40 Burst results for "scars"

Fresh update on "scars" discussed on WIP Programming

WIP Programming

00:28 sec | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "scars" discussed on WIP Programming

"Gladness team are now open for business, as always, Dr Glass offices sterile, and he follows all the CDC guidelines. So what are you waiting for? Still working from home. Perfect. Get to procedure, and no one will ever know that you had it done. They'll just no, you look great. I'm so happy about the way I look. My hair looks fuller and Er and you'd never know I had the procedure done because I don't have an unsightly scar Dr. Gladness team of over 20 years of experience in hair restoration, and his office is the longest running Nia graft office.

Dr Glass CDC
Tesla, Inc. Held it's 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting

Morning Edition

01:20 min | 3 d ago

Tesla, Inc. Held it's 2020 Annual Shareholder Meeting

"Pandemic. It was like a drive in movie there was an outdoor stage with the audience in parked cars. For weeks. A big announcement on better car batteries was promised. However, Tesla's stock collapsed. It closed down 5% yesterday, and it's down another 3% in pre market trading at the moment. Marketplaces. Kristen Drop is here. What did the Tesla boss say about these new batteries? The plan is for Tesla to manufacture its own batteries to improve vehicle driving range in power. Tesla currently buys batteries from other makers, and if they're produced in house, it'll bring the cost of the cars down. Right now, A model three. It's cheapest vehicle is $38,000 Musk is aiming for a $25,000 price tag. So why did stockholders get on their phones and start pressing cell? Well, The manufacturing plan for these new batteries isn't done and we won't see them in Tesla's for a few years, which means right now, Musk is just making promises, and he's known for over promising plus. The announcement fell short of what investors were expecting. Musk spent the last several days playing up what he would unveil on what his team branded Battery Day. Shareholders thought they were getting something called a million Mile battery, which is good for at least 10 years and would allow Tesla to price it scars below that of gas powered cars. And remind us about all this after hours premarket trading when the NASDAQ market is

Tesla Musk Kristen Drop Pandemic.
Fresh update on "scars" discussed on Eric Metaxas

Eric Metaxas

01:20 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "scars" discussed on Eric Metaxas

"Welcome to the other protection show. Have you ever Googled treated? But what's the capital of North Dakota? Do I spit when I talk All this and more on the Eric Metaxas Show? Now your host until further notice. Eric more taxes, Taxes show it's a show. It's a show about everything, which means we'd like to talk about Most things, but I guess you know somebody puts a gun to my head says. What do you really like to talk about? I would say, show business entertainment that that's you know, I don't get to do that all the time. So when I get an opportunity to do that, I leap almost literally. To take that up. I found out recently. I guess maybe I was talking to my new friend Pat Boone. The possibility of having Vicki Carr on the program. I said What? Vicki Carr. Vicki Carr, the Vicki Carr and they said Yes. How many Vicky cars are you aware of that week here and so I'm really thrilled to have her here with us. Today. Vicki Carr welcome the program. Well, Eric, it's a pleasure. It's a pleasure. Yes, I heard about pat doing it and that he had a great time and our mutual agent has said Said, You know, I think this would be something really good for you to go, you know, impacted and he enjoyed it. So here we are. I think I think of myself as the young gentile Larry King. I want big scars on my program Coming up Priscilla Presley. Actually, Vicky for those who don't know you because I have a very broad audience and there I'm assuming there are a lot of folks younger than me. That may not be familiar with your amazing career. I wantto Just be clear that you you're you're hard to sum up. I mean, you've had literally 60 bestselling charting records you've performed at the White House innumerable times. Yes, with some of the greatest presidents. HeartMate. With some of the greatest president with some of the greatest presidents who were some of the greatest presidents. I'm assuming Gerry Ford Reagan Ronald Reagan. And I had the honor. I had just come back from a trip to the Far East, and it was a tiring, exhausting trip and I told my manager I don't want to see you. I don't want to hear from you And yet the idea and I started to unpack and the phone rang and it was him and I said, What heart of I don't want to see or talk to you, he said. Frank called. When there's no last name. Yes, Right. Right. It's Frank Sinatra. And I said, What does he want? Well, what does he want? So that was at the time when he retired..

Vicki Carr Eric Metaxas Frank Sinatra Pat Boone Gerry Ford Reagan Ronald Reaga President Trump North Dakota Vicky Priscilla Presley Larry King White House
AP Exclusive: More migrant women say they didn’t OK surgery

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

AP Exclusive: More migrant women say they didn’t OK surgery

"The Francis the a China's both federal as the Associated trump new U. pope president presidential S. administration poll military Francis health Houston's is trump Press officials set from wants campaigns to courts wondering the took ban to is Associated have a sent liberate deeper banning scrapped Porter downloads are look fighter heading Rican the if virgin two at Press jets allegations to Monday voters the popular a controversial of Mary same over two and tree popular the O. from in mosques Taiwan unlikely R. the apps the that U. mafia C. a piece doctor S. Chinese center Strait starting of he's offer battleground corona in for Georgia announced apps this public pope enough virus in had weekend a Francis massive an today protection affairs been citing testing giving unusually has aid research given guidance national detained from his to beginning it's large blessing help the security coronavirus an immigrant unusual repair Sunday to show shows last a women new and of years position Vatican a the force majority month commerce unwanted data the in for think old centers privacy department crowded hurricane of Minnesota tank Americans for hysterectomies as that disease says concerns the is lecture U. damage seeking it's S. which control banning plan envoy halls to on prevent is the to and island backed transactions vote the starting a holds prevention mafia review democratic before by Sunday a and day posted the for at Associated organized in years least of election presidential the Americans closed advice U. a dozen S. the crime Press president's day pope door using will candidates saying groups did meetings not not at people blasted nineteen tick be find for able who tock with evidence from customs to nearly did officials fifty Porter download exploiting not and of half Rican mass four feel the we tick a leaders century have sick image hysterectomies percent chat on emerged tock the of self the as virgin of did voters and corrupt governing nor since not with Mary doesn't secretary French say as island we need for usually alleged they'll and to their get campuses chat vote own inept tested Wilbur by claimed get don illicit before much Ross which by and Wooten attention China ends classrooms is saying polls a being and the change nurse resisted banned it's at opened a open this who B. worked stage baffled from do on the this Vatican's use spending at November in fight the of month Irwin response the race entirely public county pontifical China's third a to warning to detention rebuild health undersecretary Marian but experts sign malicious both the center a U. that's academy total S. president in the up collection of countries territory's Georgia state had from ban launched led trump forty elsewhere on of to Peter Americans tick speculation the and but infrastructure think two tock a review cook's Joe tank percent in personal Biden will Europe at of follow visit a that medical conference in twenty wiped trump will data women's records in visit administration entitled November sixteen a out unit today and universities interviews by liberating hurricane security as of with political the lawyers so Chinese Minnesota are Maria the berry experts resuming trump but administration appointees from the in people's starts results did worry soon the twenty mafia confirm Liberation early seventeen the show force Chinese says out conducting that voting at from access Army least that company shipped it sees four was elections a to reference but women academy's has that take after now held owns the talking to receive narrowly CDC the in combat historic the maybe tick I'm U. surgeries lack the S. tock exercises best losing possible has of relationship has the centuries now thing become would that there essentially ever in have of that a four between old the some partisan access happened they region never safeguards Sorbonne the years gone Italian to sought Porto back to issue ago information university Rico to or mob Taiwan's are its didn't the put earlier president's in in understand announcing the place Catholic defence on fifty the guidance returned apps the thirteen Church main ministry seven one although the change often administration hundred saying and some billion percent that the popular is anyone of million the mounted dollars procedures of two and president says displays spending hopes bombers users in the tree assistance moves a and win of could mosque trump's at Marian least are sixteen have in aimed been in the supporters wearing justified devotion U. Minnesota fifteen at S. asked fighting fighter by old mobsters could minutes based why jets offset say China's times it's the on government within they'll problems coming in vote Italy crossed malicious six defeats weeks previously in documented person into but and feet before keeping Taiwan's elsewhere beyond collection said of the in physical somebody election the records using but of air distances with Americans Francis fifty defense the steel a president documented a interviews said three personal downloading identification the poles displays percent insists appears with infection detainees data impossible of over of take Joe devotion the his past zone Biden's talk and administration's should their to since in to week lawyers Mary Taiwan many get communicate Beijing backers show tested places must suggested by been conform scrambles plan working could did to would to with that order vote on students jets the a some the message consistent it not agency by for companies in women mail response of a describe long the be gospel came called a lead to time band to situations help fear the change and gather and transaction very the the twenty monitored teachings doctor both intelligence a tough eight clarification of percent are to where the the focusing get church there's movements a thirty things of no Americans on nine passed simple Sager which of and the year state's the the old people tick Chinese to say woman tock wash needed mag they white participating from would their says planes ani Cuba hands favor rural due it Washington was would to Democrats in told their the them not significance and away trucks states must she would rooms do working be undergo Christians trip holding of class where an operation elections who they a it's follows look don't sometimes symptomatic voters unclear out want for to to a exclusively see others visit treat this with what ovarian happen in no and the August order Sager windows especially pre cyst means by Democrats by mail symptomatic to make for the provide the health poor ani oracle's but in a fact fresh secretary month transmission Washington that's later at had recent Alex down approved I from with Walter a deal Hayes scars multi forty the to funding are Ratliff disinfected on take Sager percent her abdomen over they the had highest take who mag pushed she's between supported talks ani level still for lectures US not Washington U. its that S. release sure idea capitals operations what and procedure official also in April Sager she to got visit dispatch mag Sager medical since ani I'm experts the Washington made has U. I S. can't Donnie say switched put the Washington women's said formal lack eight arrivals relations of consent or have knowledge to from sit Taiwan on raises the floor severe to China I'm legal in Charles nineteen and ethical the last seventy issues month nine I'm I'm Charles Jennifer king the last month

Francis China Francis Health Houston U. Pope President Trump Trump Press
Fresh update on "scars" discussed on Todd Schnitt

Todd Schnitt

00:46 sec | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "scars" discussed on Todd Schnitt

"Dallas players. Dude go to the boards because they know that's what he's going to go, so he tries to make a pass the headmen, but there's a guy right on top of them. I understand that Lightning made not many mistakes tonight, but the mistakes they made have been significant and the stars have made the pay for this. Thought of the right of Vasilevskiy Siegen. Yanni gored Tyler Sigan is tossed. Yes, so it's Yan Market Gored by Yanmar Klingberg Lapointe. Lipsett cross a Styler Sagan. Right corner check. Turn it up. Turn it! Scars are getting a power play coming here at the Centre point. It's Lindelof. The late call shoots lied. Left board touches the rebound. He's the one going.

Vasilevskiy Siegen Klingberg Lapointe Yan Market Yanni Lindelof Centre Point Dallas Lightning Tyler Sigan
AP Exclusive: More migrant women say they didn’t OK surgery

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

AP Exclusive: More migrant women say they didn’t OK surgery

"The Associated Press took a deeper look at allegations that a doctor in Georgia had been giving detained immigrant women unwanted hysterectomies a review by the Associated Press did not find evidence of mass hysterectomies as alleged by don Wooten a nurse who worked at the Irwin county detention center in Georgia but a review of medical records and interviews with lawyers did confirm that at least four women receive surgeries that they never sought or didn't understand although some of the procedures could have been justified based on problems documented in the records interviews with detainees and their lawyers suggested that some women came to fear the doctor a thirty nine year old woman from Cuba was told she would undergo an operation to treat ovarian cyst but a month later with scars on her abdomen she's still not sure what procedure she got medical experts say the women's lack of consent or knowledge raises severe legal and ethical issues I'm Jennifer king

The Associated Press Georgia Don Wooten Irwin County Detention Center Cuba Ovarian Cyst Jennifer King
Fresh update on "scars" discussed on Zach Gelb Show

Zach Gelb Show

00:57 sec | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "scars" discussed on Zach Gelb Show

"The two stars You have one Stanley Cups. Sagan and Corey Perry combined for the goal. Sagan with the Bruins. Perry with the Ducks shot by Gauri on offices, the net. Corey Perry's wife is in the building. She was able to travel to admit she quarantined in the hotel room for four days, finally saw her husband after Game three for the first time. Over two months, and she was celebrating. As the stars took the lead. He is one of the few players to have family in admitted inside the bubble. So it's 10 45 remaining in the second period. The scars go back on top. McDonogh spitting out of his own zone. Donna through center pass on the right side for shot Kirk it across the line since one Save Babe. I been picked up by second. And.

Corey Perry Sagan Gauri Bruins Donna Ducks Kirk
Netflix’s The Devil All the Time

Mark Thompson

02:46 min | Last week

Netflix’s The Devil All the Time

"Netflix, now available for streaming the devil All the time is an ensemble crime drama Little film Noir ish with a bit of the grizzly to it, And it kind of recalls the cone brothers in their blood. Simple Fargo dark, twisted mode, but this has none of their mordant humor and in two hours and You know, 18 minutes, it does meander a bit here and there. Still, I thought it was a good one. Presenting this web of circumstances happened stances consequences that Titan's over the course of three decades, the forties fifties and sixties between two rural towns and a couple of families. One of the towns in Ohio, one of the towns in West Virginia, there a couple hours apart. And through these various inter related characters, you get a portrait of violence, seediness and perversity on DH, you know, and some of these characters are dedicated the religion, But that doesn't necessarily mean that good things were gonna happen to them, and the cast is First rate. Tom Holland plays Arvin Who's this quietly righteous grown up? Son of a good guy G I, who comes back from World War two, marries a waitress moves her and baby Arvin and do a fixer upper in the woods. And his dogged by tragedy that's almost biblical, and that that carries over to others whose lives were connected in the story, By the way, the role played by Holland. Yes, Spider Man himself. It's his closest you get to a heroic lead in the movie, and this British actor is pretty convincing as a young American from that part of the country. It's like he was bit by a radioactive hillbilly. I mean, really Totally thrilled with Tom Holland. Where can we watch this? The devil all the time? Yeah, it's good stuff. Bill Scars guard son of Stellan, brother of Alexander, best known in the States as Pennywise, the clown in the movies. He's He plays the father, and there's no trace of Pennywise here. Jason Clark, Riley Keogh Robert Pattinson, the new Batman in the Old Twilight vampire plays the young creature who's not above reproach. And surprisingly stocky, Sebastian stand the winter soldier from the Marvel movies as the Vincent Donofrio role of the power hungry local sheriff whose morals are questionable and we get it. It's a good movie again, not greatness. The director screenwriter here is Antonio Campos, and he adapts the devil all the time. The the book by Donald Ray Public who is actually the Narrator here and there. I always say show don't tell, but I was caught up in the desperation of all those involved. Often this thing and stayed with it until the bitter end. That's available on Netflix. As

Tom Holland Netflix Arvin Who Antonio Campos Titan Vincent Donofrio Donald Ray Ohio West Virginia Bill Scars Marvel Robert Pattinson Jason Clark Sebastian Riley Keogh Stellan Alexander
Fresh update on "scars" discussed on ESPN Radio

ESPN Radio

01:00 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "scars" discussed on ESPN Radio

"It's head 45 remaining in the second period. The scars go back on top. McDonogh spinning out of his own zone. McDonogh through center pass on the right side for shot Kirk and across the line since what in safe made by been picked up by second. And how about the play he made a moment ago to break up a two on one just before the Dallas goal. Fuck Set into the right of Vasilevskiy McDonough leaves it for shot, Colonel. Chat. Kirk players the zone shots or 19 7 Tampa Bay. They trail 32. Fuck! Work back out by Lauren for Shattenkirk fanning on a shot back the other way, come to stars. It's been and across the line for handling on the left side, Hanley drops it back out, sliding, played by Cirelli to break up the past. Now, Rachael off around to the far side shot Kirk on it for Tampa Bay. Now up for Tyler Johnson. Johnson to the Red Line to the Dallas line. Throws the puck far side Hey, skidded on it there. He clears.

Kirk Tampa Bay Tyler Johnson Dallas Vasilevskiy Mcdonough Shattenkirk Fanning Hanley Rachael Lauren Cirelli
"scars" Discussed on Bald Move TV

Bald Move TV

07:07 min | Last week

"scars" Discussed on Bald Move TV

"You know bring a tray of cookies and convince Lydia somehow that this was her idea to walk off into the woods. Yeah see I think I think the shown is capable of it because you know what caused her to snap in the first gaze is losing her family, and now that she improbably has this, you know post apocalyptic family that she loves so much that she would be willing to do anything including psychological. Warfare. Against a child per to keep it i. thought it was in that like envelope if she'll do anything to keep our community safe at this point. Sure. Yeah. What Lydia fingering Henry Scar like just just really working her her grimy fingernails in there and like Can I lace an unleashed? This can I can I can Can I find a moist in their part and Henry's dislike sitting there taking it. who directed the scene I wanNA know like. I like maybe a fifteen year old girls like I was GonNa, grab my boyfriend scars because I don't know what the Hell Do. I've been the walk with the dead I. Don't know how romance works they hinder shouldn't be like what the fuck are you doing get your fingers wound is supposed to be like. Like the mask because united, they like stitch up the back of the that's is why go? Yeah. Like I I'm not a lace. These things up I know this is I don't know it's I thought it was very. It was very bizarre way the play this weird fucking romance. I mean, the episode is called scars. So maybe they just needed to fixate on this for a little while and I don't know they're trying to do with that team I. Think you're right. I think they're trying to draw some kind of thing about it's not all scars. That's that's that was a preoccupation throughout the fucking episode Judith. Closes with a scar, not unlike Henry and wondering what's going to heal and not bad we'll get the X.'s like yeah, right right right. Right. So I think yeah. But also don't have her sticker dirty fucking Zombie previously, Zombie encased fingers in disguise fresh wound and I, don't know if you look. At some point he says like I gotta get I gotta get up. GotTa Walk Around and make sure these stitches hold is that proper medical advice? Are you supposed to try to pop your stitches when you get them just to make sure they're gonNA old? Do they have run a lap after the doctor puts them in No. But I guess the thought is like if you're about to be forced on a march to another community that's far away. They WanNa get you. You know it's not like you've got a choice to just lay up for a day or two they're going to kick you out. So might as well try it now where the medic is still there and you can redo it then get five miles up the road and just bust up you know Bust Open I I'm sure Daryl could carry him. Or Derek fucking. So him up. Yeah. Just like Oh. Yeah. With rabbit. Get some squirrel gut or rabbit gut in a Fishhook and I'll have I'll. I'll have y'all fix passed up man. Okay moving on to Judith Telling Darryl that she wants to help they're kind of sitting by a river here. I don't know win Alexandria got river. A water feature they did they did they got a windmill and guide the guy a river runs through this community. Now, they got a little mill pond setup. Sure. She she asked him to stay. She wants to help him. He thinks it's more important to move on and stay isolated so that Alexander will be safe and. Judith throws, Judah starts lobbing a bomb. The bombs says, what would rick do which ww rtd and scores pulling there too. I think it's cute. They're they're kind of sitting exactly like each other here both knees tucked into their chest I'm not sure what they're getting out with that but there's definitely. Some bonding happing here. I think it's I. It might what I assumed is that that's advice for the only children is like to get on their level and assume their posture mirror body language. Nice. Thought that like this is another example of Michigan. probably read the book or two about parenting and just being real good at it but this is. And Judith Oh it's Daryl. Yeah. Well, then okay he's terrible parenting I'm sure he's just he's just a child. So he's as her body language consciously because that's how he's feeling on the inside I was wondering yeah if if they were trying to compare to children here. It you know I I think more of Daryl than that. Certainly. But yeah emotionally he's got a lot of work to do. Yeah and I also liked the idea that judith is attracted to people who level with her and Darryl's deaf you know Michelle. Shown Jasmine shown that's the hilltop endanger. Of course not. So everything's GonNa be fine. Darryl's like I don't know maybe. And he doesn't tell her everything obviously because that's not what his mom her mom wants but Yeah Darrell Darrell turns out. He's a pretty good. There's a couple there's a line later on this episode that sketches him out to be this dad and I kind of like thought the hell the talking about but I started thinking. He's kind of a father figure to Henry he certainly father figure that Judith Year Yep So yeah, I guess that's that's why not Darryl Good Dad I'll go along with it. Sure. All right. The flashback continues Gabriel's playing the quiet game with the kids they found. shown sad the rick doesn't didn't get to see it and then she and Jocelyn. Talk about how children the future essentially, and she realizes Michaud can't live without knowing what happened to rick and encourages her to go look for him. And I think this is an amazingly written scene and it really uses Ms Wesley at our full powers because terra, her character and true blood is one of these characters where like you want her to be your girlfriend or you want her to be your girlfriend's girlfriend because she's just utterly reliable she is challenging in the best kind of ways she's lake is excellent listener, but she's also there in like an action capacity if you need her and she. Just I felt like she effortlessly slipped into this role and you know this is a really well crafted speech like her using a crazy coincidence of shown finding her with not ever giving up on rick and it really win. It turns out that she exploited Michaud now her like one of those vulnerable points and exploited one of oldest trusted legitimately lit a fire in me like I was fucking stop at this woman and I think that's an excellent use of casting like..

Judith Oh Henry Scar Darryl Daryl rick Derek fucking Lydia Michaud Darrell Darrell Ms Wesley Michigan. Gabriel Alexander Jasmine Michelle terra Jocelyn Judah
"scars" Discussed on Bald Move TV

Bald Move TV

02:51 min | Last week

"scars" Discussed on Bald Move TV

"He's handed all this success very early on he went from like essentially junior writer to executive producer in a single season. I don't want to psychoanalyze him, but it yeah, turns out like having having competent show runner. The gives a shit about the material that respects to fans and their characters. Is a huge boon and y you know you can't plug you can't. They're not just like interchangeable. cogs in a machine, some of them. Operate better than others for sure. Absolutely, and it's not like this season has particularly interesting material to work with, and that's why it's better right. It's it seems like they had really super interesting material that they could have used. In interesting ways in previous seasons and they just didn't. Really make. Use It. The same way over and over again and it just wore off your. That's the thing that makes me wonder like what? King would have done with the the saviour wars. Man I WANNA bowl over. Yeah. She taken over on terminus and kind of use this stuff along a little bit maybe cut out a whole but I don't know because the thing is is like This does this season feel overstuffed as far as terms of plot it's taken its time, but it's invested. It's time much smarter than in previous iterations of the show like you know there wasn't just like Oh God. We need a three episode arc because what the hell else are we going to do that doesn't really connect anything doesn't move characters are forward. These things are all disliked six or seven mini arcs that are been given to various characters and they play off each other like look at the tension between Aaron and Michelle now that machines like right. After Aaron's learned a hard lesson about you know going outside the walls and he's Gung Ho about security law and order. Now suddenly there's tension between him and because because show kind of changed your mind not because you know she won't clean went crazy like she had a lot of conversations with people she respected and loved, and we're trying to you know and the the natural interplay is what I think is is fascinating. What what makes it makes us care about people when they die and walked and Roofer then the live you know like there's not i. This is the first time a long time I. I can't think of a single person in any the communities from. ROUTING FOR THEM DIE Like maybe Bar Code Tattoo that's his leftover You know that's left over Gimpo stint I think. Yeah. No you're right. I'm having trouble thinking of one. I got a question for you. When you use the bathroom, you close the door behind you, right? Yeah. I. Don't want Iran does seem you business? Okay. Okay. So why would you let people looking on you when you.

Gung Ho junior writer Roofer Iran executive producer King Michelle Gimpo
2020 Fall Movie Preview

Popcorn with Peter Travers

06:11 min | 2 weeks ago

2020 Fall Movie Preview

"Hi everybody I am Peter Travers and welcome to this special edition of Popcorn where creed you all the movies opening between Labor Day and New Year's Eve I know wait what aren't we in a pandemic Will really be moved this fall and theaters to show them in I mean the answer to both those questions is a huge. Yes. Sixty two percent of all US theaters are open now and there's going to be more to come covid permitting, of course, and those movies that can't make it to the multiplex will be available for rental or streaming in sickness and in health people, you can't keep a good movie down. So let's start with the blockbusters that are out there. Number one is tenant. Brain Teasing epoch from Dark Knight Director. Christopher. Nolan. That's geared to fire up the fall season and in theaters and with your mask and distancing in place you can strap in for this kind of Christopher Nolan throw ride and watch the spy master he's played by John David Washington give James Bond a run for his money you know you just have to. Get your head around the physics in this movie. Maybe don't know about how you can go forward and backwards in time at the same time I don't know either I was a little confused by that but you'll be glued to the visual miracles that are on screen here every cent of tenants two, hundred, million dollars production budget shows up onscreen Eisele popped. Jaw dropped pulses. Oh, pound all that good stuff movies and back baby. So what else do we have? We have Moulin which is out there right now and you'll check in Disney plus to watch this because it's not in theaters but you can rent it and you could see live action film of the Disney animated hit about a young woman who disguises. Herself as a man to replace her sick father in the Imperial Army the new moon is not musical and there's no comic relief from eating Murphy as the Voice of a fast talking dragon named Moo Shu. This is not that kind of movie. There's no whitewashing but using Western actors in the drawn from Chinese legend and as Rouland the astounding Lou ye. Leads in Asian cast that includes martial arts icon jet. Li is the emperor up and China's leading actress Gong Li as shape shifting witch who teaches on how to survive and prosper in a man's world. Look move on is not your typical princess. She's a warrior fighting for her place in the world prepare to be well. Next up wonder woman one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, four, the sequel to the two thousand seventeen smash that made a star of Gal. Gadot, remember her places the DC comics immortal wonder woman into the cold. War where she does battle with the media tycoon played by Pedro Pascal and the villainous Cheetah played by Kristen Wiig always to me an asset in any movie Chris. Pine also returns Steve Trevor The American. Pilot that one woman loves I know didn't he die the last time during World War? One people you gotta go with this this is Hollywood. So if we can borrow wonder woman's last sube truth for a moment, credibility isn't the issue here. It's the show stopping stunts engineered by returning director Petty Jenkins executed by Godot, and she's a formal Israeli military structure. So you know you're in for a really good time. Next up is black widow look wonder woman has competition already. You know we've been waiting since spring for Marvel to let its first solo black widow epic out of storage and into theaters. Now, the wait is over Scarlett. Johansson is back in action as Natasha Romanoff Aka black widow. She's the Russian assassin with no superpowers road just skills she's like the female Batman this Prequel looks back, Arjun story in it's a doozie forints pugh is there as Natasha, surrogate says sister and Rachel Vice is the leader of this black widow organization. It's not just one black widow you can become a black widow tells witness business. So Watch your back wonder woman next up candyman there's nothing like the Primo horror. Film to get us all back in the dark of a theater where we can scream bloody hearts out behind a mask of course, end with get outs Jordan peele writing the screenplay. This direct sequel to nineteen ninety two's cult fright fest stars Watchmen Emmy nominee Jadu Martine the second as a visual artist drawn back to those housing projects in Chicago's Cabrini-green where he was born now the whole place is gentrified beyond recognition but the green is still haunted by Candyman Tony Todd an urban legend who still kills anyone who summoned him by saying his name five times. Okay. Altogether now with me candyman candyman candyman candyman candyman, we did it. So I'm looking around here to see if some him up. Okay next up no time to die look no red blooded movie Fan is GonNa Think of missing Daniel. Craig's fifth and final outing James Bond you know for my money Craig and Sean Connery are in dead heat for the best bond ever. This one directed by Kerry from Gonzaga who did true detective from Script Co written get this by sleeping bags phoebe Wall Rich Daniel Craig asks for her because he really wants a little feminist touch to this. This is the. Twenty fifth, all seven Cape and you know this is a record and we're GONNA lose Daniel Craig. But in the movie James Bond's been retired for five years and he gets called back in. You know that's what happens to everybody from the Godfather on. You know Bohemian Rhapsody oscar-winner. Rami ballot plays the facially scarred villain named SAFM and he's described the director as more dangerous than anyone bond has ever encounter. Man How about you?

Daniel Craig James Bond Christopher Nolan Natasha Romanoff Director Peter Travers United States Gong Li Disney Imperial Army Eisele Marvel Kristen Wiig Emmy Dc Comics LOU Steve Trevor
One woman's story of living through Californias recent wildfires

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 weeks ago

One woman's story of living through Californias recent wildfires

"During a record breaking heat wave in mid August thunderstorms hit northern California. Lightning ignited dry vegetation and soon wildfires burned out of control including in northern Santa. Cruz County We've never seen one like this in my lifetime here forever. Jamie Johnson is a local homeowner who evacuated as the fires approached soon after she was told that the flames had engulfed her home at first, she felt numb. Then, someone gave me a hug and that's when I broke down and cried and I just sobbed but then different news arrived a firefighter had saved her house. So the relief I had was just like, wow, that's incredible. Enjoy and also guilt because here's this guy who risked his life to save my home and his burned to the ground still it could be a year before Johnston's home is livable again, even then life. Will Not Be the same every day for the rest of my life living there I will remember the trauma I get to look out my door and see the scarring on land. So I'm going to find the silver linings and I think that really it's not the property, it's not the trees it's not the house it's the people. So she's thrown herself into helping others, get relief and supplies so her beloved community can

Jamie Johnson Johnston Cruz County California Santa
Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

The Vergecast

31:46 min | 3 weeks ago

Recording police brutality: how technology is driving the new civil rights movement

"Hey everybody seemingly from the verge cast really special interview episode this week yesterday the verge published feature package where calling capturing the police which was a months-long effort for almost everybody at the site to really interrogate the role of technology in the movement against police violence. The heart of the package is a feature where we talk to. People who had filmed the somewhat viral videos of police violence asking him why they did it. What happened next how they felt in the moment whether they would do it again, really contextualising these that we've seen over and over and over again we estimate videos. One is about a specific incidents with a specific set of men in Baytown Texas who filmed police violence and what happened next another one from the science team is about body cameras and police body cameras, and how they affect your perception. What's going on in some academic research that's come out about that. So I asked verge reporter, Steven and verge video producer, my calf, the two leaders of the site wide project To come on, say talk to me about the project what they learned in. Really I, keep thinking about this, the role that our phones are playing in changing our relationship to the and the government. I don't think any product manager or designer at a smartphone company ever thought that their products will be used in this way or create this moment. This is the direct intersection of technology and culture, which is something the virtuous. Investigate. So this is a really great conversation with John and Maria and a really big project. We're very proud of it that'd be read. Watch it here are John and Maria. Maria Abdul. John Steven Welcome to the virtuous easy doing well I. I'm doing great another beautiful day in. Quarantine Mario. How are you? I'm good. I'm very relieved that this really big thing that we have produced is out there. So now I get to. Take back and reflect de. So Youtube or the editorial leaders have big projects that four I would say two months we just called the police project I. Hope Everybody can see it on site. We're very proud of it in scope it looks at how people have been using technology to record the police record police behavior protests use technology and the tools to organizers protests to organize. The movement around police brutality, and then a lot of how those cameras in particular affect our relationship with the police. So it was a huge project and it looks like one big feature, a bunch of. Additional reports around that feature in two videos that my help produce. Let's start with where it came from. How did this project begin in? How did it take the shape that it ended up being on the site? That is very, very good question because. It was sort of such a big undertaking. We it started in a very different direction than it ended as I think a lot of large projects generally tend to. So it started with an idea, a sort of idea in the staff, one of our executive editor was like we should do something to capture the moment then it sort of fell on me to shape that idea. Which is, which is interesting sort of problem because I was very interested in. Working with the initial iteration of the of the project, but getting a chance to shape it meant that I had to think critically about sort of what what would fit the moment and what would capture the moment. Well, I would say so that's how we came came up with the idea of focusing on the people filming videos of police brutality because it felt like there was a section missing to the narrative that was Benjamin. Circulating around social media, which is to say, we don't really hear from those people like we hear a lot from from victims we hear from police officers, but we don't really hear from people who like the everyday people who are sort of in the line of fire and decide to make the very brave decision to pick up their phones and record and sh like shine light like shed light. On on this type of violence that really sort of goes undocumented because one of the things we police finances, it never really shows up police reports. Yeah. One thing that caught me is I say this a lot but this is a new way of using phones that fundamentally what's happening with with all of these if you look at our feature, we started at very intentionally with Rodney King. George holiday that the person who shot the Rodney King beating in the nineties using gigantic Sony eight millimeter cassette handicap which basically no one had those like some families WanNa had those. But the the that camera was present at that moment in time at one am on that corner to witness that thing was astoundingly improbable and as we've come to now, the presence of cameras is actually more likely than not in just the way people live their lives and so the decision to record seems at once. Easy simple. Everyone has a camera. It seems likely that everything will be recorded, but it also turns out to have dramatic consequences. Yeah. Yeah. I think one of the main threads which will I'm sure get into later is a lot of these people felt afraid of retaliation from the police because they posted on social media they sort of were indentifying themselves as targets, Samara and you pretty. Videos here how how did you pick the two together the verge video team did want in the verge science team did one how do we land in those two? So. At the first video and Ben Evita's. I initially saw the video on this very large like database of other videos, police brutality that had been collected, and that was being shared on twitter that we were using that we were looking through for this project, and when I first saw the video I serve noted it as something worthy. But because it had, it didn't happen at a protest. It wasn't the the video that I thought I was going to focus on but after just Justin Callum did the interview with Isaiah for the peace reporters feature in. Told me after he published the video, there had been an increased police surveillance in his life and that he was feeling a lot of anxiety and a Lotta paranoia since he published video. It just really struck me that he still even with all of the sphere and all this anxiety and what was happening he still wanted to talk to us because he had told Justin that he was interested in being part of the video project and so as soon as she told me that I spoke to him and as we sort of spoke, it was just. So clear that he understood the magnitude of recording and he understood the consequences that comes with it and yet still wanted to bring awareness to not only this moment but also what happens when you record the police? So that's how we landed on that video. So our second video on the role of body cams and capturing police brutality fell imperative that we would cover. It in that way given that it's not only bystander footage that is coming out of these recent protests. It's also a lot of body CAM footage in. So we thought it was important and imperative, and that verge science team thought it was imperative to also cover the role of camps and capturing police brutality, but also how they might actually influence how we perceive police. Violence. So it just added a different layer and a different impact to this larger piece. One thing that caught me about that and Addie has report that just is really stuck with me as we went through the project about how all these videos of protests and police violence are becoming a genre film, and as I read that and I watched the body cam video. It just occurred to me that we actually have to use of the formal language of film to describe what's happening here that the body cam is telling the story because it's one kind of camera it shows you one kind of it has a gaze and all these other cameras have another kind of perspective in it. I. Don't think we ever think about that as these videos is having maybe like that formal connection between what the cameras are doing and what you is the viewer perceived and that to me has been a very powerful through line of this whole project. Actually cameras are active participants in these stories and they shape the narrative. The same way that we we know this in every other situation where there's cameras camera shape the narrative, and they leave things out in a enhance other things and that to me I think there's going to be a big long cultural reckoning over the role of cameras in these moments because we don't really understand how that affects our blazing to the culture to the police to the state, and it's changing because the. Cameras Right now I mean it is ironic a little bit that this genre films started in Los Angeles. Well, that's the most cameras right and it's I mean like you know if you think about it that way it's like it makes sense that like Rodney, King beating was filmed by a person in Los Angeles and maybe not elsewhere but also I, think I think it's interesting that you bring up peace because i. I do think filmmakers understand this. And it is also I mean to to get not conspiratorial but to go a little bit off the rails which I still think it's in line but. The US government spends a not insignificant amount of money advising film makers were making films about the police and the military, and they do get some of these editorial. Editorial. Control some of the stuff. and. I think that perspective does shape the way that we see some of these institutions. Which is why I think it's very powerful that. People on the ground filming and they're making their own narratives about these institutions in real time. So let's start there. That's the that's the big feature. That's the piece reporters. It's eleven interviews with people who film police violence. I want to just immediately atop credit or creative director William troll and the engineer from the box media team Adler who built this thing it is beautiful is quite an experience to go through it. But the stories are actually of course, the most powerful thing. John, tell me about one thing you said to me at the very beginning of this project was this is the same story over and over again? Yes. And there's something about the volume of it that I think really brings it home feature came together and tell me hey, came to that realization and tell us what that story actually is. Yeah. So we interviewed a lot of people that was that was the hard part. One of the hardest parts of the projects was finding people who actually wanted to talk to us but I think we were using Greg sets list on twitter to find some of these people Shasta Greg I did actually interview him for. The you know that's a separate thing but yeah, I think I mean I. Think it's very it's interesting right because through these videos like they all have the same, the same beginning middle and end and. It's once you've see enough of them. It's very it's becomes predictable where the rising action in the falling action isn't purely film criticism terms I. Think the reason that we decided to go this route was because it adds context experience police violence like it's one of the things that like it really gives depth to what's going on and it's stuff that you don't normally see and the idea was to bring that sort of reality. Home to people reading, which is why the reason it's the same story every time and the reason that it's sort of like it was distracting actually at the beginning because I was like, okay, this is a different place. This is a different time. These are different people, but like chronicling the experience effective people in the same way, and that's why it was the same story every time because it's not every day that you see. Somebody who is like an officer? Who's who has sworn an oath to protect the public, just beating the shit out of. A peaceful protester and I think it's one of those things it sort of jars you out of complacency and I think for a lot of the people that we spoke to the interviews it seemed like these people were very sort of Shell. Shocked. They sort of knew the extent of the problem but a lot of them were just normal people who happen to be a protest and happened to be filming when stuff went down and so it was very strange reading these these. Reports from the ground like these eleven fourteen over and over again because. One of the reasons I think that it's important that we have the dateline like when it happened where it happened and like you know how many shares or whatever it, the the videos got was because it, it gave back some necessary context because again, if you're if you're reading this stuff in a vacuum if you're just reading reports. From. People who filmed the stuff it really does get eerily similar in for whatever it's worth videos are almost all at night. If they're usually chaotic and they all feel like are happening same place. Yeah. It's really strange and maybe they are I mean at least psychically speaking right like it's it is the same sort of mental place I think yeah and that was one of the notes as we were putting the thing together that we got from our editors was this we have to return some sense of place to it. So we we added that back in as you were kind of editing each of these individual vignettes. was there a theme that that really came out from each of the people? Was it? What what strikes me as as I watch all these videos there's just everyone has a phone out. Right like all the time it just seems like this instinct to have your phone out that to me is new. That's yeah. That's not how people thought ten years ago or twenty years ago I really do think that's in large part because of the power of social media because again, like the thing about social media, people dismiss it out of hand as like a bad and toxic place which a lot of the time it is like don't get me wrong. However, it is one of the only avenues for social change for people who are marginalized like it's a place where you can go to be heard. By by the institutions who would normally just have the power to ignore you and I think like police violence is one of those things where it is like it is sort of an abuse of power, right? It's one of these. It's like something that it won't show up on an incident report somebody like a cop like using their baton on a protester but if somebody films that and films like the circumstances where it where it happened how it happened like you you you you get a sense of whether or not this was justified and I think. A lot of the Times it's not and a lot of the Times that goes on reported and I think. People have seen that you can actually like get some measure of justice from these otherwise unaccountable institutions by sharing the stuff on social media because public pressure is still a thing and it's interesting that to go back to Isaiah Ben Evita's. He has video that officer fired like his him posting the video actually made a change at the very local level. In his town and I think I think that's a really important thing and I, that's that's sort of what's driving this stuff because again, institutions like the police were previously entirely unaccountable to the public. Mario I mean you, you are yourself filmmaker you talked to Isaiah how do you? How do you take that? That everyone is just instinctively pulling out their phone because they think it will lead to some some change down the road. I think what's interesting about Isiah specifically is that this video doesn't take place at a protest it. He was filming outside of a convenience store they were coming from a barbecue. They hadn't gone to protests recently, they were the at that moment they weren't planning necessarily planning on going to protest later that week however. In as the video begins, you hear him say I've got to get out and record this. You also hear his friends in the car say we've got a record this and yet when we interviewed them, it was the first time any of them had ever recorded police had ever been with other people who recording the police and I think that is largely part to seeing these videos. On twitter and on facebook of police violence being captured by by citizens being captured by civilians, and so they wanted to hold this police officer accountable and they also started recording him preemptively. They didn't start recording him the moment he started you know approaching them they started recording the minute they were pulling over in. So I think that really signifies to us at least to me that. Even. If you've never participated in a protest or never participated in filming the police, you now know that's an option for you. That's an option for you and that's an option for your community. It is I do think the third part that is going on said here. Is that like it is a protective thing too. You have evidence that maybe you weren't doing anything wrong even like, okay like you get pulled over by the cops and they sight probable cause like you're sitting there peacefully. You get to tell your story, view the camera to I think. These videos, I. Am sure are showing up in courts of law across the country. One thing that's really interesting about this. Again, I come back to that the piece from addy come back to the the body cam video from the science team. I was filming someone else he was at a remove right? It was his friend who is in in the encounter at the police. Most of the powerful videos we see the lead to change our are removed. They're not from the participants. How do you? How do you think that plays out in this larger? There's a lot of change in this country. Now, there's a lot of conflict actually WANNA talk we we published the piece yesterday there's been some criticism I wanNA talk about that. But right now we're we're seeing one sort of very clear perspective from a remove. How do you think that's that's playing I. think a big part of when you hear Isaiah speak about filming he talks about the fact that he constantly to remind himself to take a step back because he knew the moment that he engaged directly with these officer, the officer could come out for could come for him. You know he had he very much understood the power dynamics at play. Even, as him as the filmer, so he kept as the officer kept getting closer he kept moving back and he would ask you can hear in the learned the full twelve minute video this incident you continuously hear him ask the other officer in the video hayes it. Okay. If I'm standing here, is it okay if I'm standing here, he's very conscientious of his body and his proximity to the violence to the violence has been that's being enacted against his friends and when we interviewed him the reason that he did take a step back was because he knew that if they took him if he got arrested along with his friends that that video. Might, not like not not got published right? Like he might not get his phone back. These things might happen and he knew the power of that video and the power of what he was holding his hands and he wanted to share it with the world so that meant taking a step back so he do that and it doesn't mean that it didn't traumatize him every time he sees the video he gets. Traumatized by seeing his friends violated in this way however, he understood that the consequences would not have been possible. Had he not taken a step back and capture according? I also think. Just. Generally speaking like we tend to trust videos that come from outside sources or people who are around but not exactly involved. It adds another like an extra veneer of credibility. I think which is. Another reason that like some of the biggest videos that we see are not like it's not the body cam it's not the person on the ground being choked to death. At, somebody else. Who has has has had the same realization as as but. I think you know just subjectively with trust trust those perspectives more because they feel more objective. CVT camera just happened to capture the incident on on film. I would say with this specific incident like the group that was arrested. In Zambia. The was interested but his friends, Skyler Gilmore Phillips were they were all taking part in questioning this officer across the parking lot. So I don't think they were necessarily objective I. Don't I. Don't think they were I think they saw there being pulled over, they recognize the police officer there friend had just been with them at this barbecue and I think the fact that he was able to get the video out there in the fact that you can see the whole incident play out right? Like in our video we don't show the whole twelve minute video, but it's like five minutes. Of Not, much going on until the officer sort of approaches them. So I think the added quote unquote like credibility is that you see the beginning middle and end of that incident Isaiah did not stop recording until the police left Isaiah began filming before the police had even had even gotten out of their cars. So I think with this specific video, it's less about the eject objectively and more about the fact that he was able to capture all. How do you think that ties into one thing that we write about a lot surveillance where all being surveilled all the time you mentioned TV cameras. A on a different day in a different moment. The way our talks about like extremely prevalent C. T. V. Cameras is crap ring put a camera everywhere. Now we're being surveilled in the cops have access to this footage, right? At the same time what we've been talking about a lot is the presence of this camera at a remove actually serves a purpose is Asia. Taking that video from that remove sort of purpose. How should we think about this balance because I I personally right? Like you catch me in a different minute. I'm over here. I'm over there. Actually surveillance is good. No, I think the difference is it really depends on like the the institution that has the footage and what they want to do it. Right like the cops when they get ring footage and what I mean like it's not it's like the cops are using footage to incriminate and I think generally this is very generally speaking in very, very general terms like it's evidence, right? And you know when it's coming from people on the ground protests were filming. It's documentation it's like the same footage, but it can be used in very different ways depending on who's doing the asking. For, the footage like and where it's going I think I think that context is actually super important right? Because like in England, for example, there are cameras everywhere. There's just like municipal cameras run by the fucking. Like in London, for example, there's there's cameras run by the Metropolitan Police Department, and that's just that's just a fact of life. And I think it's interesting because like they I think they have like controls on how you can use that stuff whereas with ring networks here it's like sort of ad hoc private companies turning it over to the police whenever they feel like it. I don't know I guess I'm going on a little tangent here. I really do think that like it depends on who's asking for the footage and what they intend to do with it. I think you know people taking footage is as it's intended to sort of exonerate his friends and that they weren't doing anything wrong and this sort of an unjustified thing. And I think the intent really matters. So I think that it's not just about the presence of cameras and footage, but it's also about who has those cameras and this of act of pulling out your phone to question authority to question police officers is actually referred to as surveillance by scholars. It is the opposite of surveillance. Right surveillance is often reserved for those in power. It doesn't necessarily mean it's always the state surveilled someone but the moment that you begin to surveilled them, you were taking a bit away a bit of their agency away from them. You're taking a bit of their privacy away from them but soon, valence is this idea of challenging. Authority by trying to sort of disrupt this power dynamic by filming your oppressor by filming specifically in marginalized communities, the police, and so with surveillance, it is the idea of this is what we're talking about right like it's not mentioned one time in the videos nor is it mentioned in any of these pieces but all of this is what scholars refer to sue balance, which was coined by Steve Man, and it's all about looking from below. So you're not looking from below you're not the person who is above and the position of power. You are the person who's often surveilled right like with Isaiah and friends like they were they knew this officer they. They had never recorded this officer, but they not only knew of him. They had previously had seen incidences of him, and so I think by pulling out their phone, what they're doing is trying to challenge this authority figure to them that had represented sort of. Head oppressed in had sort of harassed or had allegedly harassed and targeted African Americans in their community. So they see this officer, they see their black friend being pulled over they understand this officer had allegedly been targeting and harassing African Americans they pull out their phone to begin to try to create a counter narrative, and before any of these things I think Bijon spoke about this earlier like when you start recording early on, you can sort of see the maybe there wasn't any probable cause and what you hear them saying the first few minutes of the video is, what's the probable cause? What's probable cause like why did you over in the officer officers aren't engaging right? and. So I think the role of that video in that moment is about who has it right? Like you can hear them. Surveillance video from above that's muted that can be distorted. It's about the person who got out of the car who started filming. Once they start one saw him started getting attacked the person who filmed at the very beginning and surveillance often doesn't involve you filming. Once you see the police officers sort of attacking someone but you film when you see a police officer because you want to challenge there are over you. Yeah. The when I say we're GONNA face a long period of cultural reckoning over this I don't think that we the surveillance scholarship is that it's very early stages right and it's not builds out. It's not complete. We're learning how it works and that to me is one of. You know when when the smartphone cameras invented I don't think people thought the people who invented the ship in the back of every smartphone thought we're going to have to have a conversation about surveillance when this is all said and done and that to me is. Right and that I think about that, all of the time like there are engineers and product managers and designers who make these products. and. Sometimes they have a guest of how they'll be used but this to me is one of the most surprising revolutionary uses of the technology right just fundamentally and I think this conversation about what does it mean for everyone to record the state? What does it mean for the state? Maybe record your back with a body camera or something else it's going to change the nature of our relationship with the people in power. It is interesting like one of the things that fascinates me about taking video protest specifically is like I think, a lot of police officers on the ground seat is violence when somebody holds a camera to them because it like it does challenger Authority, but it also like like it is a a thing creating a record in real time that they cannot control in a situation and I think it's just very strange because. Yeah I mean, the perspective really matters who's who's taking the video really really really matters. Let's talk about that for a minute in this conversation. In the feature, we have very intentionally chosen to highlight one perspective people filming the videos. We have almost no perspective from the police in return know perspective from the state in return as we are making this project I, you know the editor in chief ultimately I'm for everything I knew we were making that decision I felt comfortable with it. We do hear a lot from the police, but that notion that the camera is impeding the the police officers job that the police are themselves scared of violence they need to be protected that there are people with guns in the street Often fear for their lives how do you think that I mean the piece is almost yesterday right for many people liked it. Some people were critical of it. We appreciate the criticism and makes us better. But how do you how were you prepared for that criticism that there was no perspective from the police as after pieces published how did he react and where are you at now? That's a really I mean that's a really really good question I haven't seen much of that criticism. Charts to my filters I. Guess My. But it's I mean I think the larger question of like what police think is really interesting to me new I. Don't know if you know there's been a few years ago. I actually spent a year in Ohio reporting a story on cops there and like. Like this, this very, it was Liverpool East Liverpool Ohio, which is a very small town between it's like West Virginia Pennsylvania and Ohio. It's right on the border of those places and it was the site at one point of the like it had the worst heroin. Like heroin outbreak people were dying of overdoses every single day like the average was like one a day and the police department was like it largely fell on them to take care of the people and it was really interesting because I what I did was like I just spent like my time going on right alongside like. Suit up get my notebook get in the car and we drive around like I would smoke black and milds with this cop, and we would like He. He would pick people up and so I went to the county jail and like I saw the mechanisms of the state like from the passenger seat, which was very interesting because like the more time you spend with police officers, the more you understand that like. Seeing people seeing people's worst every day does something very bad to your brain. It puts you on extremely high alert. And it makes ordinary situation seem incredibly terrifying and I think. One of the things that goes unexplored is the trauma police officers sort of feel, and they just don't talk about it like all of these. There were seven people department all of them were very, very, very clearly traumatized. In a way that was not obvious to them, but very obvious to me is like an outside observer. And it was interesting because like the other thing that they did most of the time, it was just like social work they were just they knew all the people that were talking to they were involved in the community. Everybody knew them like I remember. The COP I was with like picked up this woman because she like had drugs on her. And he was like, why? Why? Like what happened like we talked about this I let you go last time because like you said, you were working on your raptor what happened to that and it was like one of these things where I was like Oh this guy actually really doesn't understand like where these people are coming from we ended up having to take her to the county. Jail because she didn't have money for bail is like one hundred bucks and he was like on the on the hour long ride back. He was fuming that she would have to spend this long in jail just because she didn't have hundred dollars and so it's one of these things I think like you know there are good cops. The police is fundamentally like disordered. I will say it's like. And I think both of those things are in conversation with each other because like again, there are days that are incredibly bad like this cop was telling me like the worst day of his life I ask offhandedly by the way never ask cop with the worst day of their life is. He Was Not prepared for the answer which was like he was like Oh. Yes. So I had to respond to a call this. This guy had kids who you know his his kids were friends with he locked them in the House and burn the house down because his wife was cheating on him and so this cop had to respond to the call and then go tell kids afterward what happened and it was I was just like that is just like outside. So outside of the scope of a normal person's life. That it's like did it requires examination right and I think that's the kind of trauma that these people are like seeing like one of those one of those events can scarred for life I don't necessarily think being police officer is as dangerous to save a firefighter like statistically speaking. But again, like these horrific incidents of violence really do change your perspective and I think a lot of this kind of trauma is invisible and goes unexamined and it's difficult because a protests which is a very ordinary event. There is A. There is some potential for stuff to go wrong and I think if you're on the lookout for that, like it makes it skews your perspective and you can't see what is happening objectively, which is I think why it's very important that people also film the police at these events because there is another record that is being created in real time.

Officer Isaiah Ben Evita Twitter John Steven Rodney King Texas Metropolitan Police Department Youtube Product Manager Maria Abdul Reporter United States Los Angeles Engineer Heroin Isiah Justin Callum Producer
Undocumented People With No Health Insurance Struggle Especially Hard From COVID-19

All Things Considered

03:49 min | 3 weeks ago

Undocumented People With No Health Insurance Struggle Especially Hard From COVID-19

"People who contract code 19 can spend months trying to get better. That struggle is especially hard for one group. That's a high risk of getting the virus undocumented people who don't have health insurance. NPR's Joseph Shapiro has one family's story. Laundries. Father got covert 19 in early August. He came home from a Chicago hospital. So what was that? Like the day he came home? Oh, my God, who are also have beat everybody in the hospital was like he was a But today there was no more hope for him. Where, like All my God, I don't know where leg thing guy. He's still here with us. Her father Jose spent three months in the hospital. Jose he's from Mexico is an undocumented immigrant. That's why we agreed to use just first names. He was in the I C U then in the rehab wing. Now he's home, but with long term maybe lifelong disabilities. Across the country. Latinos are hospitalized for Kobe and almost five times the rates of white people who aren't Latino. It's hard to count how many undocumented immigrants get cove it, but they're at high risk. Often they don't have health insurance. They may live in crowded homes and work in dangerous jobs in nursing homes, food plants or, like Jose in restaurants. And I see you have something on your neck. Were you on a ventilator? Yes, I spoke to Jose on a video call. He's propped up on pillows in bed. He shows the white bandage that covers the spot where a surgeon cut a sweat into his neck. To insert it, too. For the ventilator, only the Honda. Then Jose pulls up his dark blue polo shirt to show the tube to a stomach. Holland removes the phone Cameron to show it. Yes, I'm feeling to have a feeding too. That's how he's still getting fed. He hopes the tube will come out soon in. Maybe this week. Yeah. Let's take it out. Ah, staff at the hospital taught Jose's wife how to use a syringe toe push the nutrients through that feeding tube and howto work a portable ventilator. When he first came home, he still needed that ventilator to breathe. Jose has no health insurance. Some nurses come by and check on him from time to time. Still, the vast majority of Jose's Karen home, including some pretty high level medical care falls to the family. That's appalling toe. I eat Aguila cello. She's a research professor who studies healthcare disparities at Northwestern University's Medical School in Chicago. This require more specialized business, the nurse to come and take care of this gentleman at home rather than two. Let the wife and other members of the family to take care of the care That's not acceptable, for sure, not acceptable. But Bob Shaye, who started a nonprofit devices for the disabled, says it's typical. We see them all week every week now. Where people are getting discharged with scarred lungs damaged heart complete loss of mobility, neurological issues, they're still significantly limited. Then it's just up to the family does somehow figured out from there for Jose Shay's group donated a wheelchair. Ah hospital bed and other medical equipment, things that can cause thousands of dollars, especially if you don't have health insurance. Jose would like to go back to working in a restaurant. But his old job is gone. Maybe no more. And first he's got months and months, maybe longer to recover. There's an advantage to living in his multi generational family. His older Children are working for now they're paying the rent, and they're buying his medicine.

Jose Shay Chicago Hospital Jose NPR Joseph Shapiro Professor Bob Shaye Kobe Cameron Honda Chicago Mexico Northwestern University's Medi
Cryptocurrency Markets On The Edge

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

04:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Cryptocurrency Markets On The Edge

"Good opportunities over the way Kim markets wise We did say Bitcoin close up yesterday's candle good two percent. Saturday it was Dan Hoffa percents dawdling along Napa three jot rotten. Now, we're going to bullish candidates three point, four percent backing that cradles on the weekly right. Now, we had a weekly close up point six of a percent we closet eleven thousand, seven, hundred, twenty, four, the Pisa glidden thousand Mothers Bay. The raging will be fine some support now, we not out of the out of the woods yet. We could certainly say the market come back Deepa the limb five until he breakout through the high of loss wakes candle is still in the cards. Lost Weeks was eleven thousand, eight, hundred thirty. We get above the. Will Continue to say, Bitcoin, move off to what has been. Let's be honest. We over the last couple of weeks I mean. We saw that. bitcoin strong couple of wakes up seven point eight percent beckon the twentieth of July. Then the twenty seventh of July were up eleven percent. So a guy in a strong way. The third of August, the start of August, we saw the handle up five point five non then the tenth of August, two percent. Then we would down two point two, five in the last month. Last. Week out point six of Senator Forget as well. We've got the one month the month ending. Very very shortly. Murat. Month right now it's not huge is only three cents at stands lost month mother. July was up twenty, four, point two, nine percent. So. Big. Although has A. Date pullback and hasn't gone to not for a little while you know it's it's sort of slow dead off that big Brennan I wouldn't be surprised. To say, have a bit of a run because if you consider. Aman, where are we going back to the fifth wheel of scars most of August? Look we saw a low of August the low of the month. will go the low the month was ten, thousand, six, hundred, fifty, hot twelve, thousand, five, hundred. So let's let's US Mike the two thousand. Dull. Is Not crazy now it's not crazy at all. So it could say a bit of a kick on for bitcoin at pulling back a little bit on yesterday's That's like. Too much going on. We do have a four hour tried to let it thousand, seven hundred and seventy s where we have. A very already. So kicked on again, yesterday up seven point six, five percent. Closing the wake-up nausea strong a good ten percents point seven, five percent. That's a pretty, damn strong wait there for rough sell straight back off got grease the bull the Rod has a four, twenty, five, twenty, four. Down one percent Australia kicking apply there is well. Exiled did may the ten period moving average loss wake low with twenty five point three cents and closed at twenty nine point so I closed twenty point three it's now at twenty point three point, two percent and. Is Starting to get a little bit of follow through I. WanNa see. Except to a bit more before I. Get involved in this way be SR bitcoin cash sitting back down that way a cradles on. Yeah. Loss Waking. At one point four percent loss weight but to tell you walk. Josh Soda hanging above that two seven five. Region which has been acting as a bit of support that will be very interesting to see how he guy. Throughout the rest of the way swig oversee with just starting, considering where we backing to the four hundred has an arsenal trend. With currently it's an option at two hundred and seventy dollars and fifteen cents hoffa percent. Why Coins? Well, McLaughlin had I am. A RIP Day yesterday up ten point four, two percent and ready citing lot coins wake. It did have a lar- that came in fifty, three, eighty six but ended up closing at sixty to ninety four. That's a big swing up three point. I, said last week. A really strong way ready for math from lot one of the strongest ally the. Within our top ten wetness what goes on for the time being be as Vasil. So sickening that little weekly cried align. It's look it's pretty like lost of a BS vade. Puppy tends to move hard with law of one eighty, one last week and I have to I non closing one, ninety, six, eighty, six, one, get above two, hundred on base the. That's where the the movement will start to shine on through still gonNA lower to one on six seventeen point three, five off percent cod Donna on the weekly. Will it also rejected the lows of the wake lows at ten point two cents higher at twelve point seven and closing at eleven point seventy, five so. It's up a little bit. Wrought now has a little bit late. He's not worth talking about really

Deepa Dan Hoffa KIM Mothers Bay Pisa Napa Senator Nausea Aman Josh Soda Donna Australia Vasil Mclaughlin
What is online service provider?

TechStuff

05:03 min | Last month

What is online service provider?

"Ages ago Chris and I did an episode about online service providers. But this time we want to specifically look at prodigy partly because it was one of the earliest in fact, depending upon whom you ask the earliest online service provider. Now, online service providers are different from Internet service providers, right? So I'M GONNA. Blow your minds out their kids. So you youngins out there there was a time when we did not all have access to the Internet. It was a terrifying time dinosaurs roamed the earth. Occasionally, you would go camping and an enormous guy in a hockey mask would chase you around the eighties tough y'all I actually do remember that time dimly I mean I I was you know not necessarily eating all food yet and I could barely read but I do in fact, recall a time before the Internet I grew up in that time and I bear the scars to this day. Also I don't read that much currently. But at any rate nowhere, we're talking about a time where. The computer revolution had really taken hold of personal computers had already become a a rising trend it still was. Kind of a rarity to find someone who owned a personal computer it wasn't like Pc's everywhere certainly not now but they were certainly getting very popular in the mid eighty s and more and more people were adopting them as the price was becoming more affordable for the average household rather than for hobbyists only right. Right. So those those bleeding edge technology adopters who somehow have the jobs that allow them to to adult their obsession with technology they had already gone through the first wave, and now it was trickling down to everybody else arrayed. We're we're talking about the kind of the two eighty, six sort of days prodigy started. Up So. During those times your computers. Early computers were really especially for personal computers were just self contained devices right? It was whatever you software you had to run on that machine and that was pretty much it. which would put on the machine with fancy fancy, a five and a quarter inch floppy desk. Wouldn't necessarily even have a hard drive you might just run it directly from the disks. So in other words, disc was popped out that was it. You didn't have an program anymore Yay. Operating system although you might not even call it that anyway. Eventually. you start seeing things like modems where you can do things like connect to a local bulletin board system or B s this was usually something that was hyper local as something that would be running the same city that you live in because in order to connect to most BBS, as you had to dial a specific number and usually it was a, it was a local number, a local number you could dial into a bbs that's run in a state. You know twenty states away long distance charges at the time were also such that that that it would have been incredibly cost prohibitive. Yeah. Anyone any kid. Who experimented with connected to BBS is might find out rapidly from his parents or her parents that. It was not the best idea to do that without parental. Agreement beforehand because you can rack up huge bills I, mean this is the era where long distance charges were a real thing I know that a lot of people today aren't even they don't. That's not something they even think about because. In most cases, you don't have a long distance charge anymore about once a month I marvel at the incredible present, and the fact that I can call people all over the country without having any without worrying about Oh. We talked for five minutes. This is going to cost me twenty bucks or whatever and they have not said anything value. So so at any rate at this time, that was pretty much it, and then there became this idea of the online service provider away for companies to create services that would open up brand new opportunities for consumers, and it was before the Internet had rolled out to being something that the general public could access. So be sure but people were looking for a way to provide service to to consumers who wanted to communicate and be to companies who wanted to sell more stuff give give companies an outlet to sell more stuff. Right. So this was a this was. The idea like instead of instead of the Internet the Internet, it's the network of networks right? It's all these different computers that are connected together and lots of different types of communication goes across the Internet from email to file transfers to web traffic. All of that stuff is going on across the Internet an online service provider is more like a very small network. It's not a network of networks is a network in which you use your computer to dial into a host computer and the host computer serves up all the information on it that it has. So in other words, instead of having access to everything in the world, you just have access to whatever the host computer has on it. And online service providers did this in different ways.

Chris Hockey
6 New Travel Mistakes To Avoid Thanks To The Pandemic

Tips for Travellers Podcast

05:32 min | Last month

6 New Travel Mistakes To Avoid Thanks To The Pandemic

"Thinking of traveling with its domestically internationally anytime in the next year, there's a whole bunch of watch outs need to know and mistakes that other travelers making that you need to avoid if you're thinking of travelling during this whole pandemic situation that we find ourselves in Alabama. This is tips for travelers I wanNA talk about things you really need to know some things have going to discuss includes. Using travel agent or self booking higher hall packing situation can change the big mistakes that people making that you need to avoid, and probably the single most important thing you need to think about platform and know exactly what you're going to do when you're traveling in the current situation. The first key watch out is when you're thinking of travelling is assume that everything will change change very quickly. So even if you can go to certain country today or to certain state. Today that could change overnight and we've seen lots of examples happen where it's perfectly fine to fly to particular country like Spain for example, out of the UK but within hours of that could change. So countries are constantly evolving and looking at what they see as safe places to travel with you have to have quarantined with you go in with you have when you return and it changes really fast. I have had friends get on a plane heading off to Spain. For example, they've arrived learned that the UK government was about to bring in quarantining midnight got on the plane and come back because they didn't want to go into fourteen day quarantine. So when you think about traveling assume that things can change very quickly and it's really really important that you stay on top of all the advice you need to say, well, connected to the news what I recommend you do is try and book as last minute as you possibly can. You also like to get really good deals nowadays by booking last minute. So you booking when you know that the chance of everything going smoothly is pretty smooth. It's really hard now to book in advance because we just don't know what the situation is going to be. Secondly, if you book even if you're booking way ahead is ensure that everything is council refundable off movable. So if change you can move things around without any penalties. The good news is a lot of. Providers with airlines or cruise lines or hotels are making it much easier to things that absolutely critical make sure that things are cancelable, refundable and easy to move. So you can basically go with the flow. The second big watch out is that if you do your own booking which I used to like to do I'd like to my hotel separately my flight separately my accommodation separately whatever it was separately. One thing you might want to decide is don't do that book at all through a travel agent the reason being that if you have to change things, it becomes very complicated because it's four or five different context 'cause. To change things if you've booked everything through a travel agent, it's one call one email and you can sit back and let them get on with everything. You'd have to sit on phone lines for five hours, six hours to try and get through to change flights. It takes an enormous amount of stress out it makes things much simpler. So even if you a sort of person that likes to pick and mix juju thing I strongly recommend that you book through a travel agent I've seen examples now doing with all my travels over this period of time is using a travel agent to make it simple. The great news is. Also particular abroad, and you have connectivity issues or this time difference issues with that one call that one email you can basically relax keep common that happens it's been a great plus in the positive traveling when there's been lots of disruptions able to contact the agency that time was Monday cruising I convinced it back relax to the beach while everyone else was scarring around and I knew they were sorting out problems. So seriously think about using travel agent at this point tiger, he can manage all of the changes or the refunds, and basically a very importantly linked to my first point make sure that you know exactly the. Situation as changes, they will keep on top those potential cancellations and changes in quarantine rules or whatever the third watch that I have, and this is a really really important one as well is don't assume that everything has returned to normal I. Think one of the big mistakes that people making is they seem their everything today. When it comes to travel is back to normal. There are three critical things that you need to bear in mind. First of all, you need to absolutely check and make sure that everything is open just because lockdowns are ending it doesn't mean that everything is open some things may have even gone bankrupt. Just simply not opening because for whatever reason, they are able to come regulations that country letting them open the beaches may not be having you might have to book to go to the beaches you might have book time started to pool. The attractions may not be open they. You might have to have certain restrictions before you can go into see the site of the museum that you wanted to see the theme parks may not be entirely open early civil rights might be open. So there's a multitude things you need to make sure that are open before you actually decide that is what you want to go because you might be able to do what you really want to do secondly. Things may not run as you used to expect them to. Or maybe very different. So for example, many islands in the Caribbean. Some states in the US, some countries around the world requires covid nineteen test within seventy two hours of heading name for example, other countries. For example, Greece, you have to register online twenty, four hours before you go, you get a special qr courage you have to show when you check in. So hundreds and thousands of people have mystere. To Greece because they didn't understand that whole system, get the qr codes or do the paperwork correctly. So you need to assume the things are going to run differently and it's going to be really different requirements

UK Spain Greece Alabama Caribbean United States
Luka Doncic clips the Los Angeles Clippers with game winning shot

CBS Sports Radio

05:05 min | Last month

Luka Doncic clips the Los Angeles Clippers with game winning shot

"In Game three and their loss. The Dallas Mavericks left the game did Luca don changes in the third quarter? He left the game with an ankle injury. He was listed as a game time decision today in the Dallas loss in Game three. Christophe Cruising Had a very good game. 31 points. You picked up the slack Despite the fact the Mavericks lost by eight so entering game number four this afternoon. Question was what Look, um, play. The answer was Yes. Okay, so Dallas is going to get Luca on a bum wheel. But the good news is you still have. Christopher is English. Right? Well right before tip off, we all find out that Chris stop forcing. This is not playing for Dallas. He's got a knee issue. He's just out for the game. So look is playing Trey Burke gets to start and everyone's wondering. Wait. What just happened here? And then all of a sudden, Williams started to move before he had to go back and retrieve it on the left sideline. Jackson guarding him in the right hand on the cross over into the paint shoots off the left foot scores. Lou Williams 14 points in the first half. The Williams would have a saw and outstanding game for the Los Angeles Clippers. The Clippers lead this one by his many is 21 points. Believe the second quarter, the Mavericks actually started to make a run. And then all of a sudden it would be the Dallas Mavericks that had the Liebert try to sleep through a tip plateau by heart away to the rim along the right baseline spins Homer reverse layup. It's the first lead for the Mavericks since he was five before 5 73. Dallas was down as many as 21. They actually would take the lead and they would make the lead grown the screen. Luca drives right slot spend 3 60 Black right. Shoot scars in one. Stop it. Luka Dantchev 27 points, 11 rebounds, 12 assists. We're not yet to the forth, and he has the Mavericks up seven. That's the funny part, John saying Stop it. We're not even close to being done yet. Luca don chips would have himself a day Dallas would go from down 21 toe up by 12. Then all of a sudden here come the Clippers. Jackson saved you from going out of bounds up the Florida Leonard. Transition. Three Having fun Yet Yet two two point point game game is is why why Leonard Leonard and and Luke Luke Adachi Adachi is is putting putting on on a a show show shot shot making making at at its its finest finest 1 1 19 1 17 at that point from under the rim of the left corner out of the deep left corner checks and buries it. On the hardest spot this chute on the floor. Welcome to the bubble N ba. All the big shots go down. It's exactly how it works. Al PJ in that fourth quarter very late in the closing seconds, each team would have a player fouled, taking the three pointer. Each team would have said player make only two free throws. We were tied at 1 21, and then we went to overtime. And over. Time is going to be our turning point brought to you by my computer career training for a better life. I'm just going to let the play the highlights role. They tell all the stories a minute five to go driving the paint. Lou Williams lays it up and draws a foul Lou Williams half a day. 33 points and possibly one more in a moment. He wasn't done. Sean 36 points off the bench for Doc Rivers Clippers again done the Clippers air trying to go up 31 in the series. Lou Williams goes for 36 past the dancing Down the rights of the lane, euro step shoots and scores off the glass Timeout, Doc Rivers, All right, look a daunting to undock down that pair. The Mavericks go back in front. But no, we're not done. Kids. Hawaiian, Leonard catches between the rings goes around to the right side fallout instead of three. Doyline, guarded by Keiji 13 12 off across over the paint. Don't look in the corner. Morris for three, buried it for the lead. Moke Morris senior Marcus Morris senior. They call a move. He knocked down a three he has played for the Knicks earlier this year, he knocks down the three the Clippers take the one point lead. It looks like the Clippers are going to go. Up three games to one Dallas inbounds in the front court. The first time they inbound in the front court. The Clippers used their foul too, given the extra session, so reload one final time for the highlight. You will now hear. 40 10 pointing 30 times, Maybe 30 times until Tuesday's Game five gets it into Dodge Systems out of half court to the top of the arc steps left three for the win. It's just wanted for the Mavericks as time expires at the end of every time 135 133 43 points for the jet I and the Siri's is tied to On believable. What do you say? Unbelievable. Luca. This is nuts. Look a dungeons the on ly player.

Dallas Mavericks Los Angeles Clippers Lou Williams Dallas Leonard Leonard Luca Luca Don Chris Luca Don Chips Jackson Christophe Cruising Trey Burke Marcus Morris Luke Luke Adachi Adachi Doc Rivers Luka Dantchev Bubble N Ba Al Pj Dodge Systems
This Is Nathan MacKinnon's Time To Shine

The Lead

01:57 min | Last month

This Is Nathan MacKinnon's Time To Shine

"Serene how do you begin to describe the talents of Nathan MacKinnon twitter every he scores I tweet Nathan Raven kid in the first of his name, the war in Nova Scotia the protector of the Rocky Mountains is essentially a federal offence on. Skates. Kit of the Minnesota gophers. Advocate. Say Lock. Oh. Goodness gracious everything. He does he does at full speed all the time yet know the panther likes. Scars, my goodness Nathan MacKinnon in an electrifying all tied the game at true has this raw speed that it's really him connor mcdavid in terms of being on that level there's pace and then the kid. But what you're seeing from him now's you're this sort of physical presence where he's checking he's hitting I mean he got into a fight with Christian Fisher who's not exactly a small person in his own, right? Now, we're going to get some off stuff that was McKinnon handled. His Own Macanas is the big strong powerful man not only that you're seeing him play defense to a point where shared Bednarz said this morning look I believe that Mckinnon could be a Selke Anna Heart candidate with the way he's been performing Taiwan what? All you need to know about Nathan MacKinnon. Games back. Thirty six. Believable. And it just goes back to what his modus operandi is, which is to be the best player imaginable because he's so driven in that regard honors that there are times in practices where someone gets the best of him, he will accuse them of cheating when it's no Nathan, you just can't win every play all the time he's like no, but it's cheating. It's this and it's that and guys laugh at this because they just know how driven he is

Nathan Mackinnon Nathan Nathan Raven Minnesota Gophers Mckinnon Rocky Mountains Nova Scotia Scars Connor Mcdavid Christian Fisher Bednarz Taiwan
Groundbreaking New Material 'Could Allow Artificial Intelligence to Merge With the Human Brain'

Lew Later

03:25 min | Last month

Groundbreaking New Material 'Could Allow Artificial Intelligence to Merge With the Human Brain'

"Groundbreaking new material could allow artificial intelligence to merge with the human brain. Well, that's what Elon Musk has been working on with the stuff. This is not directly connected to that although I suppose he could use this material in his product. Scientists have discovered a groundbreaking bio synthetic material that they claim can be used to merge artificial intelligence with the human brain. Previously has been hard to use the typical stuff you would use for some sort of a cable or wire things like gold, silicon and steal. They can cause scarring when they're implanted into your mind to turn you into a Cyborg because you're not made of metal. So, unfortunate, your made a guts and skin and stuff. Good old fashioned biology data. How dare you gooey stuff the gooey stuff The meat sack. What they say that's you full of meat. Yeah. So obviously, we're outdated and we have to get upgraded. We gotta get upgraded and so in order to do that, they're going to use. A type of material we got the idea for this project because we were trying to interface rigid organic micro electrodes with the brain, but brains are made out of organic salty live materials. Those pesky brains. pesky brains it wasn't working. Well, we thought there must be a better way we started looking at organic electronic materials like conjugated polymers that were being used in non biological devices. We found chemically stable example that was sold commercially as an anti-static coating for electronic displays. This polymers known as P. Dot. Org pedo maybe it's a French philosopher by the name of bidault. Sounds appropriate or dot. Like t dot no says t dot. Back in the day ever that the that didn't last that long or did it. Did. Never. Really. was never really the choice in my circles no. T dot in order to reference the city of Toronto was never a popular choice in my circles. Was it a popular choice in your circles? No no, it's just all you do is say Toronto Toronto without the T, at the end. Yeah it's all you have to do. Anyway show Toronto Raptors because when we checked up on the game, they were up like thirty they're up like thirty. But who knows probably since we started filming this because we were like that gave is done and then probably now Brooklyn Brooklyn came all the way back I. Doubt it. Not, against those raptors. This versatile I it'll polymer was recently discovered to be capable of transforming house breaks into energy storage units due to its ability to penetrate porous materials and conduct electricity your brain, your porous gooey brain needs to be penetrated, and this material will allow that to happen. So you can be upgraded. Understand Down for that. Okay. You'RE GONNA be number one. LISTEN UP LISTEN UP Ilan. Wills going to be the first guy on on your brain implant assembly line just stick them in a chair put him through the conveyor. And upgrade that man. Meet Suck upgrade the man.

Toronto Raptors Elon Musk Toronto P. Dot Brooklyn
Air Pollution Could Make People More Vulnerable to Covid-19

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

01:16 min | Last month

Air Pollution Could Make People More Vulnerable to Covid-19

"Medical professional suggest some people who have had covert 19 should air on the side of caution. Do toothy air quality pulmonary doctors have seen the impacts Covert 19 has on some patient's lungs. After the virus is out of their system. We know that many of our patients have recovered from Kobe and even people that have been severe enough to require care in the hospital or ice. You like months later. Still having symptoms? What would that be? Wrongdoing. Shortness of breath. Fatigue just haven't been able to return back to their normal state of health. Doctors say. Some patients even see scarring in there ones and other complications, putting them at risk. But there are still unknowns about how the virus impact your ability long term, especially through these conditions, occasion to have had Kobe. They certainly are at risk of having more early sensitivity, and it's possible that their symptoms may get worse. In the setting of poor air quality. But I don't think we have enough data to know for sure. We just don't know how to open 19 is going to affect your susceptibility on to things like smoke or the particular matter that go along with wildfires. In the end, when air quality is low when you've had complications, breathing even after Cove it, doctors say, air on the side of caution. This Fox everyone's Alex Rose

Kobe Alex Rose
Coronavirus survivors should be cautious while air quality is poor due to wildfires

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

01:35 min | Last month

Coronavirus survivors should be cautious while air quality is poor due to wildfires

"And Action Day alert for air qualities in effect for the front range corridor that runs at least until for this afternoon, and that's due to the smoke from the wildfires. They're burning in the state State Department of Public Health and Environment says multiple pollutants could reach the unhealthy for sensitive groups. Category A times. Greatest air quality impacts expected to be in the Denver metro area. But that could extend further north medical professional suggesting certain covered 19 survivors could probably air should probably air on the side of caution because of the air quality pulmonary doctors have seen the impacts. Koven, 19 has on some patient's lungs after the virus is out of their system. We know that many of our patients that have Recovered from Kobe and even people that have been severe enough to require here in the hospital, or I see you like months later. Still having symptoms, whether that be unknowing shortness of brand fatigue just haven't been able to return back to their normal state of health. Doctors say. Some patients even see scarring in their lungs and other complications, putting them at risk. But there are still unknowns about how the virus impact your ability long term, especially through these conditions, occasion to have had Kobe. They certainly are at risk of having Maur airway sensitivity, and it's possible that their symptoms may get worse in the setting of poor air quality. But I don't think we have enough data to know for sure. We just don't know how to open 19 is gonna affect your susceptibility on to things like smoke particulate matter that go along with with wildfires. In the end, when air quality is low when you've had complications, breathing even after Cove. It Doctors say air on the side of

Kobe State Department Of Public Hea Denver Maur Koven
Lady Gaga reveals she scratched Ariana Grande's eye while rehearsing for 'Rain On Me' music video

Z Morning Zoo

00:40 sec | Last month

Lady Gaga reveals she scratched Ariana Grande's eye while rehearsing for 'Rain On Me' music video

"Lady Gaga and Ariana Grande are up for video of the year for rain. May on, they'd probably should win the award. Why? Because Ariana Grande a almost damn near went blind while doing the video occasion here, this story Lady Gaga who is wearing her fake lady Gaga, costume and nails. Scratched Ariana in the fridge and I while they were doing their dancing, shanked her with my nail by accident. Dancing lady got us scratched. My eye is an honor. I hope it's scars there. I hope and scars. Noah didn't scar and everybody was okay. But man, that was a close call for poor Arianna.

Lady Gaga Ariana Grande Arianna Noah
Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

Exponent

04:59 min | Last month

Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

"I James. I'm doing. Okay. How are you? Good thanks. All Things considered I'm busy. Tell You I've complainer this on multiple guess at this point. But what's another one I feel like? Because no one is traveling or going anywhere what is usually the slowest months? August is just insane like stuff happening constantly it started off where it got very slow in March. I was walked down people don't know what to do and were nervous. I was over whelming sense of doom and the weird thing. Is Obviously, it's not that stuff has changed that much but we talked about this on the last episode people have adapted, and now they're like making up for lost I but they're just like news coming out everywhere right a no more so than in the capital. That's right. So last week last Wednesday the editor subcommittee of the Judiciary Committee in the House had a hearing with the four tuxedos Apple Google facebook and Amazon Microsoft was notable by its absence, but it was clearly a. Focus on consumer tech. In the reason I say that this was clear is not just because such. Adele wasn't there but it became pretty clear through the questioning that Tim. Cook was only they're Kinda wanted to say that they got all of them because they were not prepared to ask him questions at all. It's clear that all the work of the committee has been mostly focused on I would say first and foremost Amazon they had the most detailed stuff there they were pretty detail. About Google, they were somewhat detailed about facebook, but you could see sort of the quality of questionings really starting to come down there, and then they didn't even know what the percentages were in the APP store. You is kind of embarrassing. They would ask cook a question and let him just talk because they didn't know what to ask next wherever else interrupt because they wanted that points to make et Cetera et Cetera and I've thought that difference in the quality of questioning per company. was pretty striking. Yeah. It's interesting. The New York Times ran a tally of the questions and I thought that in itself was interesting and it looked pretty evenly spaced and then apple was dislike fifty percent of the other three frustrating in a way because obviously I've been sort of fixated on the APP store for literally since the beginning of attack relate what am I I set of articles back in two thousand thirteen was trying to understand what how is doing such a crappy job. Imagine the APP store and one of my conclusions there was there. So scarred from their near death experience in the nineties when they had to beg adobe and Microsoft to continue supporting the Max can remain viable and I wrote this is back in two thousand thirteen that they would never allow themselves to be in that position again and well. So interesting about that is the way that has manifested is that again, this is a long running things that they've really had kept productivity APPS. In particular, it's hard to make money. You can't charge upgrades is really important sort of business mile away. It's worked on other platforms white the internet which Tim Cook Pretends doesn't exist also testimony they jumped straight from brick and mortar to the APP store. There's no intervening period there where you could buy stuff on the Internet. It's funny because when you read his testimony, you don't notice until someone points out she's like Oh my word. Yeah. You just kinda skipped fifteen years of distribution. So I didn't watch it old but I did watch part of it, and the only thing that I can remember is someone was questioning him around he has complete control of which APPs and he's like I'll well, if the native APPs that's true except Web apps so think he's not to the Internet was like little buttons that you create insofar which by the way are totally handicap progressive lobster totally handicap on IOS in wipes away all their cookies and settings after a week in. Where are the interesting things about this is because apple was held captive by productivity APPs in the nineties all of their sort of onerous APP store terms in my estimation have mostly affected would be productivity APPs in your abyss situation where you get no great innovator of APPs on these platforms in part because much risk like maybe you're going to build something in apple's not gonNA prove it or there's no business model it and it just doesn't make sense to make a new sort of productivity after the most difficult in-depth after build from a physical. API's on the device or perspective and what actually has come to dominate are. All these network based APPS that are mostly API driven and what's interesting is because apple is not a social company I message notwithstanding that they kind of weren't paying attention to that and what happened was we talked about this China where we chat actually became the exact sort of dominant APP that I think the APP store was designed to limit. But because they weren't sort of paying attention, they ended up the exact same situation as a nineties is the apple as a company is much stronger than back. Then it's not even remotely comparable but the fact that we chat is more important than your phone is definitely the case you. Like Oh we trade the same well then why is it? We have a mini APP store for on purposes and no one else has allowed it like one of the most obvious examples of APPs not being treated the same and it's not true the same because we chat as more important than the IPHONE.

Apple Tim Cook Facebook Amazon Microsoft Google Judiciary Committee The New York Times Adele Editor Adobe China
"scars" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

Marketing Secrets

07:06 min | 2 months ago

"scars" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

"Market conditions, and there's people is operatives and there's luck, and there's all these amazing things happen. That makes the make you possible right make make you not very successful. And as he said that I like those better like cycling sounds way better than failure bankruptcy. But, but are those interesting to work with an entrepreneur listed cycled once, and I was like man. How many people like they? They go out there and they do. Their big risk may have some success which gives you all this pride and confidence and stuff, and then you lose it, and because of that failure. You never try again or you, you try. You're halfway because you feel like you have. Have, these scars and figure people are judging you or you're judging yourself for all these kind of things where the reality is that we don't see those things nobody knows about the failures. Until you tell about that, they do know about it. It doesn't really matter as I found is like share. My scars draws people closer neck I mentioned earlier I think the reason why people do business with. Vulnerable share those things and so for you guys wanted to to kind of talk about stages for off. It's okay to have the scars, but don't hide him. Share those things when my kids get injured. They're super cute and they do all the time. I tell my boys are my chicks. Dig Scars. That's a good thing that's awesome like black guys are awesome when I remember one of my God wrestling fact. If you watched the video, he's still see. The scars is It's one word hit my buddies. Knee swelled shut ahead like fifteen stitches and I can see on my break four or five days in school all bears because the scar I was walking around. People do dry looks awesome. All your wrestler like people connected with that more than like looking good my hair being you know. What I looked like and so. I think the moral of this podcast, and why is understanding that? We all have entrepreneur scarves. If you don't have meat, YOU'RE GONNA? Have Him, but don't let those keep you from the next success. My friend, WHO's a politician like I don't care what happened that he could go and do be successful, but because he's carrying these scars, he's not and you have to be willing to get. Get rid of those or or not get rid of Mike embracing and share those things I. Look I screwed up. This is what happened, but this is what I'm doing now, and this is what I learned from it how I'm changing you know if I look back on my career as a lot of things that I'm embarrassed about things, I messed up on big time podcast on the about my biggest regrets I've. Why have regrets in my business things that I did that. I'm embarrassed about. I wish I would have done. Make looking back now. I would have consulted myself I. Do not do that, but I wouldn't have known the path beside gone down. These pass Roy's the. Things, we're right. Now I've always tried to be fair to my customers and employees have stuff I made mistakes and I sold things I. thought were really good later they weren't done like. THEM UP, proud of, but if I let the scars, keep me like. How many people would how many people's lives we touching affecting now? That wouldn't have been touched. Bracelet scars and Lake told me Look I messed up in the past and a have we all do and it's okay. But I don't want you guys to not progress because of that so hopefully, this gives you some comfort in knowing that gone through bankruptcy. That's okay. If you've messed up if you did something stupid like that's K.. Your Life is about making those mistakes and own. And if you do, it's almost like plastic surgery. That makes these scars to disappear, but they don't need to disappear like I said embrace it because that's what's going to draw people to you. and so that helps is on my mind today. If I wanted to share it, so hope that that was good guys. Begins Entrepreneur You know were risking stuff everyday risking our our our personnel risking our names money risking. Other people like you know like I. Wake up in the morning scared. We've one hundred nineteen of say like. If I screw up like how many people have the mindset down because of that like those real I understand that but. I've got a risk those things because how many pook lives because of that right and if you've gone through bankruptcy, don't let that stress you out. It's a gift. Founding Fathers Gift from God has given us the ability salute. We can risk and not lose everything. We can risk and and. It wasn't for that like again. Progress would stop if entrepreneurs weren't risking so it's not a bad thing, and if you like anyway so I just wanted to give you as as a gift, and if he is struggling, has probably. Going through being gone through bankruptcy, maybe it's not that you fail wants to make didn't work you. Both the people and the prior to working in a fire. People let them go. All the ups and downs and disappointment like is operatives. You have so many things on your shoulders. I get that and I. Hope that this message just helps release some of that pressure for some of you guys because if you don't keep risking if you don't keep trying, keep getting those scarves. Where's the world going to be where you're going to be with your family? It'd be where the people you're serving enemy They need you and It's worth the risk is worth the sacrifices worth of fears, because if you can affect those people like When you when you deliver on what you know, you have and you changed their lives. I get it makes it all worth it. Is Interesting to kind of to close this derelict where our company has come where we are today, right? Back! During my last cycle. Seven years ago when everything collapsed around me and I thought the world's coming to an end, and I was depressed and I was sad scared. All kinds of things happen Looking at now like if I didn't go through that Kulik funnels in this process never happened never met taught never met, who will never met built? This team never had the opportunity we. Wouldn't have known the things. We know to be able to execute on this. I wouldn't. Want things that we're steering clear from today are because of the mistakes happen too late. You back then and. Today someone could make catastrophic catastrophic. People's lives have been affected whereas I had a chance to to suffer those things to get those scars and smaller scale, and so I don't want to have listings now. Hopefully, if I learned my lesson started trying to do. So little caesars gifts embrace them. Share them and I don't hide from because the scars draw people to you and we all have them and. Don't let that keep you from from your mission, so the helps. They see in front of the eyes and we'll talk soon. Bye, everybody. Russell again and really quick I wanted to invite you to join Arguably the best thing we've ever put out inside close community, and it is challenging. Call the one way challenged everyone in their business in their life that one away from something so he has one fun away from quitting your job as he has one away anymore impacts me as run away from growing. Your company took next level. And so we created this challenge to help you to create and launch your first or your next funnel no matter where you are in your business This challenge is going to help us help you understand the strategy and tactics understand all the things you need to be successful. Dear, funnel so I'll I recommend you right now is stop everything positive side you go online and go to one runaway DOT COM. That's one fun way, Dot Com and join. The next challenge was challenged starting in the next few days to go get started right out one way DOT com..

scars Dot Com Mike Roy Russell Lake
"scars" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

Marketing Secrets

07:28 min | 2 months ago

"scars" Discussed on Marketing Secrets

"Abras Russell Brunson. Welcome marking secrets. Today's episode is called Entrepreneurial Scars. So. The big question is this. How we're entrepreneurs like. He didn't cheat and take on venture capital for spending money for own pocket. Away let us get our products and our services, and the things you believe in out to the world and yet still remain profitable. That is the question in this podcast. Give you the answer. My name's offer Brunson and welcome the marketing secrets. Everyone so I wanted to. Honestly, this podcast is want to hang out with the and because It's been interesting is. When somebody entrepreneurs and And recently, just as I'm working people and watching. People who had insane amounts of success at one time, and then who has happened a failure a bankruptcy. Whatever. Fill in the blank. The second time around long time they really really struggle and start looking at. Why are they struggling? Because they had this your success? It's almost like they're they have fear. An embarrassment of like I failed in the past mate and. I kept talking about this with some guys on our team is like it's almost like they've entrepreneurs scars and make an interesting. Is that US as the person with through the process and the failure and the you know audiences, ups and downs hit hard. We have the scars like these emotional scars, but I think sometimes we feel like those scars on our faces and other people can see him. But it's interesting. Is this people don't like? Those are just things that are there inside of your yourself that are. Because they're there. Because you feel like there there, you can see it. Keeps you from having success the next time because there's so much fear around these scars, these these things and as I was as I was talking about this this morning. I shared a story this Kinda ties things together a little better for you. They're not going to name names or anything, but there's a guy and he was a successful politician. Top this game like doing everything amazing. Just people loved him in. Him In that in that spot like and this is not like national politics I. Don't know anybody. National Politics I don't fall politics at all, but from Mike. It was a local person right and you saw him on the news and all sorts of seventies, IQ's damages charismatic and like everything was awesome and then. He got caught up in the site. Political scandal whatever I, and it's funny, because I don't get how politics muschamp cannot much by where like Oh, thing happening. He's no longer in there, and that someone else, and then fast for eight three or four years later I met him was interesting as I met him. It was a different situation and talking about business stuff and I was really excited. I know who this person is I. Want to meet him and talk to him, and as I talked to make, it was funny, not funny I shouldn't say that it was interesting to see lake. The scars. He'd God from this infamous thing. Were so deep that like it was struggling to progress in other parts of his life business, and all these other things because of the scars from this this thing that didn't work out right right and it. Wasn't good, but. Three years later and. Almost surprised that I knew about it, but I did but. You carry those scars in this conversation with you with you came in the way that I'd seen before confident in all sorts of things. I probably would have done the business deal with him, but because he had these these scars. We. Certainly didn't have all these things they were gone and I could feel it, and like that uncertainty me from due to deal with him and and I remember thinking after I finished calling. I can tell still carrying around the fear and the embarrassment and the shame of the single I. don't care about that thing. I couldn't care less. Move on in your life and come back because they. That person that I saw on TV. You're approach that way. I would have done this deal and the same things tune entrepreneurs like there's someone who I know. WHO's super successful who? Had A funnel blew up in the money, and then it went away, and now they're kind of struggling, and what's interesting is like I kind of know that backstories, then other person things like that, but with that person to make persons of an inmate I a Rockstar I think they're awesome at. They're amazing, but as I as I see them interact with other people I see the scars of that that this person has or keeping them from from from taking over the next thing, and it's funny, because like I don't think nine point. Nine percent of every single person in the world has any idea those scars. Are there for this person? But because he knows that they're there, because he no, he failed. He knows that things disappear and didn't work out the way it. He has a sphere, and as he's approaching neck situations struggling because of that because of the scars and I think it's interesting. That he's entrepreneur scars that we have a first off their visible. Nobody sees them like. I you know some people may be aware of, but nobody sees them except for you, and so because you are so where these things that keeps you from having the confidence success. You need to move forward and it was funny I was talking to. an entrepreneur who is about to go through bankruptcy. They're freaking out there so scared and and. And I kind of asked him why and they say you know because I don't want those scars, but they said afterwards if I give bankruptcy like what's my wife going to think I'm in my in laws and my family. Always all these things and I was like he's understand that like bankruptcy. They think about this failure for entrepreneurs like the founding fathers. This country gave us bankruptcy as a gift, so entrepreneurs like us would risk and try and move forward and roll the dice and hope for something like if it wasn't for that gift, you May. It's a gift from the founding fathers. I believe it's a gift from God like it wasn't for that thing. American succeeded a nation. Everything that's been amazing would've happened if entrepreneurs didn't have that risk if it was like, do you a banker? You go to jail to pay off all your debts. People, taking the risk out of our taking the risk, but because like worst case scenario is bankruptcy. We clear off your balance sheets. You start over like that's the worst case scenario. That's the greatest gift we have and. We hit that and we go through it, and also we have the scars I went through bankruptcy. Naples fear than youth. Next things like know that that should be a negative thing that means you try, and you attempted, and even attempted `success in went away. You've had success. I remember I was doing a deal with. This guy who super successful that he's consulting things where it's like five hundred grand a day with a minimum of of of ten sessions, so it's like happily bucks to get this guy to work with you right and a chance to hang out with him I was talking to him in talking strategy, and he's asking my story and I'd tell my story and. I'm pretty open with things. Now I realized that my scars or would actually draws people to I live I. I spent an hour on stage, talking about all my failures, because it draws people towards me and so. which is kind of maybe the point at the end of this podcast, but? I sure the my ups and downs, and as I told the whole thing. He's like Oh good I'll Mike. What do you like well, you cycle the Mike. What do you mean cyclopes like? Oh, he's like well. Entrepreneurs cycled at least once. I refuse to work with them. What is? Recycled means you build something up and then you crash. He's like. If you haven't cycle the guess what you're still, you're still read it. You're still drinking your own. Kool aid you still. Believe that you are the most amazing human on earth realize until after you've cycled the, it's not just. Are the greatest thing to walk. This planet like there's.

scars Russell Brunson US Naples Mike
"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

Out of the Blocks

02:59 min | 9 months ago

"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

"This book. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> This play recovered <Speech_Music_Male> place right here power <Speech_Male> and I started <Speech_Music_Male> going to POW <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> getting my life straightened <Speech_Male> stuff <Speech_Music_Male> you know. <Speech_Music_Male> Ever since. Then I've been making making <Speech_Male> paper. Flowers <Speech_Male> is a coping <Speech_Male> skill. <Speech_Music_Male> And they know me around <Speech_Music_Male> here. Is the paper flower <Speech_Male> guy. <Speech_Music_Male> The guy with the face <Speech_Music_Male> tattoos <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> right now <Speech_Music_Male> just <Speech_Male> sitting waiting <Speech_Male> for Fred. <Speech_Male> A mind coming from <Speech_Male> Penn north. But <Speech_Male> I'll see her yet. <Speech_Music_Male> I was trying to make her <Speech_Music_Male> to perfect flower. You're <Speech_Music_Male> sitting here <Speech_Music_Male> to mess <Speech_Music_Male> with this paper <Speech_Male> here. <Speech_Music_Male> I like your <Speech_Music_Male> service. <Speech_Music_Male> Yes <SpeakerChange> ma'am <Speech_Music_Male> I did. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Thank <Speech_Music_Female> you baby. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> My <Speech_Male> name is Paul. <Speech_Music_Male> Paul squires <Speech_Music_Male> yeah <Speech_Music_Male> a <Speech_Male> make the paper flower for <Speech_Male> C. L.. <Speech_Music_Male> Full <Speech_Music_Male> the pels <Speech_Music_Male> around like <Speech_Male> they're they're <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> keeps you <Speech_Male> trouble <Speech_Male> you know <Speech_Music_Male> said doing drugs rugs <Speech_Music_Male> and using <Speech_Music_Male> it's a stress <Speech_Music_Male> reliever yes big <Speech_Music_Male> time stress reliever <Speech_Music_Male> plus you can make people <Speech_Music_Male> have a good day <Speech_Music_Male> you know <Speech_Music_Male> like when you give them away <Speech_Music_Male> to somebody gets <Speech_Music_Male> welcome them <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> make <Speech_Music_Male> you feel better when you <Speech_Music_Male> get one <Speech_Music_Male> is amazing <Speech_Music_Male> how they make you feel better <Speech_Music_Male> thank <Speech_Music_Male> you <Speech_Music_Male> go. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> I <Speech_Music_Male> always <Speech_Music_Male> am fascinated <Speech_Music_Male> when I meet someone. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> WHO's like <Speech_Male> taking the plunge <Speech_Male> in God <Speech_Male> face tattoos? <Speech_Male> Yes <Speech_Male> tell me what you see <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> when you look in the mirror <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and tell <SpeakerChange> me <Speech_Male> the story behind <Speech_Male> will <Speech_Male> look in the mirror <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> and I'm reminded <Speech_Music_Male> of a night <Speech_Music_Male> drug use <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> in the next <Speech_Male> morning when I sobered <Speech_Music_Male> up and I see myself <Speech_Music_Male> in the mirror I was <Speech_Music_Male> like. Oh my God <Speech_Music_Male> done. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> They <Speech_Male> call me scarecrow <Speech_Music_Male> because my face <Speech_Music_Male> is like a scarecrow <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> is hard to get a job <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> why I wanna get this <Speech_Music_Male> flour thing going <Speech_Male> where can make paper paper <Speech_Music_Male> flowers. <Speech_Male> It's an honest <Speech_Male> living <Speech_Male> only choice dollar <Speech_Male> flower. <Speech_Male> I need <Speech_Music_Male> money to invest <Speech_Music_Male> in this stuff. <Speech_Music_Male> You know paper <Speech_Music_Male> papers main having <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Art Supplies Markers <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> fatal this stuff. <Speech_Male> I could make <Speech_Male> so much more <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> but other than that <Speech_Male> you know. Love never dies <Speech_Male> in new drama flowers. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> That <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> is going to wrap <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> things up for this <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> episode of out of <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> the blocks and original <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> production of WIP <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> ARE <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> NPR ex. <Speech_Male> I'm Erin hanging <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> produced the show <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> along with Wendell Patrick <Speech_Male> who creates gates <Speech_Male> and original <Speech_Male> musical score <Speech_Male> for each episode. <Speech_Male> If you appreciate <Speech_Male> what you hear <Speech_Male> on this program do <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> us a favor and drops <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> review on apple <Speech_Music_Male> podcasts <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or just telefe rent point <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about the show. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for sharing the good word <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> about what we do <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and thanks for listening. <Music> <Advertisement> We'll do it again <Music> soon. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> Out of the blocks is <Speech_Male> supported by <Speech_Male> pr ex <Speech_Male> and

Paul squires NPR apple Fred. Wendell Patrick Erin
"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

Out of the Blocks

03:35 min | 9 months ago

"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

"Name is neuron. MATTY's so my family's from Pakistan myself grew up on DC since I'm a brown woman then growing up post nine eleven America. I was definitely very like other growing up like in school. And I kind of just leaned into head. I kind of just gravitated toward sorta like just anything alternative. Because I was already alternative to the norm if that makes sense. It's I'm very tattooed very pierced modified. It's just really kind of liberating you. So you've got magnetic implant you show me what you're talking about so it's in the pad of mine. I right ring finger. What sold me on? It was I had had a friend who got one done. And because they are magnetic you can sense electromagnetic fields as well as pick pickup small magnetic things up to a certain way. You just picked up a lighter with your finger. Yeah I spent eight years suffering from Severe Anorexia. I'm almost exactly one year in recovery now so I started to struggle it when I was fourteen. I think it came from a lot of places. It was a lot of the Kind of racial ushering. I was like well. I can't make myself white. Would I can do I think is be skinnier like maybe you know I'll fit in better. Maybe we all feel healthier. It started off as just I'm going to exercise and eat well. But if you are predisposed to disorder that can go wrong really quickly which I did and it Kinda you just get addicted to seeing the numbers go down and then it becomes at least for me and commonly for a lot of people a control thing you feel high off of the starvation Once it's you've burned enough fat because you're not eating to power your body that will start going for your muscle. Your heart is a muscle and when you're a chronic long-term sufferers of Anorexia sometimes you can lose your hunger cues actually and they may come back. How can they may not? It's sort of got to wait and see things so I'm still waiting for mine so I usually have to set an alarm on my phone or I always have a daily schedule right now and all scheduling meals. It's definitely something I think of more like not the job but well yeah job because it's something that I have to do to stay living and for the most part it's just really at this point looking at food as like a medication. Almost as opposed to like Oh that slice of the pizza looks great. 'cause I still am working on like thinking about food as something. ooh kind of a positive thing. So it's really a lot of dedication to us doing the right thing until the right thing becomes easier. Don't judge a book until you've read the book you know. There's a lot of good stories in.

MATTY Anorexia Pakistan America
"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

Out of the Blocks

01:56 min | 9 months ago

"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

"Condition. Let me ask the question if you don't mind You've a really big scar on your neck. What's the story behind that Robert Blue Was broadly in two thousand and didn't notice the girls. Damn you see my hands my hands cutting four times in the throat and talking and all that rob someone and the girl was with him. I thought she was going of the problems of my didn't disappear actions and overlooked the action steps in a metal. Fat You too girl is. Were my best friends today. Tell me the story. We've how you become friends with someone who stabbed seven times over and the we alligators. Look at this. If I wasn't on the influence it wouldn't never kicked off. We'd basically mouth folks I mean. So how can I blame sir. I mean I've really got deep down in looking. Got Me looking to AL cells. Let me let me just before I forget. Let you go ask if you have any eh any words wisdom that you wanNA share with me guerrara listeners. About life men and women but we agreed on condition conditions. It'd be a better person. Yesterday my.

Robert Blue rob AL
"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

Out of the Blocks

02:27 min | 9 months ago

"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

"Jane Line. Then tell me. Tell me what you're doing right now. May Now walking the dog for a minute. Blind and I'm willing to destroy point is is now taking food three times a day breakfast lunch and dinner you can talk to anyone in the neighborhood. Knows me Jimmy Morgan and it will tell you. I'm always helping somebody shot. It makes them my smile once a day. If I can get some I believe in the man of stairs I know my genius this Nice. That's the best right here right where we standard. What do you like to get here? summit Plateau rock clean in my name. Is Ron from the east side Baltimore Southeast our air quality and hurry up I will tragic event I'm a retired the Victim I have my hands up the whole time throughout the whole these and eyeing which resists throughout the whole so. There's like a a youtube video of what happened to you. Do have a youtube Hashtag justice number four rock also came said some of the twenty third house. Fourteen in my life changes that day. I want to get ahead law as I went to them being on top of it tastes just having this advice was like I can't take my situation is greater than anyone else. I'm just part of of I'm I'm Greg into society where people use the life of entering sure situations all all all some officers said it's fun you know what I'm saying only thing I can changes I could get back that day before. They have never out whatever day. I'm not saying as it was like the remorse myself come disappeared. I knez nicely I used to be from. WIP ARE NPR ex. It's out of the blocks more stories about scars news and survival in just a moment. My name is Spiro. S. Many oaths at forty seven eleven eastern avenue which is.

Jane Line youtube Jimmy Morgan Spiro scars Baltimore Ron
"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

Out of the Blocks

03:21 min | 9 months ago

"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

"I have what I have. And don't let anybody get too streetwise. Knowledge in me is like okay. He's trying to do something right. He's nervous in spite the first time he didn't done this before so easy. You know his his palms sweaty Michael Anderson Twenty one hundred block Edmonson Avenue. Pretty much asked me for a ride and I say you know well. I'm great. Go home and he said well you know I pay you. Take me there. I'm like you say you know his His daughter was sick or whatever you had to get home too. So he gave me Fifteen so now take him over there then as we get in our travels he was like I need money back there. Paperback I'm like well at least give me ten of it back. I'm like okay. We'll get out right here so he has. He stopped his hands on his pants leg. I knew something was going to happen open. And when he he witnessed in jacket and as he was trying to come out of his jacket opened the door and try to push them out and as he was going out that's when he fired for shot fired secretary told me to get out and I was so angry. You know how Saito you don't want that and I just just con gear and pulled off and I couldn't see out of my right eye so I drove. It seemed like forever but it was About three miles away I went to seven eleven accident. Call now one. He drove three miles to get a shot in the face to face your face and showed Yep so this bullet went in on your eye and then went through and indeed your neck to Monette gear and and knocked out teeth. Top Broke allowed him. They had to take all of them on both sides of top. I had. You really can't see it now but it was a big hole up there idea. I see a lump in your neck. Is the bullets still in there. where I hear on the side yet? Isn't the bullet right here. If you could face to face with his guy who shot you what would you say to say or do. It wouldn't be put it that way and I probably would be incarcerated. Part of me wants to see him but Dan another part of me. Don't because I'm trying to you know get past this and be there for my family. I knew about coming face to face with him. Then you know because we come from. We don't let things like that go. I got walk these streets all the time. If people knew that I let that go like debt and came down and no telling when I walked in. And what else what happened to me so I should hope not to see them get real. He should hope that I don't see him again. I'm James Morgan Cole.

Michael Anderson Dan James Morgan Cole Saito secretary
"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

Out of the Blocks

01:53 min | 9 months ago

"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

"Was walking the friend to go. See your boyfriend and suv struck me from behind. I flew off in hit the windshield. Roll off club. My left leg on guard rail all the way down to the bone and rolled down Iraq and beg -ment they had a flaw me in by On Time My name is Anthony back and I live at four four four eastbound taps Joe Avenue and Phyllis his son Yes sir the hospital. Call me a about nine thirty in the morning now way to get there until the following you know later later on that on it because the buses won't run and I didn't have money for cab so and then when I get in there just like they told me he had to Thomas which that's why he has the memory loss. It messed up my number. Forget what part I think. It's the long term member. I have a real hard time remembering in the past but I remember from like when I was hit until now what's it feel like to not be able to remember anything from your own childhood. I hated at times finance me so upset I just WanNa sit there and corner and cry but tough through thought I was on the pretty much be wheelchair pound. I actually even asked him what I be walked in and they told me. It's a big possibility one but I came through. I'm not going to stop me and I pushed and pushed myself to start walk more and more and I actually started walking before. I should've in a way it's like you became a brand new person after this happened. Yeah pretty much. It's taught me to just be happy that I have what I have. And don't let anybody get too.

Thomas Anthony suv Iraq Phyllis his
"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

Out of the Blocks

02:34 min | 9 months ago

"scars" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

"From WWL PR and PR REX. It's out of the blocks. I'm Erin Hagen. Every scar we have has a story that goes with it. And if we're telling that story it means we survived. Whatever gave us that scar this episode stories about scars and survival Monday whisky Christian Chris? Boucher school northeast market. Twenty one on one small mystery. How best sales are cocoa Mingo lemongrass the African Ranga School. Make Light Egg Ray for phone. So will you feet. You believe in the product. You have a lovely complexion. Thank you kick. Your face has a lot of personality. You have some interesting scars. S to tell the story about when when I was sixteen I got got more by to pick a little hostile to two and a half months. I was unconscious but they told. Tell me. Ask the game cautiousness. They told me they was feeding the gold and they was fighting dogs. Sometimes I'd be having nightmares about it. That's why I have time. I'll be up in northern night. So what's it like for you to be around dogs now. Does this. I won't no it. Didn't actually my mom got muggle guts to house. Train may not did not gonNA take unless you talent hersher Dave right down the my child to break in. Let's start my phone Kiki at the Pierre Shea store or in northeast market on the twenty one hundred block of East Monument Street in Baltimore sharing the story of her scars. More stories about things that left a mark right after this Clayton Williams Ain t we own twenty one hundred Black Emerson. Evie out on long time. Tell me about your voice. How why towns away ten here when I was in the scorched breath Oakland's code this.

Evie Erin Hagen African Ranga School Boucher school Clayton Williams Pierre Shea Black Emerson Kiki Baltimore Oakland Dave
"scars" Discussed on The Grove Podcast

The Grove Podcast

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"scars" Discussed on The Grove Podcast

"One thing. I have to tell you constraints. Yeah. They leave scars you're probably okay by everything events her life. I am not either. I've got some pretty scars based on what happened to me. You may seem just a few of them. I got a lot more inside didn't see today. I'll talk to you later. I I've some that stuff some hard stuff, and I story this is such a good story, but these scars what are they? Scars the proof that we live scars are the very best part the resurrected Jesus had scars in his head. Scars has to be something pretty amazing. If me. In closing. I want to tell you to the beautiful truth of Galatian six. Don't get license. Four and five in the message. Translation snuff at right now or look later relationship four and five say this. Make a careful exploration of who you are. And the work that you've been given and sink yourself into them. Do not impressed with yourself. Do not compare yourself with others east of you should do the creative best that you can with your own life. That's it. So what do we call to do these? We're called to sink deep into our stories when we do that. What happens? We look. His story when we look up. What do we do? We're also looking out. We care deeply for each other. We live out sucking Corinthians. One that we have been given comfort, and we have to give it away to each other. We are in this life together. So because we are thinking deep into our stories we're looking at him in awe, we're looking out, and we are seeing each other. And then this crazy five milissa wherever you glory took. Amen..

Scars
"scars" Discussed on Battle Scars

Battle Scars

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"scars" Discussed on Battle Scars

"Mm. Five, a stand-up comedian, So to say the least I travel Allott as a matter of fact, nineteen countries in the last three years and over thirty states. According to trip adviser Reykjavik, Paris and New York, where two thousand seventeen hottest vacation destination. I've been to to out of those three And they are not why. So Where will you go in two thousand eighteen whatever your answer make trip adviser, thumb last-place you look before you book. They check hotel prices 24/7 compared to 100-plus booking sites to find the latest and lowest prices on the white hotel for you. You could save up to thirty percent. They also have the freshest reviews on millions of restaurants and attractions worldwide. You don't want to go to a country where you told speak the language and take a chance, Anita Got a restaurant that you're not one hundred percent sure of out and help you get a head start on two thousand eighteen travel. They're offering an easy way to save ten percent on tourist activities and great things to do. Sound good so far. Visit triggered by. R dot com slash battle and use the promo code trip tend to take advantage. Again, that's Tripadvisor dot com slash battle. The Use promo code trip trip adviser latest reviews, lowest prices Now backed about scars. before we get back to battle scars, I want to tell you about another podcast. If then is a show about technology society, power Each week, slates April Glaser can We'll warmest take you on a lively tour of the tech news that actually maps from fake news. Your Facebook feeds into the algorithms that watch your job to the Uber drivers want a career with benefits with news, making interviews of key tech industry figures. Fascinating academics and top tech journalists. They explore not only how the technology that shaping our world works, But the ideas ideologies, incentives and biases that underlie and guess what? They don't always agree. Every episode features at in-depth interview with newsmakers like Antonio Garcia Martinez Ellen POW Linda cod and Tim now skip-back battle scars. You and I are both children of the 80s literally came to this country in the 80s as boat people my father's gave from POW camp, took us to Thailand and had to fight every moment for the moment he got out of prison ten til we got on that boat in Thailand and then brought us the United States. What was that like for you? Because I was only a baby. I was Louis, thirteen months old man. My family got here. You are a little bit older than me. You add to it echoes with John F Kennedy. You weren't said, uh, we're one generation away from our freedom being taken away because you think about it. We fought for this generation unite. We razor her right hand under God. And we met her enemies on the battlefield. We, We left our home and we defended its country. So when you and I are old who's gonna defend the next generation. Freedoms of valuable thing. And the reason why I am saying this is you and I both Las our freedom right now at birth. We lost our freedom. I was only two, So I don't remember a lot. But what I do numbers, this grown up. My mother cried almost every night because her family was gunned down on the streets. My uncle was in the navy. So after to fall Saigon. He was imprisoned in what they called correction camps. By the time he came to United States, the guy had no skin on the bottom, his foot. You scared of the dark. He was scared to eat. He was in the corner of the room when there is a bed there attained Tators when I was younger, I didn't understand. When I was in junior high in high school and a help my mother. You know, raised back more a Myong-Chol you know, try to give back life to him because he was defeated And who wouldn't be to feed right? There's a agitate us. I will identify who some We caught SEAR School training, which is a prisoner, A innovation training. I've been through five different levels of it, and I and I tell you this, man, it's Bali, nothing compared to where he spent through. And I was too young to understand at at time. My mother would give me dinner Ray, and I would bring it to my uncle in our knock on the door. And sometimes you one answer doors are opened up the door. The bed is is still made. You know Myoko slaying in a corner with a flashlight passed out because he was suffering from PTSD. And what did the North in Meese done to him at this prison camps? And you don't see it right. You don't understand into you. Ashley. Put your, your life. Them aligned to defend his country. The don't see it. You don't see the sacrifices people make. When you drive across driving down a highway, you see that you know the American flag waving, You know, you just don't catch the gravity of that into you. Ashley Serb your country, or you come close losing life. So I senior video where you got shot in the neck when he came pretty close there. So one of the lessons that try to teach people is this you don't really live into Yoma's died in an Uber. You agree with us this, they'll absolutely. So tell me like after that incident happy It was I seen a videos pretty, um. Pre

United States Meese Antonio Garcia Martinez Ellen Thailand Allott Reykjavik Tripadvisor Facebook John F Kennedy April Glaser Saigon Anita Yoma Paris PTSD Louis Ashley New York Bali Ray
"scars" Discussed on Battle Scars

Battle Scars

07:38 min | 3 years ago

"scars" Discussed on Battle Scars

"Home. A new phone, the promise of. Anna called home and she was still justifiably very angry. I. I told her what happened. I told her could have been killed in. She said, I hope you stay in Iraq as long as you can like not ready for you to come home. I thought. A sucks in the desert that Al deserved die. Anam. I don't know. She didn't mean that just mean thing to say, because that's when you get hurt like that. You just trying to hurt somebody packed. I know that shouldn't believe that. I know that. I know that I mean, I do know that have gone to therapy was her sense about that. And she apologized and know that was hurtful. Thank apply man. When you're in a war zone, it's like that Just like took the wind out of my sales. And I I had this temptation to go into like self-pity and. And then I realized, But That's bullshit. You're a fucking field-grade officer. It's like Emma guys, and it's like it's Valentine's Day. And these guys were away from their wives and their fiancee's in their girlfriends them moms in their sisters. And so I just like fired myself up on coffee and was walking along the Euphrates river to all these little posts were the guys were. And I'd say he married fuck no sir. You gotta girlfriend? No. He had a mom Wallich book and of course several moms, her when she conver Ballantine's day, What's your number And a Are you fucking serious, Mike? Yeah. And so I just lent Mike and I dislike would set it up, and I just give them the phone and walk away. By the way, this wicked sat calls are not cheap. Those other countries urged offensive series. I figured fog it, You know what? I will say that my boss before he left, He was a colonel at the time he retired at the show. He said, Look. National Guard headquarters, pain furthest cuts of her. So use it as much as you need to for whatever reason you need to just get it out. There was a great I'm gonna make calls with the guys. And so I spent like the next three hours Jewish walk in and three hundred thousand dollars. Very expensive phone calls them the government. But like you know, it like may ruins to eight. 'Cause like the Rybakov wise in their sisters and their girlfriends and their moms than. And that like made me feel like a made a difference and made it easier. So. You're trying to fix it. Yeah. You know when and where you could make it better for somebody else. I couldn't make it better from Maine so. But yeah, that was uh, was. As a long chapter Arnold and his wife eventually divorced are on good terms now. And when Arnold retired from the military last summer, She was right there with him. Ten years later. The scars had a little bit of time to heal. I saw at the retirement you have a right, Exactly. She's a good person, You know, it's I became see me to stand up with. Exactly right. And so you laugh, laughing, she laughed Rasa from that was good. It was a good healing there because she's heard stories about you forever and I and I and I get the balanced that with the fact that I'm I'm finally opened being loved again, and I've got like the love of my life in my life. You know, my old ice-cool school girlfriend came back in my wife when it came back to LA and that's like, you know, the biggest healing imaginable. You know, I feel like in every days like better than yesterday, I'm going to go out on a limb and say that if not for the fact that you had to go and take photos of the places that your friends sons died in Iraq. And you weren't faced with constant death all the time. Had wife seen that email maybe in a different place in another space in your mind, who had been like? No. Yeah. It was a crisis of consciousness. It was like, I'm carrying something I don't need to carry, and I'm going to be honest because like I don't want to, you know, be, you know, less than honest. If don't want, I don't want to die with unconscious in. Yeah. And. And so I carried that long enough and um, and then I carried the consequences of it long enough, and I'm glad that I'm able to move past. There are a few reasons that I encourage Arnold to tell the story. I'd actually met his ex wife several years ago at Arnold's change of command ceremony. And as far as I do, they were happy army family. They were there to support him as he was promoted and left for a new command. That Arnold was gone for a couple of years, And when he retired, he moved back to Los Angeles. He had a new lady on his arm, and I'd seen the pictures, and then eventually at matter and she is a lovely woman. But I never asked Arnold what had happened even as his friend and as a fellow soldier. I didn't wanna get into that part of his life because I knew under you CMJ. Maybe it's not a thing we talk about. Maybe it's a thing that we acknowledge except and don't discuss. And that was the problem. We as soldiers and service members we train, we fight, we die next, which other We're brothers and sisters. Yet sometimes we don't know the story behind some of the most important parts of each other's lives. Because we can't ask or were shame to ask. Or we don't want someone else to feel ashamed that we asked. But we know that it happened, We hear the rumors We see the end results, but we don't know why. Yes, Sometimes would just shitty, 20-year-olds who shouldn't have gotten married in the first place. And sometimes it takes stepping on a bomb to make you face the skeletons in your closet. But we don't know, and we don't ask. So we don't tell. We keep that shit inside And it burns it burns from the inside out. And though secrets and the shame, they don't just burned the person, holding them in the Burn, everyone around them. And it creates a cycle of pain that we just continue to not talk about. And I think having Arnold tell that story, Maybe we help some one break their cycle. Maybe by putting this out in the open, the shame doesn't burn someone else, and we can break the cycle for good. Or at the very least. So one can step up and tell their story to. Thanks for listening. The baths Smith. The battle scars is a panoply podcast produced by Ryan Dili Cher Morris and AC Valdez are theme. Music is composed by Daniel Dottie the art work by Jesse Brown Special. Thanks to anti Bowers, panoply chief content officer. I'm your host, Tom Tran. If you like the show Review us or rate us, which tell. So what about us? And to quote fares Buehler you're still here? It's over. Go home. This

Arnold Iraq Euphrates river Anna National Guard Al Mike officer Ryan Dili Cher Morris Emma Jesse Brown Maine Tom Tran AC Valdez Daniel Dottie Buehler Rasa Bowers chief content officer Los Angeles
"scars" Discussed on Battle Scars

Battle Scars

10:10 min | 3 years ago

"scars" Discussed on Battle Scars

"A stand-up comedian, So to say the least I travel a lot. As a matter of fact, nineteen countries in the last three years and over thirty states, performing for service member station literally all over the world. And from the looks of it, this going to be a lot more traveling at the new year. Where were you travel in two thousand eighteen trip adviser helps you make the most of every trip with the latest reviews and lowest hotel prices. And trust me as a stand-up comedian, I stay in a lot of hotels and you want the best deals at the best prices. In fact, they Check hotel prices 24/7 they compared to 100-plus booking sites, including the hotels on their own website, defied the latest and lowest prices on the right hotel for you. You could save up to 30 percent on great hotels. All around the world And with two hundred eighty do traveler contributions posted every minute. You're always going to find out the latest reviews on the hotel's. Do you want to stay at things to do restaurants, all. Over the globe And as special deal advisory is offering an easy way to save ten percent on thousands of great attractions, including tours activities and more Visit trip adviser dot com slash battle and use the promo code trip tat, remember for the freshers reviews and the lowest prices Mick trip Tripadvisor The last-place you look before you book. No, before I get back to Arnold story, I wanna talk a little bit about another podcast intelligence squared. If you heard me talking to Senator Tammy Duckworth fellow combat veteran and Purple Heart recipient on a recent episode, battle scars, You know that I get pretty heated about the polarization of our nation and our politics. Well, the mission of intelligence squared is to address the fundamental problem. The show wants to restore backs reason and civility to public debate by bringing together opposing perspectives on one stage for a proper debate. And they invite thoughtful people from across the spectrum to talk about politics, Science and Health Care speakers like David betrays. Malcolm glad will Arie on Huffington Karl Rove and Laura anger. So for some civil debate that might change your mind on the serious issues, Subscribe to IQ two U S podcast today for access to more than one hundred abates and visit. I cue to U S dot org to cast your vote on the topics. Now back to bat scars. Would you work at a public affairs capacity like Arnold and I have you have to put on the public face. The juggling story was Arnold's public face. He was still in the army at the time, and he wanted to make sure that he represented his uniform and his military. Well, as many of us do. And that's what the story does. It tells that narrative about winning hearts and minds. He couldn't tell me the real story because even though he was on Terminal leave, he was still a commissioned officer in the US Army. We have a different set of rules in the military, literally, the Uniform Code of Military Justice is a rule book that dictates not only how we act on duty, but how we live our lives. And there simply things that you can't talk about last summer. Arnold retired so-called them up, And I asked him if he was ready to sit down with me again and tell me the story that really shaped him. I should probably a trim phone off ya. Uh, he hasn't been run airplane, motor, whatever. Did you ever hear the story about how I got tricked and getting engaged wells in Iraq? No. No, that's good. So before I deployed. I kind of went made my peace with a girl who who I hurt because year before Iraq, Afghanistan, app and rent, And I went to operation bright in Egypt, which is a hop, skip it, a jump away from Afghanistan. I broke it off with her. Because I was very, very convinced that I wasn't coming home And I didn't want that on my conscience. And then a year later arrack happens, And I went to apologize to her for what had happened. And, um. They wouldn't let anybody Come see us while we are getting ready to deploy in Lessner family husbands, wives, fathers, whatever. And she wasn't unless she's a fiancee. So she bought herself, a fake engagement ring told the unit. We were engaged and they letter come before bragged CMI. Well, now she's talking to wives and girlfriends in the family readiness group, and all of a sudden she is Sergeant transfer yacht, say. And. And we gotta run with the lie. Yeah, We have. Were you gotta run with it? Because fucking now it goes up to command that, Hey, Sergeant trans engaged. Even though when we got to brag, I said all my soldiers because I was in EA-6 I said, Hey, we go back on leave. Nobody fucking comeback married or engaged or pregnant. Right. And they would come back and I am fucking engaged. Now, nobody knew that it was ally new because we are looking at like tried to get seperation, pay hit Hall hedged at like getting married. So we're like, Well, that's going to happen. We're just fucking You get Mary, get separation, pay. And then you're defrauding the government. We didn't do that. Yeah. We're venture Levant up, not getting married because after I came home from Iraq, everything broke down. I mean, that was. I lived alive for a year reign with this woman. Mm. And military relationships in general are not always on the most stable ground when you're off fighting a war and that relationship was based on a fucking lie. Marin. But. Literally until this moment, I have not told anybody that I was gonna say that's a hell of a set up man in you were I could tell you were opening up a lot of stuff. I who cause. Right. Who would I have told that to good and fucking tell it to my platoon sergeant or my commander in Right? And at that up until this point, there's been no reason to ever tell anybody that. Yeah. That's the shit that happens. Yeah. But we don't talk about We can't talk about it. Yeah. And and when you left last time, the story told about the juggling with the soccer balls in saving the kids from from the the explosives. Yeah, It's great for us P A owes to get out to the world, to tell that story. But we've heard that story in different in rations thousands of times, but will we did here? What's what you told us when the Mike's went off? How that really affected you? And one of the reasons, Of course we can talk about it before was because you're still in the army. Yeah. Yeah. So I would like us if you are okay with it to you to tell that story. Yeah, that's a hell of a set up now nights Like he I just told my story of until my buddy You can tell years now with this was an intentional admitted, do it like that? I mean, I I mention, You know, when we went through this before I had gone out of the army's a captain, um, in two thousand and I moved to Portland, Oregon. And I was working as that was dot com hay day. Uh, and I was working for a PR agency And then an advertising agency, And then. And then nine eleven happened And you now was like the World broke and was like, wait a minute. Why am I not in uniform anymore? But during the time that I was out of the army, I had a you know, a, you know, you'd call it an indiscretion me call it an affair on his short-lived, But it was, uh, it was a mistake and I and and I concealed on and I and I held onto that for a long time. And, you know, I thought that was that was cool Nellis Fine. I'm gonna never concede. Never confi done. Uh, amid Nothing deny everything The Hurry. Now the reason Arnold couldn't talk about this before was because under the Uniform Code of Military Justice or you CMJ adultery is a punishable crime, not the act of adultery itself. But under Article one 34 or the general Article conduct that brings discredit to the military is punishable by UC see, MJ. And adultery is such conduct to be exact. There are three elements that have to be met for the crime of adultery under you CMJ. First a soldier must have had sexual intercourse. Of some one kind of a know da thing II, The soldier or their sexual partner was married to someone else at the time. And third, that under the circumstances, the conduct of the soldier was to the prejudice of good order and discipline or would bring discredit upon the armed forces. And you CMJ is a federal law. It's the boogeyman of all service members. Cernik as I am home over the Christmas holiday. And the soccer thing happened already a anger. Yeah, that it already happened side sort of comeback with some interesting experiences that I've been on like a couple of patrols a day for a month. Them. And so I came home and it was the Christmas holiday. I was in Salem, Oregon, and this gal that I had, you know, years previously had a short relationship with, um, had invited my wife and I to a Christmas party. And I saw the email. And, uh, my ex wife now I'll looked or my shouldering said, Did you ever fuck her? And, um.

Arnold Iraq soccer Oregon Senator Tammy Duckworth US Army CMJ Mick CMI Marin Salem Afghanistan Lessner Health Care officer Nellis Fine Portland partner Cernik
"scars" Discussed on Battle Scars

Battle Scars

05:10 min | 3 years ago

"scars" Discussed on Battle Scars

"Fighting a wildfire in Texas building a network to connect forty million people to the Internet, cutting pollution with chain saws, hear Chuck customers, tell their stories at Chuck dot com slash podcast, and stay tuned after the show to hear how sinkhole swallowed eight priceless sports cars. The following podcast contains explicit language. She step back and plenty that her chest with two fingers and said, Bombay Dunn like agency in other plunger behind you. And I'm like, Oh, I'm standing on a bomb right now. bitch a should show, you know, suddenly you're in combat All of a sudden. Grenades were flying as Mike. And we go to the vehicle and like my seen was just gone. I would have at a minimum West Muhlegg's. None probably lost more. He's a good thing. You retina vehicle, sir. Just die rental a worrisome. However, you flip your live up to that point is somehow. An it's best not to have any skull as he them. Called. He told her What ha from the tolder within civil. And she said, I hope you still Iraq as we should turn apply, not ready for you. Come home. Sucks. Many of us live our lives blissfully ignorant of how close we sometimes come to death. Every time you've slipped down a flight of stairs, be caught yourself just before you broke your neck or when he stepped off a curb nearly got hit by a car running a light or for those of us in Los Angeles. Anytime We're on the 405 free way going anywhere. The moment happens, Get a chill through your body. You're probably curse some one. And then to go about your day, you forget it. Combat veterans don't have a choice. However, the thought is always lingering on our minds. I am intimately aware of how close I've come to death milimetres to be exact. My good friend Arnold strong found himself in Iraq, standing on a massive booby-trapped explosive. And when you're literally standing on a bomb, It'll make you think about your choices in life. He certainly did. And it forced him to make some real changes. Big changes, you have that moment of cognitive dissonance of just like, Oh, at any moment you could just die. And so utter a bones you've gotten your closet. Whatever stuff The we've lived your life, you better be comfortable with it because in this place you could possibly die. This is battle scars, knock Tom. A Serb in the US Army deployed to Iraq. It took a sniper's bullet to the back of my head my fourth day in country. It's been over a decade since at gunfight I've told that story hundreds of times. They're still things about my life and combat. I haven't shared with anyone. And in this show I talked to other veterans of our recent wars and maybe put into words some of those things that we never said about those experiences. Giving of level level one two, three, four one two one two all good it. That's recording This episode. A battle scars was a little different than previous episodes. I'd asked my friend Colonel Arnold strong to drop by. Tell me about one specific event during a tour in Iraq. This one infantry Bataina the Oregon National Guard. The second Betim 160 second infantry. They were in the middle the fight for leisure one, their they're 0-4. Oh five. After their ninth casualty in having sent over thirty two of their members home, I basically volunteered to join the battalion for the last six months of their deployment. And so. You know, I was this rear headquarters guy that suddenly joined these flat bellied steely eyed killers in combat and in the thick of it. He was a citizen soldier that a national guardsmen to be exact. He had a safe desk job, but then he volunteered to put himself in harm's way and go literally onto the streets of Iraq. This company was actually the quick reaction force for the division. Basically, the guys that are going to go in a moment's notice ready to deal mayhem and get the bad guys and say the good guys. After we turned off the microphones, We kept chatting. And

Iraq Mike Colonel Arnold Bombay Dunn Texas Chuck Arnold strong Los Angeles West Muhlegg US Army Oregon National Guard Tom 160 second six months
"scars" Discussed on Battle Scars

Battle Scars

08:51 min | 3 years ago

"scars" Discussed on Battle Scars

"The following podcast contains explicit language. You told me right now I could wind back the clock 25 years knowing I would end up losing my leg some day. I do it all over again because man, What a ride. They just shot a barrage of small-arms firing RPGs into the air. I heard the smarmy hit my side of the cockpit first. Now looked over at the pilot in command a matter of I can swear in your podcasts or not, but I use good army language, You know? And said, Hey, we've been having head. In and boom DEA the RPG landed in my lab. I was passing in and out The whole timeless. We were flying together on the ground. Blessing, I remember is trying to do a emergency engine shutdown after they've got the bird on the ground in the neck. How stone. I own this situation. I'm in charge of this month in a laugh at this, and you're not gonna sit here in Pidie me and feel sorry for me because I always said, the look, the dull pitting me in my wheelchair. I earned this wheelchair and I'm going to run you over with I have to. As much as we all hated taking orders while we are in the military. So many veterans leave the service and ironically feel like we don't have a mission anymore. We don't feel like we have someone telling us what we need to do. And the reality is it's not just veterans. Everyone wants to feel like they have a reason for being here. But the rigidity of a life in uniform makes it harder for Vets when we hang up our boots to feel that emptiness of not having an as myth to follow. But I don't think service ends one civilian life begins again. It's just different. Now that service may take on a new form, you might become a teacher or a doctor, or God forbid, even a comedian. But today, I'm talking to someone who's devoted their post-military life to fighting for vets as a legislator. Some of you might already know the story of Senator Tammy Duckworth. She set out to be a combat pilot deployed to Iraq months into her deployment. She was shot down, took an RPG to the cockpit of her Blackhawk lost both her legs, nearly lost an arm. She's experienced pain, just like so many vets have and she has first hand knowledge of what we call the suck and how to embrace it. And when we were out there in the San in the desert, Joe the saying was owned the suck. It sucks to be here, but own at it's yours and on it and be the master of it. This is battle scars, and I'm Tom. A Serb in the US Army deployed to Iraq. It took a sniper's bullet to the back of my head lie fourth day in country. It's been over a decade since at gunfight have told that story hundreds of times. They're still things about my life. It combat. I haven't shared with anyone. And in this show I talk to other veterans of our recent wars and may be put into words. Some of those things that we never said about those experiences. Good morning, The Morning center. How are you? I'm good. Thank you, hurry. I'm Fantastic. Thank you so much for taking the time And and coming on the show. Oh, it's my pleasure. I wanted start by telling you I went to the VA the other day as a hostage hurt myself. Mind My doctor low Lucy been seeing for years He he's a fan of the show fan of the podcast. And he said, I liked the showed you have coming on And I said, Well, I'm interviewing Center Duckworth and he says the Blackhawk pilot that lost her legs. I said, Yeah. And here's what are you in here? Four today I hurt my knee running And he said, How do you feel about yourself Rambo Like I feel great. So I have my doctors looking forward to hearing this talk. Oh, all right. Well, what we better And speaking of the VA, you've done a ton of work trying to help those of us who come back and and need assistance from the VA and you and I both know more than most people, The wounded veteran, a very difficult position. Because w- as veterans combat veterans, especially, we come back and we don't want to be treated differently. But we do get put in these positions where we need help from the VA we are we are wounded. But we don't ask for help. I know personally as a Purple Heart recipient and wounded soldier when I came home, I did not ask for help. And I'd like to hear what you think about out, how weak We can help fix that. That believed by some of us that with a We shouldn't be the wants asking for help. 'cause I know you've done so much work with VA. Right. And I still go to VA from my house, gets my primary health guy, Half my health care provided to me by the taxpayers as a senator with my health insurance plan. But I actually turn out over to the. Dan, I go to VA, is it I I feel so strongly about supporting and enhancing be and making sure that I have the same experience as my fellow vats, but to your question, look, the very same things that make our warriors. The greatest warriors. If any military on the face of the earth is the same thing that separates us when we come home, Right? Our guys a tough them know how many times have. Have you talked about being mentally tough and physically strong as a soldier? How many times you know have have you in in your military career ignored the physical discomforts because that's what you have to do to do your job and to keep yourself in your buddies alive in those are all things that are admirable and it's what makes you tough. But then when a Warriors come home, Dosari same qualities are the ones that actually prevent them from receiving the care that they need their tooth Popular tee-shirts it that the lot of the guys war in the MPT Ward A me included a one was various different X rays of either their amputated. Limbs or their crush bones in it said, walk at off That shirt, You know they they would like take the X ray of this femur that has in about twenty five different pieces and held together by pins. And it said, walk at off another among the MP. Cheese was the at the black night for Monty Python It says, Come on back here. It's just a flesh wound. And all four limbs are missing relief. Food. Yeah You know, and and that's the way it was, But but my my own doctor years later I, you know, we became franchisees that, you know you are a really tough patient to take care of Because every time I asked you everything was okay, he was like, guests are. I'm great, sir. Let me out of when it can I get out of this hospital bed and go back to flying my Blackhawk and he's like, and you had no legs than you would never tell me the truth about how much it You were comments, pain. You were really AM bats. This shift We have to help our veterans may admitting the pain at admitting the help that you need, or even a long somebody to recognize and help you recognize the help that you need. It's on a sign of weakness. It's actually a sign of strength so that you can actually get better and then returned to being that warrior that you've always ban. But but everything that we did in the military that helped us Wicksell are the same things that end up hindering us as patience, right? Do you think that gallows humor that you had and still have I've seen other T-shirts, and then you have regarding. Being an amputee that dark humor you have might help transition us better into you know, these civilian lives were were life has changed. I mean, I personally became a stand-up comedian after I left the military because that was my way of dealing with the friends that I've lost, the injuries I receive in combat. And clearly you and the other folks in the ward use that as a mechanism to deal with it as well. Yeah, It's just a different way of owning the saw. Beg gallows humour wastes just a way for us to be strong. Even the sitting there in a hospital bed hooked up to machines and I-it's and everything assists away to show us. Now I owe the situation. I'm in charge of this And I'm gonna laugh at this and you're not gonna sit. He'll Cady me. I always said that look adult hitting in my wheelchair I earned this will chair. And I'm going to run you over with. I have two. Can

VA Senator Tammy Duckworth Iraq Warriors US Army Pidie Lucy Joe Cady w senator Cheese Dan 25 years