36 Burst results for "schizophrenia"

Fresh update on "schizophrenia" discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

01:39 min | 18 hrs ago

Fresh update on "schizophrenia" discussed on The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

"So how how does this approach work for those disorders because it does seem a little more intractable but you're seeing real changes Yeah. So accused diet is but higher fat low carb moderate protein, diet in shifts the body metabolism to utilize fatty acids. So other words you're burning fat and Keith Jones as the primary source of Energy Rather Than Glucose or carbs, and they're well, they're well known for being. Powerful in. C- IN DIABETES IN OBESITY and insulin resistance in now, near research is showing some improvements in some of the neurodegenerative conditions Alzheimer's Disease Autism, and so some of the possible mechanisms. Energy Metabolism in foot reducing inflammation, reducing that oxidative stress and oxidative stress like to think of it is the burden to the cell the environmental burden to the cell. And so it's an intervention that's worth studying for other psychiatric illnesses and we we think the Diet does similar things in the brain. To what psychiatric medications do like would stabilisers. So in these patients that I saw your my training I saw improvements went on this particular diet. That's sexually why I got really interested in. Doing on their own was there a psychiatrist who said you should try catching dieter? So, this was. A clinic that they came to specifically for weight loss. They were on psychiatric medications. Had some side effects from that they had weight gain they wanted to improve They already had a baseline Ormeau while state from before the diagnosis of schizophrenia, but they wanted to get an improvement right with that. So so be replaced on occasion Diet for treatment of insulin resistance. Beasley. And these side effects from the medication but what was interesting is You know there have been some reports about even gluten. Sensitivity in schizophrenia and so diets are gluten free diets. Jazz. So so this was the F. Another added dimension of it but I think they're lot of possible mechanisms that mentioned in. So what I am studying right now is I'm enrolling patients in a clinical trial looking at how this heater intervention, which is really an anti inflammatory metabolic intervention how it affects individuals with bipolar disorder schizophrenia where we often prescribed beats mood stabilisers or neuroleptics for symptom control, and I'm also looking at obesity and metabolic dysfunction in these patients. In so while the trial is still ongoing, the early results are promising are encouraging and. Patients have been really thrilled with the results and they've been patients who've. been able to reduce their their medication dose nick prove their health overall and. Sounds. Really. Striking when you think about it because There has not been a lot of advances in schizophrenic care since I've been doctor I mean there's GonNa Medications, but it's still the same old antipsychotic medication will often have a lot of side effects and this is a radically different idea i. mean I think I read once that about seventeen percent of schizophrenics have elevated hootenanny bodies and about twenty percent of kids do and gluten is something that causes damage to the Gut, the causes inflammation in the brain and. I think that these are all patterns that connect and you're connecting dots that haven't really been connected before and it feels like a tree and it's it's it's really it's pretty stunning because if what you're saying is true and I, believe it is because I've seen in my practice over the last thirty years that the doorway to the brain is really through food and through your metabolic pathways and optimizing those. Enough, it often is more effective than medication and the side effects are all good wants. Like wait laws and energy So it's it's pretty exciting. The other thing you mentioned that I I don't want to skip past as you talked about energy in the brain. So we talked about inflammation. And you talked about Mighty Andrea Energy. These are little energy factories in the brain in a me think of one of these re. Researcher from Harvard I. Think Thousand Saying Ego a Suzanne Go I. Don't know if you've heard of her she's a pediatric neurologist who studied autism and she's unmarried sophisticated studies in the brain looking at the energy deficits in artistic his brains which are by the way also flamed, and if you have inflammation also causes damage to the Maddock Andrea. So it's sort of a vicious cycle and found my giving these kids might occur Andreoli support nutrients like co Q. Ten, and Carnitine Is Compounds that the Mitochondria need to function should able to help these kids improve their autism. And I'm wondering on some of these metabolic disorders where their energy deficits in the brain in psychiatry if that would be a fruitful area for for years, there's any research on that looking at using Medicare Joe Therapies to approach, and treat psychiatric issues. I think that's a really great question and I don't know the research on that I don't know. Whether there's a bit been focused on that I. think that's a really important question and something I would love to look into further. Well, you know we know we know that there's a control deficits in autism. We know there's not a casual deficits in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's is a in. Area where you know might have therapies have been used a ls. McConnell issues and therapies that are used. So eight hundred something we don't really learn about in medical school. We don't learn about Medicare Andrea and sense of how to treat them. We don't learn about inflammation in the brain or really treat that we don't learn about nutrition All seem to be the most relevant now as science advances, Arthur gaps in our training, and now we're going to have to put the pieces back together. We're trying to sort through what to do and functional medicines really map for helping US figure that out and that's why I founded so effective and. Jokingly said and I called myself the accident psychiatrist because I was treating people for these physical issues and their mental problems get better you know. Yeah. Yeah. It really interesting decimating I. AM, not, an expert in kind of nutritional supplements and how that affects Snyder con drill. Function. And so I really focused on the metabolic part of. Treating Metabolic dysfunction and how that improves how your brain. self-correct some of that might or con drill disarm. We'll talk about the ketogenic diet to conjure because it's really one of the key ways that it works on us by improving the function and health of the Mitochondria in the brain and also reduce the inflammation seems kind of paradoxical because we go I need a high fat diet that seems very inflammatory in bad but it turns out it's the opposite. So can you explain how that works and the biology of how the Ketogenic Diet is affecting the brain? Yes. So with the Mitochondria specifically. All this all of. In, the brain information oxidative stress might a cadre function. All those things that we know now are the underlying biology of brain disorders. How how, how, how does influence those? Yeah so so I will give an example of. In particular. A clinical, the clinical conviction, you know food addiction or binge eating. So the Ketogenic by the way, how prevalent is that I mean, how would you say food is like? Ten percent of the population thirty percent two percent. So I'll try processed food addiction is about forty fifty percent in patients with obesity and.

Inflammation Obesity Metabolic Dysfunction Schizophrenia Mighty Andrea Energy Keith Jones Diabetes Alzheimer's Disease Medicare Joe Therapies United States Alzheimer Dieter Carnitine Beasley Maddock Andrea Mcconnell Researcher Snyder Harvard
New Schizophrenia Guidelines

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

03:44 min | 4 d ago

New Schizophrenia Guidelines

"Lot has changed since 2004 when the APA the last road practice guidelines on schizophrenia this September and twenty-twenty. They updated those guidelines and here's a few of the key changes. There's less emphasis on divorce pushing between the conventional or first generation antipsychotics and the second generation or a typical perhaps because the Katy Trail put an end to the notion that the newer ones are better tolerate or the older ones are more effective, but the guidelines do Place greater emphasis on clozapine. They recommend clozapine after a patient has failed to respond to two trials of a guy psychotics and they Define failure of response meaning less than a 20% response and unlike the 2004 guidelines. They don't require that one of those trucks. Else be with the first-generation antipsychotic. They also recommend clozapine first line for a number of patients, which when you think of it is a lot of people with schizophrenia, those are people with suicidality problematic aggression and potentially with tardive dyskinesia. That doesn't respond to other options. The guidelines do go into great detail on how to treat side effects to antipsychotics. They list metformin as first-line for weight gain and metabolic syndrome and they list the vmat2 Inhibitors two of which are like ft approved and one of which are not all is first line for tardive dyskinesia. That's one area where I might differ from the guidelines they seem to emphasize these FDA-approved treatments, which actually have a fairly poor number needed to treat and not-so-great tolerability and are extremely expensive at $80,000 a year and they give real short shrift wage. Other options for tardive dyskinesia things like ginkgo biloba extract Keppra and amantadine which were actually given more emphasis in the neurology guidelines wage in several places. The guidelines give Credence to the idea of checking blood levels on antipsychotics to see if the patient is actually taking them a lot of authors of advocated for this and the fact here is that you just don't know if the patient is taking it even though the blood levels of most antipsychotics don't correlate with any therapeutic level except for clozapine where the therapeutic effects are greater above blood levels of 350. It's still useful to check them before moving to clozapine because you don't know if the patient even took the medication that you gave them too often. They don't and perhaps the biggest and most welcome change here is the emphasis on psychosocial therapies while they were recommended in a more generic form in 2004 here they recognized A whole host of specific psychosocial programs for people with schizophrenia so they can get their lives back. Here's one that was striking to me. They recommend that all first episode page be treated and something called a coordinated Specialty Care Program. These are things that have been researched since 2004 and shown to improve outcomes. They are team based programs incorporate both medications along with education resiliency training family therapy and vocational rehab sounds like a full pallet of what people need when they're going through them first episode too bad. These programs are hard to find but they're starting to Institute the more public Mental Health Centers and some academic centers have them but helpfully the guidelines do give you a reference to free resources where you can train your staff to start one locally

Clozapine Schizophrenia APA Katy Trail Metabolic Syndrome Mental Health Centers Amantadine Metformin
The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

Serial Killers

03:29 min | Last week

The San Francisco Witch Killers Michael and Suzan Carson

"Suzanne Bartlett seemed destined for chaos born in nineteen, forty one, her earliest memories were framed by World War Two. Still Suzanne's family enjoyed a level of comfort. Thanks to her father's job as a newspaper executive and the war was fought far away. The war coverage also sold -papers. So while you're a burned, the Barnes family were doing just fine the news that kept her family wealthy told a clear cut story of good and evil of following the paths of righteousness, and since they also showed young Suzanne how easily ideology and rhetoric could spark world changing violence despite the ongoing war, the Barnes family were picture of. Success Suzanne spent her childhood and Idyllic Arizona Country Club since swimming pools making the most of the warm desert climate on paper Suzanne lived a charmed life. But behind closed doors, she struggled with mental distress Suzanne experienced voices and visions which she insisted came from psychic powers. Vanessa. Is going to take over on the psychology here and throughout the episode please note Vanessa is not a licensed psychologist or psychiatrist but she has done a lot of research for this show. Thanks Greg according to a two thousand seventeen study from Yale University psychiatrists the hallucinatory. Of Self identified psychics has considerable overlap with the accounts of voice hearing patients. The only explanation Suzanne had for her childhood premonitions was clear audience however, the frequency of Suzanne's voices and later visual hallucinations suggests she was suffering from a mental health disorder of some kind former FBI criminal profiler. Delong speculates that Suzanne may have had schizophrenia which is marked by auditory and visual hallucinations. In any case, Suzanne seemed to suffer from a form of psychosis still undiagnosed young Suzanne built or identity around what she believed were her psychic powers to her the visions and voices that played out in her head were glimpses into the past and future. These supposed predictive powers made the world feel different to Suzanne. The people around her glimmered with after images only she could see and echoed with voices audible only to her even at a young age. This second sight made her feel separate from other children. She knew she was special Suzanne specialness went largely unchallenged though her claims of visions and voices were dismissed by those around her. It was clear that she wasn't like the other kids she behaved oddly, and this eccentricity further alienated her from classmates as A. Result Suzanne was withdrawn at school and her stunted social development dovetailed with academic difficulties. It must have felt there was an endless series of road in her way preventing her from having a normal childhood and at home weren't much better. Suzanne built detached from her wealthy family and the privilege circles in which they moved though she probably wanted for nothing she never quite got the hang of a role as a prim and proper child of wealth but that doesn't mean she didn't try in her teenage years Suzanne molded. To her families bourgeois lifestyle as best she could. She played tennis dressed to the nines and schmoozed with other heirs of Arizona Money

Suzanne Bartlett Suzanne Visual Hallucinations Vanessa Newspaper Executive Idyllic Arizona Country Club Arizona Yale University Schizophrenia Greg FBI Psychosis Delong A.
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

06:04 min | 2 weeks ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Welcome to inside schizophrenia I'm Rachel Star here with my co host gay powered gape today interesting topic love dating marriage while having schizophrenia is if those three things weren't hard enough. You can see why we waited so long to do this because I've known you for a long time Rachel in all that time, you've never wanted to discuss love dating or marriage euro can't discussing schizophrenia. Yes. But not love dating or marriage. So this is GonNa be fun. Yeah. I'm not a great source for relationship advice because I'm single. That's the end of the story I. You know that's very fair. Yeah, I have been. For a long time and you're happy being single your yeah. Sure whatever. No I mean seriously the are you happy being single I rather be single than unhappy. That's fair. Okay. I'm fine as I am. Let's say that when you find that you are yeah I think the important thing for the audience to understand though is that you're not single because of schizophrenia you don't feel that those two things have any relation you do have schizophrenia and you are single but they're saying what? I'm trying to say if you asked me, could I just find someone? Yes, I could. But you'd be unhappy in that relationship, right? Yeah. I know that schizophrenia wraps around your entire life but you don't feel that schizophrenia is holding you back. You just haven't met the right person and you have very high standards and you're an impressive woman you should have high standards. Another way for high standards is shallow you're shallow. To say, shallow. Nice standards. Shallow. whichever luckily, luckily, we found a married couple. Yes. We found Andrew and Stephanie Downing who are the authors of marriage in Schizophrenia is on the prize I had no idea that this existed but Rachel you've been aware of this book for quite some time even before we interviewed them for the show and what's cool is so andrew the husband he has schizophrenia and they found out and then they got married. So it wasn't like they've been together and then suddenly something happened a few years she went in knowing that this is something that they're going to have to deal with together for the rest of their lives. What was really cool about the interview which. is coming up a little later as we interviewed them both at the same time and I thought they were very very candid. It was really interesting to hear their thoughts on this idea that people with schizophrenia shouldn't get married and shouldn't have kids. Rachel what do you think about that concept that people with schizophrenia either should not be in romantic relationships or will we most often here cannot be in stable relationships? I think people schizophrenia I could do anything relationship wise. That doesn't mean it's going to be easy as is most things in life. The schizophrenia is just something else added on the reason to people break up may have nothing to schizophrenia could be mother-in-law's terrible. Could be there just really annoying. They snore at night and you can't take it. You can only take so many years without sleep you know. So there's like silly reasons and like serious reasons why people do or don't get married or stay married backing off from schizophrenia for just talking about general mental illnesses longtime listener to the show I have bipolar disorder and I have been divorced. Twice and I'm fascinated at the number of people who hear that I have bipolar disorder and here that I got divorced that's it. That's all they know they weren't around when I was married they're just meeting me for the first time I've been happily married for eight years now and they're like, Oh, you got divorced twice bipolar disorder, right? I mean gave I've always assumed you ran off. I understand why people feel that way I do it is an easy conclusion to draw and much in the same way with schizophrenia polar disorder is all encompassing to say that it had zero to do with. It is certainly disingenuous Rachel I feel that following these stereotypes removes agency and responsibility from the people involved and I. Think this gives an opportunity to grow I believe that the divorce is were my fault and that allowed me to be very introspective look into. Myself and grow as a person if I would have taken the company line. Oh, it's because I have bipolar disorder. Then I don't know that I would have improved and I don't think that I would be happily married. Now, how do you feel about people who just blame their love woes on schizophrenia and then don't improve as a person I imagine that that you don't feel good about that because I've never ever seen you use schizophrenia as an excuse for anything. I think if you WANNA excuse you're going to find an excuse. Schizophrenia is a really big one that you could be like no one wants me because of this reason and there's other things like, yes the medication makes you gain weight yes. The medication makes you WANNA sleep most of them have sexual side effects and you can say all of that does contribute absolutely. But at the end of the day I'm responsible for me and it's my job to find a way to love my life. You know because those same things I could immediately flip in like, Oh man I have a really bad job. No one's GonNa WanNa be with me on my hair is falling out mine is so don't feel like I'm just pointing out the guys. You know there's so many things though if you want an excuse, you will always have one that's not the way to look at it, and honestly no one wants to be in a relationship with that. We talked about in preparation for the show and you told me that you were on dating. APPS. Dating APPS, you know high woman living with Schizophrenia Likes Dogs No. If it's someone that I like and we WANNA meet up for a day. I want them to know that ahead of time I rather them know going in hey, she has a mental disorder Blah Blah Blah the meek attached to them and then bring it up three weeks later, and then they leave I rather you leave than me get attached she. Oh, the downside of that is yeah. Probably makes people leave but those.

schizophrenia Rachel bipolar disorder Rachel Star Rachel I WanNa Andrew Stephanie Downing
Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

The Healthcare Policy Podcast

05:54 min | Last month

Dr. Rachel Dolan Discusses The Antipsychotic Drug Epidemic

"Welcome to the healthcare policy podcast on the host David Intra. Kosovo. With me today Dr Rachel Dolan the US House of Representatives ways and Means Committee majority staffer to discuss the majority staffs recently released report titled Under enforced and over prescribed. ANTIPSYCHOTIC drug epidemic ravaging America's nursing homes. Dr Dole and welcome to the program. I David thanks so much for having me. Please call me Rachel. While this'll be the last time Dr Dolan's bio is posted on, of course, the podcast website. In testimony before the House Energy and Commerce Committee two, thousand seven, the FDA's Dr David Graham stated quote. Unquote. Fifteen thousand adults elderly people in nursing homes are dying each year from the off label use of antipsychotic medications. For an indication that the FDA knows the drug doesn't work the problem has been only FDA for years and years close quote. Legal the FDA does provide a black box warning label. Regarding off label use of these drugs, eleven years later, Human Rights Watch published a report titled They Want Docile. How. Nursing homes in the US overmedicated people with dementia. The report found in two thousand, sixteen, seventeen quote unquote massive use or abuse of Anti Psychotics, for example, Sarah. Quel. Doll and Rispler doll that have serious side effects including sudden cardiac death. The human rights report estimated in an average week over one hundred, seventy, nine, thousand, long-stay Nursing Home Facility patients who administered antipsychotic drugs. Without a diagnosis which the drugs are indicated or approved rover, polar disorder and schizophrenia in testimony the ways and means. Committee. Heard this past November Richard Mollet Executive Director of the Long Term Care Community coalition concluded quote the use of San Anti psychotics in skilled nursing facilities is so extensive that puts the US in violation of internal conventions and covenants on torture and cruel inhumane and degrading treatment or punishment. Close quote. This is my third related interview. In December twenty twelve I discussed the topic with Diana Zuckerman. And in February, eighteen high interviewed Hannah Lamb who authored the above mentioned human rights report. With me again to discuss the ways and means report just released titled Under enforced and over prescribed is Rachel Dolan the reports lead author. So that Rachel as background let's get right into this or immediate neatly into the specifics of the report. What did the report find regarding the extent to which? They're persists overuse or misuse of anti psychotics in skilled nursing. David. So the report showed what what you what we would expect from your introduction, which is the use of antipsychotic does persist in nursing homes across the country and it remains quite high and not of course, has implications for patient safety and and health We found in the fourth quarter of Twenty nineteen approximately twenty percent of all skilled nursing facility residents in the US. So that's about two, hundred, Ninety, eight, thousand, six, hundred, fifty people every week received some form of antipsychotic medication and most of that was without any psychosis diagnosis for which these drugs are indicated So specifically, we actually looked at trends and surveyor citations for unnecessary medication use in nursing home. So that's kind of the. Part of this study and what we found was a clear change in citation rates for these facilities between the change in administrations from the Obama Administration to trump administration So we found citations for antipsychotic misuse in sniffs increased by two hundred percent between twenty, fifteen, twenty seventeen but then declined by twenty two percent from two thousand, seventeen to twenty eighteen, and importantly a ten percent of citations associated with actual harm or immediate jeopardy to a residence health or safety. So those are some of the most severe citation surveyors ever capture resulted in no fine from twenty seventeen to twenty eighteen under the trump administration. So you know. I. Would say even though this study in particular couldn't determine causation we we did see a clear association between the Trump Administration's regulatory rollback campaign twenty, seventeen, twenty eighteen and a reduction in citations for these particular drugs. Okay thank you and we'll get into the trump administration's regulatory decisions in this regard in a minute let me just ask as a follow up or an aside question and I don't think I saw this new report. So you may not have these numbers top of mind but worth asking, can you give an approximation of the cost? To the Medicare program at least relative to the overuse I, mean, this is a massive amount of money in reimbursement for these medications. I don't remember offhand. Let's see I think in the in the actually in the report we got About one third of older adult Medicare part d enrolling with dementia who spent more than one hundred days in a nursing humber prescribed antipsychotic in two, thousand, twelve constituting roughly three, hundred, sixty, three, million part D plan payments that year and of course, there's also cost associated with hospitalizations for inappropriate use of these drugs So I would expect you know that that that is obviously very under an understatement understated estimate that does not capture the full realm of payments. So it's it's fairly substantial.

Dr Rachel Dolan FDA David Intra United States Antipsychotic Trump Administration Nursing Home Facility Dr Dole Us House Of Representatives Dr David Graham Human Rights Watch Kosovo House Energy And Commerce Comm Means Committee Diana Zuckerman America Obama Administration Psychosis Rispler
Grieving the Loss of Alcohol

Addiction Unlimited Podcast | Alcoholism | 12 Steps | Living Sober | Addiction Treatment

04:52 min | Last month

Grieving the Loss of Alcohol

"A grieving process. I'm sure many of you have heard about the stages of grief right I think most of us are familiar with that and we're definitely GONNA dig into those today and I want to work on some perspective around this because you know I am crazy about your mindset in your perspective being right because that so much sets in motion what your experience is going to be if your perspective is good and healthy and your mindset is good and healthy, you're going to have a much different experience all the way around in everything that you do so I really want to dig into some of that stuff too. And as people with addiction, we tend to be very sensitive and we like to blow things out of proportion good things and bad things. But even just the simple fact of being an alcoholic we go it way out of proportion and convince ourselves that our problem is so much worse than other people's problems and no one understands us and we got the short end of the stick and it's so hard to be one of us. And it is hard to be an alcoholic. But it isn't any more difficult than being a million other things. Also what is so hard for one person may not be challenging at all for someone else. So making it seem like your problems are so much bigger or more difficult really doesn't even make sense in it doesn't serve you to have that sort of perspective in that outlook on it. There are so many. Mental health struggles disabilities, special needs that people have where they would love to be in a position to have support groups all over the world where they know all they have to do is show up for free by the way. And their problem can be solved. I promise you people with major illness like cancer or COPD or Ms. They would love the opportunity to just walk into a support group and let people love and support them and have their illness become manageable and almost non-existent. Would love that. Opportunity. I bet people with chronic depression were some people with bipolar disorder schizophrenia. They would love to have a solution so simple that would manage all the symptoms. and. Allow them to live a comfortable and amazing life full of love and community and support. And just think about all of the you know autism all the hundreds of learning challenges and thousands of physical challenges. People get hurt and injured every day and it changes their lives for ever. I would be willing to bet all those people. would. Love to have a challenge where the solution was so straightforward. And required a little personal investment and energy and willingness. Instead of. A lifetime of pain and pharmaceuticals and declining quality of life. You see what I'm saying. As alcoholics, we paint this picture for ourselves that we're so unlucky that we have this thing that is so awful and terrible and Whoa is US feel bad for us because we can't drink alcohol. But when you put it in perspective. There are much bigger challenges you could be facing. And I promise you, you will have bigger challenges in your lifetime because it's just the nature of life life is challenging. Life is hard. I really want you to keep this in perspective. You can't drink alcohol. So what? You only care so much about alcohol because you have an unhealthy relationship with alcohol. Non Alcoholic people do not care about alcohol. They don't obsess over how will they ever have fun again if they don't drink, they don't obsess over not having a drink because their lives in their brains don't revolve around alcohol. There are thousands

Copd Bipolar Disorder
Surviving Suicide

The Chalene Show

06:25 min | 2 months ago

Surviving Suicide

"Hey, there a warning before I. Start Today Show. We're GONNA. Be Talking about some pretty heavy topics. Today will be talking about mental health anxiety depression. And surviving suicide. Parental discretion is advised. In twenty, nine, thousand, nine, nearly eight, hundred, thousand people died of suicide. means, every forty seconds someone was taking their own life. And, suicide is a global phenomenon in certainly their populations, certain people, certain experiences that place. You at greater risk of suicide. But for every person who dies from suicide, it's estimated that there's another twenty. Who attempted suicide? That means for every one person who dies of suicide. There are twenty people who survive it. But death by suicide and suicide attempts are preventable. Now, that is not to say that you. You alone can prevent someone. From taking their own life or from even trying. But. It does mean that we've got to start having these conversations more openly. We've got to remove the stigma. GotTa be able to know the sign so that there's something we can do so that we can intervene. So today because of the pandemic, because of racial tensions because of the world that we live in today, suicide rates are higher than ever. Now, I've heard reports that suicides are up nearly two hundred percent so far in twenty twenty and I did my best to substantiate those statistics. Night can't tell you. I can substantiate the number of suicides is that much higher wouldn't surprise me. I just can't substantiate it when I can tell you is that Google searches Calls to suicide prevention lines and visits to online support groups are up more than two hundred percent since the lockdown began. You should also know that suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the US. In fact, I WANNA lead with some really powerful statistics so that you'll begin to think about this, not just in terms of you or your family members. But your neighbors, your parents, your grandparents, your nieces, or nephews every day. The CDC estimates about one, hundred, twenty, three people die from suicide, and that was in twenty nineteen. It's also estimated that only half of Americans who are experiencing some form of depression or anxiety ever seek treatment. But did you know that between eighty to ninety percent of people who do seek treatment for depression or anxiety find success by using therapist and or a medical intervention? Did you hear that like eighty to ninety percent feel better? An estimated quarter? Million People? Every year are survivors of suicide attempt. In previous years, suicide was the second leading cause of death in the world for people ages fifteen to twenty, four today, it's the number one leading cause of death. And although more females than males attempt suicide. represent. Seventy, nine percent. Of, all suicides in the United, states? Firearms being their most commonly used method and for females. The most commonly used method is overdose poison if you will. Now, let's talk about who is at greatest risk I. It is our LGBTQ plus community. There are three times, more likely special kids, three times more likely than straight kid to attempt suicide Oh nps if you have a sneaking suspicion that your kid might. Be Gay. Bi. Trans. Trust me just accept them and love them if you don't. They feel that. They know that don't assume your Keta straight is what I'm trying to say kids who worry about what their parents and society might think are three times more likely. To commit suicide forty-one percent of trans, adults that they've attempted suicide and the same study found that almost sixty one percent of trans people who were also victims of some form of assault sixty. One percent of those people have attempted suicide because get this lesbian gay and bisexual young adults who come from families where either the belief the notion, the sentiment was that they would be rejected because of their sexuality. Those kids are eight times more likely to commit suicide. Then, children who come from families where they feel very accepted. Each time and lgbtq person is of victim of any type of harassment or abuse that increases their risk of self harm by almost three hundred percent. Those are some of the most at risk populations, the elderly, also a very high risk population. What do I have delivered for I? Don't WANNA be a burden to my children. There's nothing for me to look forward to. Black talk about risk factors regardless of population demographic. The WanNa be on the lookout for these risk factors. Place people at a much higher likelihood of attempting suicide, any previous known or unknown or diagnosed mental disorder. Especially mood disorders, schizophrenia bipolar ast, which is autism spectrum disorder autism, any anxiety disorder, and certain personality disorders. Those who regularly use substances, like you know, drugs, alcohol painkillers, people who tend to be more impulsive or aggressive anyone with a history of trauma, sexual abuse, verbal abuse, physical abuse people who are experiencing a major physical disability setback, chronic illness, those with a family history of suicide, those who have a close friend or relative committed suicide anyone who's in recent job or financial distress. Those, who recently lost a relationship at greater risk for suicide is anyone who's being isolated or who lacks their peers social support?

Depression Wanna Google United States Painkillers CDC United Assault Harassment
Study: Nursing Home Residents Not Protected From Anti-psychotic Drugs Under Trump

Morning Edition

00:59 min | 2 months ago

Study: Nursing Home Residents Not Protected From Anti-psychotic Drugs Under Trump

"A new study says the enforcement of rules protecting nursing home residents from receiving anti psychotic drugs has declined during the Trump administration. NPR's Nina Jaffe says the findings come from Democrats on the House Ways and Means Committee. The study found that citations for the unnecessary use of anti psychotic drugs and nursing homes declined by 22% during the first half of the Trump administration. Such citations increased by 200% during the latter part of the Obama presidency. The study also found that during the Trump administration, 1/10 of the nursing home cited for the most serious violations were not find it all. The Trump Administration has rolled back a number of nursing home regulations enacted during the Obama administration. And a psychotic drugs are approved by the FDA only for treating serious mental illnesses such a schizophrenia. They carry black box warnings that the drugs can increase the risk of death and older adults. Especially those with

Trump Administration Obama Administration Barack Obama Nina Jaffe Means Committee NPR Schizophrenia FDA
Washington, DC judge stops federal execution amid claims inmate has dementia

Tony Katz Today

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Washington, DC judge stops federal execution amid claims inmate has dementia

"A judge stop the execution of a man at the federal prison in Terre Haute named Wesley Perky who has Alzheimer's and paranoid schizophrenia and the U. S. Constitution is clear that you can't execute a person who has no understanding of why it is. The execution is going to be carried out. Robert Dunham, head of the Death Penalty Information Center, U S District Judge Tanya Chunkin in Washington, D C imposed to injunctions today. That prohibit the Federal Bureau of Prisons from moving forward with Perkies execution. The Justice Department filed immediate appeals. Perky was convicted of raping and murdering a 16 year old girl. They were

Wesley Perky Judge Tanya Chunkin Federal Bureau Of Prisons Terre Haute Death Penalty Information Cent Robert Dunham Alzheimer Justice Department Washington
New York Police Officer Arrested, Charged For Alleged Chokehold Arrest On Rockaway Boardwalk

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:05 min | 3 months ago

New York Police Officer Arrested, Charged For Alleged Chokehold Arrest On Rockaway Boardwalk

"The officer accused of using an illegal chokehold on the Rockaway beach boardwalk Sunday now charged with strangulation he made his first court appearance Thursday officer David a find a door will not have to come up with bail money as long as he surrenders his passport and has no contact with the man he allegedly placed in that illegal chokehold that man's name is Ricky bell view civil rights advocate Reverend Kevin McCall was here representing the views family as an adviser a secret does he suffer from schizophrenia and bipolar sure I'm not gotten released on his own recognizance Lori Zeno is an attorney for Bellevue and says her client may have been heckling the cops on the boardwalk but didn't do anything to deserve to be tackled and placed in a chokehold they deal with people who have mental illness right they bring their own prejudices with them I know how they feel towards people who are mentally ill and that's not

Officer David Kevin Mccall Schizophrenia Lori Zeno Attorney Bellevue Ricky Bell
"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

QuaranTEEN

02:17 min | 3 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on QuaranTEEN

"Welcome to today's interesting episode. Schizophrenia I know a lot of questions. Come to mind when I say that, but let's see those for later right now. We're going to begin the episode with woman of headlines to update you on the world around us..

Mental Health In Police Custody

Mentally Yours

06:48 min | 3 months ago

Mental Health In Police Custody

"Hi, everyone, and welcome to Mentally Yours Metro cody KS mental health podcast I'm that and today. I'm going to be chatting Tamasha rake. She's the sister of shorn rake a black wishes, musician who lived with schizophrenia and died in police custody in two, thousand and eight. We're going to be talking. About how her brother died, and also about the death of George Floyd in America. Every black person I know at the moment is finding themselves. Often willingly, but gaining followers gaining. A lot of them. Sometimes unwanted sometimes wanted messages and the Adamson. Talking about A. Lots of people so. Self flagellating about what can they do about racism of a ship questions coming through same pre spree overwhelming and I don't think I know anyone who hasn't hot influx. Of people not quite on shore of how to talk to us. How can people surfing the cost of their own mental health? The moment, especially backend ethnic minority people I think it is quite tiring. particularly when you'll someone who does this work year round and someone who feels this pressure in this sadness year round to only be August just because. Another person because one death has hit the news in a way. That makes people upset in like. Lots of us are aware of many more happening are aware of this constant proximity of black people to death and. You, know wash. This is all the more jarring tiring because it's being played out on such an international scale. It can sometimes be a bit baffling to me where I'm like Oh why now like. Now you're interested, but will you be interested next month? Will you be so? That's what makes it quite difficult to deal with? Especially because. Well. Sometimes it's. Sometimes it's your actual real friends. Checking on which is nice. But a lot of the time it's people who pausing acquaintances best who seem to just be going through a list of every lesson. They know going. Hey, you a K and and you know responding to that in a way that is. So I kind of taken on this policy right now, where like? I. If I don't respond, kindly responded at all. and Some people. I. Don't know a lot of the time. There's a lot of just trying to get. So points doing the right thing as opposed to an actual desire. To whatever, but then again that might be very cynical is made. Perhaps lots of people are feeling uncomfortable. Being confronted with this. Oh thing for the first time. And don't know what to do, other than to talk to the nearest black person to them, which would have to urge anyone listening? Please not to do. Is I can tell you the like. There was a long period of time Fox. Where I didn't want to talk to any white people about this at all like I took pretty much like almost two weeks very rarely looking at social media, ignoring my phone almost completely. And you know responses to emails became longer new the stocks because it can be very exhausting, so. Comforting the person who's come to you to trying comfy? They don't really have anything to offer me in terms of comfort. They couldn't. I have something to offer them. The. Old I'm fine and. You know you're doing the right thing. It can be very tiring. But then on the other hand might sound like. Something! That is actually really great in this time. You see so many different fundraisers for projects. They have been going on for a really long time and because of this. The current. Attention on black activists, and that work and things and. Public works that makes black life more tolerable and enjoyable. Lots of people are donating campaigns that they wouldn't have so. A perfect example is mine project project Myopia which is a project that's been going for three years now that. is working with different universities to decolonize the curriculum. But. This, so we are we do. We have funding currently. That's going to you know. A few grand left off funding, and that is going to run out, and then we'll have to look for another funding because the funding for this project is conditional on me. Still having PhD funding I'm coming to the end of the end of the funding's coming right. and. We shed across a Michelle. Pay Powell and more donations in this week than we ever have. Like this moment where people are going okay I feel really impotent. Maybe I can do something to contribute to efforts that already exist, which is really useful, because people are out there doing the work like so many friends who run you know different projects like looking for you know trying to improve. Access to theater for. People of Color on access to you know like so fringe of color run by my friend, Jeff's broth and Things like. Tiny compasses black Christmas. Things have been able to Gaza donations. In Pau because of the current attention. And you kind of in this weird position as a black activist where you have to. Solve Square your discomfort with. Because I, wouldn't really you cool it profiting 'cause? We don't profiting off this time it's. Taking in funding to continue the work that we're doing to support, black paper. It feels unseemly in some ways, but at the same time why attention attention spans fickle, so you kind of have to take advantage of that current moment where people do feel. Badly in. To help

George Floyd Adamson America Gaza Michelle FOX Powell Jeff
Don't Call it a Brain in a Dish!

a16z

06:56 min | 4 months ago

Don't Call it a Brain in a Dish!

"Hi and welcome to the as Sixteen Z. Podcast I'm Hannah and in this episode general partner. Vj Pond Day. And I talk with says you. Pasha professor of Behavioral Science at Stanford all about a new technology we have for Understanding Brain Disorders. The Wild and Very sci-fi new frontier of brain organizes so what our brain organizes were they developed. And how can we use them? The conversation starts with the essential problem that we've never had real access to the tissue and actions of the developing brain or even living normal brain and the problems with all of our existing models for understanding it from genetic studies to autopsies to primates. We look at those models we've relied on in the past and what this new model of brain organizes now brings us allowing us to study the human brain both how it develops and what goes wrong in certain disorders with living human brain cells in a dish for the very first time we talk about what these organizations can do and can't what they're good for understanding and where that understanding becomes limited and. Wi calling these mini brains or brains in dish. Isn't the right terminology at all and finally how far this new tool model might be taken now and in the future and how it will lead us closer towards one day even perhaps understanding psychology itself on a molecular level. We're here today to talk about understanding brain disorders and some of the new tools were developing for how to do so. So let's start where we actually are in that. Are we actually anywhere significantly? More advanced than we were in the days of hysteria. You know thinking about things like labeling these sort of conditions idol conditions that we had no clue. Where are we actually right now? Psychiatric disorders are still behaviorally defined and there are very few biomarkers. That are considered reliable diagnosis. The truth is that our understanding of psychiatric disorders is actually quite limited. I often like to joke that I suffer from an Oncology Syndrome which essentially this deep frustration that you feel as you see just like how fast cancer research has has gone in the few decades from really like no treatment whatsoever to almost completely curing certain forms of cancers. And if you look carefully. Did you realize that one of the reasons for this? Incredible progress is that on college has really made use of the revolution molecular biology and it has done so because it actually has access to tissue to the tissue of interest we know almost nothing about how the human brain develops. Because it's it's completely inaccessible. And so again we are defining psychiatric disorders based on combinations of behaviors presence or absence or certain patterns behavior. We've made a lot of progress into classifying disorders and reclassifying them. But the truth is that our molecular understanding of psychiatric disorders of brain disorders more. Broadly is very limited And probably behind any other branch of medicine which I think is reflected in the therapeutics that we have And the complexity. I mean. It's fun to think about like you know in the eighties molecular biology. Was this hot new term. I mean you're talking about something. Almost like molecular psychology raking this big sort of emergent phenotype that is a behavioral and then trying to connect it noxious at the tissue level. Not just at the cellular level but all the way from molecular level. That is a hard thing to do. It's hard to imagine someone has schizophrenia or severe depression. What's the target to hit? You said something really interesting about just never being held back by not really having the tissue and you by that you know that we the first time we get to look at the tissue is after somebody who has suffered from a psychiatric disorder has died right that is our primary obstacle helmet. Yes and there are a number of challenges associated with studying postmortem tissue from patients. Of course the obvious one is the fact that the tissue is not a life. Yeah for me as a neuroscientist is really important to be able to record. Electrical signals from sells really look at hard communicating with each other. But at the same time another limitations actually the availability of tissue. I mean if you were to just think for instance evolved autism spectrum disorders which is very common one in sixty or so individuals and there is even an autism brain back but the number of brains that we have in a brain bank is really in the hundreds not thousands for disorder that is still and it's probably for adults to read it's right and other limitations actually age of this individual but very often also the cause of death because in most of the cases actually traumatic yes and most of psychiatric patients will take many many medications and other goal various therapeutic interventions across their lifespan. We don't know for instance. What is how is that influencing what we're seeing in postmortem tissue so you're getting a very small amount of information that may not even be accurate or very anecdotal. Yes and that's the only tool that you have at the moment besides behavior. Well I think of course are imaging studies that you could use. Mri and functional. Emory's problem with those studies is that you don't really get the molecular resolution. You don't get to really study. The tissue an alternative which has been using the last decade or so has been to model many of the disorders with animals. That has been quite an exciting field that was primarily accelerated by identifying genes associated with psychiatric disorders of. But I think we always have to be aware of the differences between Between species right even in how the brain the structure of the brain the fact that there are millions of years that separates us in evolution and the behavioral repertoire is very different across seas now. Of course they're the behavioral repertoire is much closer to that of humans but as you can imagine again the limitation there is. How scalable isn't that? How many primates can we really use this type of studies and who can afford to do this experiments on our scale? The truth is that most of the psychiatric those have a very complex genetics. It is very rare like one single gene or one single variant but often a combination of this. And it's not just obviously about the jeans but what are the cells and the circuits that are affected by this and I think that only once we start to understand some of the molecular machinery behind the psychiatric disorders. Can we as it happened in the cancer? Fueled Star thinking about therapies. That have been designed for specific disorders rather than identified by chance. Because many of the drugs that we have for psychiatric disorders today have actually been identified by chance

Pasha Professor Of Behavioral Vj Pond Day Hannah Stanford General Partner WI Cancer Oncology Syndrome Schizophrenia Emory
Implicit Bias in Mental Health

Second Opinion

03:43 min | 4 months ago

Implicit Bias in Mental Health

"Is eighteen and was acting bizarrely. He wasn't coming home. He sat staring out the window for long periods of time and had angry outbursts. His mother finally got him to agree to see a psychiatrist. Who DIAGNOSED SCHIZOPHRENIA? His mother was tearful. She told me the diagnosis at Jamal's recent visit. She's a nurse and she knew a bit about schizophrenia. She didn't see any of the disease in Jamal. He was firmly connected to reality. His social relationships had become less desirable to him but he's still interacted normally with people. His thinking speech and his behaviors were organized. And he had no hallucinations. Psychiatrists like all of us can make mistakes. Unlike my practice where I can order lab tests. X-rays your scans to help me understand. What's going wrong psychiatrists don't have those tools? They see a person for a small amount of time. Ask a number of questions and then need to make a diagnosis and often star treatment. Usually a drug. There's no shortage of reasons that doctors can make mistakes in judgment including misinterpreting patients answers not asking appropriate follow up questions or implicit bias. Implicit bias is not unique to mental health. But it can play a role in how a diagnosis a patient implicit bias. Are those stereotypes or feelings that we have toward a group of people that are sub-conscious these biases can be either positive or negative. The important part though is that we act on these implicit bias involuntarily without any awareness or control these are not biases that we know we have that we subconsciously. Suppress these operate on a completely unconscious level implicit bias as affect every one of us. Even people who are supposed to be impartial like referees judges and doctors we know subconsciously. Many doctors have biases toward women. Ethnic groups sexual behaviors recreational behaviors and certain occupations textbook or classic descriptions of diseases often paint a picture the way a white man would experience them. Medical students may not learn how the disease looks and women or other subgroups. A recent study looked at about seventeen hundred men. Diagnosed with schizophrenia. It turned out that black men diagnosed with schizophrenia. Were four times more likely than white men to actually have symptoms of major depression. Could it be that racial implicit bias accounts for black men? Being misdiagnosed with schizophrenia rather than major depression the problem is of course. That depression requires a different approach in schizophrenia and it can have a very different prognosis but without knowing it doctors may be making misdiagnoses that have important negative consequences. Jamal was reevaluated. He was diagnosed as having depression treated with both anti depressants and therapy and his mother says with a big smile. He's nearly back to normal. Jamaa looks at me and gives me a thumbs up as for the psychiatrist. Not Bad doctor. She just jumped to conclusions. Perhaps based on implicit bias and failed to entertain alternative

Schizophrenia Jamal Depression Hallucinations Jamaa
Collaborating to Cure Dementia

Sounds of Science

08:35 min | 5 months ago

Collaborating to Cure Dementia

"Many of us will have to deal with dementia at some point in our lives whether as a patient or caregiver this terrible range of conditions affects five to eight percent of the sixty and older population at any given time. According to the World Health Organization the Dementia Consortium of Private Charity Partnership that Charles River joined last year is one of the organizations leading promising research on dementia treatments in order to discuss this condition and the research to treat it. I am joined by Sarah Almond Associate Director of integrated biology. Welcome Sarah Hi. Can you explain the purpose and organization of the DEMENTIA CONSORTIUM DEMENTIA Is SETUP BOY A? K. or outside research she k. Is a charity that focuses on. Alzheimer's disease it brings together. Active research is Pharma partners. Sarah's including Chelsea River in order to bring forward novel treatments dementia including outlines disease outside reset she. Kabc this research is invited to come forward with ideas for novel targets in Europe. Degeneration Your Inflammation Way. Them work with them to put together. What packages the funded by the partners? Anti Kate to prosecute he's talk and hopefully lead to novel treatments for Dementia. What do you think of the way? They've set up their organization. I think this is a great way to stop the organization because it brings together such a broad range of experience From academic researchers may have spent years really understanding the biology of targets to pharmaceutical companies. That know how to bring targets three two treatments actually effective in the clinic and also is a CRI where we have a broad range of so biology and chemistry capability so we cannot provide the word packages also have extremely experienced. Research is catchy. Help develop the molecules to treat these young coupled with the charitable input of the Vale Uk. He Project managed but also do so much to bring forward research in this area. Yeah absolutely cut covering all the bases. So what is Charles Rivers role in this group? You mentioned a little bit and you go into a little more detail. Charleston is WANNA to Communist with capabilities and drug discovery expertise. We provide strategic input into plans to de risk these targets and how to generate tool molecule suitable testing the hypothesis. We went with Alzheimer's Research K. And the principal investigator to proposals together. That income dreams that executed by then the appeal and US working closely together. They may do the basics. Hogging island allergy and we bring medicinal chemistry or HD CAPABILITIES. That actually will enable us to find a joke against that tailgate. We meet with the foul partners to finalize plans. And then once funded. We actually execute the work. Okay awesome I understand that a couple of research projects from the consortium have already been green lit Can you explain those proposals? She'll you're correct to Russia in progress of the two targets. One is fine as the Scott appears to link to Tau Accumulation ear inflammation. We aren't sure whether we need to be selective over a closely related kind as the. Pi is looking at whether ACHSAF. You've reduced this target. That doesn't indeed impact Taufel are. They should be China in Vivo. Mostly of onto molecule and vacation and which is a specific type of dementia or Alzheimer's. Or is that just a general Assignments towel face but particularly Alzheimer's disease at the eventual Gulf one is to the impact of the tour the killer produce on time phosphorylation. In an in Vivo model than the second project is two gene mutation I l s from tempo dementia the courses of pathogenic Rene to be produced. And we're aiming to block the expo this RNA. By targeting his with the protein takes out the Chris into the cell. When this new mix and Rene is exploited toxic repeat protein produced which then up today so responses and Kohl's neurodegenerative disease so the talk if allegations. This is actually already fairly strong. So we'll focus on producing told molecule capable of testing the hypothesis drug ability in Viva. And this is quite interesting that uses Zebra Fish Assay which is as a Pi Out Annika's scrap. The compounds can reduce the interaction between the protein. And the mutant. Aren a over So vice projects Charles River going to rub in Asia screen and then performed medicinal chemistry. Touchy try and get the molecules to kind of test with the viable targets. So how exactly is the consortium supporting this work on on these two proposals? So the consortium consists of Pharma Partners K. And they weren't. She formed kind of equal partners within that and they provide funding the project so they've also provided their expertise in kind of defining the key risks that we need to address in our plans and also technically hurt entice for example as I was research to see progress against small Stein's out payroll Consult here as a whole. I understand our work on dementia has increased substantially over the last year or. So is this because of a higher demand for treatment or is it more promising research avenues. Or is it both. I think by This been advances in understanding of neurons. Lemay tion in particular so this is triggered research projects. But also there's a shift away from the amyloid focused approaches for outside disease due to a lack of clinical success but equally dementia is still highly prevalent in and loss of US. Know people that'd be personally affected by this August. Just it's very hard Eric Tree but not one which people are going to give them. What is the importance of collaboration for researching these neurological diseases? They understand that. Probably the REAL STRENGTH OF THE CONSORTIUM. I think just touches found that there are Kiama nays area The SIS for those lost focus hasn't been successful in the clinic so it's clear that novel therapeutic approaches and needed and this takes time so rarely. We need different people to work together. Different functions work together so farmer actually reduce what they do in house and choose to those complex in return. Viva studies take years to fully establish in Zeros and so when academic academia follow charities and see arose all have complementary skill sets the they they research can be three to benefit the patient in the minimum time possible. Is it also a matter of the fact that CNN diseases are so complicated? And there's so many different factors going into the Mike. No one can be an expert in enough of the different areas of research to really do absolves ex exactly not. Yeah you know. And and so just by the nature of scientific institution you may get more time to focus on specific disease mechanisms. That PHARMACEUTICAL COMPANY. Just doesn't have the kind of time to dedicate starved to really building that level understanding but they may have a much broader range of complex models. That can actually help advance. This yet come has been unfortunately so we can you tell me about the psychiatry consortium which I guess is kind of an offshoot of the dementia consortium. Yeah it's it's basically has the same structures dimensions. Timonen is formed in consultation with a K. Who a kind of had a stake in his on. Psychiatry example schizophrenia or autism and this is obscene medicines discovery cats who are not for profit and are there the cats ponant which was set innovate UK to support innovation and use by UK business? So the psychiatry console is one of the indicates which is accelerating drug discovery and psychiatric

Dementia Dementia Consortium Dementia Consortium Of Private Alzheimer's Disease Alzheimer Charles River United States Rene Sarah Hi Sarah Almond Associate Director Of Integrat World Health Organization Europe Chelsea River Charleston Neurodegenerative Disease Vale Uk Russia Charles Rivers
Governors call out White House on dearth of coronavirus testing as protests grow

Armstrong and Getty

02:01 min | 5 months ago

Governors call out White House on dearth of coronavirus testing as protests grow

"It's a matter of tests and protest the political feelings regarding the corona virus outbreak in the U. S. being rubbed raw as governors deal with challenges in their states including protests ginned up in part by president trump White House correspondent Bob Costantini reports the president's tweets in support of protesters who want their states to end coronavirus restrictions is not lost on governor Jay Inslee of Washington who wasn't directly targeted in Philly on ABC's this week this is such as schizophrenia because the president basically is asking people please ignore Dr Fauci inductor birch please ignore my own guidelines that I set forth but taking questions at Sunday night's briefing the president sounding like the administration's guidelines in some places the governors are ready to go and other places they can't go yet and they will go they want to they have to have a safe I wanted to be safe polls from pew research center and NBC news Wall Street journal released over the weekend show nearly two thirds of Americans worry states may relax restrictions too soon his state had any restriction protest Saturday but head of the national governors association Larry Hogan on CNN's state of the union points out Maryland is still on an upward case trajectory and it's become repetitious in a way is a call for more tense grows from state leaders the administration I think is trying to ramp up testing but to try to push this off to say that the governors have plenty of testing and they should just get to work on testing so now we are doing our job is just absolutely false the latest testing news from the administration the threat of invoking government orders to produce more of the swabs on long sticks that are inserted into the nasal cavity what are in short supply we're preparing here's the defense production act to increase well production and one U. S. facility by over twenty million additional swaps per month the president also spoke of pushing textile makers to working protective masks and gowns as he said of the highest

Bob Costantini President Trump Jay Inslee Washington Philly ABC Schizophrenia Pew Research Center Wall Street Journal Larry Hogan CNN Maryland White House Correspondent Dr Fauci NBC
Robert Kolker Discusses 'Hidden Valley Road'

The Book Review

08:34 min | 6 months ago

Robert Kolker Discusses 'Hidden Valley Road'

"Us about the Galvin family. Let's start with the parents. Don and Mimi there. The subject of this book Don really lived through the greatest moments of the twentieth century. He was a World War Two veteran and the two of them put down roots in Colorado after the war and raised a family and had twelve children. The twelve children's span the baby boom the. I was born in nineteen forty five and the last in nineteen sixty five and they were known in Colorado Springs. Colorado is sort of a model family. Everybody knew the Galvin's with their twelve children and the oldest was a football star and dated the general's daughter at the Air Force Academy and all of the boys were Jock simplisafe on every hockey game. They played they were sort of legends at the time but nobody really knew that privately. The family was suffering that that in the end six of the twelve children were diagnosed schizophrenia. And it was at a time in America where there was a lot of shame and stigma around mental illness. Even more than there is now where the parents were often blamed and so it was a secret for as long as they keep it a secret and that just lead to more damage and the youngest children in the family really suffered the most from living in that house full of secrets before we get into their stories. It's interesting that you say everyone knew the Galvin's in Colorado Springs. My cousin actually grew up in an air force family in Colorado Springs and had never heard of them and so it might be that. She's she's younger. She's in her forties now. But I'm curious how you came across this family and their story because you're not from Colorado Springs. Yeah their heyday was in the early years of the academy. Right after the academy opened in the mid fifties that was when the family really started to rise up so they were best known in the late fifties. I know about them because the youngest two children the only girls were friends of a friend of mine. And for years. These two sisters Margaret and Lindsey had been talking with one another about the best way to let the world know about their family but they realized they couldn't do it alone. There was a lot about their family. They didn't even know. I mean a lot of these brothers were fifteen or twenty years older than they were and then of course a lot of the medical records. They didn't have access to and a lot of the stories that their parents told they couldn't necessarily verify on their own. A lot of legends going around and in fact they some of the worst things that happened to the family had been kept from them kept secret from them because they were too young when it happened and so finally they decided to turn to an independent journalists to to cover the family independently to take the story wherever it would lead and they were confident in doing this because they felt that the there was scientific value medical value in focusing on this family and they knew that researchers had been talking to them for decades and they wanted to know what those researchers learned as. Well okay all families. Don't get along perfectly. And I imagine a family with twelve children. Probably even more so where they unanimous in their willingness to collaborate with you to answer your questions be interviewed well aside from being completely gobsmacked by the story and and really could not believe all. This happened to one family. I was pretty convinced in the beginning that there couldn't be a book about this because of medical privacy laws that all all it would take was one sibling standing up and saying what you WANNA book about this family no way and then suddenly it would get very impossible so I worked very Slowly and really took it very easy and over several months I would get on the phone. Maybe once a week with different family members saying so you know your sisters are interested in having a book about your family. How does that make you feel and sort of got took the temperature of the entire family and to my amazement everyone was interested in. Everyone was ready including Mimi. The family matriarch who had been so determined to keep everything secret for so long. She was in her nineties. Ready to talk about it too. She died in two thousand seventeen after you interviewed her. And I want to talk about that interview a little bit because as you mentioned earlier at that time schizophrenia was often blamed on mothers. Yes and and so. She was thrilled to be talking about it from a genetic perspective. You know. We're in the Arab genetics. Now so it it made her feel good to be able to say yes. Well now. We know that it couldn't have been bad parenting that it was genetics and so two that part she was happy but she was really part of her survival instinct and part of what made her so functional for so long was that she could really move past a lot of the unpleasantness in her life. So getting here to talk about unpleasant subjects was not easy and of course. I didn't WanNa get a ninety one or ninety two year old to to do anything. I didn't want to traumatize someone who was clearly in such frail health. So what proceeded was me sitting there at the kitchen table with her and her two daughters were at the table too and every time she would try to deflects the conversation. One of her daughter's would go. Oh Mom and and try to kind of cajole her gently back to talk about the unpleasant stuff and eventually she she was able to really open up about some very difficult things and I was really grateful to get that kind of clarity from her. Twelve children is difficult enough. I mean twelve children. Ten of them were boys even if they did not suffer from mental illness even during the baby boom. That's a lot of kids. Why did they have twelve children? I spent a lot of time sort of looking into that question for dom father. He was Catholic and he was looking for a distinguished life and he wanted to to stand out in some way and it made him feel good to be a pattern familias and so it pleased him to have so many children. And then Mimi who was like a lot of women in her generation a little frustrated that she couldn't intellectually really achieve dreams. She really gave up her college education and gave up and he sort of independent life to be a mother and she gave up a life of culture and sophistication moving out to the boonies which is Colorado was in the fifties to her as a sophisticated New Yorker and so she liked the being having a certain amount of notoriety and fame and accomplishment of having such a large family but more than that I think she was binging on family in a way because of a lot of the losses she had had in her life. She had lost her father when she was younger and a scandal he sort of became divorced from the family and she never really had a relationship with him. She now was in a marriage where the husband was increasingly absent. He was a career military guy who really created a life of the mind and was not an active parent like a lot of fathers in that time period and so really having so many children gave her a lot of company and I came to appreciate that aspect of it. So six of these kids. Six of the were ultimately diagnosed with schizophrenia. Which as I understand it typically emerges in adolescence or young adulthood it. Correct me if I'm wrong but we're there earlier signed. How did they first find out about the first child to be diagnosed? They suspect something was wrong. Well five of the six of them really followed that pattern. They were all twenty twenty one twenty two in late adolescence. When they had their first really visible psychotic breaks. There was one peter who was earlier he was fourteen he. There was real trauma right before that happened. He watched his father suffers stroke but the they were warning signs for for some of them for Donald. The oldest son he really was a very troubled teenager despite being out early so successful and so popular and he would do things like smashed dishes while washing the dishes out of rage or be overly almost gratuitously abusive to his younger brothers when he was left to take care of them. There are certain ways that he should have demonstrated that he wasn't connecting with the world in a traditional way in that it's almost like there is a barrier between him and others and that was very visible even in his teenage years. But it only devolved into psychosis. Once he was in college he would do things like run into a bonfire during a PEP rally or be cruel to animals. Th they were difficult moments that suddenly were wakeup calls to him. That something was really wrong and he started going to see therapists and his parents started shopping for a medical opinion. That could keep him in college and keep the family away from scandal.

Colorado Springs Colorado Galvin Family Mimi Galvin DON Schizophrenia Air Force Academy Jock Simplisafe America Hockey Football Donald Trump Margaret Lindsey
"schizophrenia" Discussed on a16z

a16z

14:23 min | 6 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on a16z

"With help from the Galvin's and other families identified another genetic area called. Churn seven and turn a seven is related to the vulnerability theory of schizophrenia. Which is that. Perhaps one is over sensitive or has a sensitivity issue to stimuli. That looks schizophrenia. As a developmental disease one that really begins in utero. Even though it manifest itself much later and over the years he struggled to find a way to perhaps make the area more healthier more resilient and less vulnerable and he has a hypothesis that there actually is a safe. Nutritional Supplement Choline can strengthen brain health generally of the unborn child but also perhaps cross your fingers sixteen times perhaps many years from now prove to make the children more resilient less vulnerable to psychosis and they're doing on all studies right now using choline and if it shows any promise at all he has the Galvin's and other families like them to thank Stephan. It'd be very interesting to hear from your side of the kind of story of the Pharma Industry Attempt to manage this as well. Where would you see those attempts after sourcing? Then where did we go next? And what was the sort of industry response? Where are we today? In the past. There was a quite productive age. Where drugs like Zyprexa were developed. Where we're looking for simply animal behaviors. That were related to schizophrenia. And here is where having sort of a tool kit is quite valuable in a sense. Because if you know for example if there's some odd behavior that an animal is showing that thorazine mitigates then without even knowing the receptors involved. Perhaps you can test drugs in animals for other drugs. That mitigate those behaviors and perhaps don't have side effects so the problem of course is that rats don't get schizophrenia. They don't even have sort of the massive cortisol structures in the folding. That would be we think is where the higher processes that are affected in schizophrenia reside. So to your point about cells dish. I mean it's really a problem of models right. It's a problem of models. How do you before doing a clinical trial in humans? How do you get confidence that your drug is going to work and I think in the nineteen nineties? There were a number of very good efforts. Based on sort of synoptic studies. People have known again going back to some of the early pharmacology. That dopamine was involved. That glutamate was involved. Now we started to identify with the Human Genome Project and just molecular cloning. In general we started uncover what the molecules are that regulate glutamate and regulate dopamine and a number of clinical trials. Were done on these as well but still does stymie. The field today is if you take the overall disease what is your model. What do you tested on? That gives you confidence that you can test this safely in humans and that will have some effect. How do people even do that? I mean are there any other tools before you begin clinical trials in humans when there's a disease that really doesn't present anywhere else outside of humans? Schizophrenia tough one. It's very tough now. Nothing is easy. But for example tumors do grow animals. And you can implant. A patient derived x plan. A patient derived tumor into an animal. And perhaps test therapies there. Or you do have cancer cell lines tumors will actually cell lines will actually grow in a dish and something that kills. Those could reasonably be called to be acting on the tumor and we simply don't have that equivalent for schizophrenia. So what was the next moment where there was something that seemed on the pharmacology side like a real viable treatment that we were you know that people were getting excited about and where are we now. People were excited about Matab Petro Glutamate receptors. That's a particular type. A subtype of glutamate. Which is the main excited Tori neurotransmitter in the nervous system in humans? People were excited about sort of finer manipulations of dopamine receptors and again by reverse engineering. Some of the atypical anti psychotics. You could find out that serotonin receptors also had involvement now. Each of these is going to be a broad family of many many genes. So can you do more finer manipulations of these not every advance in drug? Therapy has to be a totally new mechanism. Schizophrenics and other CNS disorders famous for going off their medications. So if you can perhaps make a medication that is simply last longer and can be given maybe every month or even less duration under a doctor's supervision that's a significant medical advances and this is an engineering challenge. I started life as an engineer and Drug discovery is really biological engineering. I'm not saying it's easy but we do know how to make drugs last longer in the body. There's a very interesting story. In there. With nicotine the receptor that Robert Freedman in Colorado had identified with help from the Galvin family and other families like them was a nicotinic receptor and strictly speaking. That's a receptor that when medicated might actually help with focusing concentration. I mean there's a stereotype of schizophrenic patients. Getting some relief from chain smoking because it focuses their mind and there's a hypothesis related to nicotine. There was for time that if you could somehow drug this receptor a little bit to help it along that perhaps this would prevent delusions or even prevent psychotic breaks and Robert Freedman did try for a while to work on a drug for that and he reports anecdotal excellent results for many patients. But it was a drug that you had to take several times a day and that was something that the pharmaceutical companies couldn't bring through trials to make into a once a day drug so it went away so he decided to go after the nicotinic receptor in utero. You know through Coleen especially in the nineteen nineties. There was a lot of companies and a lot of academic researchers investigating nicotine nicotinic receptors. And again there did seem to be a clear linked to schizophrenia. Perhaps schizophrenics are self medicating by smoking. If so perhaps you can make a sort of sub type of nicotine that gives you some benefit or perhaps even some war benefit and again as Bob said that perhaps last long enough in the body to be practical to be taken as a drug so in this case there was a biological challenge. There no question but it became also an engineering challenge as all drug discovery. Does nicotine is quite a nonselective molecule. While everything hits is called a nicotinic receptor but your body has something like fourteen fifteen genes for individual sub units that together come together for a receptor for nicotine and they all mix and match and very unpredictable ways and ways that still are not well known so. The challenge was quite formidable. People did go ahead for technical reasons. It turned out to be easy to make. Sort of a sub form of nicotine that would only hit seven receptors. Not Easy but not impossible. Either people had good reason to think that this might work no question. It was a huge Downer for patients for the field for everybody when this entire class of drugs just sort of didn't seem to come to nothing but we learned and the negative result often is just as informative as the positive result. We do learn. Can I ask how? Incentivized is the sort of pharmaceutical industry right now to find other alternatives to things like the class of drugs that you know. Sore Zine and some others that you've mentioned I mean those do work to some extent yes to some extent so I'm not a clinician about fifty percent of the patients well to a typical psychotics. But this doesn't touch sort of the cognitive and emotional problems and one of the things one of the many things grateful to Lynn for was really taking me to visit her patients so that I could really see. There's no question something is wrong. Just sort of a very emotionless flat affect cognition is fine clearly. These people are very articulate very bright in many cases but some things badly wrong so to your question. What is the incentive for pharmaceutical companies. It's a huge incentive. I think lots of people would love to do it because schizophrenia is one percent of the population. This is across populations across cultures. So it's a huge opportunity to make therapies that help patients what is not a rare disease for what is not a rare disease and we go beyond that again as Bob's book so amply demonstrates the toll on people's lives it's far beyond that one percent. We just don't know how to do it. Not for the broad schizophrenia. There and this is where I came from my angle to sort of look at. Perhaps there might be sub types of schizophrenia defined genetics where you really would have one particular form of schizophrenia. So Stephan if you as a researcher if you could wave a magic wand right now you know you mentioned better models. What are the things that if you could wish something here tomorrow in the form of a new technology or new capability? What would that be? That would really push us forward into a new chapter all go way afield but if we could monitor the brains of a schizophrenic with sufficient resolution with high resolution right now we've got about a millimeter Vauxhall with the best bold FM experiments while they're actually having a psychotic break. The resolution is still of course could be made finer and finer. We still can't get down to the level of a single cell but now with the blood. Oxygen Level Dependent Magnetic Resonance Imaging. We can get a measure of function in somebody's brain in real time difficult to do takes. A lot of equipment takes a particular stimulus but one could perhaps hope. This will lead to more insights. Oh my gosh how fascinating that. We've never seen. We actually have no idea what's really happening. I mean consider the logistics. You can't consent somebody and get them to sit in a machine and then wait for them to have a psychotic break. Yeah what would you be looking for? We need mechanism if the field as a whole could say here is a particular area where the excitability is abnormal area of brain tissue that has abnormally excitable or a particular receptor that is abnormally excitable. That gives us a good place to start. That gives us mechanism and then perhaps we could study what to existing drugs due to that. What is missing with existing drugs? That's fascinating it almost sounds like you need like a wearable. Mri very high resolution. Silicon Valley go to it. What about things like crisper? If you do start defining some very specific narrow very entire medic causes that the possibility is so. We'll give a possibility. Say if we knew that a baby galvan or their modern day counterpart babies had a variant in a gene that we thought because families like the Galvin's that we had good reason to believe would make them develop schizophrenia. Can we get in there and change that one nuclear tied to the wild type? It's conceivable but again the challenge here is the engineering challenge. We can do it in a dish but trying to get just that one gene edited trying to get it in just that one nucleotides changed in every cell in the brain and no changes in any other nucleotides in the brain and delivering something that will actually crossed the blood brain barrier. And then doing it on an infant. How would you even test this very very difficult? Bob You describe when Lynn Delisi I met the Galvin family and you write this incredibly profound line. That really stuck out for me as she walked through the door of the house at Hidden Valley road. She couldn't help but recognize a perfect sample. This could be the most mentally ill family in America and you really dove into every element of what that meant for them into this family's innermost suffering and struggles..

schizophrenia nicotine Bob dopamine utero Galvin Stephan Robert Freedman Lynn Delisi cortisol Silicon Valley Matab Petro America Coleen engineer
Winfrey chooses "Hidden Valley Road" for book club

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:21 sec | 6 months ago

Winfrey chooses "Hidden Valley Road" for book club

"Country Oprah Winfrey briefly consider holding off on her book club choices but she decided the books were needed more than ever and a new pic is Robert Coulter's book hidden valley road it's an in depth account of the nineteen fifties family work six children were all diagnosed with schizophrenia Coulter's book as Winfrey's fourth selections and starting a partnership with apple last

Robert Coulter Apple Oprah Winfrey
"schizophrenia" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:55 min | 6 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on KCRW

"What is schizophrenia really is it only a psychiatric condition or does it have its origins in something else who is more susceptible to it and why these are the questions at the heart of a new book about an extraordinary family writer Robert Kolker the bestselling author of lost girls tells the story of the Galvin family they seemed a model for baby boomer America twelve children with a military dad in a strict but religious mother growing up in Colorado in the nineteen sixties but over the years six of the boys were diagnosed with schizophrenia and now their journey is transforming the science around the mental illness the book is called hidden valley road inside the mind of an American family and Robert Kolker joins us now from his home in Brooklyn New York welcome to the program thanks a lot hello we can't get into every story line in this incredibly detailed and richly reported book but a generally tell me about the gallons and the time that they were living in well they really lived in the grandest period of the American century they were married at the end of World War two they raised a family in the fifties and sixties through the Cold War and through the American prosperity boom and their children really where the baby boom the oldest one was born in nineteen forty five and the youngest one in nineteen sixty five and there were twelve of them so they were famous wherever they lived as this very large family that outwardly seems perfect in every way let's talk about why schizophrenia has been such a mystery there was this a debate that you discuss initially a nature genetics or nurture that something in the way someone was brought up triggers schizophrenia what was the debate about well the very beginning of psychiatry most people who were giving schizophrenia named believe that it had some sort of physical quality to it and that it might be hereditary but Sigmund Freud disagreed he really believe that in mainly it was something that was inherited not inherited in a genetic sense but inherited in terms of childhood trauma and and this nature nurture debate continued for some time and in fact the nurture people the psychoanalyst's really held sway throughout the twentieth century at least in America at all suggesting that some people who had schizophrenia and lived in a world that the therapist had to penetrate and that with the right kind of therapy the problem might be solved in the person might enter reality again and this completely ignored the genetic aspect of it now we're living in a world where everything is seemingly about genetics but we're back to a nature nurture argument because we believe that schizophrenia and other complex diseases are just about genetics better about genes that are impacted or affected by the environment explained it well it's always been known to be a syndrome as opposed to a disease it's not like influenza where you can identify what it is in terms of its you know chemistry schizophrenia is really a collection of symptoms that are defined and then treated based on the symptoms sue you in the book I talk about a woman called Linda Lee C. and her work she believe that families like the Galvin's held the key to understanding schizophrenia that's right a doctor Lee C. was a pioneer at the time she was one of the top researchers at the National Institute of mental health and she became fascinated by the idea that if you started a family with a large incidence of schizophrenia and that you might be able to find some sort of genetic silver bullet inside it that could help us understand how the condition takes shape in the general population but she had went on to assemble the most numerous a collection of what she called multiplex families and to the gallons for one of those first families and they were the largest family and it was through the study of those families that with a lot of twists and turns she ended up once the human genome was sequenced to actively demonstrate how families like the gallons can help us understand the condition and how it takes shape yeah and let's talk about what was uncovered through looking at families like the goblins because it was a mystery right at the heart of this about the way the brains of schizophrenics function that's right and her belief was that this definitely was inherited that environment had nothing to do with it what they found was in fact a genetic mutation that might be unique to this family but is so vital to brain function that it might help us understand how schizophrenia works and that's really how families like the garbage can help us going forward we can look at them and their particular genetic mutation that might be at fault and while that mutation may not exist elsewhere you can help us understand the disease and how it affects others in their models for this with other diseases so possibly might be neuro developmental is is what they came to sort of believe yes in the eighties the new wisdom about schizophrenia was that it was a developmental disorder which is to say that even though so people came down with that at the age of twenty or twenty one that didn't mean that they suddenly got bitten by an insect and had schizophrenia or it meant that there was something with in their genetic makeup that they had from before they were even born that gave them a vulnerability a special sensitivity whether was the inability to filter out certain stimuli or difficulty and brain development that only manifested itself in the final stages of brain development which as we know now is adolescents you come across the gallons a mutual friend of mine and Lindsey Galvan introduced us Lindsay is the youngest of the twelve and he had known them for years and that the two sisters there ten brothers and two sisters Margaret and Lindsey and the family had been talking for years about trying to let the world know about their family stories and finally they decided they needed an outsider and independent journalist who could take the story wherever it led yeah now that their story is finally being told what do you think we should take away from what they went through well I mean these are challenging times independent of mental illness I think that this is an example of a family that really experienced not just one but two or three or four different horrors all at once and came out the other side it's about not turning inward when when the worst happens in life it's about reaching out to each other and understanding the value of family and the value of not closing yourself off to possibilities I really believe there's a lot of hope and inspiration in this story that people can take away from it independent of mental illness issues rather call government is the author of the new book hidden valley road inside the mind of an American family thank you very much thank you letter they're two world renowned musicians from two very different parts of the world Grammy Award winner Abigail Washburn plays one of the most popular instruments in Appalachian music the banjo Fay.

schizophrenia
Jameela Jamil Has an Ambitious Goal: To Feel Things

The Hilarious World of Depression

09:16 min | 6 months ago

Jameela Jamil Has an Ambitious Goal: To Feel Things

"It's the hilarious world of depression. I'm John Mel on this episode person who has become famous in America rather quickly as a Sitcom star and an outspoken activist. The Sitcom has ended but the activism. Who It's just getting started. Hello my name is Jamila Djamil and I am at the Hilarious Weld Off. Depression and And what do you do for a living? I'm an actor and activist at a pain in the US. Three job titles multifaceted. Jamila Djamil was a TV and radio host or presenter in England for several years. Welcome to fish. Wrap up with me. I am here to deliver onto you all of the latest chart news and gossip in less time than it takes to make a couple of so last Sunday Cigna American audiences. I got to know her playing honey. Djamil the name-dropping high-society Londoner on the NBC. Moral Philosophy Sitcom the good place. But we've been through a lot swell you. I haven't been this upsets. My good friend Taylor was rude. Yep Stage in Konya was defending my best friend. Say Jamila grew up in London. Her parents emigrated from Pakistan and India says. Her family had a lot of mental health problems. Schizophrenia OCD bipolar depression suicidal. Ibm for Jamila. There was anxiety. There was depression and coming to grips with a lot of trauma. I wouldn't say who within my entire giant family unit because South Asian families huge. But there was an abusive background. Came From and A lot of bullying at home and at school That happened to us. Because we were Pakistani and My Dad is I think. Technically Indian We were South Asians living in a very racist time in Britain such as very tense existence to grow up in where people constantly hounding you with racial slurs calling you a monkey and not wanting to sit next to you at school and just a general night Great doesn't doesn't so no it was really bad. I'm amazed I made it out of my. I've made it our of my twenties even but I've had like a full nervous breakdown gone completely just totally lost it looking back on it now. It was pretty bleak. She had big time mental health issues but she says South Asian immigrant. Culture didn't talk about that kind of thing and neither did British culture. What was being talked about? Was the necessity for girls to be ridiculously skinny. And Jamila Developed Anorexia so I think is a combination the fact that I was growing up in the nineties and so- Heroin Chic could time the adults using non ironically. Where you to? In order to be beautiful you had to emulate the look of someone who does not eat and only Consumes heroin is also look a famine? That people were trying to achieve which is fucking insane considering that famine was and is still occurring in this world and millions and millions of people are suffering and dying from it and how much those people would love to be able to eat something Having their own physiques considered chic in this Bizarre and shallow industry. I was seeing people in my own country. Flights Pakistan and see 'em like skill lethal people on the side of the street begging for food. And then I would come here and see people starving themselves deliberately to emulate that look in order to fit into runway closed just so tiny so the look was just everywhere you were supposed to have jutting out hipbones and believe me. It was a badge of owner. It wasn't something that you hid. There was a long queue outside the girls along line outside the girl's bathroom. Everyone throwing up at lunch one. After the other. The other there was a girl. Easter bring her weighing scales in school and e on them. I remember without giving an interview saying she eats nude in order to stop us from overindulging. In Your Kate Moss talking about nothing tastes as good as thin. Feels well tacos. Pizza cake was their decision that you remember making A. I need to start eating way less. I need to start. Was that a conscious thing or do they just emerge suddenly it was a very very conscious scarring moment of my maths teacher wanting to teach us about graphs and pie charts and she weighed all of us to collect all of our weights as data to show a chart. The dumbest thing you've ever heard how I was. Eleven I was one of the tools guarding was the second oldest girl in the year and I was choppy. Because you gotta get like why toget- toll and also I was just. That was just my build at the time I was loving the curry and I had no self conscious about my body whatsoever. I loved having a tummy. I didn't know about thighs very innocent child. I wasn't remotely interested in the way that I look and That moment changed everything because I was the happiest girl in the class. I was ridiculed by the entire year I came home. My family founded shocking upsetting. I was the happiest girl year and I was immediately encouraged to diet and so I started my first I about eleven and it was. I was dieting. The way an eleven year old were diet which is with no understanding of any nutrition. I was living on somewhere between like two hundred three hundred calories. A day sometimes lasts which is insane because I was very tall and even by the time I hit five ten in my early teens. I was still consuming sometimes. Want two hundred calories a day a belly move passing out all the time didn't did stop menstruating and thought that I was winning. It never struck you as something wrong with us. No everyone was doing it. Everyone was doing everyone who's taking laxatives. Everyone's drinking teas that. I now rally against so hard There was slimfast cans all over our school. I want you know fell over. One on the steps steps passed out a tiny like fake chocolate bars instead of meals. It was just people were afraid of carbs and Pasta and everyone was on the Atkins Diet. So everyone's smell like metal and also it was just disgusting. It's terrible time and we were all on it so it didn't even feel like something. You really hit ego also at the time because of Hollywood there was this fucking Brag that I think kind of still exists of women pretending they eat so much just unnaturally thin. What a dumb witted Brag finding other mental illness conditions emerging with the eating disorder or. Were you just two out of even notice a depression or an anxiety? I wasn't even out of it. I was high on it like I was just sort of I was I was such a devoted anorexic and I was so it's so time consuming beyond our exit. The amount of time you spend learning new tricks trying new tricks hiding your food all of the all of the things that you have to do with so consuming. The I didn't even know that I had any kind of mental illness. I didn't think I had anorexia. I didn't think there was no. I didn't think there was anything wrong with me. The only thing I thought was wrong with me that I wasn't enough I was never thin enough. Do you understand what Anorexia was and just think it was something other people had. Yeah I used to be jealous. I thought Anorexia could only come in the form of of someone who weighs like three or four stone forty two to fifty six pounds and I would be envious if those people for being able to achieve that. I really didn't get it. But that's the problem is if you give this misinformation children. We don't have the whole picture. We do we also have this like youthful arrogance to us where we think our health will last forever. Our lives will go on forever will never be Will never face the side effects in. No one knows about osteoporosis. Kidney damage or liver damage all the IBS. All the different things that happened to people who mess around with their health my thyroid. My drains. Everything is exhausted. I mean I even now sorry twenty years after I started sobbing myself. That's what I was gonna ask because so often people think of it as. Oh anorexia is when you're not eating enough but it is a mental thing that even if you people can have anorexia yeah and and even if you find better eating habits later on the reasoning the processing of the idea of food is still always there. So many of told our weaponized food in our minds. So we're taught that like food. Is You know if you have a parent who beats you and then feel bad about it and then gives you a meal afterwards. You start to associate that meal with love or if your parents are. You're not supposed to eat then. Food becomes rebellion and food. Become self harm so we can. We can give food all these kind of different personalities and I think a lot of people lot more people realized then they realize even during the the guilt associated food and the coding and the words that we use around food of clean eating dirty foods. This is just this shame Sort of slipped in an envelope within all of these ways of discussing this thing that we need to give our body nutrition so it can function food fuel and I didn't know that until I hit thirty

Jamila Djamil Anorexia Depression Pakistan United States Heroin Konya John Mel America Kate Moss IBM England NBC Taylor Britain Toget- Toll Osteoporosis Overindulging London
"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

09:04 min | 7 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"And we talked last episode that there were some options that women tend to have more of that they can contact as far as dealing with homelessness and different things. Like that getting help when it comes to children. What about men? What type of options are there for men? Many options are are similar. Communities are all different in terms of what services are available but a lot of services are available to men and women are things like transportation services in home services when they will come to your home to teach you how to cook or how to mend shirts that needs fixing. There's respite care. That's available for men as well if they need a break from their roommate or they need a safe place to stay for a night and of course. There are clinical services who are people with mental illness. Talking last episode. About mothers with schizophrenia. But of course there are fathers schizophrenia. And so all of the services that are available for parents are not just rems Austin Afford Dad so support groups for parents with mental illness and the specialized clinical services for parents with mental. Illness would apply to DADS as well. And that's something we spoke about in the show as I was doing research for these episodes. It was frustrating for me because I failed. Article after Article About motherhood pregnancy dealing with children having schizophrenia and. I couldn't find anything on fatherhood being a fire with schizophrenia so I definitely had something. That's not addressed as much absolutely unfortunately a lot of women who get pregnant. The pregnancy as unplanned unwanted sometimes from a sexual assaults and so often they don't know who the father is an when they do sometimes the father just chooses not to be involved in so the woman is there left to raise the baby on her own. But you're right like we don't have many services for DADS schizophrenia. We don't know much about them. A hand as difficult as it is for a mom would schizophrenia. They're probably different factors affecting fatherhood hated. Now you have a book coming out if you WANNA tell us about this. Yeah I wrote a book. It's called the beginner's guide to understanding schizophrenia. It is my take on all the latest information on the symptoms of schizophrenia. What causes it? What it looks like in the brain and how to treat it. I've written it in the plainest language. Possible I just wrote it and I so I went through all the research. That's available right now to write it but my goal was to give people the real technical information all the details. We know but in language that is super easy to understand. So it's called. The beginner sky to understand schizophrenia. You can find it on Amazon ultimately linked to it on my website at heathen bench dot com slash schizophrenia book. And also be in the show notes and this book is it more geared towards loved ones friends. Family or people with schizophrenia. I rooted for both actually so the person I didn't write it for is any sort of clinician or researcher. It's not for them. It's for people who don't know anything about mental hall or treatments of no scientific knowledge. That's why I wrote it for so I wrote it for people who are just trying to understand schizophrenia. Whether that's because you have it or you have a loved one. Who HAS IT? Or you're just GONNA curious to know more about it. That's awesome. Thank you so much Dr. Fitch for joining us once again. Very very interesting. And thank you for shedding light on these subjects and we definitely gotTa Check Your Book. Out Rachel as always incredible interview now. I know that you talked to Dr Finch for a couple of hours. And obviously we edit it down. Did you learn anything about men with schizophrenia? From her that you didn't know before this interview I learned so much from her and I'd like that she's able to explain kind of that medical side and the way she's able to just explain it so I guess simply unlike a level that me and you can understand gave you know. We're not doctors but being able to break that down and I really liked that kind of explaining the homelessness and then of course the substance abuse and all of that playing in more so with the males. Yeah she's incredible once again. Thank you Dr French for being here and please if you have a moment pick up her book. She helped us with both episodes. And you know she. Does it free of charge? She's a great advocate for people with schizophrenia and mental health general so once again hats off to Dr Finch yes Gabe I want to ask you. First as someone who does not have schizophrenia. What is your takeaway from these past two episodes on the gender differences? I was surprised and I don't know why I feel like I shouldn't have been surprised. So I feel a little guilty but knowing that the way that society treats the genders so heavily impacted the outcomes in the treatment for schizophrenia from diagnosis to treatment to asking for help to getting care that really kind of put me on my on my rear a little. Because it's just so sad. Both men and women have the same illness. Yes there's very ends and the presentations etc but the thing that made me I'm GonNa go with saddest is that the outcomes were different based on how society effectively sees men and women. And it's like. Wow just just wow no. I agree with that completely. We obviously all know the society and you know we have these different ideals in our heads but yet to see how it can really affect people who are dealing with serious mental illnesses. It's definitely eye opening. I say the past two episodes for me have been very fascinating because there are so many factors that are out of people's control and where you're talking about form hormones that the body creates like to how your body actually processes the medications. Learning to thrive with schizophrenia is not as simple as take your pills every day. It's not as simple as make sure you're going to the doctor. You can be doing everything right. You can be doing everything correctly. Be Taking your medication on time. Be going to the doctor religiously and the deck is still stacked against you. And that's frustrating. It's depressing say the least situation to be in in those times. That's when it's time to change the game. I love how Jason hit on. How used to hate it. When people would ask him what he did workwise and then he came to the realization. That wait a minute. He's a mental health advocate. He works with veterans. He's leading counsel for veterans and he's an author of public speaker and it just goes on and on and that's like so much that's amazing like he does all this incredible stuff and I don't know that gave me so much hope gave it's easy to just kind of look at the negative of what maybe someone isn't doing and not pay attention to all of the amazing incredible things that they are and to your point when you say that it's easy to look at all the negatives in somebody's life and ignore the positives we have to put that on ourselves right. It's it's easy for us to ignore our own positives and only focus on. The negative is much as I would. Love to say that. Stigma and discrimination against people with schizophrenia is. All External. There is an internal components and I agree with you when Jason realized that he was doing all of this volunteer work in his community and Jason was using his experience for so much positivity especially in the veteran community the fact that he can work with veterans and understand both the mental health aspect and the veteran aspect it makes him a hot commodity and him realizing that obviously paid huge dividends for him so I would put a challenge out to everybody listening. Find the thing that you and you alone are uniquely good at and powerful and and keep that in mind. That's awesome absolutely gave. Well put very cool. Thank you so much for listening. Please likes share subscribe? And we'll be back next month with another episode of inside schizophrenia. A PSYCH CENTRAL. Podcast inside schizophrenia is presented by Psych Central Dot Com America's largest and longest operating independent mental health website. Your host Rachel Star withers can be found online at Rachel Star. Live Dot com co host gave Howard can be found online at gay power dot com for questions or to provide feedback. Please email top back at psych central Dot Com. The official website for insight schizophrenia is psych central dot com slash. Is Thank you for listening and please share widely..

schizophrenia Psych Central Dot Com America Rachel Star Dr Finch Jason Austin Dr French Amazon researcher Dr. Fitch Howard official
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

05:43 min | 7 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"To give people the real technical information all the details. We know but in language that is super easy to understand so it's called the beginner's guide to understand schizophrenia. You can find it on Amazon. Ultimately it all linked to it on my website at Hidden Bench Dot. Com SLASH SCHIZOPHRENIA book. And it also be the show and this book. Is it more geared towards loved ones friends? Family or people with schizophrenia. I root for both actually so the person I didn't write it for is any sort of clinician or researcher. It's not for them. It's people who don't know anything about mental hall or treatment of no scientific knowledge. That's why I wrote it for so I wrote it for people who are just trying to understand schizophrenia. Whether that's because you have it or you have a loved one. Who HAS IT? Or you're just GONNA curious to know more about it. That's awesome. Thank you so much Dr. Fitch for joining us once again. Very very interesting. And thank you for shedding light on these subjects and we definitely gotTa Check Your Book. Out Rachel as always incredible interview now. I know that you talked to Dr Finch for a couple of hours. And obviously we edit down. Did you learn anything about men with schizophrenia? From her that you didn't know before this interview I learned so much from her and I'd like that she's able to explain kind of that medical side and the way she's able to just explain it so I guess simply unlike a level that me and you can understand gave you know. We're we're not doctors but being able to break that down and I really liked that kind of explaining the homelessness and then of course the substance abuse and all of that playing in more so with the males the she's incredible once again. Thank you Dr French for being here and please if you have a moment pick up her book. She helped us with both episodes and she does it free of charge. She's a great advocate for people with schizophrenia and mental health general so once again hats off to Dr Finch yes Gabe I want to ask you. First as someone who does not have schizophrenia. What is your takeaway from these past two episodes on the gender differences? I was surprised and I. I don't know why I feel like I shouldn't have been surprised. So I feel a little guilty but knowing the way that society treats the genders so heavily. Impacted the outcomes and the treatment for schizophrenia from diagnosis to treatment. Asking for help to getting care that really. Kinda put me on my on my rear little. Because it's just so sad. Both men and women have the same illness and yes. There's variants and the presentations etcetera. But the thing that made me I'm GonNa go with saddest is that the outcomes were different based on how society effectively sees men and women. And it's like. Wow just just wow no. I agree with that completely. We obviously all know the society and you know we have these different ideals in our heads but yet to see how it can really affect people who are dealing with serious mental illnesses. It's definitely eye opening. I say the past two episodes for me have been very fascinating because there are so many factors that are out of people's control and where you're talking about form hormones that the body creates like to how your body actually processes the medications. Learning to thrive with schizophrenia is not as simple as take your pills every day. It's not as simple as make sure you're going to the doctor. You can be doing everything right. You can be doing everything correctly. Be Taking your medication on time. Be going to the doctor religiously and the deck is still stacked against you. And that's frustrating. It's a depressing. Say The least situation to be in in those times. That's when it's time to change the game. I love how Jason hit on how he used to hate it when people would ask him what he did work wise and then he came to the realization. That wait a minute. He's a mental health advocate. He works with veterans. He's leading a council for veterans and he's an author public speaker and it just goes on and on and that's like so much that's amazing like he does all this incredible stuff and I don't know that gave me so much hope gay. It's easy to just kind of look at the negative. What maybe someone isn't doing and not pay attention to all of the amazing incredible things that they are and to your point when you say that it's easy to look at all the negatives in somebody's life and ignore the positives we have to put that on ourselves right. It's it's easy for us to ignore our own positives and only focus on. The negative is much as I would. Love to say that. Stigma and discrimination against people with schizophrenia is. All External. There is an internal components and I agree with you when Jason realize that he was doing all of this volunteer work in his community and Jason was using his experience for so much. Positivity is specially in the veteran community the fact that he can work with veterans and understand both the mental health aspect and the veteran aspect. It makes him a hot commodity and him realizing that obviously paid huge dividends for him so I would put a challenge out to everybody listening. Find the thing that you and you alone are uniquely good at and powerful and and keep that in mind. That's awesome absolutely gave. Well put very cool. Thank you so much for listening..

schizophrenia Dr Finch Jason Amazon researcher Dr French Dr. Fitch Rachel
"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

10:18 min | 7 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"I'm Rachel Star here with my co host Gape Howard last episode. We discussed how schizophrenia affects women and this episode. We are focusing on the gentleman exciting. We have Jason Jepson. Who's GONNA join us? He is a mental health advocate. Also a veteran. Who HAS SCHIZOPHRENIA? And Dr Finch will return to help us understand the medical side of things that are going on Rachel. I'm looking forward to a great show. I'm excited to gave last month. Rachel we learned how schizophrenia impacts women. You know things. Like motherhood and pregnancy and menopause and aging and. I don't think there's a lot of people were surprised that any illness would impact a female differently than it would a male but we sort of want to open that up because there were some big differences in how schizophrenia presents in males over females and I think that was surprising for us during the research because we just assumed that an illness hits women differently because I think society is conditioned to believe that women go through everything differently. The fact that we hear mentioned over and over is that men tend to get diagnosed far earlier in life than women. Do with schizophrenia. However as we talked about last episode that's not always true especially in families who have a history of mental illness and even amongst like different ethnic groups but due to being diagnosed younger age men often have not attained the same degree of social development as women. Do at the onset of schizophrenia and that can contribute to poor social outcomes during our research. We learned that the reason that menor often diagnosed earlier because men are showing more emotions or boehner abilities and when seen in women as we learned last month. They're just like oh well she's a woman so of course she's being emotional. Where when the exact same symptoms seen in men that like oh? This is a problem but as you pointed out getting diagnosed earlier isn't necessarily the advantage that we think it is in males because stereotypically they're looking at you for all kinds of issues as we're GONNA learn from our guest. One of those issues is violence or rage or anger. My question to you Rachel is. Do you think that men have an easier time with schizophrenia? Or is it just a different time? I would definitely say a different time being diagnosed earlier that in itself and we talked about mini episodes ago where it comes to diagnosing children where that has a huge impact on you. You know if you know earlier that you have a major mental disorder that can change just how other people view you yourself. How your parents view your future? I know that's definitely come up just in my own life. But I can't imagine. Had I gotten the diagnosis in high school. My parents probably immediately would have started wearing like while she can't go to college. Just assuming things so just like being diagnosed sooner. I think is really scary. And then the flip side not being diagnosed until your mid twenties like many women. Are you probably been dealing with this for a while? Had not been able to get help so it's definitely a different situation. I don't think either side is going to be easier anytime. You're dealing with schizophrenia. It's going to be intense across the board. Rachel do a refresh real quick and talk about symptoms that tend to impact men more than women. Men tend to have more serious cognitive deficits more the flat effect we have a monotone voice very dull expression. You don't really react the way that people would normally react in situations blunted emotional responses where it's just kind of. I don't WanNA say chill but you're just kind of you know straight across the board when things happen. Speech reduction and men tend to be less active than women. And of course just because you're male or female doesn't mean that you fit in a nice tidy box right it just just because you're male doesn't mean that you will have all of these and just because you're male doesn't mean that your family will not notice or will notice. We're speaking in generalities when we talk about stereotypically. This is how schizophrenia presents in men. Yes absolutely and Rachel. Of course we love you very much. But you're a woman living with schizophrenia. So you thought it would be appropriate to bring on a male who is living schizophrenia. And that's why we have a great guest who you spent some time with Jason. Jepson as you said. He's a veteran. He's awesome. He's living with schizophrenia. And you did a great interview. You're ready to roll it absolutely here. We go today's guest. Is Jason Jepson? Who also has schizophrenia? Thank you so much for being with us today. Jason Thank you for having me so right away. I what you to tell our listeners about yourself okay. Sure I'm a writer. I started journaling when I was in the seventh grade. I have two books out. I'm also a veteran. I'm a part of the Vet Council at McGuire. Veterans Hospital remained. Sure that veterans don't fall through the cracks and we dragged him to mineral services. It's awesome well. Thank you so much. Thank you very much for serving for US. Thank you so much. So what age were you diagnosed with schizophrenia? I was the diagnosis of schizophrenia. When I was twenty three I was diagnosed in the army. The thing is. I don't know how your schizophrenia is. But my I knew the voices the voices in my head board the other soldiers that fought in California where I was stationed in also friends from Richmond. Virginia because I saw my heaven hear their voices. It took me a little while to Except my illness. Did you have signs that you noticed earlier? Age Not really in high school. I'd mild depression. I saw a counselor for short time but I still was social. Had Friends and I've played Lacrosse in high school. Now do you have visual hallucinations. Also are yours mainly audio then in my twenties it was mainly voices that I couldn't figure out. Where were they will coming from? Stow our episode. Today is focusing on. How men experienced schizophrenia. Different than women? Do you have any thoughts on that? Do you feel. There's much of a difference Well I think everybody's experience for Schizophrenia. Is Different in general. I think we hear voices delusions but the specifics of a different. If that makes any sense okay. It's just important to find the right treatment plant for men and women you know. Find the right medication. Maybe have therapy. How does someone to trust like your parents or your friends and all that takes trial and error for both men and women. I want to ask you this because I think it has like two sides that you see. A lot of men with schizophrenia ended up homeless and I know with you also working with veterans. You hear that a lot too when you have a lot of people coming back with post traumatic stress disorder. What are your thoughts on that? Yes what kills me makes me when attack. This mental health thing for veterans is out veterans actually committed suicide in the parking lot of the. Va Can you believe that? I mean there's gotta be an answer to that. I mean. It took me a while. Ask for help myself. How do we get there? How do we combat that? You know it's just I hope. Veterans Council can reach out to them. we were still a new organization. But that's just need to ask for help and it can be take awhile but be patient. I would say men are typically known for not wanting to ask for help and I can imagine it's been doing you're talking about like soldiers you know the idea of masculinity it being even harder for guys like that exactly what you know one thing. That's helping. There's more athletes coming forward to Lesson to stigma for men. I'm sure you for that. Dwayne Rock Johnson has come out saying he gets depressed. I mean that guy's a famous actor and that's going to do great things for men in my opinion is huge. You think masculinity he's just giant muscle. What has been your biggest struggle as a man with schizophrenia? Well it's the Saudi expectations. The stereotypes gave does this wonderful on the social network but but know why kids job. I used to avoid social situations because the question. What do you do? What do you do for a living? Because I didn't have an answer then. I realized I would make a house advocate and I'm proud to be a mental health advocate when you say you're a minute health advocate that opens the door for education. What is it one in? Four people have some kind of mental illness. You know so if you open up. A mental health advocate well. My my sister has bipolar. My uncle is a schizophrenic. You know it opens it up and talking about it. Like we're doing now is the most important things to bus stigma. What advice do you have for men? That are listening. Right now with schizophrenia. Except your diagnosis is probably one of the most important things I can say when he accepted you. Get on the right medication. Be Patient with medication and It's okay to ask for help you know ask for help. It's it's okay to ask for help so with our veterans that are out there. Do you have any advice for loved ones who worry about like different people coming back from their time military wise. Do you have any advice for loved ones? Let let them know about the options like A. My mom resource my illness before I came home. She she resorts schizophrenia. She was before I came back. And you know how me with the V. A. And everything like that. She won't let me fall through the cracks I would say be patient but you you know you should offer your help. I guess and do your research on if they come back with a mental illness or whatever does support groups caregivers can take it. Just Nami dot org the Pie. Shell you something there or you know if the VA.

schizophrenia Rachel Star Jason Jepson Virginia menopause Veterans Hospital Dr Finch Gape Howard US Lacrosse younger age visual hallucinations Veterans Council menor California writer Vet Council boehner mild depression
Schizophrenia in Men

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

09:27 min | 7 months ago

Schizophrenia in Men

"I'm Rachel Star here with my co host Gape Howard last episode. We discussed how schizophrenia affects women and this episode. We are focusing on the gentleman exciting. We have Jason Jepson. Who's GONNA join us? He is a mental health advocate. Also a veteran. Who HAS SCHIZOPHRENIA? And Dr Finch will return to help us understand the medical side of things that are going on Rachel. I'm looking forward to a great show. I'm excited to gave last month. Rachel we learned how schizophrenia impacts women. You know things. Like motherhood and pregnancy and menopause and aging and. I don't think there's a lot of people were surprised that any illness would impact a female differently than it would a male but we sort of want to open that up because there were some big differences in how schizophrenia presents in males over females and I think that was surprising for us during the research because we just assumed that an illness hits women differently because I think society is conditioned to believe that women go through everything differently. The fact that we hear mentioned over and over is that men tend to get diagnosed far earlier in life than women. Do with schizophrenia. However as we talked about last episode that's not always true especially in families who have a history of mental illness and even amongst like different ethnic groups but due to being diagnosed younger age men often have not attained the same degree of social development as women. Do at the onset of schizophrenia and that can contribute to poor social outcomes during our research. We learned that the reason that menor often diagnosed earlier because men are showing more emotions or boehner abilities and when seen in women as we learned last month. They're just like oh well she's a woman so of course she's being emotional. Where when the exact same symptoms seen in men that like oh? This is a problem but as you pointed out getting diagnosed earlier isn't necessarily the advantage that we think it is in males because stereotypically they're looking at you for all kinds of issues as we're GONNA learn from our guest. One of those issues is violence or rage or anger. My question to you Rachel is. Do you think that men have an easier time with schizophrenia? Or is it just a different time? I would definitely say a different time being diagnosed earlier that in itself and we talked about mini episodes ago where it comes to diagnosing children where that has a huge impact on you. You know if you know earlier that you have a major mental disorder that can change just how other people view you yourself. How your parents view your future? I know that's definitely come up just in my own life. But I can't imagine. Had I gotten the diagnosis in high school. My parents probably immediately would have started wearing like while she can't go to college. Just assuming things so just like being diagnosed sooner. I think is really scary. And then the flip side not being diagnosed until your mid twenties like many women. Are you probably been dealing with this for a while? Had not been able to get help so it's definitely a different situation. I don't think either side is going to be easier anytime. You're dealing with schizophrenia. It's going to be intense across the board. Rachel do a refresh real quick and talk about symptoms that tend to impact men more than women. Men tend to have more serious cognitive deficits more the flat effect we have a monotone voice very dull expression. You don't really react the way that people would normally react in situations blunted emotional responses where it's just kind of. I don't WanNA say chill but you're just kind of you know straight across the board when things happen. Speech reduction and men tend to be less active than women. And of course just because you're male or female doesn't mean that you fit in a nice tidy box right it just just because you're male doesn't mean that you will have all of these and just because you're male doesn't mean that your family will not notice or will notice. We're speaking in generalities when we talk about stereotypically. This is how schizophrenia presents in men. Yes absolutely and Rachel. Of course we love you very much. But you're a woman living with schizophrenia. So you thought it would be appropriate to bring on a male who is living schizophrenia. And that's why we have a great guest who you spent some time with Jason. Jepson as you said. He's a veteran. He's awesome. He's living with schizophrenia. And you did a great interview. You're ready to roll it absolutely here. We go today's guest. Is Jason Jepson? Who also has schizophrenia? Thank you so much for being with us today. Jason Thank you for having me so right away. I what you to tell our listeners about yourself okay. Sure I'm a writer. I started journaling when I was in the seventh grade. I have two books out. I'm also a veteran. I'm a part of the Vet Council at McGuire. Veterans Hospital remained. Sure that veterans don't fall through the cracks and we dragged him to mineral services. It's awesome well. Thank you so much. Thank you very much for serving for US. Thank you so much. So what age were you diagnosed with schizophrenia? I was the diagnosis of schizophrenia. When I was twenty three I was diagnosed in the army. The thing is. I don't know how your schizophrenia is. But my I knew the voices the voices in my head board the other soldiers that fought in California where I was stationed in also friends from Richmond. Virginia because I saw my heaven hear their voices. It took me a little while to Except my illness. Did you have signs that you noticed earlier? Age Not really in high school. I'd mild depression. I saw a counselor for short time but I still was social. Had Friends and I've played Lacrosse in high school. Now do you have visual hallucinations. Also are yours mainly audio then in my twenties it was mainly voices that I couldn't figure out. Where were they will coming from? Stow our episode. Today is focusing on. How men experienced schizophrenia. Different than women? Do you have any thoughts on that? Do you feel. There's much of a difference Well I think everybody's experience for Schizophrenia. Is Different in general. I think we hear voices delusions but the specifics of a different. If that makes any sense okay. It's just important to find the right treatment plant for men and women you know. Find the right medication. Maybe have therapy. How does someone to trust like your parents or your friends and all that takes trial and error for both men and women. I want to ask you this because I think it has like two sides that you see. A lot of men with schizophrenia ended up homeless and I know with you also working with veterans. You hear that a lot too when you have a lot of people coming back with post traumatic stress disorder. What are your thoughts on that? Yes what kills me makes me when attack. This mental health thing for veterans is out veterans actually committed suicide in the parking lot of the. Va Can you believe that? I mean there's gotta be an answer to that. I mean. It took me a while. Ask for help myself. How do we get there? How do we combat that? You know it's just I hope. Veterans Council can reach out to them. we were still a new organization. But that's just need to ask for help and it can be take awhile but be patient. I would say men are typically known for not wanting to ask for help and I can imagine it's been doing you're talking about like soldiers you know the idea of masculinity it being even harder for guys like that exactly what you know one thing. That's helping. There's more athletes coming forward to Lesson to stigma for men. I'm sure you for that. Dwayne Rock Johnson has come out saying he gets depressed. I mean that guy's a famous actor and that's going to do great things for men in my opinion is huge. You think masculinity he's just giant muscle. What has been your biggest struggle as a man with schizophrenia? Well it's the Saudi expectations. The stereotypes gave does this wonderful on the social network but but know why kids job. I used to avoid social situations because the question. What do you do? What do you do for a living? Because I didn't have an answer then. I realized I would make a house advocate and I'm proud to be a mental health advocate when you say you're a minute health advocate that opens the door for education. What is it one in? Four people have some kind of mental illness. You know so if you open up. A mental health advocate well. My my sister has bipolar. My uncle is a schizophrenic. You know it opens it up and talking about it. Like we're doing now is the most important things to bus stigma. What advice do you have for men? That are listening. Right now with schizophrenia. Except your diagnosis is probably one of the most important things I can say when he accepted you. Get on the right medication. Be Patient with medication and It's okay to ask for help you know ask for help. It's it's okay to ask for

Schizophrenia Rachel Star Jason Jepson Menopause Virginia Dr Finch Veterans Hospital Gape Howard United States Lacrosse Younger Age Visual Hallucinations Menor Veterans Council California Writer Vet Council Boehner Mild Depression
Sean O'Beirne

Published...Or Not

09:53 min | 7 months ago

Sean O'Beirne

"Short stories are the perfect way to address a range of issues in an immediate and succinct. Way Sean Ben has done just that in his collection entitled a couple of things before the end so sean welcome to three. Ci thanks very much for having me. Now what sort of did you have in mind? It's a bit ominous sort of title. Yea Well I wouldn't be the person I mean just about everybody's GonNa soonest ought to be thinking about what the next ten twenty thirty forty s log and if you begin to read even in the mainstream press you'll start to get warnings that if the sky gets full of more particles that make the earth hotter and hotter parts of the Middle? Part of the Earth are going to become more or less uninhabitable this century and serious water and food shortages will come along with that. I mean this is nothing else but what anyone who gets anyway. Nissim Sci. He's starting to tell us Now then the question would come. Kenneth fiction serve that what can fiction do Without saying the same thing over and over but what what to do with that was really interesting to me was what would the people I grew up with. I love And also people who weren't exactly like the people I grew up with. How are we all going to be with this? What he's going to happen to to quite the people I really know once serious privation serious shortages dot to happen all around us. There's one story at the end Bunka which goes into that. We'll come to that one but there are other sorts of ends in mind here. The gained the a period in your life The end of communication is another one. That comes up. So let's delve into some of these stories and hopefully it won't be all that ominous Because there are some fascinating things here you did. The first story is called scouts. Were you ever a boy scout? I have to go ahead and say that I was a boy scout. I was a boy scout in the nineteen seventies I was very. I was particularly bad at sports which were an Australian boy his special problem but one thing I could find do with me was put me in cub scouts. And that work that worked I was especially bad at what we in. The nineteen seventies was called foot clinic Stood there disconsolate. A very small boy. Seven or eight years old in the middle of big muddy oval. And all I wanted was people might remember this. You GotTa be game at the end but for me it really was standing around in an hour on a on a baddeck not understanding really what to do with the football. I remember years ago. Michael Looney telling the story that when he was boy out in the country he was sort of Eilly united and confused by football. What you were supposed to do when the ball came down to woods him he picked it up. Held it to his chest and ran through the goals. Naturally as as one would. But it's a right of passage in some ways you know learning the not earning the badges miss but at what point do you sort of. What will does it come to an end? If we want to talk about ending but you transition the development there what was I suppose one of the things that got some pythons about being a scout? I mean they certainly some comedy as well but what was what was maybe saddle. Poignant upbeat about being a scout in the seventies wars you were participating in the system in. You didn't exactly think about lock these you'll participating in a system that was actually dying all around you which was the old British USTRALIAN loyalty. Oh British Astrid Unite. The revolt was valuable. Said they weren't sort of nineteen seventy seven nine hundred seventy eight nine hundred seventy nine a NI- uniform saluting the flag And trying to be sort of good junior soldier. Boys in a Y. Or at the very least the kind of good boy that you would have. That Biden Powell know if people remember Lord Biden Powell the founder of the Scouting Movement. But if you go back and look at scouting for boys it's the idea of kind of purposeful cleanliness in a little boy. That's also always turning into the effort to sort of locate and destroy aliens. But Tom and I don't mean I don't mean from outer space I mean the ones we leave this a militarist element. This is it. So it's it's playing soldier but it's also got an idea of self theirself idea of self control in it. There's a list of things that are good boy does that a scout does a scout prepared but a scout is also sort of honest in a tainted in some ways and I don't mean to mock all of that hopefully the thing about that stories. It's not all pissing from a high on the scouting movement. It's getting to something. Which was that? There was something in that I mean. I know we feel like this a lot now. But there's something in that old idea of self control. Which is such a daily on fashionable idea. Now the scouting movement held onto a part of it. But of course to us. It just looks ridiculous that you would wear your little uniform and your little hat and salute a flag on a Tuesday night. It's not so much ridiculous. One eventually which happens in the story eventually grows out of it yes and reevaluate says you grow older so it has its purpose in its place but as you say a lot of traditions a dying as well and they've got a reinvent. I mean the notion of a boy's group alone today. Isis audience changed another thing. That's changed the royals. You've got him on August news lead. There is an incompetent. Monarchist Focus Group pretty early in the and that comes out of the Scout Story too. Which is it goes to the whole idea of the Shia strangeness of trying to make an England down the bottom of Asia which we really did try and do. I went to London for the first time. Not that long gone about ten years ago. I had that thing that many many strengths must have had. Which is the shock of recognition that once you get through cock fosters on that train and start to going to London accord. It looks exactly like Hawthorne it looks. Exactly like Moldovan down to the last and you begin to understand why that you had before that we that that the F. It was really just to make these places again. The idea of Kemba well below Laos below. Papua we really tried for that and again I think one of the things. That's hopefully interesting about growing up. In the seventies I think the seventies there was a was a real transition time where that old idea that we could somehow Cape together an England down here began to break up and wash away and so and then then I mean then I think plenty of people listening to this would know this. But in a way the bill for that wasn't paid until the nineteen ninety s in the nineteen nineties. We had that exuberant Tom where we thought well. No no money in this and we'll just be Australian. It's all we can let England going by the nineteen ninety by the Howard years. You had the understanding that it was actually going to be something that we felt a lot more Sarah about a lot more angry about and we're going to punish somebody else but we still had politicians bringing back knighthoods and such luck. And that's you that's interesting but that was what was interesting about the Abbot Attempt. In about the time of that story about the top of that royal story where it really much to light now and even people that you wouldn't expect or the I thought the idea of Sir Prince Phillip and the first strategy night. All that's right it will be Prince Philip. Did you give Edinburgh that? The whole country in two thousand fifteen couldn't take that But just as Australia was reinventing itself oil or imagining its identity. Which is a growing sort of evolution. The monarchy is sort of caught in the same bind. Harry and Meghan done Mike it into the story necessarily only slightly but they trying to establish their own identity in a new ish. Can you hold on to the monarchy? This is where I think I mean. I think this is still true. This little against what I just said but I still think it's a strain schizophrenia. What you would think of is the oldest. Dr Steele holds a lot. Hold on a lot for monarchy and foreign idea of England that still does persist in one of the places it does possess these in those people in that royal family in the Queen and to some extent. Now I mean we tried Diana but now much more and William and Kate but the thing that Tom the thing about that he says it's just getting hotter and hotter for any family any group of individuals to actually be able to carry off what you need to do to be a barely successful enough royalty in the face of the sheer amount of virulent attention that the entertainment system is GonNa WanNa put on you. It's it's pretty much going to be impossible to be monarchy in the next fifty but also the the monarchy speaks to a tradition that goes back centuries which hasn't necessarily evolved and changed with the Moore's that go on today which is it's appeal. Which is the thing we desperately hope for that. You could point to any one group of things and say you want change will you? You'll stay the same. You promised The problem is is that as you say with them. What Harry and Megan is it. They couldn't take the deal that will often because the deal starts to get so strange which is listen. You'll be a representative of what is good in a sense. He's more self control. This idea that we're after over and over again but at the same time will pretty much persecute and you will be at you all the time. You'll open your door in the morning and hundreds of us where we tried to watch you and I I can't understand. I don't get a sense of whether this is to their credit or not. They just refuse that. Were like this is so awful. This is more or less like a kind of strange it privileged. But it's also a persecution and can leave. Just leave

Scouting Movement England TOM Sir Prince Phillip Harry Football Sean Ben London Monarchist Focus Group Biden Powell Asia Edinburgh Michael Looney Representative Laos Lord Biden Kemba Papua
"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

09:01 min | 8 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"And women and specifically what? It's like to be a woman and getting treatment with schizophrenia. It's a great interview and we're going to go ahead and play that right now. Our guest today is Dr Hayden finch a psychologist from Iowa. Thank you so much for being with us today. I'm so happy to be here. Thank you for the opportunity. Our episode today. We're focusing on women who have schizophrenia specifically as a psychologist what issues have you seen? That women with schizophrenia tend to seek help. With what when interesting. We tend to have more emotional symptoms with their schizophrenia than men do so often. They're coming to treatment. Things like relieving anxiety and depression. See that more in women than in men but they also have a lot of trauma. They tend to be victimized quite a lot in their lives and do not often a focus of treatment and then lots of things related to family. Planning and RELATIONSHIPS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA. Across the board tend to be more social than men who have schizophrenia. Why do you think that is? Symptoms of schizophrenia are divided into positive symptoms and negative symptoms and positive symptoms. Don't mean good. They just need that. Something is there. That shouldn't be there so for example hallucinations or delusions whereas negative symptoms are things that aren't there should be a lack of motivation or lack of facial expressions. The men tend to have more negative symptoms than women do do they have a lack of social drive and a lack of social interest whereas women don't have their symptoms as much but also women. Their onset of the illness tends to be a few years later than men and they have a bit more opportunity to develop their personality and their social skills and their twenty s and that will protect their social skills through the rest of their lives talking about the positive symptoms. You just brought up. Do Women tend to have a different type of hallucination than men experience necessarily we see the same types of hallucinations and delusions? Sometimes with women the content will be a little bit different than it will focus on their children a little bit more war safety a little bit more often. They're very similar in Tai Bow. Just the content can vary a little bit. What are the biggest challenges for woman with schizophrenia? Who is pregnant? The most obvious one has to do with medications. So a lot of women with or schizophrenia will stop taking most medications while they're pregnant. Just to err on the side of safety and so when it comes to a woman with schizophrenia who gets pregnant. A lot of them will discontinue their medications for the same concerns about potential effects on the fetus and sometimes those concerns are coming from the woman herself sometimes. We're families times even from her doctor but stopping medications during pregnancy for one schizophrenia increases the risk for relapse so think about sixty five percent of women with schizophrenia. Who Don't stay on their medication during pregnancy will relapse during your pregnancy. So then they have more problems with their mental health during pregnancy. So most women who don't have schizophrenia. Don't report major changes in their mental hall during pregnancy. But women with schizophrenia. Due in part again because of that medication being but then psychosis during pregnancy can affect seeking prenatal care not recognizing signs of labor. Were problems during the pregnancy. They might not even recognize that they're pregnant. Do there can be lots of negative consequences on the pregnancy and on the fetus when the coast develops so? I am a woman with schizophrenia. Let's say that I found out that I'm pregnant. What would you suggest being my next steps? It the situation where you need to talk to your doctor. Psychiatrist about what medications are safest during pregnancy? We do have some information about medications. Anti even that are relatively safe during pregnancy. But it's a balance between protecting yourself and your mental health and the secondary effect that has on the baby. It's a really difficult balance. It's an individual decision arm and it really depends on the particular woman her help her history her symptoms and all of but it's very difficult decision to make with respect to medications. What are the biggest challenges when it comes to being a mother with schizophrenia? All moms are overwhelmed right so you have that regular level of being overwhelmed with responsibilities but then on top of that you're trying to manage your own mental health so you're trying to get organized with postnatal checkups and Pediatrician Appointments Plus Your Own Medical Appointments and mental health appointments. They often don't have as much support as women without schizophrenia. So there aren't as many family members to lean on for emergency childcare on the have extra hands when they just need a break I also symptomatically can have more difficulty reading accused. The baby is giving them so they might misinterpret what the baby is needing or wanting and that can interfere with the relationship that they developed with the baby and a lot of women with schizophrenia. During that postpartum phase will have a pretty significant exacerbation in symptoms now. A lot of women are at risk for postpartum depression. But women with schizophrenia. Especially those women who weren't taking their medication during pregnancy are at especially high risk and that can increase the need for hospitalization. But a lot of women then won't seek hospitalization really truthfully because the majority of women with schizophrenia. Lose custody of their children in my research I found the so many of the women who have children. Who Have Schizophrenia? Also are single mothers and you very often lose custody due to either not being able to afford to provide for that child because the mother or self is having a hard time working and being able to provide or having to be hospitalized. What would you say like if you have someone come into you? Who's in that situation? The biggest thing I think is is asking for help before there's a problem so if you're noticing that your symptoms are making it hard for you to care for the baby if you're getting extremely overwhelmed with caring for a baby or even a child. It's important to ask for help before a problem comes up. Those are the women who have the greatest likelihood of being able to maintain custody versus waiting until there is a major problem. The child is neglected. Or even abused. Then it's very difficult to make an argument to maintain custody. It's a situation where we definitely want to prevent problems rather than try to correct problems and most women if they have a family and they're going through treatment like you're just trying to juggle everything and everybody who has kids and whatnot are just constantly trying to juggle their lives with schizophrenia added. What advice do you have for women? I didn't biggest thing we can all do. Really but especially women with schizophrenia. Or women who are involved in mental health system is to find out exactly what services are available in your area so you can call two one one which is a public line where they'll connect you with services in your area but you can be looking for things like housing for mothers and their children family services support groups for parents with mental illness. Respite care for when you really need a break. There are specialized clinical services for parents with mental illness. There in home services where a provider will come in your home and help you learn parenting skills or learn how to interpret with. The children are needing Even transportation services can be a big help for people who are trying to juggle it all so that's one thing is is making sure that you know what services are available and you take advantage up down but also to the extent? I think it's helpful to integrate. Your family entered the treatment so look providers who are willing to work with you and your child is there. A lot of opportunities were skill development there or invite your parents or your partner do therapy and work on communication there opportunities or integrating it so that you don't have quite so much to juggle and you can actually build skills to make it easier to juggle all of it. Something that surprised me seems to be someone should have said it to me. Long before now but with schizophrenia and women a lot of women don't tend to get schizophrenia. Until they hit menopause or they are not have it and it gets a whole lot. Worse Caminha Poss- time. I had no idea what advice do you have? I mean if I'm already hit that age range and I haven't had schizophrenia yet. That's a lot to suddenly hit. You what is your advice for seeking.

schizophrenia Dr Hayden finch hallucinations Iowa Tai Bow menopause Caminha Poss partner
"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

09:17 min | 8 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on A Bipolar, a Schizophrenic, and a Podcast

"When I was reading this research? Is this idea. That mothers with schizophrenia. They don't have a lot of Leeway. One of the things that you just said is that you would need a lot of help. I would really defy you to find a mother on this planet. That doesn't need a lot of help. Now I understand that if you're managing any illness any not mental own if you have an illness then obviously you're going to need more help. That is understood but do you think that the bar is just significantly. Lower for women with schizophrenia. That if something happens if a mistake occurs if an illness symptom POPs up the dislike. Oh well you're schizophrenic. We got to take your baby whereas with other mothers like oh well you just made a mistake. Mistakes are part of parenting. Everybody does do you think that. That is a factor in some of these stats absolutely and I think if someone has some sort of even genetic disorder. Very few people are like. Oh you shouldn't have a child you shouldn't be over. You know another person's welfare but when it comes to mental stuff it's like Oh you have depression. Oh yeah bipolar schizophrenia. Like no you shouldn't be around children and not even like you shouldn't be a mother. You shouldn't be around children so there is definitely a double standard with that. All where anything mental freaks people out. There's just so much stigma discrimination and misinformation that it makes it very difficult and it's interesting because you know Rachel I love you and I think the world of you but I know what it's like to be sick and I can't imagine having to care for a baby and I can't imagine you carrying for a baby when you're that sick and of me is like. Oh Jeez I don't know maybe that's not a good idea but my mom broke her wrist when she had three children she she was not doing well. That six weeks i. My father lost his job when we were younger. Well that's not a good idea. Either I just I think of all of the adversity that my family faced growing up but everybody was like hey band together. Work IT OUT. You can do it. Nobody said Yeah. This is proof that people named Gary Howard shouldn't be fathers. Oh this is proof that people named Susan. Howard just can't Hack Motherhood we just got through it as as a family and a community and I think that more often than not women with schizophrenia. They just don't get those benefits and I think it's worth pointing out because it is another layer. That makes it very difficult for women with schizophrenia. To lead the lives that they would like and I wanNA put a little note on this over and over I could find so much info about women having children as far as like pros cons mostly cons in just lots of people with opinions and yet next to nothing about men with schizophrenia. Being father's nothing really there was nothing. I don't know just an interesting like how society we view people with mental disorders. Having families. It was just Kinda like women obviously. Yeah they're going to deal with this but not men that is incredible and obviously something that will discuss. More next month on men with schizophrenia. Rachel Shifting Gears from Motherhood we have to talk about the aging process. What's the difference between men and women with schizophrenia? As we get older this is fascinating. We talked about earlier. Age of onset. That women tend to get schizophrenia. Later another thing though is that women can have a second peak of schizophrenia. Is What they call it. And it's usually women aged forty five to fifty who have not been previously diagnosed with schizophrenia. It suddenly comes on and it has to do with pre menopausal stage hitting and they think because the estrogen drops. There's something about estrogen that keeps schizophrenia. More in control and hearkening back to what we talked about earlier with periods and shopping. But men don't have this. There is no second part of life where suddenly a man who hasn't had schizophrenia. Will develop it in his fifties sixties. It's just not sane. In fact men with schizophrenia. As they age tend to get more of a handle on it and women. It's the opposite because you have for some women suddenly schizophrenia develops and there's a lot about that. I was wondering When I looked at the different research. These women already have schizophrenia. But maybe because they were so social. It just wasn't recognizable or did it really just come on at that moment and there is no answer for that but I did think it was very interesting and something that. If you've already been diagnosed with schizophrenia to look out for that it could get a lot worse hitting around age. Forty five if you're a woman so I got a little over ten years their clock's ticking for the second round of fun and it's something else that women have to be aware of that may or may not be as researched or as discussed. Oftentimes I think society does forget. How much educated guesswork there is in a mental health. Diagnosis Schizophrenia is diagnosed by observation. It's treated by best case practices and research and then more observation. There's a lot of self reporting from the person living with schizophrenia and all of that really allows our culture and our society and our bias to influence the end result. We have to be aware of it while it does sound scary and it is. I don't like the idea that men and women get different treatment. Obviously you don't like the idea that men and women get different treatment because it it kind of sounds like women are getting the short end of the stick. It is what we have now and for the women listening to this show this is where advocacy is just so important along with education and Rachel. I'm going to ask you. Would you have known any of this information about being a woman living with schizophrenia? If it wasn't for your job do you feel more educated and more empowered today than you did before the research for this show? And what advice do you have for? Women living with schizophrenia. To make sure that they get the best care taking into account the fact that they're women. I would not have known a lot of the things we've talked about today but especially The way estrogen is thought to affect schizophrenia. Did none of that's ever been brought up to me. You know doctors ever said anything like I said. I'm in my mid thirties and you would think maybe hey just so you know Rachel. You know women with schizophrenia. It could get a lot worse here in the next few years. None of that's ever been said to me. And it makes me realize how important it is to do your own research and I'm not saying to diagnose yourself I'm saying to really know an research what could be on the horizon especially with the pregnancy and things like that. I'm like okay well. I don't plan on having kids so I would. I ever like research. Look into all that. But then that's what led me to finding Alabel all of this which leads the menopause thing and again. It's just not something you you normally see on any of the little pamphlets in the doctor's office brought up at any therapists meeting Rachel. Were you surprised to find out? Just how separated physical health and mental health is because it. It just seems to me like before we started the research for this show that it never occurred to really anybody that your physical health would drive your mental health outcomes and while this is a chronic problem just across the board and Mental Health Advocacy specifically for schizophrenia. The fact that what's going on with your physical body has been so far removed from your schizophrenia treatment. How does that make you feel last episode we talked about the Co Co morbidity and then to go into seeing just how the hormones they do? Everything affects your schizophrenia. And it's all connected and yet having a hard time mental health effects your physical and vice versa. Something else that we as people with mental disorders do need to be aware of and to kind of not be so hard on ourselves. But I've done research and just kind of learned about different statistics. A lot of eggs are normal that I just didn't realize where it's like. Hey It's okay that I have this issue. It's not that I'm being super unhealthy. A lot of women or a lot of people schizophrenia. Also struggle with this. It's good and bad. Let's go with that. It's good bad gave Rachel. Thank you so much for your candor. Now you had the opportunity to talk to. Dr Hayden Fitch who is a PhD in a researcher and UNDERSTAND SCHIZOPHRENIA? From the clinical perspective. And you've got to ask her a lot of questions about will really the differences between men.

schizophrenia Rachel Shifting Gary Howard Mental Health Advocacy Alabel Susan Dr Hayden Fitch Co Co researcher
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

14:01 min | 8 months ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"To inside schizophrenia. I'm Rachel Star withers here with my wonderful co host. Gabe Howard this episode. We are exploring schizophrenia. In women next episode going to focus on the men but this whole episode is for the ladies often. We don't really consider gender dynamics in treatment or medication and this is a chronic across. All health. Not just schizophrenia. A lot of medications etc are only tested on men because of risk they don't want to impact a potential pregnancy etc and on one hand. This sounds good. We're projecting pregnancy but on the other hand. This means there's whole drugs that have made it to market. That may not have ever been tested with women so I think that it's exciting to consider how schizophrenia impacts the genders differently. Obviously we want to state unequivocally that if you meet two people with schizophrenia. You've met two people with schizophrenia. Tends TO BE THIS IDEA. That all people with schizophrenia are exactly alike and and we hope that this show has done a lot to dispel that misinformation. If I meet two guys named Gabe. They're probably both different. Probably probably repeatedly you hear the difference between men and women with schizophrenia. The biggest thing is the age of onset. Women are said to develop it later than men on average they say four to six years later than a man would be diagnose. Let's go be diagnosed with schizophrenia. And that's one of the things. They've noticed repeatedly in research across the years. Is that women get schizophrenia. In life later sometimes you know late twenties. They'll even say it's interesting because as you said it's diagnosed with we know from research. That people are born with schizophrenia. So the question becomes and we don't know the answer to this because research is ongoing. Do Men and women become symptomatic at the same time but men get the diagnosis faster or do women not develop the symptoms of schizophrenia. Until later and it's difficult to discover that and some of it is social engineering if a woman is behaving erratically. Well of course she's a woman and this is the kind of thinking that we have to prevent and get over to make sure that everybody gets the best care but it's on one hand it's interesting to think about when we're diagnosing people and how we're diagnosing people but on the other hand it's kind of sad if men and women are showing symptoms at the exact same age but it takes women an extra four to six years to be diagnosed. That's also scary. Yes they do say however that it's less detectable in women which I could totally see because I grew up having hallucinations but I didn't even realize myself that that was weird until my late teens than I that I stopped talking about it so I didn't get a diagnosis either until my twenties so I could easily see. You know yeah. Women tend to be more social. They tend to be more active than men. Who Have Schizophrenia? So yeah probably fly under the radar much longer. It's interesting how you put that Rachel. You said that as soon as you notice that you were having these hallucinations and issues you hit them but you remained social. You remained engaged in talking to the people around you whereas men when they notice them. They tend to retreat. It's that retreating that I think makes people realize that. Perhaps something is wrong you know. Why is this person? Stay in their room. Why does this person not have a job? Why is this person talking to themselves whereas because you remained social people? Don't say well. Hey we like it when Rachel comes over Rachel is Funny Rachel is Nice. She must be hearing voices in her head and experiencing psychosis and elucidations. And and all of the other symptoms of schizophrenia. I I can see how it could mask. It is especially to our friends and family who are not trained psychologists or psychiatrists and the flip side of. That coin. Is FAMILIES THAT SCHIZOPHRENIA? Tends to run in. There actually is no difference in the onset of age between men and women so brothers sisters. And that's because yeah grandma had it if mom has it you know so cousin. Has you tend to be looking for those symptoms and recognize them earlier. Whether it's a boy or girl growing up you send notice that. They have acknowledged that if the family and friends are aware that there could be a potential problem on the horizon. They are noticing it and much much sooner. There's also a study out of India that is found no difference in the average age of onset between men and women and I think that really does speak to the social dynamics between cultures because if people in India are all having the onset of schizophrenia at the same time it would really be unusual to think that there's some sort of genetic difference between Americans and Indians. It's it's sort of speaks to this being a social construct and again research is ongoing. We're not one hundred percent. Sure of any of these things. In a lot of countries having a mental disorder is looked down upon even more so than I would say the Western world. They don't have statistics on those kinds of things because unfortunately it will go. No one is diagnosed until much later in life where they can't function at all so it is interesting when you look like how people grow up. What's expected of men and women? I do think women could fly under the radar longer. Sometimes just because you're not like well a guy eighteen. He needs to get out. He needs to get a job he needs to at. Yeah I feel like my family. They're going to be little softer on the girl in the family and the boy so I can easily see like that flying under the radar to your point Rachel when we talk about the social differences between men and women Which there's a lot I really think of. People who have battled schizophrenia for a long time and when I work with those people they say hey look. I haven't had a job in five years and all of the men very much want to know what to do about their resume. They've got a five year gap of five year gap five year gap and many of the women are like well a five year gap. No problem I was raising kids. I was a caretaker for family. It just nobody is questioning their five year gap whereas people are questioning a male's five year gap and and all of. This is just a tie in that. In some cases the differences between the treatments and the symptoms of schizophrenia have considerably more to do with our society than it does with the actual disease. Now all that said there are disease processes and symptoms processes that work differently in women versus as as we get into the symptoms. The fine saying this you know like well Rachel. I'm a woman and I don't experience it that way or I'm a man I totally have. No no no just like across the board which symptoms tend to flare up in different genders women actually like we said are more sociable so different things like the flat affect pretty much where you don't experience emotion. You have a very dull. Expression is not seen as often in women. Women tend to even have more emotions and I know that's like Oh of course we've been emotional but with schizophrenia. A lot of times people have blunted emotional response so they don't really react the same way quote unquote normal people do but women we come off a still acting more emotional to those around us inside. We might not but we're able to kind of fake it much better. Our speech isn't reduced and I found this interesting. Gabe women with schizophrenia are actually more physically active than men across the board and also under that it can be more hostile. You know past episodes where he's talked about violence and schizophrenia. If you were to picture a violent schizophrenic I don't think anyone pictures of woman not only do I not think that anybody pictures a woman. I think that the way that society response to a male who is being aggressive and a female. Who is being aggressive is very different. And there's a plethora of reasons for this. Listen I weigh two hundred and seventy five pounds. I'm six foot three if I am being extremely aggressive and loud. That's going to look a lot scarier than if Rachel who is considerably smaller than Gabe is yelling. Also people tend to be more willing to de escalate a female than a male and again a lot of these things fall under social constructs and our whole society is set up this way right. It's not just in schizophrenia. Where this is important. We see this in policing we see this in jobs. We see this in you know I could never scream at a server in public. But you know there's a whole Internet trend of calling women who scream at servers Karen and everybody thinks that that's funny but sincerely the humor comes from somebody yelling at somebody in public and because that person's a woman it's considered funny you could never change the Karen memes to John Well Jaundice stands up and starts screaming at a server. People that's not funny. No that's like yet so everyone turns around and it's like robots call the police thinking he's GonNa start swinging. The perception is very very different. And because schizophrenia is an illness that is based on self reporting based on observation based on behavioral patterns so obviously society's perception of what they're observing is going to determine the diagnosis that you receive and to that end because of the different ways that we perceive the genders. Women are often misdiagnosed with schizophrenia. More often than men are when it comes to self reporting. I feel that men and would probably also report different symptoms more often. I don't think I ever went and was reporting. You know I just don't want to go out with my friends. Oh I just want to like stay inside. I talked about depression and that was the initial diagnosis. I got repeatedly was just that I had depression and I was too scared to even bring up hallucinations and delusions. I kind of you get used to just okay. You're just overreacting. Oh you're overthinking so. That never occurred to me certain things. I was having was a delusion it was just Oh yeah. I just soon. I'm over thinking things so I think across the board. It's easy to see. The women would be diagnosed with different things. I do wonder if doctors are quicker to Label Min- schizophrenic that women it's important to point out how difficult it is to research and study this when we exist in a culture that is an actively discussing it and as we've been talking about this whole show culture and society impacts our outlook so when a male is looking at a female patients some of those biases are bound to creep in. I do think that we have made great strides now that more women are in psychiatry because while they have biases to they at least have interjected more understanding of women and I think that's very very good now one of the things that's interesting to me is when we plotted out this. Show Rachel. I was shocked at how much was just society. How did you feel about that? What were you thinking when you were researching the show it made me look back on my own life and kind of think You know how I like self reported you know certain things and then like the way they were responded to and I think back the more physically active in hostile thing. I was very very hostile towards my father specifically when I was in high school and I don't mean I was like trying to hurt him or anything but I would have these breakdowns and he would try and restrain me which just made it worse. You know not necessarily going. What's the best way to deal with someone having a psychotic breakdown and he was still much bigger than me in able to kind of like grab me and control me but I think now had it been my brother who was bigger than my father? There wouldn't have been any controlling. It definitely would have escalated to police or we can't deal with this on our own situation much quicker than it did with me and it just makes you think though. Wow all heck. Yeah if if I've been guy or even just more physically different. My life could have played out. I don't WanNa say worse but it would have had a different impact. Rachel Wallace is an awkward question. Do you think that a female menstrual cycle has anything to do with schizophrenia? And why or why not? Oh I think it absolutely does. I've long thought that menstrual cycles and the woman type stuff definitely affects my schizophrenia. It frustrates me to no end that at least once a month I know for three days my schizophrenia is going to get a lot worse. I'm going to lose touch with reality. I'm going to kind of get more spacey. I have to really be very careful. I get more delusional. I know my hallucinations get worse. I pretty much have to anticipate. These days are coming enduring these days. I need to live in my room as much as possible to avoid potential issues. And it's right before my period and this has happened over and over and I brought it up to multiple doctors and it's not like you can just okay. Well you know up your medication for three days. It doesn't work that way you know. They'll just be like well. You know make sure you track it and do your best..

Schizophrenia Rachel Gabe Howard Rachel Star Rachel Wallace depression India Karen John
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"I don't want to label the child with that and it's like it's not labeled to diagnosis i mean would you label them with some other disease if they had it needed to get treatment i mean i think that's ridiculous. You don't outgrow schizophrenia schizophrenia. Yes that's the kind of thing we're often hit with as parents is they don't wanna diagnose your kids because they're worried about putting it in their permanent record which is so crazy also also wanted because i didn't realize this until you just said that you had another child at that has a physical physical disorder but you said that's completely different. Can you elaborate on that. How it's two different challenges as a parent. My daughter has epilepsy or she also has a former cerebral palsy. It's a little bit different. She can overcome these things and understand it timothy fighting with his own brain and it's very hard to help a child get through something like that when they don't know what's real and what's not i mean for my daughter she had i've challenges with mobility and when she was young you know trying to overcome a lot of physical therapy because she had a lot of challenges coordination and walking and things like that. She's fairly mild cerebral palsy but we had to work with her with therapy but she could. She could understand that she could understand that my legs don't work like other peoples do when i do these special things and i wear braces and i'm learning how to do these things because my legs dillard it's hard to explain into someone who is especially someone who's in the throes of delusions and voices that their brain doesn't work. It's very easy to see with my daughter. When she walks at her gate was not normal with my assign. It was very difficult to understand that you have a very active imagination or is he really hallucinating and you can't parent the same way for a child with the physical disability versus a mental illness. The child has to be old enough or cognisant enough or stable enough to be able to work with you on the therapy you know my daughter could not walk for a week and then go to physical therapy problem. It's tim was in the throes of psychosis for a week. Forget it. We had to figure out how to get him stable. The holy can even work with him on how to cope with dealing with this because growing up. What was your biggest fear for your son that he would strive to be an adult ten to twenty fifth birthday was yesterday and i turn to my mom as we sat across having dessert with him and she said i can't believe it's twenty five and i said i know i said. Honestly i live this long because ten attempted suicide three times times before he was eighteen well. We spent the better portion of his adolescent early adulthood years just trying to keep him alive so my greatest fear was that he would do himself in which which is interesting because conversely as an adult. My greatest fear for him is that someone else will do it. You know i. I was worried about his own brain against it's ten but now i'm worried about what may happen to him out in public. We used to live in chicago. We live in extreme northeastern wisconsin now and we moved here because in chicago it just wasn't a safe environment for him to be able to grow up and be a productive adult. There's too many people there's too much temptation. There's no way to help kind of create a safe environment for him. You know the police there have a history of kind of shooting first and asking questions later especially people with mental illness and i was afraid that something would happen to them externally to end his life rather than than we was a child..

schizophrenia chicago wisconsin twenty fifth
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

04:15 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"With so much between me and my brother okay so both of us and not just like mental disorder to stuff like my my brother has bicycle through africa through eastern europe alone through mexico gotten in so much trouble he incredibly of interest we all all are so they're so stressed out like i think between the two of us he is probably overall in life causing way more stress than me and i carry around a lot of guilt the past year and a half. I have felt so guilty for how much my parents have had to help me and take care of me. Ironically it had nothing to do with schizophrenia. I contracted contracted a rare flesh-eating bacteria that ate its way up my spine into my nervous system out my face. I had to be an isolation hospital and then i was at home. My my mother had to learn how to put the issues in me. My dad had to go to every single. Doctor's visit with me and i feel so bad because i had to really lean on them. Financially just is for all the medical bills but this has nothing to do with schizophrenia and when people hear this about me. They feel so bad for me. They're like oh my god rachel chill and i'll even say hey. My parents have been incredible but they still focus on me. Whereas the minute they hear schizophrenia they focus on oh my god your family has given up so much for you and your i mean i mean a little bit. I mean let's not get crazier but yeah. I do feel like a burden but it's not just just a mental health thing like it really was more of a physical thing you are living with a major mental health issue with schizophrenia. Nobody's denying that and right right now. You're also living with a major physical issue with a flesh eating bacteria that doctors are still trying to get under control so your schizophrenia is by largely managed. You do what you need to do and i'm not saying that you can ignore it or forget about it but it's not the biggest part of your life right now this physical illnesses but the unique position that you're in is you have seen how people respond to you and your family through both ordeals one. A mental illness won on a physical illness and the very fact that it's different does show some of the issues that people with mental disorders and mental health issues and mental illnesses his face because it shouldn't be different sickest sick and families come together to help their sick loved ones and it should be viewed. The same is out to say that like people people brought us cookies and stuff and i'm like no one ever does that. No one randomly stop spy if my mom has told them i've been you know mentally very bad. No one does that but just the thought that i had been sick for so long people were just so worried and it's just interesting though how people feel fine talking talking about something really bizarre is a flesh eating bacteria. That's really creepy and weird but it's almost like that's okay but schizophrenia mental disorders. That's taboo where we're not gonna ask how rachel is about all that even though we know she's bad we're dock and ask and i feel that it should be pointed out that having a flesh eating bacteria is not not common. I know a lot of people rachel and you are the only person in the entirety of my life who has ever had a flesh eating bacteria tyrian so you would think that if the old all-wheel they're fearful of schizophrenia. They don't understand schizophrenia. It's coming from a place of they're. They're not familiar with it. You would think that that would also apply over to the physical illness that you are just unfortunate enough to have but it does show a willingness cygnus to learn probably because flesh-eating bacteria doesn't have the same stigma and misinformation campaign as mental illness does people with flesh-eating <unk> sheeting bacteria aren't accused of being violent and hurting people whereas people with mental illness are which i know we already covered another episode but i think that all of this goes part and parcel parcel into your friends and family are educating themselves about one illness and they're burying their heads in the sand about another illness and it's impacting you and your family people are willing to ask me like a thousand questions about the whole flesh-eating bacteria thing the hospital..

schizophrenia rachel africa mexico europe
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"And that's where it gets tricky. Right. Because nobody is saying that people with schizophrenia have never committed a violent crime. Correct. You're saying that the majority of people with schizophrenia have never committed a violent crime. Yes. When you have people mental illness, or you're specifically talking about schizophrenia. And, you know, the majority of don't hurt anyone like, well, Rachel I mean, but some of you do that still sounds scary but not all husbands beat their wives. Some of them do, but not all of them, and that's not gonna keep me from getting married. That's not gonna keep me and or most people from finding a husband, but when it comes to mental illness, we've decided that somehow that connects that all violence is caused by people with schizophrenia and that connection just doesn't exist in. In any study that's been looked at and it's kinda scary that people are so desperate to believe it. Why do you think that people want to believe this so much? I think one of the main reasons is just being able to say somebody who did this horrible thing has mental illness. It makes you feel safer. Okay. So I don't know anyone personally like that. So I can feel safe. And if I ever met anyone like that, I could obviously tell you know, they're like twitching and screaming and things. That's the person I should be scared of, you know, you hear these horrible stories of like a disgruntled employee who comes in, and unfortunately, does something, very violent at the office and a lot of times, like, well so, and so he was suffering from depression for so long will, you know he was being treated by a psychiatrist? It's never. Oh, he broke his leg last year. You'd be like. What about breaking its leg? And even in the cases of schizophrenia, the very, very, very tiny percentage of people with schizophrenia, that do have a dangerous or violent outcome there. Almost universally uncared for or untreated, guess they're almost always left to their own devices with a very, very, very serious illness, that isn't being maintained or managed and many times, that's unfortunately, being self managed by taking illegal drugs. So that plays a big part in it. Also, we talk about mental health mental health is for everybody. Like that's just a blanket term for all of us in too many people here. Thank. Oh, well, you only need mental health, if something's wrong with your head, and it's not. It's working too much. You know that work life balance with.

schizophrenia Rachel
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"And also to talk about your experience with this, and your experience with medications and all of that sort of stuff. So usually it's gonna be a combination of psychiatry, as well as some other type of mental health support to change gears, just for a moment. You know, your, your YouTube show generates questions in, and you answer them, and it's, it's, it's a very, very cool thing that you do, and we like that because we think that gets a for any as and other mental disorders are are so incredibly misunderstood. So how have you seen social media at YouTube, or maybe just the internet affect the way? Schizophrenia is perceived in any, they're a good or a bad way. I think it's been a complete dramatic shift in its. It's a part of a larger shift that's happening in the world of mental health right now. But I think it's so pronounced for schizophrenia. So for a Lao longtime schizophrenia, the representations of it in media have really been extreme stereotypical often thing bad representations of schizophrenia, and what we're starting to see now in Rachel, you've been a part of this, and I thank you so much for the voice, you've had here in shaping, this discussion is we're beginning to see a range of experiences were were seeing people share their stories of how they were diagnosed of what their life is like, how they coped with schizophrenia and it's not guided by people in Hollywood, who might have a stereotype idea of what schizophrenia is like, but it's, it's a more authentic story in, I think, as, as I was saying earlier such a diverse problem, we're seeing more of that diverse. -versity of experience on social media on blogs on YouTube, and that for me has been incredibly exciting. And it's it's helped me to learn more about what schizophrenia is like I it's been one of the most exciting developments in, in my career and I like tag..

Schizophrenia YouTube Rachel Hollywood
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"And it's just this fun little until people and just kind of dancing. I feel my own little earthquake going on. But yeah, nothing to do with schizophrenia. So if you met me, you meet someone else you'd be like, well, how come this person? Does it shake thought all schizophrenics constantly shaking and research into the medications have developed safer medications that don't cause target of Asia? There's also medications that treat heart disconnection now which is a real benefit, and, of course, research is always ongoing, but I want to touch on one of the things that you said there where you're not a brain surgeon, and you feel that it's worth it. You would rather be in control of your life, that, yeah, you're, you're shaking your dancing. I liked how you put it there. But it does fit into your light. Is this common for people with schizophrenia or mental illness, where they sort of have to make a compromise with their medications, or their treatments? And and how do you feel about that? Absolutely correct. You. You have to make a compromise. A lot of people necessary. I'm scared such and such will happen. It might. But if me taking this medication makes it so I can get up every day and work and have a social life than I personally, I don't mind shaking a little bit. The worst thing that happens is I'm out to eat at a restaurant in. You can visibly see me struggling, but I'm able to be out at that restaurant. I'm able to be out with friends, I'm able to have a social life. You'd have to weigh the pros and cons when it comes to medication and side effects at the end of the day, everybody, whether you have a mental disorder or not. You just want to be able to have a life, people think that, you know recovery when you're talking about a mental disorder is you're just great and you have absolutely no symptoms, and you're like everybody else. And that's not recovery is being able to live a normal life not be a celebrity, but be able to work have. Friends family. That's what recovery is to most people, and it's fair to say that most of life is a trade off, for example, most of us, give our time to a job so that we can get money to do the things that we enjoy. So we've made a trade, we've traded time for money, you know other things like that we could buy a big expensive house, but maybe we can't travel, we can buy an expensive car, but then we eat at McDonalds or so on and so forth. Most people don't get one hundred percent of what they want. Do you feel that that's an equivalent analogy for this, or is it not that simple? How do you feel about it, whenever you're trying out different medications? Sometimes it's going to take a little bit to figure out what's going to work for you and it will change over time. A certain dosage might have kept, you solid being able to work forty hours a week for years. And then when day that just doesn't work anymore, and you have to change dosages chains. Medications when I look back across my life there were. Times that I was working like sixty hours a week and going to school fulltime and I look back now and think what, how did I do either of those things not less at the same time. But also during those times that usually when I was the most out of my mind, the sickest, most depressed because that took such a toll on my brain. And now I'm much much more happier. Can I work forty hours a week? I know. No, no, no. I can't go to school fulltime. I do online classes, which works a lot better for me. In a part of it has to do with medication. Treating me I'd say my quality of life has went up so much while I can't do those things that used to do in the past I much more happier. I'm a lot more upbeat. You probably if you met me in my mid twenties to now, my mid thirties, completely different person. We've talked a lot about how you treat schizophrenia in your words. What do you understand that the treatment for schizophrenia is for everyone again fully acknowledging that you're not a doctor?.

schizophrenia McDonalds Asia forty hours one hundred percent sixty hours
"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"I mean i am calm and when i think about it now i think how did i not notice this but i didn't i had no ability to see it at all the next question that when asked you is many of our audience members they don't know what schizophrenia is it all they know what they've heard on the news they know what they've seen on television they know a lot of the stereotypes in you know we have certainly done our best to explain it but normal to hear it from you a person who lives with schizophrenia what's a good lay persons definition of what schizophrenia is how would you explain it to somebody well there's different types of schizophrenia i can't speak for all different types of schizophrenia but i have paranoid schizophrenia diagnosed with and so what happens with me is that always think negative thoughts any motions like people are always trying to harm me or people always saying bad things about me behind my back and some makes me become more like withdrawn and depress of a lot of anxiety from an paranoia you know and so like what happened to me when i was really brought down with the illness that i would get stuck in a way to where i would just sit there and just not say anything not communicate you know kinda just hide myself away from my own feelings because it was it was too much for me you know i was like i was just sitting there coma toasts or having some type of psychosis because i couldn't accept the way that i.

psychosis
"schizophrenia" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"schizophrenia" Discussed on Sounds Good with Branden Harvey

"Her own experience with schizophrenia and so i'm writing from an interesting place where i am i have skits affective disorder i am also fairly high functioning especially for somebody with a form of schizophrenia um and so i felt like writing this book was really important to help people learn you know what does it mean a basic hotic like what does it mean to have us a four of the schizophrenia is is also not just about me like i talk about how to people treat people with schizophrenia in colleges lake wow does the administration deal with that uh stories about violence um a written essay about a man who was murdered by his uh sister and mother because they were scared of him he had schizophrenia and they didn't know how to deal with him and they ended up shooting him like in the middle of the night on a deserted road and they dumped to the side of the road and left and so yeah they're all these stories that i to tell and wanted to tell it i just turned in one of the final drafts the book it should be finished soon so get butts that's what i i've been working on for the last year or so but also just it's been really wonderful for me to have had written a book while being sick because it reminded me or not reminded me but it let me know that i could do it was possible tradeable i love this idea that you were able to bring this book to fruition because you knew you've done it before and it comes back to that idea of resilience and then the book itself is you know i think it's going to be impactful i think that comes back to this idea of of legacy him i guess i'll just bring it back all the way and say that obviously creativity goes into that but with this book in in this conversation you're trying to have i'm curious what is your hope for what the future looks like for people who have some form of schizophrenia what does the.

schizophrenia