17 Burst results for "san francisco art institute"

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on Hollyweird Paranormal

Hollyweird Paranormal

05:12 min | Last month

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on Hollyweird Paranormal

"Being moved around and even misplaced students. Faculty of the past have often heard fanton noises such as footsteps screams and even visions of spirits appearing at odd hours of the day in the hallways. Most people have said that. The tower was a hotbed for paranormal activity. Because of the legendary stories that have been told about the haunting. 's the san francisco art institute had at one point hosted an art exhibit based on the haunting themselves so the exhibit was fittingly named ghost of the tower and it was unclear when the huntings had the gun but it had long been a legendary story told from student to student so it's been watered down and it's unclear if there are still haunting to this day of rest assured you may be bound to run into a student that may have visited the tower only to possibly tell you of an eerie or uneasy. Feeling they've gotten from the possible paranormal activity. They have felt or witness. Even ghost hunters had. I investigated the institute in the nineteen sixties. After repeated accounts by construction workers who had heard various screams and noises. Some of them had refused to work. After hearing stories of grizzly accidents ahead apparently happened prior to the renovation that the intended to do and that is the san francisco starting to yes. The slamming of the doors. Wouldn't it be a bitch delayed sleep in that institute racist sleeve. That's all. I ask but on a sweep scale of one to high on asleep scale of one to five which sleep there again. There's really no are. They probably wouldn't sleep desperate times. I guess on a scale one to five though with one being the lowest would choose to sleep there. No one's at one okay. But if i had to make it work okay you can make it to nice easy. Three yay for almost cal. State channel islands and scary. Dairy is the second one. This one is really interesting. Okay so before cal. State channel islands open. The campus was built to house. The camarillo state mental hospital kind of was the hospital open pores. Yes obviously as every story. Is the movie california so the hospital opened in october. Twelfth of nineteen thirty six although it started with only four hundred ten patients that year it grew over seven thousand by nineteen fifty seven and was considered to be largest psychiatric hospital west of the mississippi. God yeah it gets even worse..

fanton san francisco art institute camarillo state mental hospita san francisco california mississippi
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

07:30 min | 3 months ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on Design Matters with Debbie Millman

"I thought that i would be accepted in society. I carried that. Fear an internal homophobia within me and it didn't happen like legitimately until i moved to san francisco and i was sitting on a curb with my best friend dean at that moment in time dean moser who i had met at a residence club that i was working for my room and board. While i went to san francisco art institute and dean thought i had a crush on him and so dean said cathy. Something i have to tell you. I'm i'm i'm gay and i was like. Oh well i i am too you know. And that was the first time that it was actually spoken. And then there was no hesitation after speaking. What's so interesting to me. In terms of looking at your body of work is despite the difficulty that you might have experienced. And the inner homophobia you did seem right from the very beginning in your body of work to i. Embrace isn't even the right word. but celebrate. Celebrate your your sexuality and your gayness. Yeah no i think that i did but it wasn't right away actually took some time. I mean there was the side person kathy. Ob ride who everybody who is a friend called me calls me cathy by cathy opie published in on our backs magazine not catherine opie so i took on these different kinds of personas i suppose to again create a different compartments of my life and what is now. I guess that's in some ways like having multiple closets in one tiles. And i i think that you know Really beyond being kathy on our backs and celebrating that through a queer culture. It wasn't until becoming a part of act up and queer nation that i decided to make my work publicly about mike awareness. But i would have to say that. A good portion of my work was trying to be very serious street photographer in san francisco and then quickness within my work at cal arts was actually the dissemination and observation of master-plan communities in southern california which i kind of grew up. Been from moving. From sandusky to rancho bernardo pie california and watched that turn into masterplan community. So i think you know. The quickness was always also involved in relationship to how do we fit squirrelled. And you know if there's this kind of separation in relationship to idea of community than how do i portray my community and i think it was a quandary for quite some time. The quadri also. I think began even before you committed to photography as a profession. At at one point after you graduated high school you considered becoming a kindergarten teacher and even went to Virginia mont college to study early childhood education. I mean that's in thinking about the pathways of a life. You were on that. Pathway i was i profoundly love children like i really really loved children and i suppose that's even the other aspect of clearness is. How was i going to become a mom. Because that was always what i wanted to be. Even as a child. I would tell my mom that i was going to have twelve children for some reason that i saw Yeah that would have been too many. Yeah so kindergarten you know. Be a camp counselor for a long time. And i really liked kids so i just imagined that i would be pretty fun. Kindergarten teacher a year into your studies to become a teacher. You call your mom and said. I'm an artist and i need to go to art school. How did she respond. I mean she was both your parents really encourage you to be this kindergarten teacher. Had they respond to you wanting to be an artist. Well my mom was the one who was supporting my ability to go to college. My father was it was financially capable but chose to not financially support my endeavor of receiving a college degree. He kind of believed that when you turn eighteen. You're on your own kind of guy generous now right so so my mom you know. That was hard for her. She actually took a loan off of her car that she owned outright for me to go ahead and move to san francisco and i picked san francisco art institute. I wasn't thinking about. San francisco is being a very gay city. It was just like in california and a really good notable arts school that had like ansel adams and minor white and dorothea laying and the legacy of that program in terms of photography is is actually. Why chose it and mom's supported. She said okay. But i'm only going to be able to pay the tuition kathy. This is a really big tuition. And just so you know in nineteen eighty one. It was about seven thousand dollars a year and she was able to get me all the way through paying the tuition and i did get some scholarship money and then grad school was again up to me so if i was going to go to graduate school than i had to do it on my own. You left san francisco to pursue your mfa at california institute of the arts in valencia. You said that that transition sucked in. What way did it suck well. I was leaving a community. That was profoundly also becoming decimated from aids and i all of a sudden moved back into a very hot off southern california environment in the middle of a master plan community that i had exited when i was you know basically nineteen years old from from living with at home in in powei and to be all of a sudden going from the bay area of this incredible city. And it's the first time. I had ever lived in a city back to the suburbs where it was really hot and i couldn't wear my leather jacket year. Round like i could in san francisco and being kind of newly possessed of my my clearness my being dyke. It wasn't even queen s. I don't even think we use the word. Queer and in one thousand nine hundred five but my my kind of being a dyke and what that meant for me. Yeah and it was even i. Even though i had catherine lord and millie wilson and mazing people around me at cal arts who celebrated that and definitely added onto my ability to understand. Theory and feminism. And you know had. Douglas crimp come through the school enormous about people at that time period. It's still wasn't san francisco. Yeah as a way to cope. You started photographing planned community. That was being built across the road from your apartment which ultimately became part of your thesis portfolio in this work included photographs of quote matching.

catherine opie dean dean moser san francisco san francisco art institute kathy cathy quadri Virginia mont college rancho bernardo sandusky california cal southern california minor white mike ansel adams dorothea california institute of the ar
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

04:14 min | 3 months ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"And that sort of thing right and then of course in the evenings mother would like to go out because it was still young. And i'd be alone in a hotel room and we didn't have tv right but we had the leftover catalogs from the museum's he went to you know like who meant to the feats like we're in florence and we picked up. 'cause i mean tourist do that right. You picked up the handbook or something from the museums right. And so. I have those and i started copying pictures out of them. That's how i got started. Mother mounted in light martyrdoms but she liked madonna's and child's as most mothers do when i was going through mother's things after you know i found some really some really good drawings idea of madonna's and child's she saved those they got g debt may be crying it maybe action yet. It made me make seen before this scene liz private. It didn't matter that was a good answer wasn't it and is true to its just polished. Though 'cause i'm used answering it. There is no need to be polished with me. This is just a conversation. I'm an artist. I'm a professor lee. You're an artist run. The last thing i remember was something that somebody that he was he was nice but he but a couple of times he kinda he kinda lectured anyway. That was a while ago. So go ahead. I am not going to lecture. You promise worried about that because it's just about the same things. Well our pows almost crossed at some point not literally but we went to the same school. You went to the san francisco art institute you were to the san francisco one i did. Yeah i was supposed to go there and show the movie and i was going to do..

madonna liz lee san francisco art institute san francisco
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

05:39 min | 4 months ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Could you please pronounce your name correctly for me. It's snoop now. I found you because you were people of odd nerd. Durham did i say his name correctly. An english it's all torture. Yeah okay fair enough. It's strange to quote somebody in Opened his actual name would be odd. You would pronounce big difference in. Yes okay. that's i've never met the gentleman myself. So but i'm aware of his work because when i was in graduate school at san francisco art institute. Actually one of his old pupils was in school with me. lila carlson. So i was already aware of his work out. So that's how i am. And i was doing research on norway and i was like i wanna talk to. Somebody studied with him. And i found you so i guess the first question would be your background. How did you even get to the idea of sort of being creative person. So where your parents creative did you have some schooling when you're young like how did you become an artist. Well first of all. I don't think also about being autism or painter. I just loved to draw when i was a child. Most children do this man. They stopped at the age nine ten because they wanted to look something like real not just fantasy but for me. I didn't stopped. Kinda fight. Just kept on because i i think i kind of had a tablets if you can call it that and people around missile that so i was able to just keep on what i was what. I'd like to do some of them quite early. Just follows my Italian or my interests from. I was sixteen. I attended school. Which was mostly to Drawing painting sculpture graphics. Things like this. And when i was around i think eighteen nineteen. I contacted owner. Jim become student. While before that i actually was also attending i was like kind of a a pupil or assistance is more like an old fashioned way to not like typical academic school. I was into another artist's studio and helped him most of with sculpture on graphics. But i also did my own. Thanks there so that enough. This i contacted Asked him if i could become suit. I was not the only one who wanted to do this. But at that time he actually needed also. This was the nypd a week before christmas. He said yes. I also really need. an appar or person can take care of our children had probably had four small children..

lila carlson san francisco art institute Durham norway autism Jim
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

05:14 min | 5 months ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Eight is number or we're gonna stay in santa fe for our next guest who is joining us today on the line On the line today with us is linda loma hefty wa and she is a painter print maker and mixed media artists and her work is currently on exhibit. There at the museum in. Linda is hoping and choctaw pleasure over here with us. Welcome to native america calling linda. Accu you holly till I thank you for inviting me to be on the show Yes my work is currently on exhibit. I have a retrospective show at the At the moca museum I was one of the first. Artists are one of the first Students to attend is back in nineteen sixty two and I've been doing my art ever since so I do have my my. My background might be a fan. Mfa from san francisco art institute. And then i came back to teach i for Forty years and recently retired and twenty seventeen. Well in quite a journey in so linda tells a little bit about what is currently being exhibited and of course the name of of exhibit that it falls under the name of the evidence. The movie lan Sixty years plus of my art and again. It's a retrospective exhibit curated by laura evans and It shows My journey of you know again since i started I nineteen sixty two. So i started painting my last year of high school and It starts the exert starts With you know as you follow us to starts with my high school work and then it goes into. When i was in a student in san francisco and then when i came back to new mexico santa fe and then all the Basically it's about landscapes so the changing of landscapes and an abstract form so All the work is you can see shifting the changing of colors the shapes And you know. I think about those kind of things to the Climate change and All those.

linda loma moca museum linda santa fe san francisco art institute laura evans Linda Mfa america new mexico santa fe san francisco
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on The Wise Fool

The Wise Fool

07:07 min | 9 months ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on The Wise Fool

"Practices or very dramatically different. Yeah i mean. I think i think it's it's the ease of production is replication in a in a zine to get you know to get to get whatever it is out there in multiple copies in the easiest way but also there's something that is your creative and artistic on our cable issue. I would abby of artists books that it isn't just that the fine elements certainly is a big portion of this. But i think that there's a lot of people who do are books that are more along the lines of less archival and more something that is released of you. Get into using the word crafty. And it's not it's not that but it's less precious and more a moment in that light can should be touched and should fall apart. Should you know should get smudged. And you may be is less less refined but his elaborate. In the way that artist's book is elaborating in a message of artist's intention. So i mean. I think people who doing collage on sort of rougher paper and it's sort of like you know maybe a more cruiser binding but that's really what the book is so i wouldn't. I wouldn't just limit it to buying our current role materials. It's okay the podcast is called the wise fool. I'm rockin just filling it out perfectly. Fine okay now i. I have experiences. I actually did. My master's thesis at the center for the book created a a small run book there through when i graduated from san francisco art institute. I absolutely love the place. But one thing that i remember about you all and of course. Obviously things have changed to twenty years that you had would type lead type and the ability at that. Time to do polymer plates for swank. Line types what holum plates was the when i was trying to come up with earlier and yet yes on replace great okay a i guess the question would be. Are there even newer technologies. I mean are people like three d. printing their type in this kind of stuff or is it are people going back to lead type would type. Yeah i guess. I'm sort of asking like what's popular right now. Are there some newer technologies or people going back to even older technologies again. There's so many different currents running through all of desk because there are so many different so many different things going on. I would so i would say in general when we train on presses we teach them let type you have to love that. Because it's it's it's next level. Time-consuming put a pin in. That will come back to that. Yeah which could be exactly where you want. Most people really find that they wanna have a little more flexibility in what they can do and to just want to not spend the time. Setting the polymer plate is appealing. Because you get the the letter press printing experience but basically anything that you can you can do in in design you can have made into a plate and then you can put it on. Put it on the press imprint. So that certainly with the wedding invitation crowd and people who just wanted to do something that is. That's just really with type although you can certainly pushed the boundaries of what type can do if you want to see someone who does that. Look just spring oregon. But i think people will mostly use palmer plates when they're doing their printing so that's the most common as far as like as new things. I mean. the thing that is certainly has always been big in. Zine scene is the graph printer that you know that apparently used to be the big thing for churches printing out there programs because it was cheap and you can do bunch of them of them fast and that's hugely popular. We have one that works okay. And that's very very popularizing will probably continue to be popular. Three d printing. Good question has got. I'm sure there's this. There are people out there using three d. printing in a way that is five seen were seen people do three d. printed tie pie basically letters or characters even not even necessarily letters and then run it through the press as long as it's designed as tie so they could mix and match it with would block led type and their three d. printed stuff so they come up with some fantastic ideas. Yeah people do some different things. We were offering a class for a little while. Where people printed with lego blocks. Put the lego blocks in your made them tie. That's one thing we In terms of older methods we now have a couple of hand presses and our studio director chad johnson. Those are sort of his love in terms of being able to do something that is. There are ways that you can print with a hand press so as opposed to evanger cook cylinder pressed where. You're rolling the way you're pushing. The paper through the press along with the cylinder is a different way of coming at the paper. Whereas if you for hand press it's similar designed to what gutenberg would have used you one printing at a time but it will because you're coming straight down on something you can do much more nuanced finer types of printing but again it's not a quick production well which leads to something else that like. I would love for the listener to be able to understand. I understand because i did. It is the amount of time that it takes because like you talked about like lead type and how time consuming it is to set it up. I'd never found the setup of a such a bother. My problem was always putting it back like because anytime you set up lead type every single letter that you put in there. If you're in a good responsible shop you then have to take the time to then put all those letters back in the in the correct case immigrant slot. That's that's the part that oh you know cleaning up bothered. That was so time consuming. Certainly the setting of type making sure the the spacing and the look of it is correct and and.

chad johnson twenty years five san francisco art institute gutenberg every single letter one one thing Zine of hand presses
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:07 min | 11 months ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Our feelings. And Bill Kurtis reacts to having to give up his Donald Trump impression. Just as he has perfected it. No, no Will ask who really was just not having it on our quiz coming up right after this hours dance. Live from NPR News. I'm Barbara Klein. President elect Biden's transition team is providing details on what to expect from the Biden administration shortly after Wednesday's inauguration. NPR's Mara Liasson has details. The administration wants to not so much hit, the ground running has hit the ground sprinting. Lots of executive orders. He's going to sign on day one in order to extend the paws on federal student loan payments, rejoined the Paris climate Agreement. Reverse President Trump's Muslim ban mandate masks on federal property extend the ban on a evictions. He's also going to submit on day one and immigration bill to Congress, which would codify Dhaka and provide a pathway to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants. Meanwhile, razor topped fencing and National Guard troops are being put in position around the U. S capitol amid threats of extremist violence at the inauguration. Los Angeles County had a pandemic milestone this weekend, the nation's most populous county has surpassed one million confirmed cases of covert 19 and his Matt Gillam of member station KCRW reports. The county got more bad news. The new variant of the virus has arrived. The Corona virus strain be 117, which originated in the United Kingdom is now in L. A Health officials say this first case of the variant, which is about 50%, more contagious than regular cove, it was found in a man passing through the region who's now isolating in Oregon. Experts say it's likely the UK strain has already spreading in Southern California. Million confirmed cases of the virus in L A means roughly one in 10 Angelenos has been infected. However, recent modeling from the county suggests the actual transmission of the virus could be much more widespread, infecting one in three residents. California expands access to the vaccine L A is still keeping tight restrictions on it as it continues to inoculate Frontline health care workers for NPR news. I'm Matt Gillam. The U. S. Is calling for an independent investigation into allegations of rigging and Uganda's presidential election. NPR's ADA Peralta reports the U. S provides million's in development and security eight. In a statement, the U. S State Department said it was quote deeply troubled by reports of intimidation, violence and irregularities during the presidential vote in Uganda. Even before the votes were finished counting. The leading opposition candidate, Bobby Wine, alleged the elections had been rigged. He remains under house arrest, and it's surrounded by the military. US said it would take action against anyone undermining democracy in the country. The United States provides more than $900 million a year to Uganda, and critics say the aide has helped President um 70 remain in power was 70, who has ruled for 35 years has just won a six term in office. It a. Peralta NPR news. Compel her. This is NPR from KQED News. I'm queen IQ him. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted unanimously this week to recommend historic status to a Diego Rivera mural at the San Francisco Art Institute. Here to explain is KQED, Sarah Hodgkiss and Sarah. This was initiated because the Art institute is considering selling the mural, which could fetch up to $50 million to pay off a big loan yes, and what the board of supervisors did on Tuesday. Was began the process of landmark designation for this 1931 mural. Now the Planning Department and the Historic Preservation Committee will weigh in and write about the historical significance of the mural, essentially creating a dossier about it. And then the supervisors will review that once again and decide finally how to vote. So what is the significance of this mural? So it's just one of three Diego Rivera murals that we have here in San Francisco, and the Mirror's name is the making of a fresco showing the building of a city. So it portrays some of the historic figures that are linked to San Francisco history. And it also depicts the industrial workers who actually Built the city. It's emblematic of digger various practice. And I imagine the Art Institute isn't too happy about this move. Yes. So s FBI is a small school with a storied history. And it's had a lot of financial troubles or videos for a variety of different reasons. The board of S FBI were some of the only voices on Tuesday They were arguing with the supervisors to not give landmark status to the mural. At least not yet. So the mural is S FBI's most valuable asset, and the board wants flexibility to use it to secure a bridge loan, which they say is essential to get them through the pandemic and beyond. That was KQED artist Sarah Hodgkiss will tweet out a link to her story.

Diego Rivera mural NPR News NPR Los Angeles County Uganda President San Francisco Art Institute Donald Trump Matt Gillam Bill Kurtis San Francisco Board of Supervi Bobby Wine KQED S FBI Sarah Hodgkiss ADA Peralta Southern California San Francisco Barbara Klein Biden
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:25 min | 11 months ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Garcia Navarro. Good morning. This our state capitals across the country are on high alert as we head into Inauguration week, and we ask a former general who led troops in Iraq about the possibility of a homegrown insurgency and in the movie pieces of a woman a taboo subject. That's the big screen treatment Vanessa Kirby on her excruciating birth scene. It was a bit of a scary one just because I have never given birth before myself, and I thought, If I get a second of this wrong, then the audience will be pulled out the film, and it will feel like a movie version of a birth. It's Sunday, January 17th 2021 headlines are next Live from NPR NEWS. I'm Barbara Klein. President elect Joe Biden has unveiled an aggressive and ambitious agenda for his first days in office. NPR's Mara Liasson has details. No president has faced so many crises all at once on assuming office. Incoming chief of Staff Ron Claims says Biden will confront four overlapping crises, the pandemic, the recession, climate change and racial justice. And claim outlined a flurry of executive orders that Biden will sign right away on day. Two claims says Biden will issue orders to help safely reopen schools and in the first month he will unveil a second covert recovery package building on the $1.9 Trillion bill he laid out last week. There's a lot Biden could do himself through executive action. But to pass legislation through and evenly divided Senate, Biden will need the help of Republicans. And although business groups like the Chamber of Commerce have praised some of his proposals, it's not clear if Republicans are willing to work with the new president. Mara Liasson NPR news Los Angeles has passed a milestone in the number of covert 19 cases, headache. Lynn heard these reports. The county topped one million infections this weekend, according to state officials. Los Angeles County is the first in the U. S to have reach that figure, along with 253 more deaths reported Friday. The total number of fatalities is now over 13,000 Also confirmed the county's first case of the more contagious be 117, the same variant first discovered in the UK, Although the new strain doesn't appear to be more virulent, officials say it is transmitted much more easily. Los Angeles Department of Public Health, said in a statement. The variant is likely already spreading in the community for NPR news. I'm heavy Lynn hurt. He's in Los Angeles. Nationwide. Johns Hopkins University is confirming more than 23,700,000 Corona virus infections. India launched its nationwide vaccination program this weekend, aiming to inject 300,000 people a day using a domestically made vaccine as well as the Oxford AstraZeneca drug. In neighboring Pakistan. A vaccine has been approved, but the BBC's Dilma give Oring reports Islamabad doesn't know where the doses will come from, does the underlying tension between India and Pakistan the fraud political relationship? At the moment. Pakistan's implying that it hasn't approached India about applies anyway. Therefore, my asking it look the possibility of Western countries. Perhaps there are other manufacturers, of course in other countries. But there's also the global vaccine alliance, which may help out there trying to give free doses for about 20% off populations in countries that needed Pakistan should be on that list. Again. It won't meet all its needs on the timing of that isn't very clear. The BBC still make covering this is NPR from KQED News. I'm queen IQ him. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted unanimously this week to recommend historic status to a Diego Rivera mural at the San Francisco Art Institute. Here to explain is KQED, Sarah Hodgkiss and Sarah. This was initiated because the Art institute is considering selling the mural which could fetch up to $50 million to pay off a big loan. Yes, and what the borders Supervisors did on Tuesday was began the process of landmark designation for this 1931 mural. Now the Planning Department and the Historic Preservation Committee will weigh in and write about the historical significance of the mural, essentially creating a dossier about it. And then the supervisors will review that once again and decide finally how to vote. So what is the significance of this mural? So it's just one of three Diego Rivera murals that we have here in San Francisco, and the Mirror's name is the making of a fresco showing the building of a city. So it portrays some of the historic figures that are linked to San Francisco history. And it also depicts the industrial workers who actually Built the city. It's emblematic of digger various practice, and I imagine the Art institute isn't too happy about this move. Yes, so as if the eye is a small school with a storied history, and it's had a lot of financial troubles over the years for a variety of different reasons. The board of S FBI were some of the only voices on Tuesday they were arguing with the supervisors to not give landmark status to the mural, at least not yet. So the mural is S FBI's most valuable asset, and the board wants flexibility to use it to secure a bridge loan, which they say is essential to get them through the pandemic and beyond. That was KQED artist Sarah Hodgkiss will tweet out a link to her story.

Joe Biden NPR Pakistan Los Angeles Mara Liasson president KQED India San Francisco Board of Supervi Los Angeles County Diego Rivera mural Sarah Hodgkiss Lynn Art institute BBC Vanessa Kirby San Francisco Garcia Navarro Los Angeles Department of Publ
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Sense of wonder is is much what religion Keeps alive for human beings as as ritual Yes. I think ritual. It's an important part of it. Because ritual is constantly Building. You repeat the same thing at different stages of your life, you know, and you're putting new layers of meaning. You're really recognizing. The familiar He wrote a beautiful, beautiful essay about your father's death in 1980. There's a lot of drinking sherry and eating Stilton cheese, which he loved. Which feels to me like the bread and wine. I mean, right? It has that same centrality and you talked about the various things you sent with him into the fire volume of flakes, poetry. Flowers and a crab said she said of the, uh in memory of the way he had taught each of us to study tide pools and the way he had taken a crab with him year after year to his opening classes. At the San Francisco Art Institute to open his students eyes to the fearful symmetries of organic life. And then you said Nora, which was his You're except sister right? Brought a bagel because he won sister, half sister half sister. Because here Eric brought the crab. Okay. And Eric's a stepbrother. Step, brother. All right. And she brought a bagel because your father had quipped it easily in that the hole in a bagel would be reincarnated as a donut forgotten that But there's this. There's something you wrote, can I, You know, I just want to say your writing is so beautiful and and so I'm doing a lot of bringing it into this conversation, but I feel like it has its rightful place, he wrote. And this is to me. It gets at ritual as, um Something that is also of That they're even the rituals of our personal lives have more than just personal meaning right, You wrote. We talk in this country, often about property rights. We talk more rarely about those shares people have in each other's lives and about people's rights to participation and pleasure. Especially at the moments of passage, the right to throw a handful of Earth on the coffin the right to stand up to catch a tossed bouquet and dream of one's own future wedding. To kiss the bridegroom or hold a newborn. Couples today devise new rituals or set up housekeeping together in ways most meaningful to themselves without wondering whether meaning is something the photo a larger community. Seems like such an important question. Statement me. Well, you know it Z. It's interesting one of the things that I've done for the last few years. As I I'm elector. I'm a reader in my church. And Of course, the readings recycle. And One of the things that has Fascinated me about first. I just thought this is this is a business of I'm going to read well and loud enough and slow enough and do a good job. But What I've found over time. Is first of all that the readings Have a different meeting. When they're red from the lectern. During math. When they're when they're red in the context of a community. You know, I've practiced So I don't stumble. I've been over them. I thought about him. So you mean it's different even when you practice by yourself, and then when you stand before the community and read it aloud, That's one thing that I practice by myself when I stand before the community. And I look at these people. And that's the other thing. My relationship with the people. Has changed. Which I didn't expect. I didn't know that would happen. And how do you explain that? What is that about? Community comes together. And here are these words that have been read and re read and reread. Reinterpreted. For 2000 years. And you think about how many people on a given Sunday Trying to Find something fresh to say about Something that's been read. And preached on and Hundreds of churches for For Thousands of years. Thousands of years. Yeah, I mean, yeah, that boggles the mind, but they do. Because you are always meeting The ritual. A little bit different from the way you were last week or yesterday or whenever. Confronting different things in your life. There's a resonance. Between the tradition. And the president. That makes it fresh. I don't know how better to put it. Um let me ask you this, um This large question. What does it mean to be human, which Is a philosophical question. It's a theological question, and it's an anthropological question. It's a question you're Mother, Margaret, meeting your father Gregory pits and we're asking I know it's it's also a huge question. Um How would you start to talk about how your sense of that has evolved? In the course of this life. You've lived perhaps in ways that Have taken you by surprise or not. I was going to give you a unacceptably intellectual answer about having to do with consciousness. Um And you made it a much more personal questions. Um Consciousness is important Reflection is important thinking about what you're doing. What it means. In the search for meaning. One of the things that I Came to believe. When I wrote that piece you referred to about my father's death. Is that death is a very important part of life that we should deny. But In spite of our terrible hubris and greed and competitiveness. But We can learn to see ourselves in proportion. And realized that were small and temporary. And don't Understand as much as we need to And we live in a time of Real urgency. Where are we?.

Eric Stilton San Francisco Art Institute Nora president Margaret Gregory
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:56 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"An anthropologist that that sense of wonder is as much what religion Keeps alive for human beings as as ritual Yes. I think ritual. It's an important part of it. Because ritual is constantly Building. You repeat the same thing at different stages of your life, you know, and you're putting new layers of meaning. You're really recognizing. The familiar He wrote a beautiful, beautiful essay about your father's death in 1980. There's a lot of drinking sherry and eating Stilton cheese, which he loved. Which feels to me like the bread and wine. I mean, right? It has that same centrality and you talked about the various things you sent with him into the fire volume of flakes, poetry. Flowers and a crab said she said of the, uh in memory of the way he had taught each of us to study tide pools and the way he had taken a crab with him year after year to his opening classes. At the San Francisco Art Institute to open his students eyes to the fearful symmetries of organic life. And then you said Nora, which was his You're except sister right? Brought a bagel because he won sister, half sister half sister. Because he had Eric brought the crab. Okay. And Eric's a stepbrother. Step, brother. All right. She brought a bagel because your father had clipped it easily in that the hole in a bagel would be reincarnated as a donut forgotten that But there's this. There's something you wrote that can I, You know, I just want to say your writing is so beautiful and and so I'm doing a lot of bringing it into this conversation, but I feel like it has its rightful place, he wrote. And this is to me. It gets at ritual as, um Something that is also of That they're even the rituals of our personal lives have more than just personal meaning right, You wrote. We talk in this country, often about property rights. We talk more rarely about those shares people have in each other's lives and about people's rights to participation and pleasure. Especially at the moments of passage, the right to throw a handful of Earth on the coffin the right to stand up to catch a tossed bouquet and dream of one's own future wedding. To kiss the bridegroom or hold a newborn. Couples today devise new rituals or set up housekeeping together in ways most meaningful to themselves without wondering whether meaning is something the photo a larger community. Seems like such an important question statement to me. Well, you know it Z. It's interesting one of the things that I've done for the last few years. As I I'm elector. I'm a reader in my church. And Of course, the readings recycle. And One of the things that has Fascinated me about first. I just thought this is this is a business of I'm going to read well and loud enough and slow enough and do a good job. But What I've found over time. Is first of all that the readings Have a different meeting. When they're red from the lectern. During math. When they're when they're red in the context of a community. You know, I've practiced So I don't stumble. I've been over them. I thought about him. Do you mean it's different even when you practice by yourself, and then when you stand before the community and read it aloud, That's one thing that I practice by myself when I stand before the community. And I look at these people. And that's the other thing. My relationship with the people. Has changed. Which I didn't expect. I didn't know that would happen. And how do you explain that? What is that about? The community comes together. And here are these words that have been read and re read and reread. Reinterpreted. For 2000 years. And you think about how many people on a given Sunday Trying to Find something fresh to say about Something that's been read. And preached on and hundreds of churches for For Thousands of years. Thousands of years. Yeah, I mean, yeah, that boggles the mind, but they do. Because you are always meeting The ritual. A little bit different from the way you were last week or yesterday or whenever. Confronting different things in your life. There's a resonance. Between the tradition. And the president. That makes it fresh. I don't know how better to put it. Um let me ask you this, um This large question. What does it mean to be human, which Is a philosophical question. It's a theological question, and it's an anthropological question. It's a question you're Mother, Margaret, meeting your father Gregory pits and we're asking I know it's it's also a huge question. How would you start to talk about how your sense of that has evolved? In the course of this life. You've lived perhaps in ways that Have taken you by surprise or not. I was going to give you a unacceptably intellectual answer about having to do with consciousness. Um And you made it a much more personal questions. Um Consciousness is important Reflection is important thinking about what you're doing. What it means. In the search for meaning. One of the things that I Came to believe. When I wrote that piece he referred to about my father's death. Is that death is a very important part of life that we should deny. But In spite of our terrible hubris and greed and competitiveness. But We can learn to see ourselves in proportion. And realized that were small and temporary. And don't Understand as much as we need to And we live in a time of.

Eric Stilton San Francisco Art Institute Nora president Margaret Gregory
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Thank you. San Francisco North Highland Sacramento Gonna do social distancing. What are they gonna do? If there is positive in the shelter? People with disabilities fear FEMA will be unprepared to help them if a natural disaster arrives during the pandemic. It is Wednesday, July 22nd and this is all things considered from NPR news. I'm Ari Shapiro and Mary Louise Kelly this hour, the latest on federal police confronting protesters in American cities, also an unpleasant surprise. That's becoming more common big medical bills from surgical assistance. I have absolutely no intention of paying your bill. And if you feel that you're owed something for your services, I suggest you take it up a busy surgeon in Idaho. A spike in Corona virus infections means a strain on hospitals were on, of course of seeing exponential increase. Asses and until and unless we change our collective behaviours, those will continue now. The news Live from NPR news. I'm Jack's fear facing Ah lawsuit and backlash over an order requiring schools to re open. Florida's governor appealed directly the parents today. NPR's Greg Allen reports, he gave a televised address, saying concerns about the Corona virus should not keep Children out of school. The union representing Florida's teachers is suing to block an order requiring all school districts offer in class instruction five days a week. The union says the order violates CDC guidelines and the state's responsibility to ensure schools are operated safely. Governor Rhonda Sanders says parents and students can offer online instruction if that's what they want. But the Santa says the virus poses little risk to Children. While the risk from two students from in person learning or low, the cost of keeping schools closed. Are enormous, continuing with online learning only to Santa says places a burden on working parents and will likely widen the achievement gap between students from affluent and low income households. Greg Allen. NPR NEWS Miami federal judges declining to release around 300 migrant parents and Children being held in U. S detention centers. U S District Court judge making that decision today despite what he called immigration officials shortcomings in terms of controlling the spread of the Corona virus. Lawyers for the families that requested preliminary injunction forcing the release of the families because they fear they were that fear of being infected by the virus. Within 3700 coronavirus cases have been confirmed in U. S immigration and Customs Enforcement facilities. During a state visit to Denmark. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has pledged us will become more of a partner and trying to push back Russian and Chinese influence in the Arctic region. Just well, Overgaard has that story. The kingdom of Denmark includes Greenland and the Faroe Islands, both in or near the Arctic Circle. In recent years, Russia has increased its military presence there, and China has stepped up economic investment. Last year, President Trump made waves by suggesting the U. S by Greenland something that Danish foreign minister said was not on the table at today's meeting. Pompeo, meanwhile, thank Denmark for helping to promote sovereignty and transparency in the Arctic. Suspicion is all the more urgent. As we face new competition in the region from countries that don't always play by those rules. If it all. Meanwhile, Greenlandic and Farrelly's leaders say they hope the Arctic can remain a low voltage region and not a playground for superpowers. For NPR news. I'm Cecil over guard in Billund, Denmark. United Airlines, like a number of other major carriers, now requires customers to where mass on board it's flights. The airline is taking things a step further with requirement Mass be warning ticket counters in an airport lounges says it's broadening that's mass warning requirement in an effort to establish another level of protection. Stocks closed higher today. The doubt 165 points. The NASDAQ rose 25 points. This is NPR. Live from KTVT News. I'm Richelle Maria Dylan, The Santa Clara County district attorney announced this morning that his office will no longer seek the death penalty. District Attorney Jeff Rosen was once a staunch advocate of capital punishment. But he said the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis led to a change of heart, Rosen said. There's quote a tragic but really risk of wrongful conviction. And he said the most drastic punishment has been used disproportionately against people of color. Governor Gavin Newsom put a moratorium on the death penalty last March, suspending any further executions. But if that were to change, Rosen said he would reverse all current death sentence convictions in the county. A few months after announcing it would suspend all of its degree programs. The San Francisco Art Institute says it will enroll students for the upcoming academic year. After all is Chloe Veltman has more. The art school threatens to cancel its programs back in the spring because of declining enrollments hi real estate costs in the pandemic. But in a statement released today, the institute announced it will bring some of them back and has invited students to re enroll. The reversal comes as the result of fundraising efforts, operational cuts and covert 19 8 packages. A board of trustees agreed to keep the school's 15 tenured faculty full time for now, but dozens of adjunct professors lost their jobs indefinitely. In June, Thie institute said classes will be offered online on it will need to raise $4.5 million to make it.

NPR Denmark Greg Allen Mike Pompeo Attorney Jeff Rosen Arctic Florida FEMA U. S Ari Shapiro Santa Governor Gavin Newsom Governor Rhonda Sanders San Francisco San Francisco Art Institute U S District Court Mary Louise Kelly Idaho
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:32 min | 1 year ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I have opened up and they're just raring to go by Easter president trump suggests a much faster timeline than doctors recommend today is Tuesday March twenty fourth and this is All Things Considered from NPR news I'm ari Shapiro and I'm also Chang it's official the Tokyo summer Olympics are postponed we'll have reaction from athletes this is pretty serious people are getting very sick people are losing their lives and and sports have to take a backseat to the also doctors are thinking through a difficult question in hospitals start running short of beds or ventilators who will get priority plus with Israel and lock down what is the pandemic mean for the Israeli Palestinian relationship the only solution for them both to stay safe and to get out of this crisis is cooperation first the news live from NPR news in Washington I'm Jack Speer White House officials at their daily briefing today said the corona virus is far worse in New York City than any other part of the country right now NPR's Scott Detrow has more at the latest White House briefing task force coordinator Dr Deborah Burke had a stark advisory for new Yorkers everybody who was in New York should be self quarantining for the next fourteen days to ensure that the virus doesn't spread to others no matter where they have gone whether it's Florida North Carolina or out to far far reaches of Long Island that's because more new coronavirus cases are coming out of the New York metro area than anywhere else in the city also has the country's highest infection rate York's governor and mayor warned a surgeon hospital cases is coming soon president trump is promising federally built temporary hospitals for New York and a navy hospital ship will arrive soon Scott dentro NPR news Washington here governor Andrew Cuomo in fact today said it could be just weeks before as many as forty thousand people in that state in intensive care such a surge would swamp hospitals which have just three thousand intensive care beds in the entire state Cuomo noting the raven's new infections is doubling every three days New York City mayor bill de Blasio said the city is bracing for months of crisis data from the Johns Hopkins University coronavirus website shows more than fifty three thousand cases now reported in the U. S. with more than seven hundred deaths president trump is calling on South Korea to send medical equipment to help fight the corona virus pandemic NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports the two leaders spoke by phone today the blue house as the presidential office here is known says that the twenty three minute phone call was made at president trump's urgent request president moon jae yeon promise to provide as much equipment as his country could spare it said it didn't say exactly what equipment trump requested but South Korea has recently garnered praise for mass producing covert nineteen test kits since late January South Korea has tested nearly three hundred and fifty thousand people far more than the U. S. moon said south Korea's equipment might need U. S. food and drug administration approval according to the blue house trump said he could get that done the same day Anthony Kuhn NPR news Seoul stocks moved higher today on Wall Street amid signs a deal aimed at easing the economic pain of the corona virus pandemic may be close lawmakers today were said to be arguing over minute points of an agreement aimed at injecting nearly two trillion dollars in the U. S. economy one key provision would boost unemployment insurance for those who are furloughed because of the pandemic the plan would also provide money for businesses shuttered due to the outbreak any deal struck by the Senate we still have to be approved in the house checking the numbers on wallstreet the Dow jumps two thousand one hundred thirteen points the biggest one day gain ever two twenty thousand seven oh four the nasdaq was up five hundred and fifty seven points today this is NPR live from KQED news I'm terrace either Santa Clara county's board of supervisors has approved a three million dollar boost to a couple of fund set up by the Silicon Valley community foundation KQED's additive on the money reports the regional response fund will distribute two million dollars to organizations like destination home which will distribute the money to smaller nonprofits to address homelessness in the county another million will go to the community foundations coronavirus nonprofit support fund to help smaller organizations survive the pandemic here Santa Clara county supervisor Cindy Chavez spring in our valley is when everybody does their fundraising for their general operating dollars so the idea here is to support as many people as we can with this fine more money is on the way private companies like Cisco adobe and zoom have pledged another seven million dollars in aid I'm a dependability takes reading news after nearly one hundred and fifty years the San Francisco Art Institute may close its doors this spring Sarah Hotchkiss of cage KQED's arts reports the Russian hell art school announced on Monday that it is suspending enrollment for fall twenty twenty it also detailed plans for possible faculty and staff layoffs after graduation in may the school was attempting to merge with another bay area educational institution when the pandemic Kay and negotiations halted current students are encouraged to pursue placement at other schools the four hundred or so new students admitted for fall twenty twenty will receive deposit refunds if that's if A. I. does re open it's unlikely to remain independent.

trump president
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

KTTH 770AM

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KTTH 770AM

"Serving St marking noted George Crossman Tony Kentucky nineteen seventy to nineteen ninety two he was a professor of arch and head of the department of art at northern Kentucky university is degrees or BFA from San Francisco Art Institute MA an MFA from university of California Berkeley and a masters of divinity from United theological seminary the story begins on June one nineteen eighty five while Diane at a hospital in Paris France had a near death experience that involved being tormented in the hello calling out to Jesus being saved given a life review and having all those questions answered from that experience he ceased being an atheist and is now a Christian pastor is written four books based on his experiences participate in over thirty overseas mission trips and countless missions in the US currently there's a Hollywood movie being produced by all accounts to DO space on the story reference store Marshall live in the house he built in nineteen seventy seven with the dogs and goldfish avid flower garden painter and grandfather's life is dedicated to sharing the love of god the world especially if you're in the love of Jesus Christ the most important lesson he learned in his near death experience is a personal meaning a one on one you and him relationship with Christ Jesus Maria's our storm hair of and are you doing tonight transaction under it all up the first steps yeah that's a that's a that's quite a run road I gotta tell ya so tell us what what happened why were you dying in Paris on June one nineteen eighty five just just tell us all about it I had a perforation of the warmth of course I didn't know that elements lock in the morning on a Saturday each bomb went to the ground with mustard shoot pain I'd ever experienced mental I started with some for my abdomen two one so small stomach after your big stomach before the instructions to get insulin still I actually thought that I'd been shot by the board except that I hadn't heard we had it done but the justice system camps for my wife called which they call the emergency medical service and doctor came in what was wrong with me and see what me off the floor and examine and all and called an ambulance and they took the cross junction city hospital and because the world's sake I rose to Jim in the emergency room and but because it was a Saturday send me over to the surgical hospital to have the surgery on there was no searching the building question the socialized medicine doctors working under through Friday and slowly can minutes they were called but they were unable to locate anybody when the doctor at the hotel with doctors university city and every doctor Grover talked to in the US all told me that my life expectancy wish a few hours this is weird between one hour and you know actions for five hours she would be dead announcer this ten hours later never having been given and he soon watch the world burn as soon no your college or anything stream in the room at eight thirty and nine surging through an internal selection of Dr and not still try to get one the next day I have done hanging on and losing my ability through on this is very very painful difficult to prison I was incredibly returns so once you start small and my good byes with my wife and I stopped are trying to prepare a market which should be coming almost impossible to do that I want I'm conscious and when I woke scam I'm abbreviating this because you would take me hours to tell the whole story specialist does your group of people outside the room there were sent in her application so we've been waiting for you and I thought that they were some of doctor everything was more reels down my experience of reality thank you for last night this was a dream or something else that no actually it's more real search for in that selects which real finalists farms on a long journey into darkness and I realize that this was not good read out this was not good at all as soon knock on wood you any further should not you got for the vehicle and so we had a big fight and there's absolute portion Polish chart graph search and then it began to tighten chair and there are a lot of them and one of the twisters hopeless situation and flee he came in very since not want to go inside because it's one disgusting when they look like river what do they look like yeah people just regular or not really yeah I'm sorry what because when they met me they were out in the hallway and was turned into our I only just simply remember then as long getting dressed in query and then looking very very jails he shouldered correction trail in west palm so one nation kids so what wanted to do was win which basically was some term that part I was flying there and I heard a voice she possibly trade bot Watson from them but I don't I'm terribly regarding the Porsche trade got knocked out of one hundred trade account trading the voice and pray to god I thought okay once a kid tradestar stronger in numbers for issue clearly remember anything listing all confused as change that memorized in school I mean I can not flips on just a couple lines of course not shipped or things like that and slice into my delight and surprise when I sent them the people that were around me got very angry and said there is no god nobody can hear you we're gonna make things much worse on clean up what they said what they said was very cursing in being nasty ugly violin just basically a yarn awful they don't want your about dot really clears state definitely didn't like a box I'm not doing that encouraged me to keep starting gone stuff back down was that they were retreating away from me to suggest some dirty recycle streaming online or something and I found myself alone in that place there are just complete darkness I thought about my license whenever my whole us intrinsically solution that basically flunked the course I didn't know what I don't know what the curriculum watch for whatever was I didn't know if you know what what source you but I know I haven't done it I mean I Sheldon my relationships with my father with my mother with my sisters with my wife with my kids with machine learning everything I look at this list miserable Oct and once in the right spot I was which is just so great and this great artists this wonderful person I realized that that was so the complete solution of sliced the energy so does nothing great about there was just a mediocre nonsense and not all right and up to this place Josh sorry and right away and that since World Jeez for ever and ever and ever with these horrible people because such what I've had burned warmer time who's telling you this what sort of gotcha yeah they're not just storage because now I'm I'm for then you can go online and on the left in this bottom of the church of chocolate smashing despair my mind recalled myself to support you in Sunday school singing choose swirls merry and when I recalled the birds of the place I'm not quite sure myself singing and Sunday school class kids for like felt when I had spoke to see trouble to assist I don't mean this subsector which is that there was just super guy she says it's really cool guy who took care of me at my house little boy I would trade agenda you don't have nightmares tonight and she would chase the monsters away and make me feel safe from I want what I had when I was a child that police in nice guy she's just well my lonely are very simple childlike technician but I want I want to know him and so I called out to match that uses to discredit me white appeared in the darkness you thought and possibly forty and white light these forms and shapes Hanson arms and research sold his slight reach down and touch me a monthly charge all the gore and just figure why and I was full and complete thank you but much more importantly than inside was such he showed me with the slogan is chance went behind my back thank you for coming out and on very firmly against his chest I'm sure action selection of joy and happiness introduced first he carried me out of that place and we began directed journey toward shifts when it first was what and sure sure part was a galaxy but when I realized watching a galaxy it was we're going to work on which Dodge house heaven and I shall be sched I was so unworthy I'm not sure what caused the piece of souls I'm sure he five stars hi folks my sources he's made a terrible mistake I don't belong here and she spoke to me for the first time the Serbs we don't make mistakes you do belong here right I just thought I didn't say I fought how did she how did you know our structure thank you Sir I know everything you've ever thought and I felt really bad because all of a sudden I started going through all the stuff that we didn't want him to know that I thought and he started laughing because she appreciated duty of speaking about the things you don't want to think about and he said I know everything about you I know every everything you've ever thought and.

Tony Kentucky professor George Crossman northern Kentucky university San Francisco Art Institute MA university of California Berke five hours ten hours one hour
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Than forty six raised in Massachusetts Reverend Howard storm is currently pastor St mark's United church of Christ in Laconia Kentucky is one March is a three D. after Jules therapist in Ohio the wound for Thomas Kentucky Martian hour of six children and nine grandchildren he was ordained in ninety two serves on United church of Christ Norwood Ohio United church of Christ of code in Ohio is currently serving same mark United church of Christ Metonic Kentucky nineteen seventy to nineteen ninety two he was a professor of art and head of the department of art a northern Kentucky university is degrees or BFA from San Francisco Art Institute MA an MFA from university of California Berkeley and a masters of divinity from United theological seminary the story begins on June one nineteen eighty five while Diane at a hospital in Paris France had a near death experience that involved being tormented in the whole calling out to Jesus being saved given a life review and having all these questions answered from that experience he ceased being an atheist and is now a Christian pastor is written four books based on his experiences participated over thirty overseas mission trips and countless missions in the US currently there's a Hollywood movie being produced by all gone studios based on the story riven storm Marshall live in the house he built in nineteen seventy seven with their dogs and goldfish Evan flower gardener painter and grandfather's life is dedicated to sharing the love of god the world especially if you're in the love of Jesus Christ the most important lesson he learned in his near death experience is a personal meaning eighty one all in one you and him relationship with Christ Jesus Nereus hour storm event are you doing tonight very good thank you your son it all up yeah that's a that's a that's quite a run road I gotta tell ya so tell us what what happened why were you dying in Paris on June one nineteen eighty five just just tell us all about I had a perspiration of the one of course I didn't know that elements lock in the morning on a Saturday I went to the ground what's most acute pain I'd ever experienced mental exciting lists and for my abdomen two one so small stomach after your big stomach before the intestines begins and I'm still I actually thought that I'd been shot by the board except that I hadn't heard.

United church of Christ acute pain Hollywood United theological seminary university of California Berke San Francisco Art Institute MA professor of art mark United church of Christ M United church of Christ Norwoo Thomas Kentucky Howard storm Massachusetts Paris Marshall US Paris France Diane Ohio Laconia Kentucky
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on The Daily Grind Business Podcast

The Daily Grind Business Podcast

12:21 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on The Daily Grind Business Podcast

"I promise you you will not regret it today. On the podcast we sit down with the amazing Mark Silber. Mark is the best selling author photographer filmmaker and producer of the very popular Youtube series advancing your photography. We is interviewed scores of some of the biggest names in in photography he started learning darkroom skills and the basics of photography at the legendary Peninsula School of Menlo Park in California in the sixties and moved on to hone his skills to professional standards at the famed San Francisco Art Institute mark moved into teaching photography in workshops all over the country and became renowned as an engaging and helpful speaker and coach as his greatest joy comes from helping others he loves adventure and you'll find him out backpacking surfing or snowboarding or maybe just chilling taking a walk through Carmel with his wife and Golden retriever today on the show. Mark shares is amazing entrepreneurial journey with us. There's a lot to be learned from this interview every one as always be sure you have a pen piece of paper sit back and really dive deep in today's interview with Mr Marc silber enjoy well mark silver welcome to the daily grind how are you I am great and so happy to join you. Yes we're all super excited to hear Mark Mark. If you wouldn't mind say for listeners out there being I introduced you to speaking a little bit more of who you are and what they do well. I've had a lot of different things I've done and I started out as photographer when I was quite young actually twelve years old I learned darkroom skills awhile and ended up attending the San Francisco Art Institute with one of my classmates was anti Liebowitz who I think everybody knows if you had the name one photographer you probably think of any Liebowitz this with the rolling stone and vogue and whatnot Vanity Fair and my actually it's kind of funny career path. I wrote about it in my book. I ended up going in a completely different direction and and built a very successful management consulting company in Silicon Valley interesting and kind of parked my photography and other skills away until the company Anthony grew to appoint where I thought you know it's time for me to turn this thing over to my partners and go back to photography which I did in two thousand four and from two thousand four on I basically basically been growing photographer video production company <hes> and author <hes> so that's what I do these days I authored books. I do video production photography and really enjoy what I'm doing all around no doubt so I mean what's your main source of excitement right now. Like what are you super excited about work wise you know I guess I love writing books. It's a huge process. This and I met the tail end of it where the book is printed. It's going to be dropping on very soon. The process isn't over for modern authors. That's kind of a new beginning those those wonderful days when people used to write books and then turn them over to their publishers and I think that's so far gone you know so <music>. I'm very involved in <hes> talking about the book and also you know feeling in the gaps in just sort of defining more about what what this book is all about so I'm excited about that so give us a little synopsis Sir or for People Listening who are curious about the book like what's the main messaging of the book. What do you want people to take from it well? The book is called create tools from seriously talented people to unleash your creative alive and the that tile kind of summarizes the whole thing what the main message of the book is there is a path to becoming more creative. It's not just sort of an accidental thing and there is a a direct act relationship between the steps that you follow in the final outcome but the other part of that message is so the book lays out but the other part of the messages creativity can appear appear in any form. It's not just about being you know watching madman in those creative those creative crazy guys that are dreaming up stuff. It's about any form of creativity whether it's being an entrepreneur. Entrepreneur or a better parent or you know taking a house that needs a lot of work and turning it into a piece of art so that's the message of the book as you can become more creative and here's the path to follow and because I interviewed eleven different very very creative people I mean these are some seriously talented people from <hes> multi Emmy Award Winning Multi Grammy Award winning all you know some really people who've arrived and finding out how they did it and what what their barriers were that they had overcome. I think that has a lot of line on the process process as well. So what are some things people can do because you know for myself. Even I found myself growing up. I never thought I was creative and I think only in the last few years I've really started. I feel like that I've developed sort of this creative side but I don't know how to look back and say here's what I did in order to do that. Obviously it's something that you focus in on for people who are listening who wanNA become more creative. What are some things secrets that they could do? Well okay so the first thing is that's. The most common misconception that I've run into in talking to people is that they feel maybe they're not create over. They don't have a creative gene or however. You want to describe that and so I kinda blow that out of the water and so do the people that I interview they mentioned it over and over again. There really is no such thing as a person who isn't creative. It's just a degree Gotcha so like anything thing. If somebody you know felt like you know there's a sport that they wanted to get better at whether it's golf tennis I'm right by the coast so mice Mice Spur Sport of choices surfing which is not the easiest sport you have to you have to first of all decide. Okay I'm going to I am going to improve in that area and then put effort into it you it doesn't just rollover and all of a sudden year one day are you're better golfer yeah. There's a lot of work goes into it and the same thing is true with creativity but there are some definite things you can do to improve your creativity and the simplest of these is to spend time mm-hmm soaking up other people's art and creativity and the simple recipe for that is going to museums and looking at art and not just glancing at it but really looking at what resonates for you and why so why do you why are you drawn to this particular painting or or sculpture or music or video or film or whatever it is and and really looking at it then it starts to rub off and I think this is also I people watch cooking shows. You know it's not that they're necessarily ever going to cook that. You know especially with these weird. You you know top chef yeah challenges of course you may never ever ever cook that meal but you it Kinda rubs off on you and you get to see these people under stress you know dealing with these odd dishes that they have to cook and then you think well you know I I could do that but there's probably a simpler dish that I could do on my own and it starts to actually up your creativity just by observing those people in action and that's a simple formula. Yeah museums are there. Is there a wrong and the reason why ask this question of a preface it is a wrong way in which you can sort of practice creativity or become creative. 'cause you brought up sports and I'm a big proponent. You want to get better in sports. You gotta practice but like I'm a golfer. There's ways in which I think people if you take lessons but you only take lessons once a week like you'll get worse so there's a right way in a wrong way of doing. Is there a right way or wrong way story of doing that. I think you know I think the only wrong way too little different with sports and where you know like surfing golf and skiing or very. There's there's there's technique. That's if you don't have you you're right you can start bill developing muscle memory in the wrong way and then you have to unlearn it later on which is even harder so I would. I'd say the wrong thing to do. In creativity is to deny yourself the opportunity and it's really that simple or even worse is to edit yourself in your head or otherwise and say say this isn't any good. I can't write the you right one-sentence. I don't how to write. Nobody's GonNa read this all those negative thoughts you have to let that go and one of the tips from again from these eleven people they all said this in in different ways but they said first of all don't add it in your head and don't listen to those negative voices if you if you want to learn to rider draw or photograph than just start doing it there is an editing process but that comes after you've done it after you amassed some piece of work but I get out there and do it and that's a that would be the biggest mistake I say. Is You know don't allow yourself to have that opportunity and I think that I mean I know that I struggle with that. Even even you know when you start with something you critique yourself so much and you almost wanna like you almost WanNa Stop Sam speaking over the microphone you stop yourself and you go back and do it again and then it just sounds like you're you're building it off a script and and then it's hard to get those thoughts out of your head of I stuttered. I don't want people to make fun of me or I drew this. I don't want people to make fun of me. How are you able to filter that out or what are some ways you can filter that noise at well? I think the first way is just to know that is going to happen to funny thing. If you already know that you're going to get criticism whether it's external or in your own head that's the first step that kind of developing thick skin which I think ultimately we need yeah. If you're going to be an entrepreneur or you really need a thick skin because you're going to have a lot of people telling you your nets do. Why don't you just stay with your job? You know <hes> it's huge huge risks. Nobody's GonNa buy that. You know all that all that garbage so knowing you know it's kind of like if you're you know a sport like offered or or <hes>. Let's take skiing..

Mark Mark San Francisco Art Institute Mark Silber Mr Marc silber Youtube legendary Peninsula School producer Menlo Park Carmel skiing Emmy Award California tennis Anthony Grammy Award twelve years one day
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

03:13 min | 2 years ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"It is Friday. You look at you. It's friday. It's Friday, come home. It's Friday Friday. We got a crazy story here. We have another school that is bit. The does what? Yep. Always this the goes. Oh. Does. Bomb? And another one goal in another one gone and other little bites the dust. Hey, dude, you institute they're gone. I don't know what happened out there. But the Art Institute in Hollywood as closed up shop here institute, a California Hollywood closing down as of tomorrow students just finding out and now they are protesting students took to the campus to not only voiced their concerns. But to also trying to figure out what I've ever heard of this school of you. I've heard of it, but beyond hearing of it don't know anything else closing down. You know, what they do something with art? Yeah, I get that Art Institute of California Art Institute of California Hollywood campus has gone students took to the campus to not only voice their affiliated with the San Francisco or as a campus. Oh, let me do about half our research. All right. All right. Hold on. I didn't say anything here. Did you get the right spelling try it again? Yeah. I got the spelling Art Institute. Yeah. San francisco. Does he have to capitalize? Both. Try. I got the arts arts schools in San Francisco Art Institute in San Francisco. You're painting photography film. Printmaking sculpture. It looks like they're still open. Oh, it looks like it would have to say no for now. But I'm going to do a little research on high alert. Are also trying to figure out what is next for them. They learned at the beginning of the quarter about eight weeks ago that the school may be closing. But they were not giving a timeline. They say last night. A mass Email was sent to students informing them that the school would close as of tomorrow. No, you know, what those students said they have the right to be pissed. You know, they spent all this money. They got friends there. Maybe they're on the football team. And then they got to turn in their pads and their helmets. They gotta move off campus perhaps they're going for their their masters or bachelors perhaps a doctor degree of some sort. There could be and they spent their whole life there, and they'll Alder dreams in their hopes have blown up on them. What happens to their debate team? I don't know. I don't know. What goes on? Maybe you guys on the hockey team. Right. He's plays right wing for the Art Institute. Maybe some lacrosse it's gone. It's over man. That's devastating right now who does Notre Dame play in the opener, especially heart institute of Hollywood. They're going to have to force it. I guess it's a fake school. Is that what you're saying? They.

San Francisco Art Institute Art Institute of California Ar San Francisco spelling Art Institute heart institute of Hollywood Hollywood California Alder hockey football eight weeks
"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

06:39 min | 3 years ago

"san francisco art institute" Discussed on KPCC

"Tickets at Ahmanson theatre dot org. Welcome back to the frame. I'm John horn. Thanks for joining us think of any pop culture icon from the past fifty years, and they've probably been photographed by Annie liebowitz, although much of her background is in reportage storytelling through photography. She's known best for her portraits and cover photos for Rolling Stone and Vanity Fair, she's photograph musicians actors, poets and politicians alike from John Lennon. Meryl Streep to Richard Nixon. She was even spotted at a recent Beto, aerobic rallied. Now her early work is on display at Hauser and Wirth gallery in the arts district of downtown LA. The show is called any leave of it's the early years nineteen seventy to nineteen Eighty-three archive project number one, and it chronicles her work at Rolling Stone magazine and her transformation from a photo journalist Choi portrait photographer, I took a walk through the exhibition with labor vets last week. And we started with a nineteen seventy antiwar demonstration where she'd taken pictures of Allen Ginsberg and Eldridge cleaver. She was studying painting at the San Francisco Art Institute at the time. And I asked her how she went from paintbrushes to cameras that took a class in photography and just found a. Geography as a young person so much more gratifying immediate and it just felt right? And the people are friendlier in the in the photo department, and then the painting the painting was pretty abstract and pretty angry, Vietnam war and the school was on the GI Bill, of course. And there were a lot of soldiers coming to going to school and a lot of drunk teachers, and he was a little scary for seventeen eighteen year old kid. And so the camera was very grounding every novelist can probably remember the first piece of writing that here. She sold every actor. Can remember the first part that they got paid for is there an image in this room that you can remember being one of the first that you got paid for and which one I did not paid much. That's for sure. But actually, it was not the free actually Rolling Stone. The breakthrough moment was really this work that I did. At this rally in San Francisco is anti-war rally this one here. This actually was a cover of Rolling Stone. My I cover of Rolling Stone. Well, I know where this is this the university of California Berkeley. That's right. That's right. What Rolleston was impressed? With is. This happened the day before I went back to the school the day of the demonstration process, the film, printed it and brought it into the next day. And they were so impressed that because it was a very young magazine has a fold up rag paper. And so they just started giving me work to do. And then I talked my way into going to New York with John winner. He wanted to do an interview with this John Lennon about the breakup of the Beatles, and they were really special Johnny Yoko. They couldn't believe Jahn. Brought. Winter brought a kid. And they were impressed with that with John. I think and he gave me a car block. It was a really important because it was set the precedent for what I expected had to be treated from then on out. I think what a lot of people don't remember from that era is not just Rolling Stone. But look in life magazine were seriously committed to photography, they would commission photographers, they really embraced photography as a form of journalism, and they gave photographers a lot of leeway to do what they wanted to do. And you were really in the right place at the right time in many ways that was certainly some of that I admired so much shit. Listen, I wanted to be a photojournalist, you know, when I started working for only style I wanted to leave behind the fine arts work was not a good furniture. No. So you know, I was going to have to tell them more. More my story from my point of view and left journalism behind and eventually turned to portraiture because it was a way of sort of having real licensed to do what you wanted in a photograph and not worry about crossing over to the other side. When I look at these pictures, there is a candor to them that seems like a relic that in some ways the way that celebrities or anybody controls his or her own image right now is so tightly choreographed. Yeah. You can't it seals like you were. I don't know if you just kind of embedded yourself. So they forgot about you. How did you get this kind of access because the world was different? But also have a feeling you had a way to make yourself disappear into their world. You know, it really was a different time. And and people were more open to just letting you be there. I mean things are much more control now, and I've trying to bring back the photo essay. Now, it's really hard because. The just for that kind of thing. I I did a cover story on Lena wait for Vanity Fair. And I told her what I wanted to do. And she said, okay. But that's rare. I mean, I just kind of hung in her house while she worked in road and took pictures and went in and out. I mean, it's it's not like you're there for twenty four hours. We just go in and out of someone's life. I'm trying to incorporate some of that with people who will give us that. I just worked on a on a politician that that I had that kind of access be better work. I can't say. Poker faces. I wanna play a game against here. What is it about politicians that is unusual or interesting that maybe you don't find in celebrities? Well, my day in in in the early work. They really had no idea about. What it was like to be photographed what it meant like they were just kind of like they had no idea. What what anything was? And and it was kind of like a free for all. You could really just I mean here, you're seeing them Nixon resignation. But it wasn't so locked up. Now like any well known person, it's hard to get this kind of access one of the things I love about some of these pictures like the resignation of Nixon. I shall resign the presidency effective at noon tomorrow. My recollection is you took all these pictures. And I want to say was hunters Thompson who is supposed to file the copy masters deadline asked the story. And so you just ran photos because there was no copy. It didn't make deadline. He was at the Washington Hilton by the pool with a battery powered television set. And so.

Rolling Stone Richard Nixon Rolling Stone magazine John Lennon Annie liebowitz Ahmanson theatre John horn John Meryl Streep San Francisco Art Institute Beto LA Allen Ginsberg university of California Berke Choi Hauser San Francisco Eldridge cleaver