribution optimization disrupted consensus and distributed collaborations systems soi robotics and online voting and in this particular eighty of research. I mainly focus on darwin's by indeed for owners many avi considered networks. There's some of the notes in the networks are militias adversarial or they're just forty. And how does this affect the oral fixation off the elegant now. This is something that's interesting to me in my engineering part of the brain working for big company. I'd say well we can control all of our nodes about some rogue employees or something. But i guess outside of a company the world really runs on bigger systems. How common are these sort of peer to peer distributed problems in people's everyday lives definitely. I made for example. Just consider our current situation which is the ongoing pandemic. Let's see your these. Scooby trackers right you have these scored trackers on your phones than you. Are gary these records with the sword these strikers in vancouver you go in close proximity to someone else that say who might annette it or who might in recent history being tested positive so this gives you a notification. Hey you know you gaming on equity this person and he was the best positive so you may want to take some precautions. Analysts say based on these kind of trackers companies and government started building policies. Just imagine how difficult it would be if someone starts messing around for example. Let's say be Falsely claimed themselves as high-risk saying that. I just hires Ever i'm a Is also is that would discreet Rice appear to be systems are already there used is just a v are naively ignoring the fact that some of the notes in the systems be malicious authority. Fonte just like internet. You have millions of notes on the net not everything. Not everything is on the cloud on server controlled by big or big komen administration. They are so many of these notes that are spreading misinformation they have destroying to disrupt the internet for example you might have heard of. Thanks like jamming attacks Jammed the settlers despite sandy query. So you know these kinds of notes vais fairly common in our everyday use in suggests we get to hear them band. There's a big disaster. Or there's an actual big down of these systems when i started learning about distributed computing and of course it was called big data at the time. One of the first examples is term frequencies so in a lot of documents you the percentage of times you see something that often gets labeled as embarrassingly parallel because you just want to frequency. You need the numerator divided by the denominator and it's easy to divide that problem up and rejoin it but not. Every problem is so embarrassingly easy to solve. What about your specific research into gradient descent. What makes that one hard to do in a distributed fashion. You had distributed Any one this networks to be useful to the specific problem. Let's say that you are trying to solve for example as you just mentioned either. You're trying to get the frequency of a border from documents spent on the internet or let's take a step forward but apps you are trying to build some kind of image classified so different notes on the have different data sets. Let's say images of their dogs. And you want to use these images of dogs neck so many images of those who could be a very strong image classic fire for dogs something that would dismantle the human ability declassified at all so you wanna less this complicated Now designing image classified using all these distribution data said on the internet different notes having different data points. It's quite complicated even when you have all the data points at one body a machine. It's a headline. more of the. The sets are divided in different machines so to ensure that comes like these like machine learning run smoothly when certain nodes in the network militias spinal challenging not descending. It's very interesting to study. How these types can be done. Smoothly on gedeon descent is specific That is by far the was algorithm used from sheet lending pieces and what happens ingredient descent. Is you have these different. Data sets distributed on different notes. Therefore defend nodes have different loss functions. Now what we are trying to do now in this district. Setting is minimized the aggregate of all these functions are loss functions. Now when you're doing this by nature the most commonly use angry gradients design. Because it's naturally distributed many obligingly send it just reduces at the gradients of loss functions in each round. Or so if you're learning and gordon to when you're adding these gradients together some notes are not going to provide you ladies of los angeles. They may be forty. May be broadway. You re totally incorrect. Greediest maybe designed maliciously innovate to move you. words solution. that famous day goes data points. They may favor. Let's say dogs of a burglary or some other panels notions. Maybe they want to completely rendered the classification problem useless. They want to maybe instead of dog. Trained you the classify so as you can see ensuring that is reputed gradient descent runs smoothly at least within some reasonable dominates in residents of such Notes is of practically at this point vendor. You have all this The algorithms training using data sets coming from all sorts of people on it.

Ebay University Komen Administration Darwin Switzerland Annette Gary Vancouver Gedeon Rice Gordon Los Angeles
"scientist" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

103.5 KISS FM

03:00 min | 8 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on 103.5 KISS FM

"Scientist to suck it up in your strong idea. Food, So you know, here I am in turn, take steps, and they're already being debunks roof over here. Doesn't think I can even do it. Do you have any kind of in your home.

Scientist
"scientist" Discussed on The goop Podcast

The goop Podcast

05:55 min | 8 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The goop Podcast

"Thank you. Yeah, it's and it's so true right when we when we look at our daily actions, we try to control. What can't be controlled. And we don't try to control. What can be controlled right so we when when a change happens in our lives, we shake our fist at the gods, wishing that the universe had doubtless a better hand, which is a really futile exercise, because there are just certain things about our external circumstances that we can't change and trying to do that. It's like tugging at a flower to make grow faster right? It's not possible. It's far more useful to ask okay. The Universe dealt me this hand instead of wishing for a better. Better hands. How can I play? Best play the hand that was given to me of the pandemic disrupted the way that you're running your business. For example you can ask well can I use my skills, products and resources in a way that I haven't used them before. And how can I solve the problems that the world needs solving right now as opposed to the problems that that I expect it to solve, and I personally went through this when my book came out on April Fourteenth and my book was canceled. And I was really excited about it of course and I spent two very miserable days wishing for reality to be different than it was. And then I told myself you know it's time to walk the talk and think like a rocket scientist. And and go back to actually asking yourself what is within your control? What can you do now that your physical bookstores canceled to get the word out? And that actually ended up generating quite a bit of creativity and I did a number of virtual events in virtual book launches with other authors in a in in a similar position and I think in terms of promotion I ended up better in a better place than I would have had gone on a physical bookstore. Yeah I. Mean You talk about you right to you know in other words used you right?.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:30 min | 11 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Lonely and as as a scientist is he must have been feeling I was just I was just allies for few minutes there not sure what to say and not sure what to do we struggled for months if not years to make sense of that moment when it happened it was only with time that I came to realize that Roger should been struggling with the well the sadness that was far deeper than many of us probably imagined so we felt a lot of guilt wondering giving Mrs sign should we have been more supportive of him I I think back on those days as a child when I would walk around the construction site at home and have those conversations with him and I now realize that haps those conversations and that more than I had thought I feel grateful that I had the opportunity to have those exchanges with him because those are the few moments were assigned joy on his face and heard in his voice as he talked about what he loved which is architecture and construction I want to talk for a moment about the general connection between social isolation and loneliness and the phenomenon of suicide the numbers are really staggering the Vic forty five thousand people commit suicide in the United States every year worldwide it's about eight hundred thousand people it's really astonishing that we don't pay more attention to the problem not just in the United States but around the world well it is an suicide sadly although it's been improving in some countries around the world has been worsening and others including the United States and I think part there's so many reasons why I think we don't talk about a deal with suicide as profound an issue as it is I think it makes people uncomfortable number one and I think it also makes people feel helpless the roots of deep depression and suicide are complicated and it's not always easy to understand where they come from there are also lots of mixed feelings that people have about suicide with their with rooted in religious believe foreign cultural norms but the bottom line is when it comes to suicide when it comes to depression the one of the greatest resources we have one of the most powerful sources of healing that we have in our back pocket our relationships with others those relationships may not always feel available in the moment so we want them but it stands out to me despite being a doctor who is prescribing a number of medications over the years that one of them was powerful medicines we have his love and the vehicle through which that love is delivered our relationships and at a time when we are struggling with such high levels of suicide at a time we seen such high levels of depression anxiety particularly among young people I think it's more important than ever that we rethink and harness the power of relationships and recognize that they are not just nice to haves but they are necessary to have an essential part of the foundation that makes us healthy well and strong I'm wondering how is a doctor and his former Surgeon General you see these issues playing out in the context of the corona virus pandemic we're all being told to practice social distancing we're meeting few friends we hunker down with family or many of us hunker down by ourselves can you see this pandemic increasing social isolation worldwide I think there's a real possibility that the physical distance thing we're being asked to observe to tamp down this wave of cove in nineteen infection could very well contribute to more loneliness I think you could contribute to a social recession if you will mark by deepening levels of loneliness is we stay apart for longer and longer periods of time but I don't think it has to be that way in fact I think this is potentially an opportunity for us to re think and re center our lives around relationships to recognize once again and perhaps even more deeply appreciate the role and power that relationships have in our lives not just to our spouses and our family members and close friends but also the relationships we share with colleagues at work with classmates at school and even with strangers in our community and I'm struck that it in a moment like this when we're all being asked to separate them when I go for a walk around the circle in which I live and if I see somebody walking the opposite direction the way furiously and smile as if either just so hungry for human contact and you know what I wave back just as enthusiastically because I too am hungry for human contact I feel like we need appreciation for the strangers in my life for the faces that I don't recognize but for the relationships that I now see are actually quite valuable so I think that if we approach this moment with intentionality if we approach this time as it is with the mindset that we are going to double down and focus on both the quality of our time with other people as well as the quantity of time that we dedicate to the people we love and I think that we may be able to come out of this much stronger in terms of our human connections with each other than when we began we may be able to use code in.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

03:12 min | 11 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Skype a scientist and the website is offering certified scientist to teachers and parents who would need educational science content for more on how the concept works KCBS news anchors Jeff Ballin paddy rising spoke with Serah Makka novelty founder and executive director of Skype a scientist Sir I have to tell you my daughter Breanna is a biochemist and very into science education so when she suggested I check this out I did and I see why she's so excited about this is really a cool thing that you folks are doing yes thanks so much and thanks for having fun Branagh is a wonderful buy into Medicare we'll talk a little bit about how this works sure so effectively if anyone wants to have a conversation with the scientists about any type of science you could think up all you have to do is go to Skype a scientist dot com and then sign up and you fill out a Google form that will basically get a sense of who you are and what type of scientist you want to talk to you from there within about a week you'll get an email from us with all of the contact information for your scientists and then you in the scientists will pick a time to chat this can be for classrooms for book clubs library groups and of course during this kind of uncertain time families that are at home on the couch together looking for something to do and the program is totally free and then from there you just go and I have your conversation so usually the scientists will introduce themselves what they study and then it all a conversation how long have you guys been doing this and and how hard was it to ramp up we have actually been working since our January twenty seventeen and everything after we've gotten bigger and bigger it's really nice there's a lot of scientists on Twitter they're all really focusing on science communication so even in the last month our scientists proctor has doubled because so many people are kind of looking for something positive to do and have more time to kinda communicate so how are you going about finding the scientists we pretty much all word of mouth space so we have about five thousand scientists that are available about two months ago we only had two thousand but we've really been ramping up in the times of corona virus I think because people realize how important speaking with experts and and how find it's really just want to help and so both of our recruiting is done on social media who is taking advantage of this the most I mean when you look at who wants a scientist who what if you found out it totally makes bags so we have classrooms that are participating historically we've always been mostly serving classroom but there's now a lot of classrooms aren't meeting in the classroom we have some folks all having kind of doom classroom meet up at a lot of people that are at home everyone from parents with a five year old will have a conversation about anything from frogs to face whatever you want few teenagers that are stuck at the in the house and just have a a group of them together to chat Serah Makka Nolte founder and executive director of Skype a.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

03:38 min | 11 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Nitrogen liquefies ninety-six which means if he gets anything above one hundred ninety. Six degrees Celsius boils we can see kind of what a fact that will happen on a liquid liquid boiling by first cooling down this balloon. Feel sorry for a balloon. This is the first. This is just my own breath. You mentioned something happening to your putting the balloon in the thing and that is far too big a balloon to go into that flash normally so when you pull that out of the flask. You've tiny apple shape little balloon if you can see the little bit of liquid which is sloshing around in the bottom. Can people see little things about their? Tiny amounts of liquid is boiling to blow up the whole balloon again. So is that is that the air turns liquid liquid air which takes up much less space than gaseous so. The balloon shrank. Now it's boiled again. It's expanded about thousand times blitz. Which is why swallowing. Liquid nitrogen is a really bad idea. Expanding would be that. I don't WanNa be this balloon again because basically you're thirty degrees Celsius above motion boiling point. It's going to appoint immense pressure as it to into a gas container so housing for fact walk. Can we do with putting liquid nitrogen and somewhere? We're probably not supposed to unless you have scientific supervision written many many risk assessments over the years so this is actually one of two major ways. You can kill yourself with liquid nitrogen. The other one is doing lift with it or in some kind of confined space extremes oxygen and suffocate. This is fun but when we're looking at today is putting it into container so our fizzy drinks bottles the happier. Fizzy drinks drinks some advanced. Because they will come in handy later. Thank you square. My ear defenders poor in liquid nitrogen at the moment. This is completely safe from a little bit chilly. Not Complete relatively so. This is pouring into a fizzy bottle and smoking like a horrifying mad scientist experiment. The point we become dangerous is if I put the LID on the bottle because lemonade bottles are incredible pieces of modern engineering. They cost just a couple of pants and they're incredibly strong. Fail at maybe ten atmospheres. Ten Times the pressure. We feel now which is about one hundred tons per square meter so a lot of pressure so putting the lid on. It's what makes us dangerous to do that. I'M GONNA come over here. Good Safety I we have really been. We've been to contain anything flying out so wonderful video the naked scientists website of this blowing up with no really been and it's petrified so I could put a little shot the lead thirty three to one right anyone else a little nervous who's GonNa slowly creep cross the stage..

LID apple Ten Times scientist
"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

04:22 min | 11 months ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Scientific detective stories and shining a light in directions. You might not expect like gene sequencing puppy or maybe tearing apart a flower. You've taken all the parts that one. I messed up. So that shows you how good he had to get it this and even drinking a bunch agenda. Don't miss out subscribed naked genetics. Wherever you get your podcasts this week we're bringing you a recording. Allied event from the Cambridge Science Festival that was recorded back on the eleventh of March featuring geneticist Giles. Yo Chemist Liliana Planet geoscientists David Robbery and animal behaviour. Expert Ellen drinkwater so let's dive back in with Christmas jobs. We we really should dwell on your science a bit so you are a geneticist. I am so tell us what you actually apply your genetics too. So I'm actually a geneticist. And perfectly upstanding thing to do. My mother-in-law still speaks to me so this is a good thing but people often use genetics to study a trait or disease and I happen to study body weight and actually the moment I say body weight obesity actually of which is one end of the spectrum. I suddenly become the bad prison and become the bad person because I'm perceived as giving fat people overweight people people with obesity and excuse which always an interesting take. If I was studying the genetics of cancer would be giving a cancer patient and excuse I wouldn't and the reason why I'm bad it's because people understand this right people say that well but that's why you'll get a size you while you eat too much. They say that to me thank you. I lost weight. I WANNA point out when I was Vegan anyway so much and that is true. Your Body Weight is going to be down to how much you eat and how much you right. But that the question is why and at the end of the day is because different people behave very very differently around food and there's a lot of genes that are actually involved. The physics is the first demo. Dynamics you've come magic the calories in and magic calories away but it's working up to the physics why we actually get to the physics. We get why we too much. That's where the biology is and I think by studying extreme cases of obesity. So these are not going to be normal cases of obesity. These are three year old children. Who are forty fifty kilograms? Okay so that's a lot of weight. I'm seventy five kilograms. For example. One of the partways. We knew disrupted and severe. Obesity is the fat sensing pathway. Where because there's a lack of a signal from the fact that brain that brain doesn't know that in fact of you and so you continue. Actually actually that is genetic let is genetic reason why you're fat doesn't talk properly to your brain and that makes two executives a hormone there called. Leptin and when there's actually a mutation in the Hormone Leptin then you don't have any left and then your brain doesn't know how much fat you have now. How much fat you have. The thing is Charles Y. I'm slightly skeptical. And Yeah probably disabuse me of my skepticism. Is that fifty years ago. The number of people who are overweight and obese vanishingly small and now he's very very large. Now we're not evolving. That fast are we. We're not why is there a different? Whenever people studied talk about jeans they think that geneticists only look at the genes in of themselves. And we do look at the jeans but we have to look at the genes in context with the environment it turns out that every single human trait as including our body weight has a genetic influence every single trait of behavior. The trick is to ask what role the environment place now your genes as you say. There are empirical you born with them. You die with them. They don't change anywhere in between but the environment does and as the environment changes the way your genes express themselves and change actually then changes as well and so what has happened is as we get to the stage where we have too much food today. I think there's not anything to debate. Suddenly it has unmasked susceptibilities of certain people who are going to eat more in the environment whereas it was just not enough food around for people to eat too much whereas now there is ample opportunity for people to take advantage of the environment or not advantage depending on you look at and actually get to lodge now as we said we promised you demos and it wouldn't be a proper naked scientist show without them so I'd like to introduce science demo superstar and former naked scientists. He's going to put the boom in this show. Please.

obesity Charles Y. Cambridge Science Festival Ellen drinkwater David Robbery scientist Giles
"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

07:45 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

"Sarah's a scientist herself she does very cool squid stuff by the way and she felt like there. Was this disconnect between scientists and the public. So she thought won't okay. Let's bring them together. But I notice that there wasn't a super easy way for scientists to get in touch with the public sort of in a way that Easy for them to fit into their schedules. But Hey it's the twenty first century. That's what technology is for and so. I wanted to sort of have this streamlined. Way To get scientists talking with non-scientists. Just give people the opportunity To meet a scientist now the setups pretty straightforward your teacher. And you want to teach your kids about squids scroll through and find squid scientists and request him. Don't have a specific topic in mind. That's cool to just pick something more general like biologist fill out the form and boom. You got yourself a scientist so when you first started scape. Scientists part of your motivation was to clear up some misconceptions that people might have about scientists like who they are and what they do and what they're like. So what did you guys want people to know about scientists? I really wanted to show people the diversity of scientists. I think we really get this kind of over-simplified view of who scientists are how we behave what we're interested in outside of science in TV and movies. I mean you get this pretty much. Almost all white guys all straight people. All white guys are socially awkward with varying levels of social skill and so we know that scientists are just as varied as any other group of people. And so. It's not necessarily that. I WANNA say scientists aren't like this it's like scientists aren't only this. Scientists are all of these different ways of being and so in our program. We also ask our teachers if half of their students are from an underrepresented group in stem so that we can match them up with a scientist from that group because we really want to show everybody that there's a place for everyone in science. Yeah let's talk about that a little bit because I think we know now like scientifically we have data that suggests that when kids see people that look like them doing science they can imagine growing up to be scientists too. So you really build that idea into the scientists that you pair with the classrooms. Yeah absolutely we WANNA give as many students as possible a window into science that they can relate to. Yeah Yeah and speaking of relating. I WANNA play clip for you of microbiologist Ruth Eisenberg. She's reading a question submitted in live chat so the question is is there any advice that I would give to a young student right now that might show interest in becoming a scientists from a small town? Okay perfect so I actually come from a pretty small town where not? A lot of people went to college in general so if you have an interest in science say keep passion alive you can get involved in science activities like presentations or anything that the community can participate in a lot of colleges and I really liked that because it sounds like you know the scientists herself would have loved to have that program when she was a kid. Is that something that you hear from the scientists? Who Do these calls? That's part of why they participated in this. Yeah totally I hear that all the time. Yeah so a lot of scientists that are now adults working in science. Never really saw people like them when they were up and so I think that's one of the reasons. Scientists are so enthusiastic about participating in this program because they wish they had something like it when they were young. Yeah no I mean I do. Don't you I mean that's probably by? You made it right totally. Yeah Yeah Yeah I mean I think I remember the first time I met a lady scientists who specifically the thing that I wanted to do and that that was a transformative moment. I think yeah I hadn't even met a white woman scientists until I was a sophomore in even in my department studying Marine Science and we had zero female professors at all so I mean as a white woman so imagine how much worse it is for. Somebody other folks. It's just like yeah anything that we can do to show people How welcome they can be science the better. What other kinds of feedback do you get from scientists from teachers from kids? We've got a lot of feedback. I didn't necessarily expect to get for. Example are scientists will say that when they talk to people who have never really thought about their area of science before that they'll have these questions that are like. Oh my God. Why have I not gone way? You kind of get totally cool. Things that are like we'll blow the mind off somebody who's been studying this effort twenty years. Well Can I. Can we talk about that? Because that's a point that when when I think when people think about scientists doing outreach they really think that the benefit is only for the person that they're trying to reach out to but in reality you get these people who haven't been thinking the same way that all the other academics that you've been surrounded our thinking and you can get like really good ideas about your own science from having those conversations. Yeah absolutely a person who hasn't been taught to think in the exact rigid way that your field thanks. Having that kind of naive can be totally amazing. It's like it's definitely not. It's a two way street. And that's one of the great reasons to have conversations with people and not just deliver Information Athem. A lot of really awesome stuff can come from those conversations. Yeah so what has surprised you the most since launching this project so many things surprised me that it's kind of hard to pin it down. I think once I participate and they get like a bunch of fourth graders so like electrically enthusiastic about what they're hearing about that really remind scientists. How COOL THEIR JOBS? Because when you're working on a grant and you're reviewing other people's papers and you're trying to get your own work published it can kind of disillusion you on how totally cool our jobs are. And then when you have like a fourth grader. Just like beside herself shaking about hearing about your squid or your termites. Wherever you're studying it can be a real like just awesome reminder and get you excited to go back to the lab the next day. That's been amazing so I've kind of a big question for you. What does it tell you that people have this much interest in talking to you? Know Real live scientists over video chat. I think people are just really thirsty for authenticity today. I mean I think you get so many things kind of filtered through various forms of media. I guess and they're just they just want something real. I feel like a lot of people just want to see partially like behind the curtain of how things are really being done and just want something directly from the source and so I think that that's why our program has been so super successful because we get people direct access to the science right as we're learning that information. Sarah McNulty is the Executive Director of the nonprofit skype a scientist. You can find out more about their live sessions how to sign up all that jazz at SKYPE SCIENTISTS DOT COM. We'll put a Lincoln are episode notes to this episode was produced by Rebecca Ramirez edited by the way special thanks to Emily von for her fact checking in Production Madison via shortwave from NPR..

scientist Sarah McNulty Ruth Eisenberg skype Lincoln Rebecca Ramirez Executive Director Emily NPR
"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on Short Wave

"You're listening to shortwave from NPR. Lock EVERYBODY TO SCRAPE. The scientists live just as a heads up. We are running these about once a day Monday through Friday ish during this delightful quarantine time that we're all in Sarah McNulty's just starting up video livestream. She's the Executive Director of the nonprofit skype scientists generally me matchup scientists with classrooms and other groups to chat about science and generally make science accessible for as many people as possible and make people feel as welcoming science as we can the CROON virus pandemic has slowed down a lot of businesses. But but skype a scientist so a massive spike in its audience over the past couple of weeks as schools have closed in more and more people stay home before we may have had like twenty people. Show up to a livestream And now we have over five hundred showing up every livestream which has been amazing. Plus Sara says they've had a similar boom in scientists reaching out to lead the live sessions. All right so I am a paleontologist and I'm so excited to be here today. I this is the team interaction. I've had in about a week so I'm real sorry really excited but had talked to anybody in a long time outside my house so I'm in these days. The questions scientists are getting are just as silly an insightful. As ever like do rats sparked don't know that's a good question. I don't know if they fart. I do know that they eat their own coup. But I don't know if they are. How DOES BACTERIA SURVIVE INSIDE SQUID? When the sweater babies they don't have any beneficial bacteria inside them so they actually get them from the seawater. There's a special organ in and of course. Have you ever eaten the bear? Have you eaten the bear? I don't know how to answer that question but no I have never eaten a bear.

scientist Executive Director skype NPR Sarah McNulty Sara
"scientist" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on Tumble: A Science Podcast for Kids

"We're talking to the youngest scientist we've ever had on the podcast. Brother and sister Oscar in May Johnson were nine and twelve years old when they conducted experiments in the Galapagos Islands. Go UP AGO. S- like the most famous science place in the world absolutely in this episode may an Oscar or going to share their story of science discovery. Before we get to this week's episode. We've got some new patrons thank on Patriae on Abdulah an odd non argan Silas Henry Anton Stella and Joshua enjoy. We also have some more of our patrons that are having birthdays coming up. Liam whose birthday is on February twenty third Brady Happy Birthday on the twenty fourth Christopher in Grace Mom and dad are proud of you know you accomplish your dreams and happy birthday on the twenty fifth Luke Biggs who loves dinosaurs also. Happy Birthday on the twenty fifth. I like dinosaurs to tell you. Happy Birthday on the twenty sixth Emma White Happy Third Birthday on the twenty eighth Hazel Fades completely on us on the third of March Henry. Stella Mom Dad and your brothers love you so much along with your passion for dancing skiing and robotics and happy birthday on March fifth. And lastly Charlie Happy Birthday on March fifth. Thanks to all of you and to everyone who supports tumble on Patriot. If you'd like to get a shutout like these people or get a happy birthday wish from yours truly on our podcast. Just go to patriot dot com slash tumble. Podcast pledge at the five dollar level or higher once again that's Patriot dot com slash tumble. Podcast well Disneyworld. We all know it. We're do we because if you haven't been there lately well you.

Silas Henry Anton Stella Galapagos Islands Oscar scientist Luke Biggs Emma White skiing Liam Patriae Charlie Johnson Brady Christopher Joshua
"scientist" Discussed on Famous Failures

Famous Failures

11:09 min | 1 year ago

"scientist" Discussed on Famous Failures

"WALC ladies and gentlemen to a very special episode of famous failures it's a special episode because I have a new book coming out is titled Think like but I I wanNA share just a little bit of background with you and explain how you can preorder the book and get bonuses that for some categories are worth ten x the cost of the box if you want to check them out right away you can head over to rocket science book dot Com I was zoomed multiple identities over the so my life and one of the identities that I cherish the most is that of a former rocket scientist I was Astra Physics Major in college and worked on the opposite nations team for the two thousand and three Mars Exploration Rovers Project I've been working on this book for over two years now but in one sense I've been working on for my entire life because all of the was the knowledge practical insights I've gathered over the past thirty seven years of my life are all in this book and here's the good news you don't have to be a rocket scientist to think like one in the book reveal nine simple strategies from rocket science so you can use to make your own giant leaps in work and life whether it's landing your dream job accelerating your business learning a new skill or creating the next breakthrough act the book will inspire you to take your moonshot and enable you to achieve lift off I've been ecstatic with the early reviews of the book I want to share a few of them with you Susan Cain The New York Times bestselling author of quiet says thinking like a rocket scientist is not rocket science packed with witty writing insightful advice and integrating stories this must read book will change the way you see the world and empower you to change the world itself mm-hmm grants who is in Eurotunnel's bestselling author originals says that the book is bursting with practical insights Houston we have solutions Daniel Pink who is the New York Times bestselling author of books like when Dr and a whole new mind says by the time you finish reading this endlessly fascinating book your thinking will be bigger better and bolder Julian got three who is the best selling author of how to make a spaceship says this book will make you look at the world with a different Lens and we'll help you make your own seemingly crazy moonshot a reality to celebrate the launch of the book filed a set of amazing preorder bonuses which you can find by heading over to rocket science book Dot Com and if you'd like you can also just go over to my websites Roll Dot Com and head books at the top I won't go through all the bonuses here because they are listed on the on the webpage but importantly the digital version of the Look if you preorder any copy any edition of the book you can download the digital version right away so you can read the book now today before the the book is released to the public the digital version is available for all devices including kindle nook IOS android personal computers unit. You might be wondering why I am running a preorder campaign really is for two primary reasons the first is that pre orders carry enormous weight and Book Promotion Major Bookstores. is used preorder numbers to gauge public interest in the book and if the preorder numbers are high they'll stock more copies of the book which means more readers will see it and can preorder bonuses are my way of thinking you for supporting this podcast for supporting my writing and ensuring that this book will be one of many to come so if you plan to order the book please choose to preorder it and once again you can do that by heading over to rock assigns book without further ado here's a short cert- from the book's introduction in September nineteen sixty to President John F Kennedy stood before a packed Rice University Stadium and pledged to land a man the moon and return him safely to the earth before the decade was out it was an incredibly ambitious promise the original Moonshot when Kennedy gave a speech the logical requirements for a moon landing hadn't even been developed no American astronauts had worked outside a spacecraft to spacecraft had never docked together in space NASA didn't know whether the lunar surface was sufficiently solid to support a lander or whether the communication systems would even work on the moon in the words of one ASA executive we didn't even know how to do Earth orbit determination much less project Orbis to the moon getting into orbit around the moon not to mention landing on it required mind-blowing position it was like throwing a dart at a peach twenty eight feet away and scraping the fuzz without touching the body and what's more the peach which is the moon would be in rapid motion darting through space on reentry to the earth the spacecraft would have to enter the atmosphere at the right angle tantamount to locating one particular Ridge on a coin of one hundred eighty riches to avoid grinding too hard against the atmosphere burning to a crisp or skating across it like a stone skipping on water for a politician Kennedy was surprisingly candid about the challenges ahead here's what he said and they'll I realize that this is in some measure an active faith and vision for we do not now no benefits await us but if I were to say my fellow citizens that we shall send the Moon Two hundred forty thousand miles away from the control station in Houston a giant rocket more than three hundred feet tall the length of this football field made of new metal alloys some of which have not yet been invented capable no standing he stresses several times more than Eh experienced fitted together with a precision better than the finest watch carrying all the equipment needed for propulsion Guidance Control Communications Food and survival on an untried mission to an unknown celestial body and then return it safely to were reentering the atmosphere at speeds of over twenty five thousand miles per hour causing heat about half that on the temperature Zahn almost as hard as it is today and do all this and do all this and do it right and do it I the nicktator doc yes even the metals needed to build the rocket hadn't been invented we jumped into the cosmic void and hope would grow wings on the way up miraculously the wings sprouted in nineteen sixty nine less than seven years after Kennedy's pledge Neil Armstrong took his giant see for mankind a child who is six years old when the Wright brothers took their first power flight lasting all of twelve seconds and moving one hundred and twenty feet would have been seventy two when flight became powerful enough to put a man on the moon and return him safely to the earth this giant leap which was taken within human lifespan is often hailed as the triumph of technology but it's not rather is too great triumph of a certain thought process rocket scientists I used to turn the seemingly impossible into possible it's the same process that is allow these scientists who scored dozens of interplanetary holes in one supersonic spacecraft sending these spacecraft millions of miles through outer space and landing them exactly where they want is the same thought process that brings us closer and closer to colonizing other planets and becoming an interplanetary species and it's the same thought process that will make affordable commercial tourism the norm to think like a rocket scientist to look at the world through a different Lens rocket scientists imagine the imaginable and solve the unsolvable they transfer and failures in the triumphs and constraints into advantages debut mishaps has solvable puzzles rather than insurmountable roadbocks. They've moved by blind conviction but by self doubt their goal is not short term results but long-term breakthroughs they know that the rules are in set in stone the default can be altered a new path can be forced in the modern era rocket science thinking is a necessity the world is evolving yet dizzying speed and we must continue me problems in our daily lives those who can tackle these problems without clear guidelines and with the clock ticking enjoy an extraordinary advantage despite his tremendous benefits we often assume that thinking like a rocket scientist is beyond the ability of mere mortals without a special kind of genius has the common saying it's not rocket science we identify with Elton John's rocket man who despite being selected for a Mars mission laments about all the science I don't understand and this book will not teach you the science behind rocket science you won't find any graphs on these pages no aptitude for crunching numbers is required. lurking behind the elusive subject of rocket science are life changing insights and creativity and critical thinking that anyone can acquire You won't be a rocket scientist by the end of this book by you'll know how to think like one I once worked on the scene for the Mars Exploration Rovers Project which sent to rover a my rocket science past remains the most interesting part of my resume during speaking engagements the person introducing me inevitably says something like the most intriguing thing all of them were thinking talk to us about rocket science instead although we glamorize rocket scientists there's an enormous mismatch between what they've figured out these were necessary features during the pelvic age keeping us safe from things poisonous foods and predators but with this book my goal is to create an army of non rocket scientists who approach everyday problems as a rocket scientist you'll take ownership of your life you'll see.

scientist WALC Elton John Mars Exploration Rovers Projec thirty seven years three hundred feet twenty eight feet twelve seconds seven years twenty feet six years two years
"scientist" Discussed on Got Science?

Got Science?

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on Got Science?

"So so this is a program that places PHD scientists who are either early career mid-career late career doesn't matter in the government for a year to two years to see how they can use their expertise within the within a government setting. I'm trying to find where their expertise fits into policymaker. Gang and also figure out you know, how this big bureaucratic unwieldy seemingly a thing like government actually works. And so I wanted to to get a feel for how I could use my experiences in grad school, my commitment to wanting to democratize access to the products of research. So make sure that they're communicated to the public, and they're also communicated to researchers. So that we're really making sure that science has a place within the public discourse. So what do you see as the danger of science not being part of the public discussion? I see a lot of decisions that are being made based on emotions and emotions alone, which I am a very emotional person. And I find that for me to take a step back to identify in my emotions as fear or or. Or excitement or what have you take a step back and think well, why what does the evidence say, and what are the consequences if I don't act in in accordance with the ovens because there are some times when I take strange vitamins because I see them advertised advertise, they'll make my hair shinier, and I want that. And I look at the evidence, and it doesn't really back it up, but there's also no health risks. So I think well, why not just doing your own experiment. Yeah. Just doing my own experiment. And if it makes me feel better than that's fine. But then of course, there are other cases like climate change, which it's here it's happening and we've caused it. And if we don't act now than we are really risking the health and livelihood of our planet of our fellow people by by neglecting the evidence. So I think that's really the risk of of not of not communicating about where science falls in public discourse. Because. Sometimes it's benign to ignore the evidence and other times, it's completely catastrophic. I wanna pivot to inequity in and bias. I mean, many people think, hey, the science is the science there can't be inequities or by sees can you give some examples to our listeners. So they know what we're talking about. Yeah. So I think it is really a common refrain is that scientists are purely objective, which ignores the fact that scientists are people, and we can be trained to recognize our bias in the ways that they're creeping up into our research, but often that's not really something. That's very much explored in scientific training is identifying the biases that come up as a product of of how we're raised. How we're socialized how we interact with one another. And so I think that the way that this really crops up in the case of women minorities. Disabled people. People LGBTQ people is that people people's assumptions of, you know, I'll take me as an example. I'm a woman in case, you can't tell by my voice. And I've had people tell me that some of my bold ideas are over ambitious, whereas if that idea came out of the mouth of a male colleague of mine that would be seen as visionary or bold yet innovative, cutting edge and the way that that creeps up when I'm writing a scientific paper or applying for grant money is that they'll look at that over ambitiousness and say that it's unrealistic and not worth funding. And so that starts to hurt the careers of women starts to hurt the careers of people who don't conform to the stereotypes that we've been socialized to accept as as what a scientist looks like which is typically white SIS gendered, male and. So unless we're having these kinds of conversations about the ways that bias affect who gets to do science than we're really not going to be able to course. Correct. Despite how however many, you know, fun diversity initiatives we throw out there. Despite however, many kind of kinds of like by moments that we try to have unless we're really interrogating the bias that we hold even I as a woman hold certain biases that are implicit against women. Just because of how I've been socialized within this greater societal context. And I think that also if we're keeping certain people away from the bench, if we're keeping certain people out of these conversations, not giving them a seat at the table. Then we're really especially when you start.

scientist two years
"scientist" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

You Are Not So Smart

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on You Are Not So Smart

"Why don't you talk about how this is this technique of saying, I'm not a scientist is sort of this rhetorical crawfish. Ing you can way to get out of having actually talk about something. You don't know anything about? Why don't they just say, I don't know? I mean. Yeah. That's what that's what a scientist would say. Right. I mean, scientists are trained to to be fine with not knowing something to be fine with uncertainty and everything I think that's just a political tech. Right. I mean. I think politicians are generally trained to to never admit that sort of weakness. I I mean, I I would prefer a politician who just says, you know, what I'm not sure I will try and find out. But that's yeah. I mean, it probably just is a sign of, you know, trying to sound strong at every possible point. Yes, you know, in general politicians never going to tell you when they don't know something. So it's good to keep that as a rule of thumb when dealing with politicians Stroh. Yeah. So they they what they are telling you might actually be reworded version of I have no idea what I'm talking about. That is a good thing to keep in mind. I think you're right. So I assume you put the most important thing. I so we'll firstly we'll talk about his over-simplification. And if you could define what that means in your term. Based off the book itself. What is over simplification? Well, first of all, I would not say I put the most important one. I put the simplest one. I if you want to start with that one out. That's fine. Okay. We'll start with the simplest. And then you tell me what the most important is. We do that. Okay. Great. So the over simplification is sort of the more self explanatory titles at ease. I mean, it when a politician takes a often, very complicated scientific topic and boils down to sort of sound bite sized and completely ruined. The actual science in the process. This is I think it's important to make the distinction that decision. Just trying to explain something. Clearly, it is very important for both the scientists and a politician not to mention a journalist to be able to explain a complicated topic in simple terms. That's fine. If you're doing diligently, and well, it's when they take that idea of trying to boil something down and sort of use it to their advantage to completely ruined. In what the actual science is that you get the over simplification. And so like, what's like, a really good salient example, and you can pull one straight from the book if you want to be like sure, so the one that I that I led the book with that. I think is a pretty important one and just sort of interesting one is to do with a whole lot of politicians talking about a fetal pain the pain that a fetus supposedly feels while in the womb. You get every couple of years, and they did it again last year, the Republicans in the house and sometimes Senate ticket up they try to pass a Bill that they called the pain capable unborn. I'm going to get the name wrong here. Something about pain in fetus. Although they called an unborn child and the idea being that at twenty weeks. Scientists told us. The fetus feels pain, and they will get up in in the in the house chamber or in on TV and say this over and over and over and just those simple terms at twenty weeks, a fetus feels pain which sounds very sort of scientific like we've figured this out you get to twenty weeks, and suddenly you can feel pain. This is absolute bullshit that doesn't make any sense. Actually, what science does tell us is actually pretty difficult to say for sure, but it's probably closer to twenty seven or eight weeks before the sort of neuro anatomy is in place to actually feel paying too. But it's tough anyway. Because pain is subjective experience. I mean, I don't know that you're feeling pain until you tell me, you're feeling pain or screen about it. You know? But if you're a fetus, that's kind of hard to do. So they are taking this very complicated..

scientist Stroh Senate Bill twenty weeks eight weeks
"scientist" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Science Show

"Word scientist was uttered in public apparently hue didn't want to refer to the popular brilliant astronomer mathematician mary some ville as a man of science so is karen kupa says technically the first two sport the title of scientist was a woman philosopher stephen gawk raja some you'll tell the coleridge the poet the philosopher certainly thought that you couldn't pursue any cultural or scientific tiffany's without a firm theological grounding but she thought of in terms of anglicanism he thought that basic understanding of what he considered to be religious truths in religious precepts was necessary to frame any general views about the role of science and culture is very much on side with hugh in that case he was indeed and they were both very influenced by content in this respect even though it was in both cases it was a bit of a reworking of canton a more religious direction it took office century for the word scientist to be commonly accepted historian will add shwe hicfa to the term used to describe someone working in knowledge production was natural philosopher that is very ingrained a very prestigious term and all of a sudden you're trying to change to a new term to describe knowledge production to scientists so many is rather degrading the why was tom nology language why was it so important to that time massive changes in knowledge and hill is very king to police new scientific terms to make sure that the robust he was responsible for michael faraday is adoption of electrochemical terminology such as electrode cathode electrolysis and i on so in this way he'll became a powerful broker in the coining of new scientific terms and guiding the direction of scientific knowledge human into that built in the sixteen hundreds the oakpanelled renne library trinity is a book lovers dream pass me shakespeare's first folio on newton's principia mathematica delve into original milton works or one of the eighth century medieval manuscripts but no i visited trinity to look inside the huel archives which cat for by librarian nncholas bell where searching renne library looking at funding of lessons.

scientist michael faraday shakespeare newton nncholas bell karen kupa stephen gawk hugh shwe hicfa tom nology oakpanelled renne library milton
"scientist" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Good science that they can't stop themselves from falling yeah those kinds of traps it's an interesting question and it has to do with how deep does their philosophical understanding of science go and honestly you could be a successful scientist without being philosopher in that you could you could be technically good in your field you could be obviously very knowledgeable and you can have certain attributes like being creative being able to think outside the box right think of of new ways of explaining phenomenon thing you know being good at designing hypotheses and research to test those hypotheses and knowing how to move the ball forward you know in your research and yet not really understand the critical thinking element of science you know and those are the people who are technically good scientists and they may be brilliant at what they do but they just don't fully grasp the mechanism of selfdeception that we need science to protect us from and so they fall into those traps because they didn't really really fully understand them and we see the whole spectrum i think most scientists have a pretty good understanding of of process but a lot don't you know or they or their understanding is ultimately superficial which is why so many scientists fall prey to things like p hacking hacking i think is mostly a phenomenon of scientists who don't understand the critical thinking aspects of science so they do things and without understanding that that completely invalidates their research you know so that's we just need more i think more thorough in universal education in the sciences in critical thinking and selfdeception we've said it before i mean there should be courses that are in the canon that teach critical thinking it should be starting the earliest age possible and.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

WSRQ Talk Radio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

"The hour he's the author of the formula for miracles worst science reveals the secrets of the spirit and rent talking about work programme being cut a push in this direction i think an instant healings when we when we're talking about health success talk about the power of intuition is it the most important and powerful tool we have had absolutely and one of the mit serve our world is that it's all about knowledge and and education and then a little color company that's not true at all the absolutely the most important thing we have in life is our intuition and let's talk science for a second uh people most people think we had well what makes great scientists this there's super smart someone like einstein uh if you actually read what einstein road and when he talked about key repeatedly emphasized the importance of intuition and if you look at all the great scientists of in history newton einstein pests like galileo etcetera all of them were intuitive s every single one of them and so if you're smart that can make you a mediocre scientist but you combine that with him tuition that's what makes a great scientist and of course if intuition it's important for a scientist of course it's important for everybody and it's unfortunate that most of us again another myth of our society that's not true at all most people think you're either born psychic or you're not no it's like a gene you have or you don't uh that's not true everybody has the ability to develop and build up their intuition it's just that some people have a natural talent easier for that but that's true of everything in life isn't it some people have a natural talent for singing were playing the guitar or running really fast but others don't but with the proper training everybody can develop their intuition everybody can learn.

scientist
"scientist" Discussed on Science in Action

Science in Action

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on Science in Action

"The tremendously important their important both as the measure of being an excellent scientist bob it's also that influence on governments around the world every time a major ipcc report comes out it gets a lot of attention that probably the most important reports that a dumb in climate scientists and also important presumably for the careers of the people that right them yes i think so it can be prestigious the ipcc was awarded the nobel prize for peace in two thousand seven these reports he don't get paid to write md no you've done their purely voluntary so with the survey of how much women were having a presence oil having a voice at she was the difference between women having a presence in having a voice while you can have a lot of token women sitting round the table but if they're not given a chance to speak then then not really participating or influencing the report four amine we see this a law generally across sciences people sometimes remember oh we should have some women on that panel but then the question is to they get the opportunity to speak an all they listen to said what we try and find out with your survey how women felt about their experience with ipcc we were trying to identify the barriers to the participation and very importantly we were hoping to make some recommendations that would improve the situation what we asking them what did you find out from them i think the first thing to say is that many of them reported a very positive experience but interestingly a lot of women that said they didn't face barriers when we asked them about what the others did they reported the many others experience barriers i think the largest barrier that we identified was english language ability a lot of people saw that as a barrier to happing voice and of course that it would be experienced by men of.

ipcc nobel prize scientist bob it
"scientist" Discussed on EFT/Tapping Q

EFT/Tapping Q

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"scientist" Discussed on EFT/Tapping Q

"So the scientists in me looks at the emotional part the physical symptom that's coming up and then i look at the body part in the organs or the system that is giving you a sign and then is a scientist goes in and go okay gallbladder issues bile bile is a really nasty looking color it's kind of this yellowy orange color it's usually assoc associated with kinds of angers and frustrations so then you can start layering these things and go you know what i have a lot of anger and i have a lot of digestion problems because i can't digest the anger i'm feeling towards myself or towards someone else so then you can go beyond just this is the temporary have an ache or have a little bit of indigestion and then you can go okay what am i angry about who am i angry with is this new or is it old you know is this just my pattern or does it my family pattern for generations my family has been angry and then you can start dissecting the present moment and then you can sit down and start going through systematically and look at where in this example you're angry and start releasing all the issues about anger and then look at the patterns of where you've learned about anger from either your family members or someone in school or you know your boss or just society in general about what we need to be angry about than so then i kinda start taking them apart in i go through that kind of layers.

scientist