19 Burst results for "sal Khan"

"sal khan" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

07:30 min | Last week

"sal khan" Discussed on The Vergecast

"And cannot do all right. Sal khan co khan academy we. You're the founder of khan academy welcome to decoder. Thanks for having me a lot to talk to you about. I always want to ask people how they make decisions. Feel like your decision set with khan academy has gotten ever more complicated because of the pandemic a lot of kids are experiencing school in something that looks like khan academy every day now. That's their primary form of learning. How has that changed for you. And khan academy now. Yeah you're absolutely right. And when when the pandemic hit and mid march and we first caught wind of it in february or mid to late january. I got got a letter from a teacher in south korea. He was leaning on khan academy during their nationwide school closures. And i'm like wild. Is that a whole country. Shutdown physical physical schooling and then a few weeks later early march. I live in northern california and actually local private school had to shut down. That was maybe it was the first. Us shut down in the country and dawn on us. You know. i'm on the board of my children's school that i that i started a few years ago and they started talking about. Well we have to have some plans if we shut down. And that's when it started. Dawning me with me. If people sit down a lot of people are going to lean on khan academy. We could have never seen this. But you know we're we're accessible free. Where proven et cetera et cetera. Recover multiple subjects in grades But yeah we saw our our usage go through the roof. As soon as the schools closed it was about two hundred fifty to three hundred percent of normal and to be clear. I view only khan academy as a sub optimal situation. You always want the khan academy where you can get your practice your feedback learn at your own pace adopt to you want that in conjunction with ideally a great physical experience. You know. I make it very clear if i had to pick between an amazing teacher or amazing technology for myself or my own kids or anyone's kids. I'd pick the amazing teacher in person any day The technology has to be inservice to. How do we take that to another level and you know khan academy has always been around about. Hey you're one teacher. How'd you meet the individual needs of thirty kids. how did you give them practice at their learning edge. And that's where khan academy is or you're a student in class but little confused. You need some gaps build at night. It's eleven pm. How'd you get help. Khan academy is there for that but as soon as the pandemic at people's started leaning much much heavier on khan academy Then you know the thing that i observed was huge inconsistency in the synchronous part of distance learning. That was happening. My kids school actually did a very good job. Within three days they were up and running and once again. It wasn't as good as being in the classroom together but they got i would say eighty percent. They're ninety percent there. They just on video conference like give me a specific example. What they did well well. The school started where my kids go. I have three kids now. They're eleven nine and six younger and just turned six. It's called com lab school. It's always the school was formed based on an idea of okay. Let's assume things like khan academy exist in the world. What could schooling then be like. Well then the teacher shouldn't be about giving the lecture and you don't have to move all the kids lockstep when people get together. The teacher should act as more of a advisor. Or how do you unblock kids or even. How do you be the conductor so that you can get kids to help each other so the school has always been about student agency and kind of the students being the center of their learning and that the adults are there to always help and unblock and you know that might seem like a small thing but it's a huge thing. It's much harder and it takes a lot more education than just going through the same lectures a year after year. And so that's always been the core principles of the school and there's other principals. Everyone is student everyone. A teacher learning should not be bound by time or space. You know we have a couple of kids at the school who are like level athletes and if they have to go practice skiing in tahoe they should be able to keep learning and so the school already had a lot of those muscles that as soon as distance-learning happened. They just kept doing what they what they were doing. Is just people weren't able to come physically to the school is as much and it was really impressed especially for my older kids. My eleven year old and nine year old because the school had been investing so much in student autonomy students being accountable and setting their own goals and reviewing their goals with their adviser. My eleven nine year old really. Didn't miss a beat. I mean my eleven year old is on the other side of the house right now cranking through his goals better than i do. My six year old was a little difficult at first but he he actually eventually got it as well. You know one thing. I've been thinking about a lot. Is we've written stories about this at the verge where you just see. An entire generation of kids grow up. They've already got sort of like corporate management muscles. We just ran a story about a tiktok creator. It makes all the most viral beats tiktok and he literally talked about getting views as a kpi. And i was a twenty two year old kid. Making these were like. Kpi's are not part of it. Do you worry that kids who sort of interesting cranking through goals like that's a very management approach to learning you're gonna set some goals are gonna hit him. You're gonna move onto the next goals. Do you worry that kind of these software tools ended up teaching kids to be to think in that more rigorous corporate way or is that actually good thing there there certain aspects of corporate thinking that yeah definitely wouldn't want to kind of you know imprint on everyone in the world. But there's some things that i think are reasonably good If you about the alternative the alternative. When you and i were in school teacher what do i do next all right now. What do i do. Is that going to be on the test. You know we all remember. Some kids would razor. Is that going to be on the test. Which is a very passive mentality. You're really not taking ownership. You're letting stuff happen to you. You're kind of doing what you need to do. You're not really very driven yourself. But i think what you're seeing that student that you're talking about what i'm seeing and kids at lab school is they're saying okay. I want to learn something i want. Be something by a certain date. I think that goal setting muscle is very healthy thing. They're able to if they're a little bit younger with the help of peers with the help of a an adult break. Those bigger goals down into smaller goals. That are more tangible in a month or week or even a day that i think is a universally very helpful capability and learned to organize around it which i think is very i mean i. It sounds maybe corporate but my kids are better like they. They have google calendars with their friends and they schedule calls. And but it's all like it's. It's actually a very healthy way because they're also doing it like we're going to play a role playing game together and this is how we're going to organize and you. It's even been more important during covid when they're not able to dislike go to each other's houses in the same way so i think all of those muscles if anything not only are they not negative but actually think those are the muscles. More kids need. Because you have this. I don't impede its mismatch or some type of distance that kids get usually when they go from high school to college or from college to the workplace dislike. Hey tell me what to do. Next model goes to like. No you figure out what you need to do next. And if you're not good at it in the workplace and these kids are able to develop it early on but they're able to develop it with support of adults and they're also and this is something that adults don't have been able to develop the support of teachers and parents also know what healthy looks like. So if i see my eleven year old..

khan academy Sal khan school teacher south korea california founder google tahoe advisor
"sal khan" Discussed on The Vergecast

The Vergecast

01:39 min | Last week

"sal khan" Discussed on The Vergecast

"Episode. I'm talking to sal khan the founder and ceo of khan academy nonprofit online learning platform for students in kindergarten through high school. Welcome to introduction to economics tips for reducing stress around taking important test. Welcome foundations of american democracy. What i want to do in this video is think about the origins of algebra khan academy is one of those organizations that can only exist because of technology south started tutoring his niece in math over video using off the shelf cameras and software and that has grown into an organization with twenty million students a month in forty six languages in over one hundred ninety countries and online learning has gotten even more vital with the pandemic in this conversation nights. Hush on the future of learning what online education is good at and where it struggles. How khan academy is growing and how he's thinking about handling trickier subjects like history in social studies. After all mathis mostly just math but school districts in the country in the world have very different views on how to handle the humanities. That's a hard problem for nonprofit to solve in a deeply polarized world. One thing you should pay attention to here is how you know what online learning is good at and how to lean into that. His goal isn't to replace schools but to build something else that works within that balance is tricky to find and i tried to push him on. What technology can and cannot do all right. Sal khan co khan academy we..

sal khan khan academy founder and ceo mathis
"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:02 min | 2 months ago

"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"'cause if schools have to shutdown physically in the United States people are going to need something clearly, online would have to cover multiple subjects in grades would have to efficacy research behind it. It would have to be trusted you. It should be accessible on mobile devices and computers everything. It was clear. We're GONNA we're have a big role to play. So we started you know acid engineering team to stress test servers make sure we can handle more server load and then the next week you know California was one of the first states to say that they were going to close and then. By the week, pretty much most of the country and the world had shut down. You know we normally see about a pre cove. It was about million students were coming per month and that increased to thirty million. Then they were also spending fifty percent more time on the site Registrations went through the roof they those ten of of normal on a daily basis and I think right now we're sitting at around one hundred, ten million registered users. What, what is your? What is your operating budget? Your annual operating budget? Our annual operating budget now is in the high fifty million which every time. I, say it gives me a cortisol bike. Yeah But about a five, million of our of our funding comes from a few hundred thousand people donating on average twenty thirty dollars. So there's a lot of people donating because coal donate button on site. Yeah. I asking people for money is a very humbling thing to do My hope was always let me show people how great this is I have to become a little bit more explicit saying that I have a need and then hopefully people would show up. Yeah. I think less than a check. It's more than this. Now Khan Academy videos have been viewed like. Almost two billion times. Which is Insane I have to imagine sal over the last few years as the kind of Ed tech sector has exploded right and lots of schools by these programs, dream box and other four prophet. Programs that are available to help children with math and other language skills, etc I mean I'm sure people can't even sow. Let's spin off a for profit channel here. You've got something big here. You know there's there you know, and then you won't have to worry about raising money for for Khan Academy you know you can still do that but let's let's do that. I mean that must have happened must still happen. You know we do. oftentimes you know sometimes I'll go to a potential. PHILANTHROPIES will. I'd rather invest than donate. Something like that. People, I think there's some creative ideas that I would entertain. They're like Khan Academy is brand valuable. What if we could take that brandon? Do it in this tangential spaces and Khan Academy can have equity and maybe it can help build an endowment for. I'm always open to. Ideas. But what? I always remind myself and look I'm I'm not someone who has transcended material desires I tried to transcend material desires but. I have go to a friend. Who's you know done well with a Po or something and they've got the new tesla or living. You know they're living slightly upstream the income gradient. And living a little higher up the hill. But I remind myself. One I consider myself incredibly fortunate to be able to do what I I am doing, and the way I think about is I've done my philanthropy in reverse order and I stayed in the Hedge Fund world and you know maybe one day become a multimillionaire or larger and then but then what I've done with that money. I, you know I'm not. Someone who who wants that much I I want to be able to you know have have a backyard be able to best support the family you know go on vacation once or twice a year right and anything above that. If I did become a billionaire I would have donated it to an effort like Khan Academy. So you might as well just cut out the middleman. Time, shift it and work on and and I do generally think that it has benefited the mission and the vision because once people hopefully are viewing it as an institution they do they're they're they're rooting for it because they they realized that it's not it doesn't have an ulterior motive. You know the the everybody I've had on the show over the past four years that you are most like Jimmy Wales. Jimmy. Wales had an incredibly enormous influence on the world with wikipedia. Right? Had they done this as a for profit? He could have been a multimillionaire his argument was it wouldn't have worked. You had to make a nonprofit and by the way he said look I don't really care about having lots of money I. I have a really interesting life. I. Get to meet really interesting people, Interesting People WanNa, meet me I get to have. Get exposed to all these ideas that to me is worth more than any amount of money I could ever have and I that's really stuck with me because I. Think. He's right I think he's right. I agree with I mean I. Like Jimmy, Wales, by virtue of this adventure, I've been on I get lenses into really interesting parts of the world which for the most part have made me more optimistic about the world you know I every now and then I'm you know get invited to various conferences that you know where you know very powerful people are talking about the problems of society and how to fix them, and when when you when you when you get into these circles, you realize most of these people are honestly just trying to help you might not agree with everyone etcetera etcetera but it's it's actually been very It's made me more optimistic about the world not less. When you think about this just this incredible journey in the amazing success of of Khan Academy. How much do you think it has to do with you know your skill and how hard you worked in intelligence and how much do you attribute it to lock It's all. All of the above I mean it's you know one person can call it. One person might call it benevolent aliens working in your favor to prepare humanity for first contact. But yeah, there's something. That I I can't i. mean there's a lot that I can't take credit for I mean and above and beyond luck. Sir I. Guess It's luck where I was born where I was born a had the teachers I had had a the friendship supports that I had and then. Fell into things at the right time and but every now and then you see a door crack open, you save I think there's something interesting on the other door and you've got to sprint through it, and so I try not to overthink when when there are signs in my life that that doors open don't don't don't make someone have to force through the door. Like, run through that door. And Sal Khan founder of Khan Academy. By the way if you google his full name Salman Khan, you will find at least one other famous person who has exactly the same name. That other Salman Khan is one of the most popular Bollywood Actors in the world and actually I was I was in India five years ago and I met him I think it's just because you know people from this kind of get a kick out of things like that. Let's get this guy and that guy. So, there's there's some youtube videos of US having getting co interviewed. He's a he's a big star. He's he's a big heartthrob. He's major Maitra. He's also very well known for his physique. He's kind of the guys that that that taught bollywood that. Indians all have to look like software engineers. And thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You can write to us at H. I. bt NPR DOT Org. Our twitter handles are at how I built this or at Iras are instagram accounts are at guide dot Roz or at how I built this NPR. Our show is produced this week by Jan Andersson with music composed by routine Arab Louis thanks also to Julia Carney candice limb, Derek Gaels JC, Howard Grant, and Jeff Rodgers..

Khan Academy Salman Khan Jimmy Wales California Wales United States NPR cortisol Hedge Fund sal twitter PHILANTHROPIES brandon instagram google Jan Andersson
"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

14:33 min | 2 months ago

"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"Each other a little bit and I was just like, what do I do now? I could do do I. Do I, call him how do I contact I'm sure he's not listed. Contact Bill. Gates. Was An obvious and. Simultaneously a reporter from fortune. Had reached out actually before this happened saying Oh you know. There's this thing you're doing. It's really interesting. We'd like to do a story about it, and so I was already talking to the reporter and that reporter calls and he's like, did you know that bill? Gates uses Khan Academy as I had no idea and then the reporter Robert Kaplan with fortune he says. I'M GONNA Call Bill Up. I'm like if you think you can call bill up and do that, and so he calls me like two days. He's like bill took my call he I just interviewed Bill Gates about you and and it's like this really surreal thing because. This person this obviously like a lifetime hero. Up In computer science reading about Bill Gates and and then the fortune article came out. And I still had not met bill yet or even had any contact with them and the article said something like the title was Bill Gates is favorite teacher. Wow. The press sometimes rights hyperbolic headlines to I always felt insecure as like my favorite teacher. Did he say that they misrepresenting? Serious Imposter Syndrome, and then I got a call a cell phone rings. Record a video and I answer I say hello and I hear you know this is Larry Cohen, Bill Gates of Staff. You might have heard that bills a fan and I was like, yeah, I heard that. And if you're if you're free over the next couple of weeks, would love to fly up to Seattle and learn more about what you're doing. Maybe ways we could work together and I was looking at my calendar for the month Completely Blank and Said maybe next Wednesday. Cut My nails do some laundry. I'm happy to meet. Happy. Happy to meet with bill can make that work So yeah, I flew up and we had that meeting. What was that like? and. It was a little bit awkward. Wasn't like an obvious like. Oh, you know what you're doing. It was like Oh. So you know Y- There's a little bit of a prompt I. Think Larry Medicine Tell Bill what you're up to, and then I just started into into. My laminated slides. And with me love it, you didn't bring laptop. You brought laminated slides I love that. I mean there's an irony to it that I'm obviously someone involved in technology counterfeiters based on technology. I'm presenting to the creator of powerpoint. So. Yeah. I went through an and and at the end and he didn't give during the presidential lot of feedback. So I just kept going and it's one of those moments where you know. Twenty percent of your brain is trying to do what it needs to do, and then the other eighty percent of your brains saying. You're talking to Bill Gates that's Bill Gates. He's three feet away. Don't mess this up south don't mess up your about to mess this up don't mess up And then when I was kind of done he kind of he's like, yeah, noticed a ton of sense. This is great. This is great and I'm like, Oh, my God you know. And then I got overconfident I, I, remember I throw another. That doesn't make sense you're right. Wow. But was there any like end? Here's a plan on how we could collaborate. was there any of that at all? They ask they bill said, well, what would you do with more resources and you know I think this is the question I have to answer really well and I said look you know it's just me and closet right now with more resources. We could translate this to the languages of the world. We could build out the software platform. Some more people can access it. We could tools for teachers and I said I think we could were reaching hundreds of thousands now I think we could reach a million folks by the end of the year and it could be ten or one, hundred, million. You know by the end of the decade this need for that and you know I said look if I if I. Could hire up about five six engineers and educators and content folks I. Think we'll be up and running So you know fully loaded costs in silicon valley be million million and a half dollars a year and so this and yeah, we'll. We'll. We'll think about that. That seems reasonable. So and then a few days later they said Yeah that's they could do that. So I started talking to the Gates Foundation about about that that grant and simultaneously. Folks from Google had reached out. Google had made this promise in two thousand eight, which was a ten year anniversary of Google that it would donate ten million dollars to five projects that had the potential to change the world, and they determined that one of those projects has to be a project that has a chance to educate the world and. They on their own said, we've done a lot of research and we think what you are doing has the best chance of helping to educate the world. Okay well, I'm glad you've been listening in on my delusions and by fall of two thousand, ten about the Google and the gates foundation each gave about two million dollars So we had four million dollar initial funding for that first two years to hire team internationalize and start scaling. Khan Academy. Wow more than four million dollars. So now you've got to. Grow. You've gotTa Build. You've gotta get office space, but a higher people you've got to really turn this. Thing, that was just you into. Thing. So what did you? Do I mean that's kind of overwhelming a bright. Isn't it. Yeah, it was I. Mean I'm usually call. One of my closest friends Shaath Newson, how he was someone I met actually in Louisiana he beat me at a math competition in tenth grade, and then we were on the same team representing Louisiana. Academic Game. So that's how I got to know him. He ended up becoming my roommate freshman year at. Mit. We're pretty much like brothers and I said, he shot the new help like I. Know This wasn't on your career path to to start to help me kind of get the sing off the ground but like I need your help and I think it'll be fun and. You know he he took a couple of days to think about it and. He decided to take the plunge with me, and so he quit his McKinsey job and joined. Khan. Academy is as the President and COO essentially help me turn into a real organization at the same time. There were these two engineers it's what's really eerie how these people came out of the woodwork to engineers that summer. Ben came into Jason Rozov did volunteered for Khan Academy and I assume there are some young kids are looking for some experience. But when they were volunteer, I'm like these are incredible. These are some of the best engineers and designers I've ever worked with in my life who are they, and then I realized that actually known figures. Like. A really well known engineers and designers. and. So they were something my next call Said Hey would you guys WanNa work fulltime for Khan Academy? I, think we're going to get funding and They after a few months, we were convinced them. They worked initially remotely from New York. Then they were able to to move out to the bay area. So as you began to grow and scale and more people I'm assuming you kind of wanted to professionalize it a little bit more and maybe kind of start to replace some of those early screen capture videos. That you've made in two, thousand, six and seven. Yeah the interesting there's a constant tension as an organization grows. Of How do you make sure you do what's right from a professionalization point of view from scaling from a managerial point of view. But how do you make sure that you're not just doing the things that everyone else does that ends up creating these large bureaucratic organizations that? Aren't always the most innovative and how do you make sure you don't lose whatever secret sauce you had that made you success initially and a lot of con- academies. I say not. So secret sauce I believe was its ECCENTRICITY has quirkiness. It's in formality coupled with its depth, an intuition and desire to. Show. The wonder in the universe and the curiosity and So you know the last ten years for me have just been how do I? How do I balance that you know? Can I bring in other people who also compliment us but we do not lose that entrepeneurship that creativity that curiosity eccentricity that the quirkiness that made Khan Academy what it is. What's the I mean at that point you were still. You're offering still math and. finance. Was the ambition to. To offer as much as you possibly could offer in as many subject areas as possible. Yeah I remember writing these envisioning docs back in two thousand, eight, two, thousand, nine says, okay. We want to create a world where anyone on the planet has access to all the core academic learning they need from pre k. through the core of College Subjects in grades it was part of the initial vision that yeah one day we would try to figure out you know language arts, humanities, etc because they're important early learning. And then we'll just keep running experiments to see how they go and and You know we're we're still on that journey. Yeah. I interview dumb. The founders of head space different. Obviously a for profit company is a meditation APP but initially, all the meditations were Andy Andy Party Com-. If you're familiar with it, I'm very I'm very familiar with right and initially all the videos were were Sal Khan but sal Khan is not scalable. You cannot make tens of thousands of videos was that clear to you pretty pretty soon after you started the funding started come in that you needed to get other people to make videos to your standards. Now, we don't have a lot of folks making videos I still make. A lot of them I pretty much all of the math and science video and we have a few other folks who are doing some history videos and some language arts videos. And one of the reasons why we were we became a little sensitive of like not just outsourcing it to five hundred folks. We got a lot of feedback that. Education even what is done in this kind of distance way synchronous you have to trust your teacher. You have to trust that they're going GonNa get to someplace that I I know is going to be insightful, and there's going to be an a Ha moment that you're willing to invest in it, and we've had moments where you know there's a video for me a video from me, and then there's video from someone else just even though they might be explaining that better than I could have it could be dissonant for the student where they're feeling wait I really got catch it that my teacher now substitute showed up. So what we've been trying to. Balance that. It's amazing. I met David Coleman, a couple of years ago the head of the College Board and he talked about the partnership that they did with Khan Academy where you offer free sat prep which. Is. Essentially. Really. Had a pretty big impact on the four prophet sat prep industry because you're essentially offering this product and service for free. Yeah. You know. I think all of these players they're trying to do what they can in the context that they're doing it but David Coleman reached out. and it was really I think David's brainchild when he took over the College Board that you know the cod were the folks who administer the sat and the AP exams. It was the cause was a non for profit that came into existence to try to level the playing field that yeah, a hundred years ago. The only kids who are getting into Ivy League schools where kids of legacy kids who have scored to the rights knows exactly and the notion of the sat is, let's give a chance for the kid in Louisiana to to to to compete with the kids from an Dover or Chote or deerfield. As we know this whole industry billion dollar industry came up around what look like creating a perceived and maybe actual advantage for the for the you know upper-middle-class or or a fluent and David said, look we've been. Secretly observing Khan Academy and what we really like about. Khan. Academy is y'all about really learning the material I had actually made some sat videos for navy and my cousin facts you went through the sat practice book and I did every problem in the book on video for my cousins. That it was a four hundred something problems and I was afraid that the college would was going to sue me because I didn't take their permission to like screen capture their problems. Davis I watched that and what I really liked about it is and no point. Did you say, Oh, this is how you guess you always said Oh this is a concept you need to learn to be ready for college. This is where you learn it. This is how you learn it. There's a little bit of test-taking strategies. He's like that's what test prep should be. It should be something that generally makes you better generally makes you more prepared for college and and how you perform the sat's going to be a byproduct product of that. Yeah. So he said how about we partnered create the world's best test prep that happens to be free and It made sense to me, and over time the relationship volved were they actually pay US resources To Create Free Test Prep which is, you know that's that's the type of revenue I love it sustain us, but it's it's free those student. This year the most challenging year for school age kids For many decades. And it's looking like this year probably will be remote mostly, it will be remote for many many if not most kids in the United States. I have to imagine that you have seen a dramatic uptick in user's usage this year. Yeah. Yeah we we I caught wind in February this past February that you know something interesting was happening. We got a letter from a teacher in south. Korea telling us that he was heavily dependent on Khan Academy is they had their their nationwide school closures and that was the sounds like, wow. A whole country's closing schools because of this Cova thing that's that's and. A few weeks later. I live here in Santa Clara County, which is I think it was the first community spread happened to your hand local private school had to shut down due to contact tracing. That's what it I don on us. It's like, wow, this hit the US at which even then seemed like science fiction in early. March. But you know it was one of those. Moments where you look left and you look right you realize I think this is us..

Bill Gates Khan Academy Sal Khan Gates Foundation Google reporter President and COO Louisiana United States fortune Seattle McKinsey David Coleman Santa Clara County Korea New York Robert Kaplan
"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:43 min | 2 months ago

"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"So. Start getting text messages for man. Would, you can imagine I now take very seriously and she four or five of them and kind of cryptic as text messages often are, and they said, this is an writing I'm at the Aspen Ideas, festival main pavilion. Walter. Isaacson Interviewing Bill Gates. Gates. Last five minutes talking about Khan Academy. Wow and Let's just kinda stared I was like, what is she talking about and I started doing a web search for Aspen Gates Khan. Academy. After about ten minutes actually found like the.

Bill Gates Aspen Gates Khan Khan Academy Isaacson Walter
"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

07:15 min | 2 months ago

"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR and. So it's two, thousand, nine and sal has just left his high paying job at a hedge fund to focus on Khan Academy full time. And since it's just him, no other coders, no other teachers this new venture is not costing him a lot of money. But what is costing him is the fact that he's no longer making any money. You know the first three months you're euphoric. You're you're super excited about your new lifestyle is this nonprofit do-gooder? In fact, ACT I would say by months seven or eight, I couldn't sleep. I I. Literally Could Sleep I, I. I was yeah I was getting anxious I was waking up in the middle of the night cold sweats I was I would I would look at my bank account for over Kennedy You know, look at our expenses, I would run financial models for my family. And my wife say. Nothing like. I. Mean in hindsight I was like I shouldn't have been so. Kept it to myself but I wasn't I was in a really bad place mentally and the stress and the anxiety was was killing me was there. May Be residual fear of like. Failing. I think there's you know we talked a lot about childhood in you know not having a lot of resources growing up think I I frankly still have. A fear of being one catastrophe away from financial hardship. Yeah and In two thousand dollars like? I made the catastrophe happen like I. Wasn't like a hurricane or something that that's ruined our finances on a fire. It's like I quit a good job and like the type of job. Is. Not Easy to. Get. A highly sought after jobs. If I really had to I could probably go get a job but what I be able to get as good of a job as what I had that that actually probably was was unlikely and. Try to channel whatever nervous energy or anxiety I had into the work is let me make more videos. Let me Let me make more content. Let me write more code and and hope that eventually someone will notice. I guess, like sort of maybe it was a kind of a low point that you hit and. A. Wealthy. Very wealthy person. We checked his end or the wife of John Door the. Billionaire venture capitalist CA reached out to. Make a donation what what was the story? Hey this is you know I I have this theory that benevolent aliens are are helping me so that Khan Academy can help prepare humanity for first contact and you know the end door coming into my life, and then you know what happened shortly afterwards was may two thousand ten and you know I was getting these donations off pay pal if people donating ten dollars, twenty dollars every now, and then a fifty dollars donation come in that was pretty exciting and then. I saw a ten thousand dollars Asian come in so. Ten thousand dollars just like that. Yeah it was I. Just like I got an email notification from like pay pal donation it's come in I was like Oh this is going to be a fifty like ten, thousand and. Dan I immediately did a Google search I was like Oh. Wow. Like and doors she's like a real philanthropist and I immediately e mailed her and I said no thank you so much for this incredibly generous donation. This is the largest donation that Khan Academy has ever received. I've tried to project like a real institution and if we were physical school, you have a building named after and and and immediately emails back and says well. You know I didn't realize you. You weren't getting this kind of donations i. see that you're based in mountain view You know I've been using your stuff with my daughters. I've been using it even myself to understand the financial crisis and accounting and finance. If, you have time I would love to grab lunch with you and. I was like, yeah, absolutely and so a week later. Maybe, a few days later, we were in downtown Palo Alto at an Indian Buffet restaurant she asks me over lunch. So what what, what's your goal here and I told her when I filled the paperwork with the IRS to become a nonprofit that little part of the forum with mission Colon, they give you the line and a half I filled out a free world class education for anyone anywhere. and. She looked at me. She's like well. That's ambitious. How do you see yourself doing that and I told her you know be very clear mission. I don't think. I'm just going to be able to check it off this weekend and then move onto healthcare or something. But I showed her she was already familiar with the content I was making I showed her the exercise, a software pot from making I said look videos are nice and I wanna keep making videos I really enjoy that I want to translate into the languages of the world but the real learning happens when students are able to work on exercises get immediate feedback. Ideally, teachers and parents can get dashboards to understand where their kids are and how to do more interventions. By, this point been rejected by so many major foundations probably about twenty of them. But, in preparation for all of them had a binder of of testimonials from around the world I. Mean it was Louis. Several hundreds, pages thick and these letters I showed it to her showed her how the the usage was growing exponentially and I like you know I think this could eventually reach like all of humanity. And she's like well, you've made a lot of progress a how I only have one question how are you supporting yourself and as? Proud of a way as possible I said. I'm. Not. She kind of processes that and she's thinking you're a big shot. You're like doing TV interviews and Hundreds, thousands of people using this like, right? Yeah. No I mean I had been on. And I didn't realize there was actually there was a buzz about Khan Academy in Silicon Valley at the time but I didn't know about no one. But I wasn't in the No. I wasn't even the right circles to be experiencing the buzz and so anyway, she she she she offered to pay the bill and I said Oh if you insist. And ten minutes later I'm driving into my my driveway and I get text message from an and it says. You really need to be supporting yourself. I've just wired you one hundred, thousand dollars. How That was just one of those moments where you just stare at the phone and you sit in your driveway for like the next half an hour. Wow. Like you know. Holy Crap. I mean I think. I might have cried like it was that type of You know all that stress built up over the months all of a sudden. It just gets released. You know inside that one, hundred thousand was all of a sudden change everything forever but it's like, okay I can now pay my bills. Were Not GonNa have to dip into savings. It gave a like. I. Can do this for a few more months for.

Khan Academy Dan I NPR sal Palo Alto Kennedy Google John Door Indian Buffet Louis IRS
"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

08:00 min | 2 months ago

"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"So. Most of the products and services we've talked about on the show have been innovative or disruptive in some way. But some of them and you've heard me say this before have fundamentally changed the way we live I mean lift AIRBNB starbucks. Shop Affi-. wayfair. These brands have transformed the way that many of us shop and travel and work. But every now, and then a founder comes along that seems to want to do something even more ambitious, even more transformative like remember. Pat. Brown, he founded impossible foods to create meet out of plants meet. So meet like that even the most die-hard carnivores would want to eat it. Pat Wants to put a stop to meet production period because of the damage, it's doing to the planet and essentially and I don't think I'm overstating this. He set out from day one to change the world. But still. Pat Brown stands to make a lot of money from his company same with most of the founders who've been on this show and I don't think any of them are motivated primarily to make money but it is part of the story they make a product or offer service, sell it to you and me, and they also get rich perfectly fine. But what about someone who makes a product or offers a service that is equally transformational maybe even more so but makes it one hundred percent free To do that, you have to make personal sacrifices starting by earning a lot less money. which is just part of what makes Sal Khan. So incredibly remarkable. Over the past twelve years, he's built Khan Academy into a powerhouse, a massive online learning platform that offers free tutorials to anyone anywhere. And from the very beginning South sided, his academy would be a nonprofit that it should never be tempted to compromise on its values. But before he launched Khan, Academy Sal didn't anticipate any of this. He was just trying to help a younger cousin with her sixth grade math lessons at the time he was working for a hedge fund. But from those early days of doing one on one to toils sal gradually built a platform that offers hundreds of classes in dozens of languages. Nearly thirty million people use Khan Academy. Every month to learn math science arts even sat prep all four free and Khan. Academy has inspired the launch of many other online learning platforms, but many of them are for profit operations that charge money. But we'll get to all that moment first. Let's back up just a little bit sal Khan grew up in metairie Louisiana his mom was from India and his dad was from Bangladesh and the marriage ended when sal was pretty young. My parents. Had issues and so they separated when I was probably about eighteen months old two years old and then I had really never seen my father and I saw once four an evening when I was thirteen and then he passed away the next year so it was really might. mother who raised us as as a single mother. While was there a community of South Asian families in imagery? Growing up. Yeah my you know when my parents separated. We actually live with my young at the time they were in their twenty s, and so they all were kind of like father figures and almost like older siblings to to me as well and and a lot of ways they were not your stereotypical you know. Just come to the US study. Get a job save money kind of prudent immigrant story they were. They were much more embracing of New Orleans. Culture. And I would say they're the most new ORLEAN South Asians. You will ever find it in your life. I had a very colorful childhood. You know late night parties, people, singing, and dancing. For me it felt like a I remember my third birthday that my uncles got a belly dancer. I still remember Habiba you know So it was definitely a different type of childhood, but it was a in some ways a really rich one. So what did your mom do for a living? The first job that I remember her having she she was the person who takes the change out of the vending machine at the at the local hospital actually the hospital where I was born and she took me to work a couple of times 'cause she didn't have childcare and I thought at the time I remember watching her do that. I think it was like the coolest job on earth because you have the key that you can open up the vending machine and like quarters just pour out of it. So she did that for a little bit and then essentially was a cashier at a series of convenience stores is kind of doing you know one minimum wage job after another and then I was in high school she had remarried her my Stepdad at the time were able to. Kind of cobble together to get a a small convenience store in. Your book you write. Louisiana was as close to South Asia as the United States could get. It's spicy food. Giant cockroaches in the corrupt government which is both funny but somewhat true true. I guess right I mean. You grew up at a time when. Like David Duke was the. The representative in steel her. The part of Mary where we had our store, it was called seminole convenience store on Seminole Avenue, and it's called a parliamentary called on that was kind of the heart of David Dukes base. So to speak I remember in a right outside of our our store across the street was the largest David Duke for president signing I've ever seen and so it was A. You know the the folks who lived in the neighborhood who were frankly know Super David Duke supporters in some ways it was lucky. This is pre nine eleven They didn't really know what to make of my family at at the time We've had a few conversations I remember with people the store where they they openly told us that they were trying to decide whether we were white or the N. word to you know we were confusing them but you know growing up I was the only Brown kid in in the classroom. But I never felt in school at all like folks were in any way biased or racist against me. If anything I have to give the the school system to Jefferson parish school system, a lot of credit you know I think a lot of what I am today is because they gave me opportunities there were teachers that believed in me. I had a really good friend circle So so I have no. You, know I I don't feel like it was a a tough childhood. So. Was your mom Did she have very strict expectations for you I? mean she had come from India to the United States of sacrifices to cheese sort of. You know would say you have to be an engineer doctor lawyer like would was there any kind of talk like sat at home when you were a kid? You, know, my mother. Definitely did instill some really strong values. You know just seeing her operate. My mom is a very courageous person and we were the only family that that in our friend circle where you know we were kind of not well off or at least not middle class. But I think that was helpful to because. The family friends we had many of them were the stereotypical doctors and engineers and you obviously can see where you live and you see where those kids live and you can see kind of our financial insecurity. I still remember I must have been eight or nine years old at Kmart and I was being a brat. I really wanted to be by this.

Sal Khan Pat Brown United States Khan Academy David Duke Louisiana founder AIRBNB India Affi-. New Orleans David Dukes South Asia Kmart Bangladesh Jefferson parish school representative metairie Mary
Khan Academy: Sal Khan

How I Built This

06:58 min | 2 months ago

Khan Academy: Sal Khan

"Most of the products and services we've talked about on the show have been innovative or disruptive in some way. But some of them and you've heard me say this before have fundamentally changed the way we live I mean lift AIRBNB starbucks. Shop Affi-. wayfair. These brands have transformed the way that many of us shop and travel and work. But every now, and then a founder comes along that seems to want to do something even more ambitious, even more transformative like remember. Pat. Brown, he founded impossible foods to create meet out of plants meet. So meet like that even the most die-hard carnivores would want to eat it. Pat Wants to put a stop to meet production period because of the damage, it's doing to the planet and essentially and I don't think I'm overstating this. He set out from day one to change the world. But still. Pat Brown stands to make a lot of money from his company same with most of the founders who've been on this show and I don't think any of them are motivated primarily to make money but it is part of the story they make a product or offer service, sell it to you and me, and they also get rich perfectly fine. But what about someone who makes a product or offers a service that is equally transformational maybe even more so but makes it one hundred percent free To do that, you have to make personal sacrifices starting by earning a lot less money. which is just part of what makes Sal Khan. So incredibly remarkable. Over the past twelve years, he's built Khan Academy into a powerhouse, a massive online learning platform that offers free tutorials to anyone anywhere. And from the very beginning South sided, his academy would be a nonprofit that it should never be tempted to compromise on its values. But before he launched Khan, Academy Sal didn't anticipate any of this. He was just trying to help a younger cousin with her sixth grade math lessons at the time he was working for a hedge fund. But from those early days of doing one on one to toils sal gradually built a platform that offers hundreds of classes in dozens of languages. Nearly thirty million people use Khan Academy. Every month to learn math science arts even sat prep all four free and Khan. Academy has inspired the launch of many other online learning platforms, but many of them are for profit operations that charge money. But we'll get to all that moment first. Let's back up just a little bit sal Khan grew up in metairie Louisiana his mom was from India and his dad was from Bangladesh and the marriage ended when sal was pretty young. My parents. Had issues and so they separated when I was probably about eighteen months old two years old and then I had really never seen my father and I saw once four an evening when I was thirteen and then he passed away the next year so it was really might. mother who raised us as as a single mother. While was there a community of South Asian families in imagery? Growing up. Yeah my you know when my parents separated. We actually live with my young at the time they were in their twenty s, and so they all were kind of like father figures and almost like older siblings to to me as well and and a lot of ways they were not your stereotypical you know. Just come to the US study. Get a job save money kind of prudent immigrant story they were. They were much more embracing of New Orleans. Culture. And I would say they're the most new ORLEAN South Asians. You will ever find it in your life. I had a very colorful childhood. You know late night parties, people, singing, and dancing. For me it felt like a I remember my third birthday that my uncles got a belly dancer. I still remember Habiba you know So it was definitely a different type of childhood, but it was a in some ways a really rich one. So what did your mom do for a living? The first job that I remember her having she she was the person who takes the change out of the vending machine at the at the local hospital actually the hospital where I was born and she took me to work a couple of times 'cause she didn't have childcare and I thought at the time I remember watching her do that. I think it was like the coolest job on earth because you have the key that you can open up the vending machine and like quarters just pour out of it. So she did that for a little bit and then essentially was a cashier at a series of convenience stores is kind of doing you know one minimum wage job after another and then I was in high school she had remarried her my Stepdad at the time were able to. Kind of cobble together to get a a small convenience store in. Your book you write. Louisiana was as close to South Asia as the United States could get. It's spicy food. Giant cockroaches in the corrupt government which is both funny but somewhat true true. I guess right I mean. You grew up at a time when. Like David Duke was the. The representative in steel her. The part of Mary where we had our store, it was called seminole convenience store on Seminole Avenue, and it's called a parliamentary called on that was kind of the heart of David Dukes base. So to speak I remember in a right outside of our our store across the street was the largest David Duke for president signing I've ever seen and so it was A. You know the the folks who lived in the neighborhood who were frankly know Super David Duke supporters in some ways it was lucky. This is pre nine eleven They didn't really know what to make of my family at at the time We've had a few conversations I remember with people the store where they they openly told us that they were trying to decide whether we were white or the N. word to you know we were confusing them but you know growing up I was the only Brown kid in in the classroom. But I never felt in school at all like folks were in any way biased or racist against me. If anything I have to give the the school system to Jefferson parish school system, a lot of credit you know I think a lot of what I am today is because they gave me opportunities there were teachers that believed in me. I had a really good friend circle So so I have no. You, know I I don't feel like it was a a tough childhood.

Sal Khan Pat Brown Khan Academy David Duke Louisiana Founder United States Airbnb David Dukes Affi-. New Orleans Jefferson Parish School South Asia Bangladesh Mary Representative President Trump Metairie India
"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

01:59 min | 2 months ago

"sal khan" Discussed on How I Built This

"This message comes from NPR sponsor Adian the future-proof Payments Platform. Welcome all payments beyond the cutting edge of customer experiences and Grow Your Business. With Adian Visit A. D. Y., E. N., DOT COM SLASH NPR to learn more hate. It's guy here. Have you ever thought about starting a business and if so what would it be? How do you come up with an idea? How do you find the money to start? How do you get the word out about your product or service? What do you do? If your idea isn't working and how do you pit well to answer those questions I've written a book it's called what else how.

How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

How I Built This

09:26 min | 3 months ago

How I Built Resilience: Sandra Oh Lin of KiwiCo

"On these episodes, we talk with entrepreneurs and other business leaders about how they're coping during this very challenging time and today we're gonNA hear from Sandra. Olen, the founder and CEO of Kiko Kiko makes arts and science projects for kids and ships them out in monthly subscription boxes or crates in March when students began learning from home Sandra's company a spike in orders, and it's now shipped over twenty million boxes around the world I spoke with. Sandra from her home. In the bay area is trying to keep up with demand. Tell us a little bit more about Kiwi Co for people who don't know what what you do tell us about your your company. Yeah. So we design and deliver hands on experiences for kids, kids of all ages. So we have different experiences and products that we develop for Newborns and infants alway through to kids at heart. So teens and even grown ups and these hands on experiences they range. So science experiments, games, kids making play projects that encourage imaginative play. And they're all center around this idea of how can we encourage kids to see themselves as makers And I. Think the the best known as the Kiwi crate and inside like you get pipe cleaners and different OV- like Styrofoam balls and I think that's probably the best known product that you guys make. Right the Kiwi crate. Yeah. Yeah. I mean that's our flagship line. So qe crate is geared for early elementary age kids. So five to eight and it's very project base for Kiwi crate. There are at least two different projects and it's usually one that's a science and engineering focused project and one. That's more be more of an art in creativity designed focus project. So let's say one project overall. It's about arcades and one project might be you create a mechanical arcade cloth that you can actually grab things with and the other side of the crate might be a project where you're making your own yarn pom Pom Creatures, and then you're actually taking your claw, you're trying to grab those creatures as well as whatever else is around your house too. So it's a combination of discoveries along with hopefully A. Little Bit of delight and a whole bunch of fun which I love and tell me I i. know that you launched this in twenty eleven and at the time I guess you were like you were in charge of the fashion portfolio. For Ebay. How did the idea come to you? So it was born mainly out of personal needs. So my my career has spanned consumer products and technology mostly ECOMMERCE. So it started my career in India proctor and gamble and then had been at pay pal at. Ebay but when we started the company, so two thousand eleven, my kids, my oldest two kids were almost three and almost five and I really want to give them especially the hands on activities. It was a way for them to really see themselves as producers and not just a passive consumers as kids who could actually kind of problem solve and make something, and so I started to pull together different and inspiration and I was like, Oh, my gosh, is taking a long time like I need to. Amortize. My effort and so I would invite friends and their kids, and one of the MOMS actually said, you should start a business around this and it was one of those things where I think long story short is that we found that there are a lot of parents who are well intentioned very busy. They want enriching activities for their kids and if it can come. To them in a convenient format from a trusted brand, and that's something that actually really resonates and then if you think about it from a business perspective, if you can get a subscription service to work, it works really well right and so if you consider all the elements of subscription service or you're considering lifetime value if you're able to drive down their cost of Acquisition then you're able to provide something that is not only valuable to the customer, but ends up being something that works really well all the business side to I I imagine when the Middlesex business for a moment I mean I imagine that when it became clear that the pandemic was GonNa shut down huge parts of the economy like most business owners you probably. Anticipated a downturn for Your Business and first of all, how did you prepare for that possibility? Well, to be completely frank, it was a little bit of madness say kind of the beginning. So we were a little bit ahead of the curve and having folks work remotely. But then as people started to shelter in place was definitely a scramble you know we had to see. What the impact would be to the business, and so we've definitely became more conservative. So very quickly we decided to basically pull back or remain conservative on marketing spend. We were looking at things like hiring and figuring out what we wanted to do that. So we held on hiring but then we're also tracking the business and what we actually started to see pretty. Quickly is a pretty decent uptick in the business. I think the combination of parents being home needing something to engage kids we happen to be a good solution, and so we started to see an uptick in the business and then accordingly had managed to the business based on that demand at a pretty dramatic to I think, right? Yeah. So I think you had mentioned. I kind of in the beginning that we shipped out over twenty million crates now, and so if you look at the first ten million crates, we hit that Mark Actually in January twenty nineteen, and then in the next eighteen months or so we actually shipped out another ten million crates and you can imagine kind of the celebration of the business and some of that. Is Because of acceleration that we saw on the business given the pandemic and the demand that was their I'm not surprised spoke with the CEO of dream box who told us that they have seen a doubling of on boarding on onto their platform it's a math platform for elementary school kids. I spoke to Sal Khan a few days ago of founder, the Khan Academy. I mean, they're seeing record numbers of students on their platform I mean as you have seen this kind of surge in demand, how have you been able to meet that demand? I mean, for example, have you had any challenges sourcing supplies? Yeah. So we've definitely had different challenges associated with with meeting the demand I. Think the great thing is that our team has been incredibly responsive and making sure that we shoring supply chain putting in the appropriate orders to make sure that we had the inventory available and I think when it's kind of regular times. To a certain extent, it's almost like your utilities or you know you expect the water to be there in the electricity work and similarly expect that you're going to have product to ship, and so we had to be very proactive about making sure that some of these things that we may have taken for granted and pass were there available to us that we could actually serve the community fulfillment was definitely another area that we had to really shore. Up and make sure that we have the capacity and then customer care I. Mean Obviously we WanNa do an excellent job of serving the customer and making sure that their questions are answered etc and so there was a certain amount of capacity that we were planning for in March April Etcetera May June, and so we had actually scaled add up pretty significantly. Let's go to some questions we're getting in from folks watching system cows, Zimmer he asks via twitter. How do you develop your kids and how do you test them with kids? Yeah. So we have interestingly to product design and development teams. So we have a physical product design and development team, and then we have a digital. So the digital is creating ecommerce platform or content platform. So the software and then our physical product design team is really comprised of folks with mechanical engineering backgrounds, industrial design. We have someone who actually worked on space satellite system. This is, and so these are the folks who are accepting the different projects that could to the kids prototyping testing, etc, and a big part of what we've done at Kiko even since you started it in my garage actually is that we are always testing but children. So in every office that we've had, we have a sizable room and four to eight times a week kids are coming in to test the products at various stages and that is. Something that is absolutely critical for us. We may assume that a project may be engaging. It may not. We may assume that a material is something that is malleable enough for preschoolers hands, but it may not be, and so it's just a critical step in. So as we've actually been working remotely, that was a big challenge to figure out, and so it's been pretty amazing. We quickly decided to actually purchase three D. Printers, laser cutters, etc that we. Then distributed to different product designers, and then on the testing side, we ended up actually either shipping or having a hand off locations for kids to pick up and test materials, and then do them via video conference and so we actually ask for different camera angles to see what the kids are doing because depending on the age of the kid it's not so much that they're going to tell you what's going on you actually have to observe. What's going on in? So that's definitely been an area where we've had to figure out how to get things

Sandra Mark Actually Ebay Kiko Kiko Kiwi Co Founder And Ceo India Olen Sal Khan Khan Academy CEO D. Printers Frank Twitter Zimmer
"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"But people have just gotten so cynical about it. And they're not thinking kind of big enough about it. And it's. Slow motion emergency because as bad as inequality is today. I just read something this morning that you know, we're at the same inequality levels that we were a hundred years ago, which is kind of the peak for the past hundred years. It's it's going to celebrate because of obvious, you know, you you have globalization happening. So low skill labor goes other places, but on top of that you have obviously automation in a and and all of that. So you the entire industrial revolution pyramid that we have been living in the bottom two layers are collapsing, not just labor. But even that information processing, which is really kind of these white collar jobs a is going to do that. So as a society, more and more productivity is going to happen. But it is it does it just show up to the top eight percent. And then you just have to do massive redistribution and you'll leaving everyone else without purpose. Or do we do we try to educate ourselves out of it and try to invert the pyramid, which is the more. The the boulder thing to do. But if we don't try I think we're gonna have a very a very dystopia world in about fifty years. Is there a piece of advice that you've gotten that over time is really? Been valuable for you that you want to share with other people. I'll give to that. I always remember actually, especially when I'm hitting kind of a tough spot, a one was it was actually the commencement address. When I graduated from college the president of MIT at the time, Charles vast. He's he's now passed away he used to tell this really funny story, I won't tell you the whole story, but this caused student came up to him later and said you gave me the best advice ever when I graduated and when I got my diploma and and president festival. What did I tell you? He said keep on moving keep on movie. But it is. It is amazing thing. Like, you know, what you hit a wall? Whatever just like just keep you know, put one foot in front of. That's what I've taken from it. I think that was his message as just like as long as you just keep taking those steps that gives even back to Khan Academy. Like, you know, we now I probably made thousands of videos now and people think like, wow, how did that happen? It was you know, every day just making a couple making two three and it just adds in. And it started, you know, if back in two thousand and six imagining trying to create something, you know, right now, I think last month, we're reaching close to twenty million learners that would have seemed delusional an in two thousand six, but it's just one step in front of another. You hit a wall and many walls were hit. But you just no I'm gonna keep chugging it this the other thing, I this actually came from my first, boss. I my first job was at oracle. Thomas Korean was was my boss, and he's not done amazing things with his career. But I remember times kind of cynical sometimes about, you know, something is being in a big company. And I'm like, oh, there's some time some politics, and you know, this is. Happening slower than shed. And he's like look south, of course. And that's life. And you're you're you're twenty two years old as you're gonna learn more about life. But like just everyone moment think about what's the most positive thing that you can do and I've just taken that as don't get cynical. It's very easy to get cynical. But at any moment life happens keep moving, and what's the most positive thing that you can do at that moment because that's a good segue to my telling you keep moving, Sal. Thanks. Thanks for all. Thanks for all the work you've done. Thanks for spending time with us. Really? Really? Appreciate it. Appreciate it. Thanks for you. Well, that's it for this episode of stay tune, thanks again to my guest, Sal Khan. If you like the show rate and review it on apple podcasts every positive review helps new listeners find the show, send me your questions about news and politics sweet them to me at pre Perahera with the hashtag

Sal Khan president Khan Academy MIT apple Thomas Korean Charles vast hundred years twenty two years eight percent fifty years one foot
"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"If you wanna move to that too bad you have to learn to control yourself. I think it gets worse for kids who might not have extra supports because they might get into a system where it's a fixed pay system in a pre. You're my children. We we are able to give them all of the all of the benefits of of a great preschool all the benefits of tutoring them, and and and you know, all sorts of enrichment activities, and if there's a group of kids who get that. And then a group of kids who aren't getting the preschool who aren't getting the enrichment activities as early as kindergarten. It starts to their self esteem. It starts to hit how the teachers perceive them and once again, tone human beings, are very sensitive to it. And I think over time that has a very big affect, you know, a thought experiment. I'd like to give people as if you were go back in time four hundred years to western Europe, you would have seen which even then was one of the more literate parts of the planet. You'd see about fifteen percent of the population was literate about twenty percent of men and ten percent of women. And I suspect that if you went to someone who knew how to read a member of clergy and said wh-, what percentage of the public is even capable of reading. They probably would said, oh with a great education system. Mhm maybe thirty percent, and that would have been reasonable given that his context of well, that's optimisic in a world. We're only fifteen percent can read today, and they probably would have said that probably most of the population isn't capable of reading. But we did have mass public education that came out of the industrial revolution, which was a huge boon to society. And we now know that pretty close to one hundred percent of the population is is capable of reading. But if if we if we go out to even fairly optimistic people, and I would ask you what percent of the population is capable of of being a member of the creative class for lack of a better word. You know, the people who could be researchers find the cure for cancer be an entrepreneur, right? The next great novel..

wh cancer Europe fifteen percent one hundred percent four hundred years thirty percent twenty percent ten percent
"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"You're doing five different things in your brain is constantly saying to have another Email. Let me check social media cetera et cetera. So I think that can have a harmful effect. And I think before we started talking about how I started meditating, and it's almost the exact opposite of that. So it does get you a little bit more in the flow and focused. But I think the biggest factor isn't that? I think human beings, you're their studies from well before social media and cell phones became a thing this go back to the seventy s and eighty some of these studies I wrote about in my book is that when they studied students in a class. They're able to focus the first ten or fifteen minutes. Hits. Then they zone out for about four five minutes, then they own in. But nowadays on they can they can't zone in fifteen minutes. Now, they might zone in twelve minutes or or or shorter, and then they own out for a little bit longer. So that's actually a very natural phenomenon that you can really keep your focus for about fifteen minutes. Then you zone is a very natural thing for the human brain to do. The reason why classes are sixty minutes or ninety minutes despite some of that research is just logistics. They're like, hey, we're taking all the trouble of scheduling people into room. They have to switch classes they have to move their bodies have to get their books out. So let's keep them there as long as they can without needing a bathroom break. I I literally think that might be the design principle by by which it was made. So so I think all of us, you know, if we go back when we were in school and in the eighties and nineties we all zoned out after after ten minutes after fifteen minutes that we didn't have social media. We didn't have these other distractions. I think the difference now is kids today. You could almost say have they know what it's like to get something in a ten minute dosage, and they're like, hey, that's actually a lot more. Even learning is is a lot more peeling in in that dosage, and so when they go back to the ninety minute form factor, the an emphasis, passive, and you have to sit there when you know, something that's a little bit easier to digest, your you're going to have trouble taking the thing that is, you know, a little bit boring in passive. That's not to say that the class is an incredibly valuable all the teachers that I talked to love this is that look now, it doesn't have to be about passive information delivery when human beings get together. It should be about what can the human beings do together? How do they teach each other? How do they can have a Socratic dialogue to a project? They do a simulation. You haven't very optimistic view, which I like, and I hope is correct. But I want you to talk about it for a second. You say that that everyone really innately wants to learn virtually everyone, and it's not the case that we sometimes think well, some people are not interested in learning that often it's the failure of the teacher or the failure of the school riphil your of the institution or some other failure that doesn't tap into. What I think you believe is an innate desire. Fire to learn and of curiosity. Yeah. I mean when I was point out is you you give me a group of three and four year olds. I don't care about their parents education level their income level their race their gender aware. They grew up. They are the same. Like if you bring any new object into the room any three or four year old. Will you literally have to fight them off? They want to explore it, no matter how mundane it could be like a pink piece of of plastic. They're going to go it they're going to do all sorts. So that is a very core thing that makes us human. I think, unfortunately, what what happens is many times, you know, once you go into traditional system, and this is a system that kind of came out of the industrial revolution of Victorian era, where self control was kind of kind of the highest thing over even things like curiosity, and and creativity yet a lot of that look straight put your finger on your lips. And listen to what what we got to say. If you wanna move to that too bad you have to learn to control yourself. I think it gets worse.

fifteen minutes four year four five minutes ninety minutes twelve minutes ninety minute sixty minutes ten minutes ten minute
"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"I was a CIs guy a computer science guy early part in my career, you know, when the dot com bubble popped in the late nineties. I went to business school and coming out of business school. I I had ironically sworn off entrepreneurship because I thought I didn't have the stomach for it. And I said, let me do something, you know, that that's less economically sensitive, the bright idea of joining a very small. Hedge fund does me and my boss. But while I was doing that is this is now two thousand three two thousand four I had just gotten married a family member. Now, the issues twelve years old had come up from New Orleans, which is where I was born and raised to Boston for my wedding. And he just came out of conversation. She was having trouble in math. I offered to tutor her when she got back to New Orleans. She agreed. So I would just get on the phone with her, you know, long story short. She at first she just was convicted wasn't capable of learning yet. Trouble with unit conversion then slowly. But surely on the phone, I kind of deprogrammed her lack of self confidence. Then she started learn the math. She actually got caught up with her class a little head of the class and because of her. Perceived weakness she'd actually done quite badly on a standardized exam the previous year, and they'd put it into a remedial math class. So once I saw that she had caught up and that she was a head. I called up her school. I became something of a tiger cousin and I called up school. And I said, you know, I really think neither remind should be able to retake that placement test from last year. They said who are you? I'm I'm her cousin. They somewhat surprising to let her take it in that same Nadia who was in a remedial math class literally a few months before was now being placed into an advanced math class. So I was hooked. It was a fun way for me to bond with a cousin a family member who was about fifteen years younger than me at the time. Then I started working with her younger brothers and over the next two years. I'm had moved out to California with our firm and word got around the family that free tutoring is going on. I find myself so bargain, it's a bar. It's a good price. Yes. Had a money back guarantee had about ten fifteen cousins family friends that I was tutoring every day after my after the markets closed. My wife at the time. It was a medical resident. So I had we didn't have kids at that point. So that's what I would do and the early Khan Academy had nothing to do with videos. It was actually I saw common patterns in my family members that the reason why they're struggling in an Sandra class had nothing to do with their aid intelligence nothing to do with their with algebra. It was because they had accumulated gaps from fifth grade or sixth grade or seventh grade, and so I started writing software just for kicks that would help them practice some of those gaps. So that it can really get that fluency that proficiency. So that the algebra whatever else didn't really take as much cognitive load. They didn't have to think about how do I divide decimals? I do I evaluate a negative exploded. And I saw that that was really helping helping my family, and I used to show this off to all my friends at dinner parties and things, and I was actually at a dinner party. This was in November two thousand six and the host his name's Zulfikar rooms on have to give them full credit..

New Orleans Nadia Sandra class Khan Academy Boston California fifteen years twelve years two years
"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:44 min | 1 year ago

"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks for having me pre right off the bat. Let me just ask you this. How disappointed where you're South Asian parents that you do not become a doctor? It's it's it's actually a bit of a sore point. My mom will we made a couple of medical videos, and actually we had partnered with Stanford medical school to do them. I'm forty three. Now. This was I was probably this is when Khan Academy had already become a real thing. I I must have been about thirty six thirty seven when my mom found out about those videos. She literally asked me whether I could now get a little credit for Mets faster. Did you make joking? Did you make? I know when we talk about our parents were never joking. Did you do that in part to appease them in part? Maybe. Did nothing it just it. Just amplified the disappointment. How'd you how'd you pick the name? So so interesting the name Khan Academy. How did you? How did you come up with that? You know, hey, I'm actually quite sensitive about that. Because I fun of I used to make fun of people who would name things after themselves. I thought it was a very narcissistic thing to do. But in the early days of Khan Academy before it was even called kind of kademi when I was working with family members. I was writing software for them. And I wanted to call it something this was before I'd even made YouTube videos, and a lot of domain names were already taken up, and the one thing that was available was was kinda kademi. And the reason why I picked academy. I was almost a joke. It was me. And my family members my last name, and then my the kademi I thought it would be nice if it had an air of being something that could turn into an institution, and that's something that eventually I I do want it to turn into another dimension of it, even when we incorporated as a nonprofit that actually was a reason in a pseudo strategic way while so wanted Convair because an for profit. I don't own any shares. There's no formal. Lover of control. But I thought, hey, you know, at least if my name's on it. They would only fire me in an extreme circumstance that would have to find another con or they would have to change the name. Although, you know, pecan academies. It sounds cool and it works if your name if I'd done this. I'm not sure Berar academy would have worked. It's too many syllables. I think he's got a ring to it. But if you had if you had a podcast, you might call it. Stay tuned with pre. So I put my name in it also. So I so I also can't be judgment. So a lot of people may not be familiar with the amazing story of how Khan Academy started. So you disappointed your parents by not going to medical school? Maybe made them feel a little bit better by going to a hedge fund, and you're a hedge fund guy and explain what happened. Yeah. My real training and background was in tech..

Khan Academy Berar academy Mets Stanford medical school YouTube Convair
"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"He tries to punish you in the same is true. It seems with security clearances the remember that in the context of as we're learning overruling all these career people and giving security clearances to people who seem not to deserve them. He is on the other hand on multiple occasions wanted to withdraw the security clearances that people who happened to be his political rivals like John Brennan that's bad enough on its own but against the backdrop of. Of him overruling, all sorts of people who have a better idea these things, and he does I think it's obnoxious, and I think it's repugnant. And I think it's a problem, and I think it should be investigated. And I've heard some talk on the part of some Republicans of taking away Adam shifts security clearance. It's ludicrous. National security clearances are serious things. I had to go through multiple processes both as an assistant US attorney as a staffer in the Senate, and of course, as United States attorney to qualify for those things security clearances are not perks to be distributed. You know at holiday time to the people who you like and to be taken away from people who you think could behave badly this. Last question comes into tweet from Eric Snyder at east Neider underscore one who asks at pre Perahera. You are outwardly. Sanguine? How are you? Inwardly sanguine cautious skeptical concerned upset frantic panicked apoplectic. Hashtag Asprey Eric. Thank you for your question inside. I am a caged feral animal in I could explode at any moment. I'm kidding. I'm just cooling the gang. My guest this week is Sal Khan. He's the founder of the education nonprofit Khan Academy. He started out teaching one cousin over the phone. And now the videos on his site have been viewed more than one point six billion times. I speak with him about the inequities of the American education system, whether there's an attention crisis, and why we still studied trigonometry. Sometimes just unlocking the mysteries of the world is its own goal. That's coming up. Stay tuned. How much time do you think attorney span managing their legal practices, clients and cases as an attorney myself. I know that the answer is a lot, thankfully, there's a better way with Cleo..

Sal Khan John Brennan assistant US attorney attorney United States attorney Khan Academy Eric Snyder Asprey Eric east Neider Senate Adam Perahera
"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"But that leads to an interesting conundrum on the question of his role in doing the summary of the Muller report and in being involved in the assessment of whether or not obstruction was committed and the description of obstruction and making the decision along with the attorney general to say there was no obstruction. Having reviewed the Muller report, which did not make such a conclusion. Remember, the Miller report is sort of agnostic on it says we can't say that a crime was committed. We can't say that a crime was not committed. The president is honored all of that is odd because rod Rosenstein from what it looks like from the outside was a little bit of witness on hip structure, mattering, he's the one who observed things that the president. Did he had apparently conversations with the president and all throughout the pendency of the investigation. It seemed odd to me. The he's a person who has potential conflict of interest in might have needed to recuse himself that never happened in part, and maybe it's legitimate. But I just don't know. But that didn't happen in part because no Democrats over clamored for it. Nobody ever said rod Rosenstein doesn't belong involving the investigation or overseeing it because he is a material witness in some way to the obstruction and the reason for that. And that's also understandable is that Democrats in congress, and I've talked to folks who said this felt that rod Rosenstein for all intents and purposes was one of the good defenders of the Muller investigation and member people were always worried rod Rosenstein was going to be fired and he was on the wrong side of Donald Trump. There was a moment when he was summoned to the White House and everyone breathlessly reported that he was about to be canned because of his defense of the Muller investigation in the president was mad at him about that. So people looked at him as a defender of that investigation. So didn't raise questions about conflict didn't raise questions about you know, potentially his needing to recuse himself. So now, we are in a position where people are not happy with the result. People think the Bill bar inserted himself. I'm one of those people to basically say there was no obstruction here along with rod Rosenstein made clear in the letter that they did that together. And it's a little hard. I will say for Democrats in the house and the Senate to complain about rod Rosenstein involvement because all along for decent reasons. They said well, rod Rosenstein as a defender of the investigation. I think that's sort of interesting and the other interesting question is why is rod Rosenstein still there given that we had all this reporting that he was leaving. That's happened. Multiple. Maybe he's there to help with the reductions actions. Maybe he's there to help deal with litigation that may rise over the subpoena that the House Judiciary committee just voted on to obtain the report in its entirety and testimony from some other people who are under scrutiny by Bob Muller..

rod Rosenstein Bob Muller president Donald Trump White House House Judiciary committee Miller attorney congress Senate
"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"I'm a grad student in Pennsylvania. And one of my questions is previously. Keep talked about the respect that you have for rod Rosenstein. I'm just a little bit confused about the role that Rosenstein played and having any input into our wrote because in his summary. I think that he referenced that both he and Rosenstein had kinda come to these conclusions. So kind of division of who's actually responsible want what role route Rosenstein played in that. I would like a little bit of clarification on because so far it seems like the focus is mostly been on bar. And there hasn't really been much discussion about that. Thanks looking forward to hearing from you. And all listen for this on the side cast by him talked with extra question. So rod Rosenstein is sort of interesting figure in all of this. And I think we'll be an interest. Figure when the post mortems on all this are done as people may know, I know him we were together as United States attorneys. He in Baltimore, I in the southern district of New York. Let me say at the outset, you know, he's a smart disciplined thoughtful capable lawyer. I think the legacy of his involvement in all of the business of the last two years is a little bit mixed. Remember, it was rod Rosenstein who wrote that memo at the request of the president setting forth reasons why Jim Komi could be fired. None of which the reasons why Donald Trump actually fired. Jim combing, anybody who thinks that is living on a different planet. The idea that Donald Trump fired Jim Komi because he didn't treat Hillary Clinton well or color within the lines ethically with respect to Hillary Clinton is as I've said living on a planet, maybe not a planet in the solar system. So rod Rosenstein allowed himself best case scenario to be used in that instance, but then after eight or nine days of blowback in which he was vilified, I think fairly legitimately. So he oppo. Pointed Bob Muller. He's the only reason we have Bob Moore. And whether you think that's right or wrong that was a pretty important statement and a pretty important development and then throughout the pendency of the Muller investigation. It was rod Rosenstein who stood by it defended said it wasn't a witch hunt..

rod Rosenstein Donald Trump Jim Komi Bob Muller Hillary Clinton Jim combing Pennsylvania Bob Moore United States New York president Baltimore nine days two years
"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

Stay Tuned with Preet

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"sal khan" Discussed on Stay Tuned with Preet

"From cafe welcome to stay tuned. I'm Preet Berrara. Almost anything is beautiful. If you see. Wow. This has implications on how the universe works, which is from the day. We were sending we're like how does this thing? Work, this puzzle that we have found ourselves born into and every topic is answering that question in some way, shape or form. That's Sal Khan. He's the founder of Khan Academy. The online education nonprofit, I speak with him about the state of learning in America. What technology can and can't do in education and disappointing are South Asian parents by not becoming doctors that's coming up. Stay tuned. What is Justice? How is it served who wheels? It how is it accomplished? And when does it fail? These are some of the questions in moral quandaries at I wrestle with in my new book doing Justice. A prosecutors thoughts on crime punishment and the rule of law. It came out just two weeks ago into the great relief of my mom and dad it debuted at number four on the New York Times bestseller list, that's kind of a unexpected and feels pretty good. Thank you to all who have shown your support. Doing Justice is about the stories and timeless principles. That can help us understand this moment in history. I hope you'll order your copy also available as an audio book at doing Justice, book dot com. Now, let's get to your questions. Hi, this is not Asha. I'm a grad student in Pennsylvania. And one of my questions is.

Sal Khan Preet Berrara Khan Academy New York Times Pennsylvania America two weeks