19 Burst results for "sally helm"

"sally helm" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

HISTORY This Week

08:06 min | 9 months ago

"sally helm" Discussed on HISTORY This Week

"History this week. September sixteenth nineteen sixty five I'm Sally Helm. The word had gone out through local deejays on Spanish language radio and through notices in the newspaper of the National Farmworkers Association. On Mexican Independence Day at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church. In Delano California. There's GonNa be a big meeting. Something important to discuss. So five hundred farmworkers and families have shown up. There sitting in pews and on balconies waiting to hear whatever there is to hear. Everyone knows that tensions are brewing in California's Central Valley about a week earlier of Filipino farm workers walked off the job. There led by a man named Larry IT Leong and they're protesting bad working conditions and low wages. There are a lot of Filipino American farm workers in Delano and the surrounding towns, but the majority of workers are Mexican and Mexican American. So if the strike is really gonNa work, these groups need to come together. And the striking Filipino workers have asked for support. They've come to the national farmworkers association. A group of mostly Mexican American workers led by Dolores, Huerta and Cesar Chavez. Chavez later said quote. Was Oh God, we're not ready for a strike. There was only about one hundred dollars in the bank to support striking workers, where to and Chavez, and other leaders Gilbert Padilla they've been organizing and preparing, but they thought they had more time. Now they have to make a decision and. quickly. So on September sixteenth. In Our Lady of Guadalupe. Church, they put it to a vote and the workers decide unanimously to strike. With that, a new phase begins in what will become a five year struggle on the farms where much of America's produce is grown. And, that struggle will reach far beyond the farms, two grocery stores in New York City and shipyards in London, and even the battlefront of the war in Vietnam. Today, how did a small group of activists organize a strike? And then expand that strike to a national boycott of grapes. And what can their work teach us about how to build a successful multi-ethnic movement? Thank you to homedepot dot com for supporting this episode of history this week, our producer Julie explored their collections of home decor and will tell us about her homedepot dot com purchases later on. So stick around. On September eleventh to won the world changed, but there were warning signs, it's always easy in hindsight to say a big mistake I'm Jim agreed I'm a reporter in the WNYC news room and I'll be revisiting the evidence to understand why we didn't see it coming I'm troubled even to this day that we miss something blind spot the road to nine eleven a new podcast series from history and WNYC Listen wherever you, get podcasts. Professor Matthew Garcia is an expert on labor movements and Latin history. He now teaches at Dartmouth. And when he was growing up, you would not find a grape in his household I love graves. didn't eat grapes growing up because I grew up as a good Mexican American southern California observing the great boycott. My family are Mexican Americans and my grandparents were farm workers, and so it was very conscious of the boycott. Garcia ended up studying this moment later in life an academic and he eventually did start eating grapes again but he never saw them the same way. Grapes are a strategy for social change and that was impressive to me and I felt like in all the history I learned I hadn't learned exactly how the boycott worked and how Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta and Gilbert Padilla, and all these people that I learned of since made it happen. Chavez and where the and Padilla and others did their work in California's Central Valley much of the country's produce is grown asparagus almonds, walnuts and Avocados citrus growing there, and of course. Grapes. Grapes were really popular and there was expanses large expanses of acres that you could grow on a almost like a plantation type setting many of the workers on these huge farms are Mexican American and they had deep groups in this region. Mexican people had been coming to the American southwest or ill North Bay to them before there was a line separating that area and so it is a kind of native lands in some ways. Farmers knew the land and how to work it. After Mexico's nineteen, ten revolution, many rural farmers were displaced by the tumult. And number of them moved north. They came north because it was familiar to them and they also came north because their labor was of great value to that. Virgin, Nina content they were recruited they were wanted and they really found themselves useful. They found themselves comfortable and so many of them state. By nineteen twenty at least seventy, five percent of farm workers in California were Mexican or Mexican American. Many also stoked the racist idea that these workers were biologically suited to difficult farm labor, which often involved stooping down close to the ground. Is the so-called short handled Ho it created incredible back pain and back problems because you're bent over the handle this short they presumed that Filipinos and Mexicans were biologically predisposed to using those instruments and so there's this way in which racism is built into the kind of technology that is imposed on workers to use in farming. Men Great Depression brought many poor white farmers to California anti Mexican sentiment really grew and between nineteen, twenty, nine and nineteen, thirty, nine, the US government began mass deportations repatriating Mexican Americans to Mexico. Even, though many of the people deported had been born in the united, states had never been to Mexico. But then in the nineteen forties will work to meant that there was a new shortage of labor on farms in California. and. So the Roosevelt Administration started something called the bracero program. It brought guestworkers from Mexico to the United States but these workers would only stay for a short period of time. They could be paid a lot less and that if they became a problem could be shipped back to Mexico this undercut the ability of Mexican Americans to organize unions because the growers could just go to the guest worker by the nineteen fifties and sixties other labor unions are well established across the US organizing miners, an auto workers and others, but farmworkers are a real bind. Labor laws don't protect them. The work is often short term and far-flung so it's hard to get organized. Plus the program means workers have even less bargaining power. But there is a real need for them to band together. Because farm workers are getting paid really badly and living conditions are often terrible shanties and. Structures, there was a lack of running water oftentimes, there is a lack of sanitation, but organizing has proved really tough. Until some new activists come on the scene..

Cesar Chavez California Mexico National Farmworkers Associati Gilbert Padilla Our Lady of Guadalupe Church Dolores Huerta US Delano California Central Valley Larry IT Leong Sally Helm Professor Matthew Garcia Delano Dartmouth Guadalupe WNYC America New York City Roosevelt Administration
"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today's show was produced by Darren Woodson Sally helm Ar- editor is Brian her stat, and our supervising producer is Alex. Goldman. I can eat if if I can Email from say like Nigeria in prince, I'm assuming I should not download that attachment. No guy. No. Where you listening to this story. Yes. I just I just. All right. So guys you're here to tell us what's coming up next on. That's right. So today, we're going to speak with Bobby Brown. She started her own line of cosmetics. And she was in charge of every single aspect of running our company at I I used to hire an interview every person that walked in that brand, and then I didn't anymore and all of a sudden they were people working on my brand that I never met before. And that I might not have hired. And you know, it was a struggle. And I tried to let go of the details. But then I realized the details were what makes the company so special. And so I kept thinking I could fix it. If we could just do this. If I could get this. It could be better and it didn't get better. From NPR. It's how I built this show about innovators entrepreneurs idealists and the stories behind the movements. They built. I'm on today show how a makeup artist named Bobby Brown built billion dollar line of cosmetics by doing one simple thing making women. Look like a weren't wearing any makeup stick.

Bobby Brown Darren Woodson Sally helm Ar supervising producer Nigeria Goldman Alex Brian editor NPR billion dollar
"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

04:57 min | 2 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

"Hey, it's Sally helm. There was big news yesterday out of my home state of California. The giant utility company Pacific Gas and electric or PG and E filed for chapter eleven bankruptcy protection. PG any is one of the nation's biggest utilities they serve about sixteen million people. And this news comes after two years of really bad wildfires across California. Investigators have said that PG any equipment caused some of those fires and the company is facing billions of dollars in potential liabilities. Last year. We did a story about wildfires and fire investigation and the questions we asked then are right at the center of what is happening with PG any so were reentering that story today. It originally ran it February two thousand eighteen here's the show. There are these videos. You may have seen awhile back. It felt like they were everywhere for a while there shot from cars driving down the four oh five freeway in Los Angeles. It's dark out the cars drive through this valley and they passed between two hills. That are completely on fire. It looks like the cars are driving straight down into hell. I grew up not far from those hills. And I spent a lot of time watching these videos as wildfires were spreading throughout southern California. It was a really bad fire season. Okay. I'm about to get on the four. Oh, five I went out to Los Angeles. Because I really wanted to stand on those hills use the right? I wanted to see what do they look like now. So I drove up there. I got out of my car and right away. I saw a house that had clearly burned. Wow. Pass the house. There was a trail leading up into the hills. I can see the four or five freeway down blow me. Wow. You can still really see their these twisted up trees. Oh my God. There's like a shell of a car on the side of the hill. How it's like walking through a weird wasteland. It's really Irie. I don't know what exactly. I'm looking at except that the fire was definitely here. But I'd call someone who would know what he's looking at. Hi. Are you Robert? Hello. Robert. Rowe agreed to meet me here because he can look at a burnt up hillside lake this and read it like a book, he's a former firefighter and for more than a decade. Now, he has had his own fire investigation company. I design my own logo. Let's go little guy with a magnifying glass with a flat top, and he's pyro. Comm, right. And you're gone. Oh, so we start walking up the hill together. So when you walk up here, what do you notice? I mean to me it just looks like a sort of apocalyptic wasteland. So as we're approaching a shrub here, we're going to be looking at Robert starts, turning over rocks pointing out trees that are burned almost at this spot that we're in. It's like one chapter of the fire that burnt here, which was called the Scurr ball fire discoloration on the on the enzyme is reading this hillside to see where the flames were coming from were they traveling up the hill or down the hill or across the hill. When we got up to the peak. He tells me fired traveled up there. So there's no question. Did you see that? Right. When you walked on the scene. Well, yeah. Pretty much went a wildfire breaks out pyro cops like Robert they show up at the scene, and they have enormous power. Because the spot the fire started, and the reason it started those are going to have huge consequences for a lot of people. You're going to identify the source of ignition down to fraction of an inch. And it becomes somebody's equipment that either failed or somebody's action. Then somebody's gonna go to jail or somebody's going to have a hefty recovery. Bill that they're going to have to pay could be even like really million billions, actually, billions of the beef billions. Hello and welcome to planet money. I'm Sally home. And I'm Kenny Malone and wildfires are not like other natural disasters because you can't pin an earthquake on a single reckless teenager. You can't treat a hurricane back to the first gust of wind but with a wildfire. You can find your way back to the first spark you can find a reason this disaster happened and sometimes someone has to pay. Today on the show how to find the source of a deadly wildfire.

Robert California Los Angeles PG Sally helm Kenny Malone Pacific Gas hillside lake Bill Rowe two years
"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

04:14 min | 2 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

"For less money, not to second guess, Wendy or her new insurance company, but I couldn't help but wonder have they really changed have. They really so cynical. Tina, I am a little cynical. So I decided to run a kind of cyber fire drill to essentially test the carbon unit tests, Wendy's employees exactly so I called up my old pal the investigator Devon to see if you could help me with a little fishing expedition, Devon runs these kinds of tests for clients all the time, he artisanal crafts emails with a specific company in mind, like if he was gonna fish impure, it might say click here for free tote bags for Wendy's company. It was financial it. In fact, it looked a lot like the. Regional E mail. That fooled Mavis in the first place. He wants the emails to look really close to something that you would actually get. I know that sometimes what happens is they slightly misspell a word like let's say one of my clients is AIG insurance. It'll be too is. So it'll say a I g insurance is something like that. You're very good at this. So Devon launched sting operation here planet money. We are calling it operation Mavis couch. We told Wendy it was going to happen. But she didn't tell her employee's. Hey, wendy. It's dna. How are you? Hey, I'm good waiting to hear. Well, I've got Devon on the line. So that he can tell you himself. We fished your users two days ago. How many? Sanders. We fished one hundred nine users and we had five users open the phishing Email. We had one of those five users click, the Lincoln, the Email and continue to the phishing website. In other words, they put in their name and password. That is correct. That's not good. So maybe things haven't changed as much as they thought. But then when do you surprised us, but I already know who it is. They self-reported Healy. Yep. I got an Email in our human resources in box with a copy of the Email from the person saying, I shouldn't have done this. I clicked I put in my info. So I called her IT team. And I had them scan. My computer one person clicked now that might not sound like much progress. But any hacker will tell you the difference between someone alerting IT right away in a Mavis his case waiting for days. Well, that's an eternity. There's a huge difference between say calling nine one one minutes after heart attack and calling nine one. One four days later. So the training worked and Wendy is paying less for her insurance coverage the impact of a cold hard insurance policy is actually a very human thing. It creates a system in which what I do affects you it whispers role in this together and in doing so it becomes powerful force pushing the world toward safety. Good decision. Maybe even fewer hacks. It is so valuable but yet so unnoticed. You just got a little much about insurance. I did it deserves it. It's a beautiful thing. And that's great. Nice work, Wendy, but did operation Mavis catch Mavis. No. Good. Okay. Not people are getting smarter. There's a conscious decision that has to be made. You can have all kinds of these things that you put in place, which we've done, but in the end, it's the people that have to make those choices and we're relying on them to make good choices. <music>? How often do people lie on dating apps are robots taking our jobs. Why are we less productive? I'm Stacey Vanik Smith co host of the indicator from planet money where we explain economic ideas that help you understand everyday news and everyday life. That's the indicator from planet money. You have a fishing mishap to confess. We are on Instagram Twitter Facebook, we're at planet money or you can Email us at planet money at NPR dot org. Today's show was produced by Darren woods and Sally helm Ar- editor is break her stat, and our supervising producer is Alex cold, Mark, we would like

Wendy Devon Mavis Tina Stacey Vanik Smith Instagram Healy investigator NPR Sanders supervising producer Darren woods Alex cold Sally helm Ar editor Mark nine one one minutes
"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:03 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Oh my goodness finally we have a winner basic healthcare, Patty going to accept. That as a given good I'm gonna I'm gonna accepted you know I'm. Gonna look into it but. I'm certainly willing to open the, door? To. It. Thank you so much Patty it's my pleasure thanks for having me Now. We've been to Alex our listeners Sam who had faithfully been drinking vodka. On. Behalf of journalism back from. The, liquor store hanging out in the office and I will fact check whether or not there did, get flushed everyone grabbing my I have answers I'm very excited this and wanted. To know if a doctor could explain this alleged cheap vodka allergies, so I called one up I'm Heather linebarger and I'm a physician and who else are you I'm. Karen, former roommate that's right and she explained. To. Me that, the liver alcohol in something that's really close to formaldehyde wow, which can kind of make you flush and not feel good. This is like the thing that you used. In, science class. Where, you would like cats, exactly and, if you don't have enough of this one. Particular. Enzyme that. Gets rid of. Formaldehyde formaldehyde, might hang out in your, body and turn your cheeks red and genetically Asian people. Tend to have less, of. That particular enzyme. So this is something Times? Called Asian flash we. Actually got. A ton of emails about this one but since you're both wait that one is probably. Not, it there is one theory that Heather thought might be the. Reason why this happening to you and it actually kind of validates something that the scientists. In. Your episode said which is just the cheap vodka might not distill out all the extra byproducts of whatever it's made out of like potatoes or whatever vodka. Someone in your stand can come from any kind of stuff if. You let it from Of, alcohol totally is and my guess would be your bosses having more of an allergy to the other kind of broken down stuff for the more important question which is did your cheeks get flushed let. Me just take a look Yeah yeah. Yeah there's a little flesh. You. Look like like one someone put like one round of blush. Your cheeks yeah I don't know how evaluate like rounds of blush a little bit like no. One's going to be like oh my God hold. Off on the black okay I. Think, this means. We do need. To correct the record I think we can say that you're alleged flesh Israel. To just feel very vindicated right now I definitely do your show vindicated my feelings also that makes me feel really good well thank you, I appreciate, you I think that wraps? Up the rest of the story I love working at platinum Today's show, was produced, by, Sally helm our editors Brian I sat and our. Supervising producer is. Alex Goldmark I'm. Karen deafen thanks for listening Karen we. Never actually if you get plus when, you drink, she, podcast I guess that means you're just going to. Have to come. With us here Drinkers cheap vodka well at least guy Raj you can tell us what is coming up. Next on how I built this yes so, today we have this incredible story of a woman who, was determined to start her, own skin care company we went to a contract manufacturing Los. Angeles literally sort of felon also and told him our dream given the pitch and said we need you, to do like a test, run for us he's absolutely no reason to do this because ninety nine percent of everyone that sits opposite, me, telling me this, story does not succeed, but for some crazy reason, think you've got something interesting and I want to be in for the ride From NPR how I built this a show of that innovators entrepreneurs idealists.

Karen deafen Patty Heather linebarger Alex Goldmark Angeles Supervising producer Raj platinum Today Israel Sam Sally helm Brian I ninety nine percent
"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

"Obsessions. Mine is cartels. I will admit it. I am fascinated by cartels when businesses get together and decide not to compete, decide that they are too powerful and too special for the law of supply and demand like OPEC does for oil. And what I love about cartels is that they are set up because of greed. I mean, who wouldn't love to charge more for your product, but then someone always gets too greedy and starts to cheat. They stab each other in the back Femi. Those thinking about this, the life and death of cartels. When I heard a story from my friend Jeff placentas he worked for this group called innovations for poverty action. You could call it nerds without borders, nerds, without borders. It's a nonprofit that helps get economists to help out with problems in poor countries. And Jeff was telling me about this one particular cartel that his group had encountered in Senegal. The poop cartel yet, who is this poop cartel that you speak of? So you've seen in the way porta-pottys get serviced here. When you're porta potty is full, you've probably seen the trucks that come by with a tanker truck with the big homes and they suck it out and clean it. And it's the same thing in Senegal. Like households have a latrine pit. That's, you know, kind of like a big port, a potty and gets full. You need to get it cleaned out, but it looked like these trucks were perhaps fixing their prices. They looked like they were crisis were permanently high instead of maybe a competitive market that you'd expect to see. And obviously that put it out of the reach of a lot of people who needed it move over OPEC because there's price-fixing and Senegalese poop. Innovations for poverty action sent a rag tag team of economists to Senegal each with their own skills each with a single mission. Could you create a more efficient market by turning the poop, cartel truckers against each other. Ah, poop war. This this I had to see.

TD Ameritrade Robert Smith Facebook radio Smith NPR Taylor Haney Bryant Erstad Amazon Alex Goldmark Sally helm Bill Columbia University Vagit Instagram Twitter editor producer milk
You've heard of the oil cartel or the drug cartel but what about the poop cartel?

Planet Money

01:45 min | 3 years ago

You've heard of the oil cartel or the drug cartel but what about the poop cartel?

"Obsessions. Mine is cartels. I will admit it. I am fascinated by cartels when businesses get together and decide not to compete, decide that they are too powerful and too special for the law of supply and demand like OPEC does for oil. And what I love about cartels is that they are set up because of greed. I mean, who wouldn't love to charge more for your product, but then someone always gets too greedy and starts to cheat. They stab each other in the back Femi. Those thinking about this, the life and death of cartels. When I heard a story from my friend Jeff placentas he worked for this group called innovations for poverty action. You could call it nerds without borders, nerds, without borders. It's a nonprofit that helps get economists to help out with problems in poor countries. And Jeff was telling me about this one particular cartel that his group had encountered in Senegal. The poop cartel yet, who is this poop cartel that you speak of? So you've seen in the way porta-pottys get serviced here. When you're porta potty is full, you've probably seen the trucks that come by with a tanker truck with the big homes and they suck it out and clean it. And it's the same thing in Senegal. Like households have a latrine pit. That's, you know, kind of like a big port, a potty and gets full. You need to get it cleaned out, but it looked like these trucks were perhaps fixing their prices. They looked like they were crisis were permanently high instead of maybe a competitive market that you'd expect to see. And obviously that put it out of the reach of a lot of people who needed it move over OPEC because there's price-fixing and Senegalese poop. Innovations for poverty action sent a rag tag team of economists to Senegal each with their own skills each with a single mission. Could you create a more efficient market by turning the poop, cartel truckers against each other. Ah, poop war. This this I had to see.

Td Ameritrade Robert Smith Facebook Radio Smith NPR Taylor Haney Bryant Erstad Amazon Alex Goldmark Sally Helm Bill Columbia University Vagit Instagram Twitter Editor Producer Milk
"sally helm" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:26 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"A difference between how banking actually works in this country and how it should work. So says, Morgan Rix, I'm Morgan riffs. I'm a law professor at Vanderbilt, but before that I was at the treasury department and worked on banking policy there. And then even before that, I worked in finance and law where I primarily focused on banking issues, Morgan and a couple of other colleagues have recently proposed that all of us you and me and other normal people or normal. H people should have the option of having a basic checking account with the Federal Reserve. If we want it, the fed is in charge of monetary policy in this country, but also. Oh functions is a kind of Bank itself. It is called the central Bank, and it is basically the Bank of banks banks have to have a Bank to and the fed offers deposit accounts and payment services to banks and financial institutions throughout the country. And Morgan's idea is that these basic banking services should be available to everyone to the public, not just a banks. This idea he says, would solve at least two problems at directly affect a lot of people. I not everyone has easy access to a Bank account to the US. We have an unbiased population that's about seven percent of all households, seven percent that is almost nine million US households with no Bank account. And these tend to be low income households. Part of the reason the banks turn away these customers is that they consider them to be unprofitable. People without Bank accounts face all kinds of problems. What do you do when you get a paycheck? You need to convert it into cat, which means you're probably going to a check cashing outlet of some sort, and and they're generally charging. Call it two percent off the top. So you're paying a haircut on all your earned income and your, you're probably not that high to begin with by the way, if you don't have a Bank account. So that's ends up being a lot of money for the people involved. So you want to just pay routine bills. You may need to go stand in line at a Bill, pay center to pay utility Bill, as opposed to doing with the rest of us do for the most part, at least more affluent people which is to use convenient online Bill pay. So there's a lot of of actual fees and costs there's time and inconvenience cost associated with not having a Bank account. It's like an example of how it's more expensive to be poor. You know what I mean? There's no doubt about that. And it's also a problem for everyone else because it's easier for us all businesses and individuals to to transact with people who have make accounts, your employer would rather do direct deposit than have to cut a physical check. But if you don't have a Bank account, they need to cut a check. So if everyone had access to a Bank account at the fed, the first problem it would solve is that simply more people. Would have a Bank account. The second problem it would solve Morgan says, is it even those of us who do have Bank accounts would stop getting kinda ripped off on those accounts? Think about it this way. As Stacy mentioned, the Federal Reserve is in charge of monetary policy, which means it. It moves interest rates up or down depending on how the economy's doing. And one of the ways that the fed changes interest rates in the whole economy is by changing the interest rates that it pays to the banks that have accounts with the fed. So for example, the fed has raised interest rates from zero to about two percent in the past few years. So banks that have a deposit account with the fed or getting almost two percent interest on their deposits. So in theory, in theory, the banks shoot pass on these new exciting interest rates to their customers, but do they pass on those rates? No.

Federal Reserve Bank Morgan Rix Bank of banks United States Stacey Fidelity Investments Cardiff NPR Yemen Vanderbilt Sally helm Representative professor
The Fed: Why can't the 'bank of banks' be your bank?

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:26 min | 3 years ago

The Fed: Why can't the 'bank of banks' be your bank?

"A difference between how banking actually works in this country and how it should work. So says, Morgan Rix, I'm Morgan riffs. I'm a law professor at Vanderbilt, but before that I was at the treasury department and worked on banking policy there. And then even before that, I worked in finance and law where I primarily focused on banking issues, Morgan and a couple of other colleagues have recently proposed that all of us you and me and other normal people or normal. H people should have the option of having a basic checking account with the Federal Reserve. If we want it, the fed is in charge of monetary policy in this country, but also. Oh functions is a kind of Bank itself. It is called the central Bank, and it is basically the Bank of banks banks have to have a Bank to and the fed offers deposit accounts and payment services to banks and financial institutions throughout the country. And Morgan's idea is that these basic banking services should be available to everyone to the public, not just a banks. This idea he says, would solve at least two problems at directly affect a lot of people. I not everyone has easy access to a Bank account to the US. We have an unbiased population that's about seven percent of all households, seven percent that is almost nine million US households with no Bank account. And these tend to be low income households. Part of the reason the banks turn away these customers is that they consider them to be unprofitable. People without Bank accounts face all kinds of problems. What do you do when you get a paycheck? You need to convert it into cat, which means you're probably going to a check cashing outlet of some sort, and and they're generally charging. Call it two percent off the top. So you're paying a haircut on all your earned income and your, you're probably not that high to begin with by the way, if you don't have a Bank account. So that's ends up being a lot of money for the people involved. So you want to just pay routine bills. You may need to go stand in line at a Bill, pay center to pay utility Bill, as opposed to doing with the rest of us do for the most part, at least more affluent people which is to use convenient online Bill pay. So there's a lot of of actual fees and costs there's time and inconvenience cost associated with not having a Bank account. It's like an example of how it's more expensive to be poor. You know what I mean? There's no doubt about that. And it's also a problem for everyone else because it's easier for us all businesses and individuals to to transact with people who have make accounts, your employer would rather do direct deposit than have to cut a physical check. But if you don't have a Bank account, they need to cut a check. So if everyone had access to a Bank account at the fed, the first problem it would solve is that simply more people. Would have a Bank account. The second problem it would solve Morgan says, is it even those of us who do have Bank accounts would stop getting kinda ripped off on those accounts? Think about it this way. As Stacy mentioned, the Federal Reserve is in charge of monetary policy, which means it. It moves interest rates up or down depending on how the economy's doing. And one of the ways that the fed changes interest rates in the whole economy is by changing the interest rates that it pays to the banks that have accounts with the fed. So for example, the fed has raised interest rates from zero to about two percent in the past few years. So banks that have a deposit account with the fed or getting almost two percent interest on their deposits. So in theory, in theory, the banks shoot pass on these new exciting interest rates to their customers, but do they pass on those rates? No.

Federal Reserve Bank Morgan Rix Bank Of Banks United States Stacey Fidelity Investments Cardiff NPR Yemen Vanderbilt Sally Helm Representative Professor
"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

"Trade war looks like between two guys in virginia but these guys are not the reason were maybe in a trade war with china no they're really not this us trade representative's report was about so much more it's about accusations that china is forcing american companies that want to do business there to turn over their technology and of course companies do want to do business with china it is a huge market hundreds of millions of consumers so oh companies go there and they turn some stuff over and of course they don't wanna talk about the compromises they've made and many of them probably fear retaliation from china it's company isn't really in that position it's a small company and they're not working in china but in one way i think they are representative of what's going on here at the heart of this fight between percival ed is a ton of mistrust over what the other guy was up to and there's also a ton of fear i think and when i read the us trade report i came away thinking we're afraid of china we're afraid that they are trying to surpass us in part by stealing our stuff president trump seems to think a trade war may change that but it could be a really expensive fix you are somehow involved in a trade war or a price war or war war let us know send us an email planet money at npr dot org left his hawk to you we're also on twitter facebook and instagram today's show was produced by sally helm ar editors bryant erstad and alex goldmark is our supervising producer special thanks in this episode to aaron ns michael kohn rob water mark cohen and rachel stern also thanks to chad bound who hosts this show called trade talks also some business we are looking for a new intern i started at npr as an intern sally did as well it is a blast you'll learn a lot and you get paid if you're in school or have recently finished checkup more info at npr dot org slash money i'm nick fountain and i'm new l king thanks for listening

rachel stern chad michael kohn sally helm twitter president percival ed npr intern virginia mark cohen alex goldmark bryant erstad instagram trump us representative china
"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Education and the arts towards a better more a just society more information is available at sei sims foundation dot org it's morning edition from npr news i'm rachel martin and i'm david greene all these tariffs and counter tariffs from the us and china harken back to an earlier era of protectionism sally helm from our planet money team has the tale of smoot hawley in the van diagram of icon ick pop culture moments anyone anyone and important economic history lessons there is an overlap of approximately forty seconds a tariff bill the hawley smoot tariff act which anyone raised or lowered that is the boring high school teacher from the movie ferris bueller stay off dartmouth economists doug irwin knows this scene virtually by heart anyone raised or lowered raise tariffs during the great depression irwin wrote a book about these tariffs he says you can call them the hawley smoot or the smoot hawley tariffs they're named after senator and a congressman who helped set them in motion the year was nineteen twenty nine president herbert hoover was about to be inaugurated and the us economy was doing really well employers were hiring the unemployment rate was very low there's no great depression in whatsoever but one sector wasn't doing as well agriculture so congress set out to write a tariff bill that would protect farmers once congress started talking about tariffs though tons of other industries said hey wait can we get some protection for our products to clothes pins and oil drums and apparently there was a one firm in ohio that raised goldfish and they thought that imported goldfish were eating into their market talking like a little goldfish in a bag in a fair i think that's what we're talking about congress went a little tariff crazy lawmakers were all trying to get something good for their district they'd say all support your tariff on on wall if you support my tariff on goldfish and once the votes had all been traded congress ended up raising more than eight hundred tariffs now there was a group of people saying stop stop do not do this economists economists generally don't like tariffs and they argued look if you put a protectionist tariff on wool then other products that use wall will get more expensive so americans will pay more for coats and pants also the economists said other countries will retaliate a group of more than one.

herbert hoover doug irwin dartmouth hawley smoot david greene npr sei sims ohio congress rachel martin president congressman senator school teacher smoot hawley sally helm china us
"sally helm" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For millions of people we'd finally be able to talk seriously about being like a millionaires tax to fund the mta longterm even with eight more votes in the senate the democrats still don't have a majority and the deal between the idc and mainline democrats is yet to go through the mta is rolling back a program to renovate dozens of subway stations because of cost overruns wnyc's danny lewis reports the billion dollar plan was to upgrade thirty two subway stations with better signs phone chargers and generally make them nicer to be in but the mta says after it started the work if found the stations were in worse condition than originally thought and costs ballooned now only twenty stations will get renovations nixon point they said the tri state transportation campaign says the agency should have stepped back and thought about it spending priorities why didn't they stop allocating funding into led lighting and other things that nobody is asking for and instead put more money into making sure that those critical infrastructure repairs were dot the mta says reducing the number of stations on the list for upgrades will mean fewer disruptions for customers sunny skies today highs near forty nine degrees it will still feel colder with the wind is the wind gust as high as thirty seven miles per hour some clouds tonight with a low around thirty six degrees and then some rain and snow showers tomorrow it's morning edition from npr news i'm rachel martin and i'm david greene all these tariffs and counter tariffs from the us and china parkin back to an earlier era of protectionism sally helm from our planet money team has the tale of smoot hawley in the ven diagram of icon ick pop culture moments anyone anyone and important economic history lessons there is an overlap of approximately forty seconds a tariff bill the hawley smoot tariff which anyone raised or lowered that is the boring high school teacher from the movie ferris bueller stay off dartmouth communists doug irwin knows this scene virtually by heart anyone raised or lowered raise tariffs during the great depression irwin wrote a book about these tariffs he says you can call them the hawley smoot or the.

school teacher doug irwin dartmouth hawley smoot david greene npr nixon wnyc senate smoot hawley sally helm us rachel martin danny lewis mta idc forty nine degrees thirty six degrees
"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You're listening to planet money i'm sally helm there are these videos you may have seen in december it felt like they were everywhere for a while they're shot from cars driving down the four oh five freeway in los angeles it's dark out the cars drive through this valley and they passed between two hills that are completely on fire it looks like the cars are driving straight down into hell i grew up not far from those hills and i spent a lot of time watching these videos as wildfires were spreading throughout southern california there was a really bad fire season okay i'm about to get on the four of five i went to los angeles in january because i really wanted to stand on those hills right i wanted to see what do they look like now so i drove up there i got outta my car and right away i saw a house that had clearly burned wow passed the house there was a trail leading up into the hills i can see the four or five freeway down blow me wow you can still really see their these twisted up trees oh my god there's like a shell of a car on the side of the hill it's like walking through weird wasteland it's really eerie i don't know what exactly i'm looking at except that the fire was definitely here but i have someone who would know what he's looking at hi are you robert hello robert rowe.

california los angeles robert rowe sally helm
"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

"To be clear navy said that all three of these vodkas they had less of this bad stuff than anyone was really going to be able to taste but she did say and i like this part that trace amounts of any compound in evolved cut could be enough to set off an allergy like may be making your face turned red when you're drinking chiba on renewing who has a problem alex so i can't speak to that but the bottom line for me science shows if you don't have an allergy all vodkas are pretty much the same and if you do there is one more test our out mugano rig number two you feeling i actually do feel the redness coming out here you're telling me i i don't have it i mean look alex you convince me i think what we've learned here today is that the differences between cheap inexpensive vodkas may not be a stable for most people maybe not even for you but that your delicate constitution may be sensitive to them on the inside other polite way of saying a lot of mean bigs and i appreciate that and i will take it i never did turn red that night danu i couldn't say we live here we thought about this episode drop us aligned planet money at npr dot org and follow us on facebook twitter instagram at planet money today show was produced by sally helm and sendups upn than brian first at at its plant at money going to give a thank you to our former intern ellis wilder who help the bunch on this episode before she went off to a new job with the podcast trump inc congratulations also thank you to our current intern of even the cordial if you're looking for a new podcast to try can i recommend the sport full dan's podcast you sure cannell excel accept that recommendation yeah we just didn't episode all about m s g monosodium glutamate and we looked into the faulty science and yes racism that led to so many misconceptions about msg so sport was available where do got plenty of money that's the sport full you can find it on npr one or wherever you get your podcasts i'm alex goldmark i'm dan passion thanks for listening.

navy chiba sally helm intern dan alex goldmark facebook brian ellis wilder npr
"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

"Support for planet money in the following message comes from betterment they want to know are you getting as much as you can from your investments betterment is the largest independent online financial adviser and they now offer refree investment review which helps you assess your investment accounts tax strategies fees and risk exposure see what you're doing well and how you could improve with betterment no sign up required visit betterment dot com slash planet money to start your free five minute investment review today all guacamole okay we have the planet money team out scouring the produce show for stories that will amaze and delight they're looking for the hot veggie the coup fruit our senior producer he's doing it expose on food waste producer sally helm is trying at new food technology and then we have the planet money inter as well as an intern and we do pay you but as an intern you're always interested in free foods so your simon is to find all of the things that they are giving away free samples at this festival and to keep a list i've been training for this to all the reporters went off to finish their assignments and after the show is over the came back to me to checkin and tell me what they found first up elsa chang allows the chiang was looking for the big cahuna the rock star of the show and give me the late land like what are what is out there all right so what you see at this produce show is booth after boots and sitting in these boots waiting to be noticed are the grow words distributors the manufacturers of the previous products but roaming freely and deciding which booth to pay a visit to are the buyers and those are the big guys in the show he's are the walmart's the cosco's the shop rights and they decide ultimately which produce from these booths are going to end up in the customers hands and you can spot these buyers right away because they're wearing these shiny red ribbons on their name tag that's a buyer and a 'aina then travel onto rises fears iran.

financial adviser producer sally helm intern simon elsa chang chiang walmart food waste iran five minute
"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The internet how many of those footprints should be private how easy should be for the government to see any of those footprints these are all questions the supreme court my touch upon at argument for this case and part of the reason that little tim carpenters case got kicked all the way up to the supreme court is that it's not just about our smartphones everything is smart these days yeah there are smart fridge is that know how much bacon we eat there's though smart watches that collect data on how fast are heart beaten and tim carpenters lawyer nate wessler thought of another one that 10 occurred to me internetconnected vibrators incredibly the that upload to accompany servers information about someone sexual activity the next level some you know that i started my career as a lawyer and this is what i love about the law you start with this tiny criminal case in detroit a bunch of robbers hauling away cell phones in laundry bags taking down a bunch of radio shacks and it sounds like kind of a nothing case at first but now it's gone all the way to the supreme court and it has implications for every single one of us since you are a lawyer there's a question about this that's been driving me nuts since the beginning yeah let's say that the supreme court rules in favor of timothy carpenter deceit get out of jail this he then get to ditch the 100 and sixteen year sentence well if not likely because of another small part of fourth amendment law called the good faith exception which goes like this if the police followed the rules when they got evidence to convict you have a crime and then those rules change after your conviction unfortunately for you your convictions still stance so while the world has this fascinating conversation about the future of privacy rules little tim carpenter is probably stuck in prison for the rest of his life two love to fear beneath white and think of the show would want us to cover so send us an email where it landed money at npr dot work or find us on facebook or twitter today's episode was produced by the great sally helm ryan or status our editor out spoke mark is are supervising producer.

criminal case tim carpenter facebook editor mark tim carpenters nate wessler detroit timothy carpenter twitter supervising producer sixteen year
"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on Planet Money

"Support for planet money in the following message comes from lincoln using skills experiences and more to match and promote your job to the ride candidates to find out how to receive a fifty dollars credit to ward your first job host visit linked in dot com slash money led to hear what you think of the show would want us to cover so send us an email where it landed money at npr dot org behind us on facebook or twitter today's episode was produced by the great sally helm ryan earth that is our editor alex goldmark is are supervising producer and special thanks to paul own at georgetown law and andrew crocker at the electric frontier foundation thank you guys for educating me about the fourth amendment and thank you to tulsa johnson and her lawyer matt brummond for talking to me about how cell phone location data affected her case if you're looking for something else to listen to can i recommend wait wait don't tell me it's news quiz show it's funny it's irreverent tells it like it is listen wait wait don't tell me on npr one or wherever you get your podcasts i'm noel king and i am of the chiang thanks for listening all right so new well you once had a cell phone number that was clearly inherited from someone else and you'll get calls all the time for some woman named rachel right yeah i'd get them like once or twice a month and i got a little bit obsessing like who is rachel and why did she leave her phone number and closest i got i think rachel olds and people's money so we got a little curious who has tim carpenters phone number now is he the rachel in someone else's life his go numbers in the public record because of the case so i gave it a copt.

facebook alex goldmark georgetown law johnson matt brummond noel king rachel olds twitter editor supervising producer paul andrew crocker npr chiang tim carpenters fifty dollars
"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And on facebook find this atlantic city show was produced by the great sally helm plenty of any supervising producer is alex goldmark writers that edits the show a lot of people helped us out with today's show we want to especially thank very brilliant caroline kousky at were in risk management and decision processes center craig fugate and used to run fema steve ellis at taxpayers for common sense rob more at the nrdc and david konrad who consults for the association of seat flood plain managers down in texas thanks to erin duka and sandpit and thinks he backed by mcnaughton and i noel king thanks for listening so each week planet money is back to back with how i built this hosted by guy rise it's an hour of economics in entrepreneurship and guys here now guy what's on your show today we'll know we've gotten incredible story about media mogul seriche alvi he started out his career based shipley at rockbottom he was unemployed he's living on welfare in montreal and he was trying to kick a full blown heroin addiction i remember walking down the street completely freaked out with a friend of mine overalls would meetings and i was scared imbued modo's doing and he a what have you got to lose his a maybe it will be like one magazine that you make and you can go around and say hey i've made this maggie in and then you can apply for a job and go jobs and were or maybe it will be huge deal from npr kids how.

mcnaughton npr heroin erin duka texas alex goldmark maggie montreal shipley facebook david konrad nrdc steve ellis craig fugate risk management caroline kousky supervising producer sally helm
"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"sally helm" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The island this weekend in pierce chris bender of reports that it's hard to get the message out the national weather service used the word imminent to describe the failure of the had talk at damn as hurricane maria devastated puerto rico earlier this week it dumped tons of rain on the island and and it strained the dam which is about ninety years old anthony rainiest of the national weather service says he's talked with local engineers there's a crack on wanna feel wall opium and they haven't been older they are able to fake damage stood at am he says they had originally hoped to evacuate all seventy thousand people who could be affected but now they're focused on the three to five hundred along the river below the damn the problem is the hurricane knocked out power on the entire island and in this area puerto rico arena says there's absolutely no cellular or online communication chris bender i've npr news three days of mourning of officially ended in mexico city after tuesday's his deadly earthquake for rescue efforts ongoing as in pr sally helm reports resident thought the on as he now is one of those affected by the quake his apartment building in the neighborhood of roma i swear is currently uninhabitable a glass individual cookie just live that has sat outside of reopened bakery that things are slowly getting better that despite another quake saturday morning in oaxaca let's check at seismic alarms although north and mexico said according to the us geological survey that quake registered six point one officials say there are nearly four thousand damaged buildings throughout the city schools will reopen on monday sally home antichinese mexico city and you're listening to npr news germans are voting today on whether to give chancellor angela merkel of mandate for a fourth term npr seraya sarhadi nelson has more from berlin even though a third of german voters are said to be undecided incumbent uncle a makul's political party is widely expected to be the top votegetter but she will likely have to partner with one or more other parties to govern one group she's vowed not to partner with is the controversial alternative for germany the party is predicted to come in third place which would put rightwing nationalists in the german parliament for the first time in more than half a century seoul singer charles bradley has died bradley's publicist says he died this weekend in brooklyn.

chris bender charles bradley seoul germany berlin sarhadi nelson npr mexico oaxaca sally helm anthony rainiest hurricane maria brooklyn german parliament partner angela merkel chancellor mexico city puerto rico arena hurricane opium puerto rico ninety years three days