35 Burst results for "russian government"

U.S. charges Russian military hackers

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

09:26 min | 5 d ago

U.S. charges Russian military hackers

"A story for you. May Two thousand seventeen voters in France went to the polls to elect a new French president just like in our election the before then Russian intelligence agencies in the Russian government played hard in the French election that year russian-owned websites pushing outlandish rumours about the centrist candidate Emmanuel macron. Those rumors were then processed into pieces Russian state media outlets. macron's rival was a far right candidate named Marine Le Pen she had inherited from her Holocaust denying Father Control of Francis Post. World War Two Fascist Party. So it was the neo-fascist party running against macron. Lapenne far-right neo-fascist campaign was explicitly bankrolled by a Russian state controlled bank. Marine Le Pen went to Moscow and met with Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin during the campaign. This was not subtle. But it was. Too much for Russia to pass up a divisive racist far right fascist candidate injecting chaos into the elections in a major. European. Democracy in twenty seventeen that's like catnip to Russia. Right? They want to undermine democracy everywhere. They will undermine Western countries in general however they can. But Russia's saved its boldest move for the eve of that French. Just two days before the vote. Russian. Hackers part of the same Russian military unit that had disseminated hacked democratic emails during the twenty, sixteen American election the before. They dumped tens of thousands of files, online, nine gigabytes of stolen emails and other information all hacked from Emmanuel Macron's campaign, and that might have become the dominant news story of the final weekend of that campaign. Before French voters went to the polls. It might have actually ended up upending that election if it were not for a quirk of French law, which imposes a media blackout on anything relating to the campaign for full day before voting starts all the way through until polls close on election day. That blackout period in French law precedes this whole scandal with Russia messing with the French election. But it ended up saving the day. The material that was hacked by Russian intelligence got posted online and France just hours before media blackout period began just minutes before the blackout began at midnight that night the macron campaign issued a statement warning that the hackers had inserted forged fake documents into the hack stolen material they pleaded with the media to not report on that junk. And the media didn't. They stuck to the rules. And in the end, Emmanuel macron beat the far-right neo-fascist Marine Le Pen by more than thirty points. And there's a couple of reasons for us be thinking about sort of relearning the story of that. Two thousand seventeen French election right now one is that the intelligence community is raising the alarm that Russian intelligence is executing an operation just like the one they did in France on us right now the supposedly Biden scandal that Rudy Giuliani has been shopping the scandal he. Managed to get printed in the New York Post which president trump has been gleefully promoting ever since including posing with a copy of that paper in the Oval Office that junk that Giuliani has been promoting is being actively investigated by federal investigators as potentially part of a hostile foreign influence operation illegally targeting our election and the intelligence community is investigating this Johnny on the spot. In part because they saw this coming in advance, this is in the New York Times last week quote, The Times reported last January the Ukrainian company were Hunter Biden was once on the Board respond had been hacked by the same Russian Intelligence Unit that hacked the Democratic National Committee in two thousand, sixteen last month US intelligence analysts contracted several people with knowledge of that hack. Asking them for further information because they picked up chatter that stolen burris, my emails would be leaked in the form of an October surprise among their chief concerns was that the burris material would be leaked alongside forged materials and it it's to hurt Biden's candidacy as Russian. Hackers did when they dumped real e mails alongside forgeries ahead of the French elections in two thousand seventeen. So that's what they did to Macron in two, thousand, seventeen they hacked all install all of this stuff from his campaign than they mixed it up with Ford stuffing dumped it right before the election. That's what the US intelligence community said. They believed was going to happen with Barista and sort of October surprise firm Rudy Giuliani. Thank right on time Rudy Giuliani shows up some emails from a mysterious source that are totally unverified and unverified able and only one Rupert Murdoch owned right wing tabloid will air that junk. Put it in their paper. So. That's one reason. The Russian operation in the two thousand, seventeen French election newly relevant to our lives right now, the Russians may be trying that exact same trick all over again except we don't have media blackout rules. The other reason that that two thousand seventeen Russian operation in France is newly relevant. Is that the guys who did it just got indicted by the US Justice Department today? Here they are the Russian military intelligence hackers who carried out that operation to interfere in the French election in two thousand seventeen the Justice Department says in the indictment today that these guys also launched major malware and hacking operations that shut down the power grid in Ukraine that hit the parliament in the nation of Georgia that chemical weapons investigators in the UK and Europe who were looking into the Russian poisoning of former Russian spy, Sergei scruple who was poisoned with a Russian nerve agent on British territory they say, they also orchestrated hacks that hit hospitals in companies. In the United States. They also organize tax that hit the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics quite a list. And? Although. One of the Russian hacker that was indicted today was previously indicted by Robert Muller in two thousand eighteen for his role in the hacking operation against the twenty sixteen election here in the US, today's indictment of these Russian hackers doesn't include any charges related to American election interference this year. That said the election. The American election is two weeks from tomorrow. It's hard to look today's indictment without trying to understand how it relates to our own election and what the Justice Department is trying to signal here. Is that the right way to look at this. Joining us now is Jeremy Bash. He served as chief of staff at the CIA and at the Defense Department under President Obama Jeremy Nice to see. Thanks for making time. It, Rachel. So, this is a lot. Going on the surprise announcement today from the Justice Department about the indictment of these Russian hackers when you look at this with your background in intelligence and your understanding of what Russia has done to target our democracy and others. What do you think is most important here for people to understand. Well I think was most important is that the GRU this Russian military organization that was responsible for the two thousand Sixteen Hacking Dump Operation Against the Democrats that was responsible for the two thousand seventeen election appearance in France as you noted, and is responsible for these militias cyber attacks globally including, against us, hospitals and. They are very active. They're very capable and they are in fact probably behind this this Russian. Intelligence operation at least a looks and appears to be Russian intelligence operation targeting the Biden campaign. Last. Week Andrew Weisman, who is part of the Miller investigation wrote in Law Fair about the decision that was made by bill bar earlier this year this spring to drop criminal charges against Russian companies that had participated in the attack on our election in two thousand sixteen and that didn't actually get a lot of attention when it happened in March I think in part because the country was overwhelmed by what was starting to happen to us in terms of covid why spent makes the case that before may have acted essentially improperly in dismissing those charges essentially signaling to Russia that the. US Criminal Law wouldn't be used against them as a tool if they wanted to interfere in the election this year I'm wondering if this might be a signal in the other direction, if this might be some sort of signal to brushback rush intelligence ahead of what appears to be their ongoing efforts to boost trump in his reelection effort. Hartono, racial. But what we do know is that there are mixed signals being sent by the US government here. Today we have the Justice Department indicting Russian hackers, but you've got the president of the United States welcoming condoning what looks apparently like a Russian intelligence operation targeting the Biden campaign remember Rachel that Rudy Giuliani. In Kiev, with Andrei Dirk Catch Ukrainian lawmaker who has been assessed by US intelligence and announced by our Treasury Department to be a Russian asset for the last decade. Giuliani goes to Kiev meets with Dir cash and he comes back and low these many months later, Giuliani surfaces up with these a very mysterious emails. So every Intelligence Professional Rachel that I've talked to the last twenty four hours says that this walks like a Russian intelligence disinformation campaign this talks like a Russian intelligence to information campaign. This is most likely Russian intelligence is permission campaign against the Biden team.

Rudy Giuliani Us Justice Department Russia United States France Emmanuel Macron Hunter Biden Macron Marine Le Pen Rachel Fascist Party President Trump Vladimir Putin Moscow
Nerve Agent Was Used to Poison Navalny, Chemical Weapons Body Confirms

Not Too Shabby

00:20 sec | 2 weeks ago

Nerve Agent Was Used to Poison Navalny, Chemical Weapons Body Confirms

"Weapons has confirmed that the Russian opposition activists, Alexei Navalny was poisoned with another choc type nerve agent. It pointed to the similarities between traces in his urine and blood samples and chemical weapons on the banned list. The Russian government has denied any involvement. Prosecutors in

Alexei Navalny Russian Government Nerve Agent
Mueller prosecutor says special counsel 'could have done more' to hold Trump accountable

The Daily 202's Big Idea

04:42 min | Last month

Mueller prosecutor says special counsel 'could have done more' to hold Trump accountable

"A former top prosecutor on special counsel Bob Miller's team writes in a new. Tell all book where law ends that the Group failed to fully investigate trump's financial ties and should have stated explicitly in their report that they believed he obstructed justice. Andrew Weissmann claims that Muller's efforts were limited by the ever present threat of trump disbanding their office and by their own reluctance to be aggressive against a sitting president. The team made sure it's work was logged into a computer system in a way so that it would be preserved if trump got rid of Mueller but Weissmann says the pressure caused them to pull punches. He likens it to a sword of Damocles hanging over all of their investigative decisions, leading them at certain times to act much less forcefully and more defensively than they would have if they were investigating anyone but the president. Weisman says it led them to delay and ultimately forego entire lines of inquiry though were quite promising particularly regarding this president financial ties to Russia. This bothered him deeply because in America no one is supposed to be above the law not even the president here is a key paragraph from Weisman's new book which comes out next week, and which we got an early copy of he writes quote. We still do not know if there are other financial ties between the president and either the Russian government or Russian oligarchs. We do not know whether he paid bribes to foreign officials to secure favourable treatment for his business interests a potential violation of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. That would provide leverage against the president. We do not know if he had other Russian business deals in the works at the time he was running for president how they might have aided or constrained his campaign or. Even if they are continuing to influence his presidency. Weisman was considered one of the top prosecutors at the justice, department had been a senior supervisor before Muller brought him onto his team. Now he teaches it Nyu law school in the book. Whitesman lays particular blame on Muller's number two errands assembly for stopping investigators from taking a broader look at trump's finances and he writes that he wonders whether investigators quote gave it their all Weisman lambasts attorney general bill bar for among other things giving the public a deeply misleading four-page summary of Moore's work before the full report was released publicly. bowlers report was far more damning than the anodyne description that bar put out. It was upon reading bars misleading four-page memo that Weisman decided yet moral obligation to write this book. Weisman is critical of Molar himself for not stating plainly that he concluded trump obstructed justice which Weisman says the evidence clearly shows Weissmann said in an interview on Monday with my colleagues Matt Sabotage and Spencer Sue that he told more, he would have stated that conclusion in the teams final report. More. Critically, Weisman complains how he felt more was wrong not to green light issuing a subpoena for trump's testimony, and he also details how he personally pressed the special counsel repeatedly to do so. The office also declined to compel testimony from the President's son Donald Trump Junior, or even to seek an interview with first daughter Ivanka trump who was involved in a lot of the potential misconduct described in the final report. Weisman's primary task was to lead the team called Team N, which investigated former trump campaign chairman Paul manafort for financial crimes in hopes that he'd flip to become a useful witness another team team are was tasked with exploring whether the trump campaign had coordinated with Russia to influence the election and another team six hundred was tasked with exploring whether trump had obstructed justice. Weisman is critical of that ladder team teams six hundred saying that an FBI agent assigned to it complained to him that it was quote pulling its punches and shooting down her views. And weisman alleges that its leader Mike driven another veteran former prosecutor. Confided in him privately that he would not have been. So mealy mouthed about saying the president had obstructed Justice Weisman's says driven. told him quote if you and I were in charge this is not how it would read. I should say here that Zebedee Moeller Andrew even did not respond to our requests for comment about what said about them in the book.

Justice Weisman President Trump Donald Trump Ivanka Trump Donald Trump Junior Muller Andrew Weissmann Prosecutor Special Counsel Russia Bob Miller Russian Government Zebedee Moeller Team N Paul Manafort NYU Financial Crimes
Berlin hospital: Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's condition has improved, he can briefly leave bed

WTOP 24 Hour News

02:35 min | Last month

Berlin hospital: Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny's condition has improved, he can briefly leave bed

"Treating Russian opposition. Leader Alexei Navalny say his condition has improved. He's off the ventilator and able to leave his bed briefly at a hospital in Berlin, Putin has emerged or I'm sorry. Now Bonnie has emerged as Putin's Vladimir Putin's biggest opponent, and there's new information today concerning his poisoning. Joining US live W T O P. NATIONAL security correspondent J. J. Green J. J. Some new evidence has surfaced, leaving little doubt that the Russian government was behind the poisoning. Tell us exactly what this is, That's right. In publication called his Eat last week. They reported late in the week, and we've been looking into it since then, and talking with a number of sources in Europe and here as well. And there apparently, is something to it. What they said was Navalny was poisoned with a quote new variant of the chemical weapon. No, Me Chuck and that variant, they say it's something that was previously unknown to the rest of the world. It is said to be more vicious and more deadly than all known offshoots of the Nova Chuck family, which makes the decision of those pilots to land the plane that he got sick on before its scheduled arrival in Moscow. All the more important in saving his life when I does this point to Russia on Lee Global intelligence and sources have been telling us for decades that the Russian intelligence apparatus created this weapon back in the seventies and eighties. During the Cold War on Ly Russian intelligence services could have carried this out. This is what German intelligence is saying today that on ly Russian intelligence could have done this. With such a lethal and complex poison, they say, and they sight more details about this, saying this means that there's still producing it. There's still using it and it's still evolving, which is a very dangerous thing. Now. Today we understand that Vladimir Putin was put on the spot by French President Macron and asked about the situation. What did Putin have to say? Interesting. Putin did not address whether or not Russia did this or not. He was asked about Russia's involvement in this and he told my crone, we have nothing to say about it. That doesn't say we didn't do it. That doesn't mean we weren't involved. Somehow. That doesn't mean this didn't come from Russia. What he said was, we have nothing to say about it. And that is a very loud statement to the world. That is a lot more than what one might think is a denial. This is a very loud statement and folks are taking it that way. All right, J. J thanks,

Vladimir Putin Russia Alexei Navalny Russian Government J. J United States Europe Moscow Berlin Bonnie Lee Global Macron J. J. Green
US-Russia Tensions Flare up on Multiple Fronts

Sean Hannity

00:44 sec | Last month

US-Russia Tensions Flare up on Multiple Fronts

"White House says it's deeply troubled that a Russian opposition leader has been poisoned more from the Pentagon about other Russian meddling one day after the German government said Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was poisoned with a deadly nerve agent. The Russian government denied the charge. Traces of Nova chock a product of Russia's chemical weapons stockpile was found on Navalny who remains gravely ill. Poisoning comes days after a Russian fighter jet blows an American B 52 bomber over the Black Sea. And what a U. S officials called ahead but maneuver passing in front of the nose and full afterburner, creating turbulence for the U. S. Air Force bomber crew. Last week, Russian forces sideswiped a U. S military vehicle in Syria, injuring seven American soldiers at

Russian Government Alexei Navalny Nerve Agent German Government Black Sea Pentagon White House U. S. Air Force Russia Syria U. S
Germany identifies nerve agent used to poison Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:26 sec | Last month

Germany identifies nerve agent used to poison Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny

"Vladimir Putin and his government were involved in a poisoning. Former CBS News Moscow bureau chief Beth Noble says the results show That Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was poisoned by a military grade nerve agent last month. One of NAVALNY strategist says that to have poisoned Navalny with this particular nerve agent is like leaving an autograph at a crime scene that it just totally implicates the Russian government. House Speaker Nancy

Nerve Agent Vladimir Putin Alexei Navalny Beth Noble Bureau Chief CBS Navalny Nancy
German government says test showed nerve agent Novichok in samples from Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

Morning Becomes Eclectic

00:46 sec | Last month

German government says test showed nerve agent Novichok in samples from Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny.

"Leader Alexei Navalny was poisoned with a nerve agent Nova Chalk and is demanding an explanation from Moscow. NPR's rub. Schmitz reports Toxicology test carried out by a German army laboratory revealed what it said was the doubtless presence of a chemical nerve agent of the Nova Choke group in Navalny system. I've only was flown to Berlin, August 22nd after he collapsed while on a flight from Siberia to Moscow. Nova Choke is the same nerve agent that was used to poison Sergei scruple of former Soviet spy and his daughter in a 2018 attack in Britain that Western nations have blamed on Moscow. In a statement, A spokesman for German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the German government condemns the attack in the strongest possible terms and that the Russian government is urgently requested to explain what happened. Rob Schmitz. NPR NEWS

Nerve Agent Rob Schmitz Nova Choke Moscow Nova Chalk NPR Alexei Navalny German Government German Army Angela Merkel Russian Government Chancellor Siberia Sergei Navalny Berlin Britain
In mock funerals and '42' jerseys, kids mourn Black Panther

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

In mock funerals and '42' jerseys, kids mourn Black Panther

"The fans German young government and old are trying says Russian to come to opposition grips with leader the death at Alexei the age of forty Navalny three of Black was poisoned Panther star with Chadwick the same Boseman type of Soviet era nerve agent Bozeman's death the prompted British authorities Black Panther identified Wakanda salutes into twenty around the country eighteen and mock attack funerals on a former Bobby Russian and Lenny spy homes live in mesa chancellor Arizona Angela Merkel's we got spokesman a lot Steffen of action Seiber figures that says testing out you a military saw facility and met before had inside now shown the movies proof without and then doubt put the them chemical around nerve him agent their arms from outstretched the know the chalk Gavin group Batiste lives I think in Lafayette it's a Louisiana dismaying event thank you that there not is only gone was I the victim don't know what of an to attack say with I a never chemical thought nerve this agent would happen in in Russia my day Germany has this demanded is a response from the Russian government nine his mom the Clinton Sonya says says Bozeman it hasn't and been its characters formed yet in the movies all the bounty represented being a poisoned sense of reality with a nerve agent and hope a I'm sense Charles of the of last dreaming month and to jazz embrace you are eleven year old Nick coming says when he heard Chadwick Boseman died it felt like a part of him got erased I'm a Donahue

Russian Government Charles Louisiana Gavin Arizona Chancellor Mesa Wakanda Black Panther Donahue Chadwick Boseman Nick Clinton Sonya Alexei Germany Russia Lafayette Batiste Seiber Steffen
Germany says Russia's Navalny poisoned with nerve agent

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

Germany says Russia's Navalny poisoned with nerve agent

"The German government says Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny was poisoned with the same type of Soviet era nerve agent the British authorities identified into twenty eighteen attack on a former Russian spy chancellor Angela Merkel's spokesman Steffen Seiber says testing out a military facility had now shown proof without doubt the chemical nerve agent from the know the chalk group I think it's a dismaying event that not only was the victim of an attack with a chemical nerve agent in Russia Germany has demanded a response from the Russian government the Clinton says it hasn't been formed yet all the bounty being poisoned with a nerve agent I'm Charles the last month

Alexei Navalny Nerve Agent Angela Merkel Steffen Seiber Germany Clinton Charles Chancellor Russia
Navalny’s team sees Kremlin behind attack

Inside Europe

05:08 min | 2 months ago

Navalny’s team sees Kremlin behind attack

"Activists in. Russia. Say They will not be silenced despise the apparent poisoning, their most prominence leader Alexey navalny he collapsed after drinking a cup of tea an airport cafe while campaigning in Siberia. If he was poisoned, it's the latest in a series of attacks on Kremlin critics. Journalists both inside and outside the country and European leaders are threatening a robust response. Our Moscow correspondent Lucy Taylor reports at the budget logger staying. Agents ability. To Christ his four million Youtube followers Alexei navalny has the loudest voice speaking out against the Kremlin Russia. Deborah wound. He exposes corruption and embezzlement and rallies crowds of young protesters in Russia's cities another newsletter rob discussed they didn't really. In this video a few weeks ago he tells them to believe in themselves and the power to change the country. But for now, at least that voice is silent. Nevada. Collapsed screaming on a plane and Siberia. His team immediately blamed a cup of tea. He drank in an airport cafe. The only thing he had to eat drink that day you. Russian doctors in the city of oems said, there was no trace of toxins move in. I can say for sure oxo Bates and barbiturates of not being found the research is going on, but those agents not in Nevada his body. This was the chief doctor, the hospital Alexander Murkowski. Already, working diagnoses. The main one we leaned towards most his carbohydrate balanced disorder meaning metabolic disorder. It might have been caused by a rapid drop of blood sugar in a plane which caused him to pass out. Novon. These family insisted he was airlifted to Germany to doctors. They trusted to be independent, and by contrast the team Berlin Scherzer's hospital say that's s syndicate that he was poisoned. They say they found evidence if Colin stays inhibitors which affect the nervous system and could cause long-term deal. The German government has kept Navalny unto tight. Watch. This is the Foreign Minister Heiko Mas. Differ. Suspicion is not that Mr Navalny poisoned himself, but there's someone poisoned misdemeanor felony and there are unfortunately one or two examples of such poisonings in recent. Russian. History it was clear that after his arrival security measures had to be put into place, we are dealing with the patient to likely the targets of a poison attack. So the pressure is building on Russia to investigate what happened. The Kremlin says, it's offended by claims of a cover up and says, there's no need for an investigation until it's conclusively proven poison was involved but analysts abroad say the case follows a pattern of attacks on critics including the Salisbury poisoning of the former spy, Sergei scruple in twenty. I share ran gap from the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs Gail University. The fact that this may be poisoning. This is a part of a pattern that the Russian government has engaged and you all know this just from the nerve Asian. That was used in this cripple poisoning, other Russian spies, both in Britain and elsewhere been poisoned. It's a really that's not something that one that is a common way of attacking someone so I think there's sort of a signature here that suggests that this is a Russian government, probably a GRU intelligence operation. The Russian government denies any involvement in Alexei navalny illness saying the accusations can't be taken seriously and it denies that there is any trend of attacks on anti-government figures. Russia's State Duma is looking into whether they're foreign links to the attack on. Novelli. But his friends say is the third time that he's been poisoned in Russia. This is his friends surgery of it is very important to remember. It's not the first attack on Nevada using chemical agents. He was attacked in two thousand seventeen. The video cameras actually identify the man who executed the attack. This man was not investigated interrogated or prosecuted. The second time was attacked last summer. When he was detained in. Moscow. Prison and was actually administered within the prison within the prison cell. So it was also very easy to investigate. It was not investigated as well. which kind of tells you how the Kremlin treats people who Tacna Botany Moose Women Somewhere Bolshoi. Kremlin says it doesn't want Nevada illness to damage ties with Western countries. Assist supporters prepare to fight regional elections without navalny. The case could have wider geopolitical consequences. The United States said it would endorse the European Union led investigation and German Chancellor Angela Merkel said those responsible should be held to account. See. Taylor d-w Moscow.

Alexei Navalny Russia Nevada Kremlin Moscow Russian Government ROB Siberia Lucy Taylor Alexey Navalny Novelli Berlin Scherzer Deborah Alexander Murkowski Youtube German Government Oxo Bates Germany Angela Merkel
Kremlin says no evidence leading opposition leader was poisoned

The World and Everything In It

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Kremlin says no evidence leading opposition leader was poisoned

"Leaders are calling for an investigation into the suspected poisoning of Russian opposition leader. Alexei navalny but the Kremlin says it sees no need world's Kristen Flab has that story. NAVAN is currently in a coma in a Berlin hospital and doctors there say evidence suggests he was likely poisoned German? Chancellor. Angela Merkel has called for a full Russian investigation and officials from the United States France and Norway echoed that statement on Tuesday. But the Russian government says there are no grounds for a criminal investigation rush doctors and pro-kremlin media reported there was no indication of only was poisoned divall. Knee is an outspoken critic of President Vladimir Putin his lawyer and doctor said, the forty four old was also poisoned in July of Twenty nineteen by an unknown chemical agent reporting for world I'm Kristen

Kristen Flab President Vladimir Putin Russian Government Alexei Navalny Angela Merkel Navan Chancellor Coma Berlin United States Norway France
Russian government brushes off accusations Navalny poisoned

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 2 months ago

Russian government brushes off accusations Navalny poisoned

"The Kremlin has brushed off allegations the Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny who is in a coma in a German hospital was poisoned Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov has dismissed the accusations saying we absolutely cannot be true on arrival an empty noise the insistence by the government that the valley wasn't necessarily poison comes a day often German doctors said tests indicated that he was poisoned and elicited outrage from the valleys allies who say the criminal is behind the illness Peskov ads he sees no grounds for launching a criminal probe into the valleys condition saying he could have been triggered by a variety of courses I'm Charles the Ledesma

Alexei Navalny Coma Dmitry Peskov Charles The Ledesma
Senate intelligence report warns of repeat of Russian interference in US election

Hidden Wealth

03:04 min | 2 months ago

Senate intelligence report warns of repeat of Russian interference in US election

"Week, the Senate Intelligence Committee released its final report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. A detailed significant contacts between the Trump campaign and people with ties to Russian intelligence. Former campaign manager Paul Manafort was especially singled out as a grave counterintelligence threat. More on the Senate report will speak to Olivia Beavers, congressional reporter at the Hill. There's really build on our knowledge from other investigations and incense become public, which is the House intelligence investigation and the special counsel's investigation. It was made public last year now. Some of the main points there really caught our attention for those of us who have been following this closely is just a great detail and how they hae. These extensive communications between Russia and members of the Trump campaign, and one of the names that really stood out was Paul Manafort and Home. Manafort, they said was in constant communication with someone means Kalinic and they went further than the special counsel and described clinic as a Russian intelligence officer. So basically, they were saying that Manafort was willing to share a polling data he was helping with Russian oligarchs. Efforts to spread information overseas in different countries and He was also possibly interacting consulate with this as they describe it, Intelligence officer who might have had an involvement in the DNC hack in 2016, so it really kind of Through Manafort and these Russian government linked individuals much closer than I think. We had previously known another report with regards to Paul Manafort, they said, because he was so willing to share some of that data that he was a grave counterintelligence threat. Although they didn't go a Sfar saying he actually quote unquote colluded. With anybody that was never really determined. But just because of his dealing with this guy that they now deemed a Russian intelligence officer. He was a big threat that way and a lot of what they also talk about is that Russia Saw all these vulnerabilities in the trump transition team. They saw them as an experienced, disorganized unprepared and they were ready to exploit all of that. That really stood out as well. They were saying, you just touched on. They basically saw an opportunity that you had all these inexperienced business officials working on the transition team. And they decided to take advantage of that. And they did that through reaching out to people who didn't have these kind of foreign affairs backgrounds was understanding how Russia works, and it wasn't just Russia. It was other countries. They said. Allies and businesses, but basically you had During the transition. You have a new president coming in. And you have all these outsiders rushing kind of embedded themselves to a point where they have access and that was A point that this report was trying to make is that this is not a thing that is safe for our intelligence purposes, and we should be more careful about going

Paul Manafort Senate Intelligence Committee Officer Russia House Intelligence Special Counsel Sfar Donald Trump Senate Olivia Beavers President Trump Reporter DNC Kalinic
Doctors Blocking Aleksei Navalny's Transfer Out of Russia, Supporters Say

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:14 min | 2 months ago

Doctors Blocking Aleksei Navalny's Transfer Out of Russia, Supporters Say

"Russian doctors say opposition figure and prominent critic of President Vladimir Putin is too sick to be sent to Germany for treatment. Alexei Navalny has been in a coma since falling ill on a flight Russian doctors controversially claiming that no valley wasn't poisoned after all, Yes, they're still refusing to let him fly to Europe for treatment, and this is against the wishes of his family colleagues. And in these doctor, the 44 year old is Russia's highest profile opposition leader, vocal critic of the Kremlin on Vladimir Putin. He became ill on a flight to Moscow. Now video from the airport shows the activist before he boarded the plane. A spokesperson saying he was poisoned, possibly in a cup of tea that you drank that they're on the plane. You can hear a painful moaning in a video recorded by a passenger's others filmed as the plane makes a landing in Siberia and the valleys put onto a stretcher. I'm rushed to the hospital, The valley's team plain that they were were told told the the substance substance in in this this system system was was dangerous dangerous for for anyone anyone to to be be around around him, him, and and they they accused accused Kremlin Kremlin of of blocking blocking his evacuation from Siberia. In a deliberate attempt to try and cover up his poisoning the Russian government's being accused of poisoning its critics in the past. Of course, something's always denied. No valley remains in intensive care and still no clear answers as to what unearth happened to

President Vladimir Putin Kremlin Kremlin Siberia Alexei Navalny Russian Government Coma Europe Moscow Russia Germany
Russia announces expanded trials for coronavirus vaccine approved 10 days ago

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

Russia announces expanded trials for coronavirus vaccine approved 10 days ago

"Trying to coax more information out of Russia, about that Corona virus vaccine it claims to have developed. The Russian government says it's already giving it to its citizens after approving the vaccine last week, even though it hasn't yet past the advanced trials. They're normally required to prove a vaccine works. A senior official at the W. H O says they are taking an accelerated approach to speed the development of a Corona virus vaccine, but they're still concerned about safety and efficacy of all potential vaccines. Not only the Russian one Dr.

Russian Government Russia Official W. H O
Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny in grave but stable condition after suspected poisoning

The World

03:33 min | 2 months ago

Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny in grave but stable condition after suspected poisoning

"Alexei Navalny, the face of Russia's opposition, a lawyer, a politician and a harsh critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Today, Navalny isn't an intensive care unit in Siberia. Suspected of poisoning reporter Charles Mains joins us from Moscow Charles How did all this play out and hasn't been established? That someone did indeed. Try to poison navalny? Well, it's still a developing story. And as far as whether you indeed was poisoned or not, is still an open theory, depending on who you talk to. We do know that he was fine home from Tomsk in Siberia back to Moscow. Along the flight. He didn't feel well, which prompted an emergency landing in Omsk not to be confused with Tomsk. Navarone now is actually in a medically induced coma on a respirator at the hospital there. Doctors say he's in serious but stable condition, although their quote fighting for his life Also lets his wife Julia, and his personal doctor now there's well that there were reports have some delays in getting access to Navalny initially with lots of police on the scene, So how did this happen? Have you heard any theories? Will his spokesperson I care? Young. Bush made comments to media here. So she says he just drank some black tea at the airport before the flight, and it's obvious that he was poisoned at that moment. Idea here being that hot liquid was more likely to absorb quickly into his body. You know, In fact, a passenger named Pavel Lebedev took a photo of navalny sitting at the cafe in the airport before he got on the flight. He appeared to be drinking tea and later the two of them ended up on that same flight. Andi. It's interesting that some point heat this level have noticed Howl's coming from the laboratory realized that the cries were coming from Navalny, and he ended up detail ing all this in a post to social media once he touched down in arms. So that was at the airport. What else can you tell us about the suspected poisoning? Is there any talk of a possible suspect or suspects or or a motive? No suspects yet certainly know among Navalny supporters. They find this to be no accident. Not surprising. They think it's politically motivated. Navalny has made his fair share of enemies with Siri's reports on corruption in the highest rungs of the Russian government and off Russian business. He's certainly been attacked numerous times before, including in 2017, when provocateurs doused him with a green dye that partially blinded him for a period. Then again in 2019 when he was exposed to some toxic substance while serving a month prison term, which caused some skin lesions, But he made it. Okay on course, there's this troubling pattern of enemies or perceived enemies. Of the Russian state being poisoned, Attacked, sometimes killed, you know in this prompts this constant debate here over who's really behind them, and specifically whether Vladimir Putin really gains from these brazen attacks on his opponents, and that the Kremlin says they're designed to make Putin look bad, and I want to bring in another voice here. This is Andre Kalashnikov, an analyst with the Moscow Carnegie Center here. Even if Kremlin doesn't know anything involved Squad Strange because it means that this kind of events are uncontrollable. FSB local If his B Saman emus off, no one could do it. Without essentially from Kremlin Now. The other option, says Kalashnikovs that the's orders or indeed, coming from the top from Putin. The point is, we can suspect but never seem to really know and interesting enough. The reaction to today's news from the Kremlin spokesman Was to wish Navalny speedy recovery reporter Charles Mains in Moscow. Thank you very much for this.

Alexei Navalny Vladimir Putin Kremlin Moscow Tomsk Charles Mains Siberia Howl Pavel Lebedev Reporter Bush Navalny Omsk Russia Moscow Carnegie Center Russian Government President Trump Julia Andre Kalashnikov
Final Senate Intelligence Report On 2016 Election Russian Interference Released

Morning Becomes Eclectic

01:02 min | 2 months ago

Final Senate Intelligence Report On 2016 Election Russian Interference Released

"Three year long Senate Intelligence Committee probe affirms links between the Russian government on the Trump campaign as well as a Kremlin sanctioned breach. That undermined the 2016 election in Trump's favor. NPR's Tim Mak reports of final bipartisan report on Russian election interference is now public. The report outlines former Trump Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort CE work with a man named Constantine Kalim Nick, who they identify as a Russian intelligence officer. The Senate Intelligence Committee says that Manafort sought to share secret internal trump campaign information with him briefed Kalim Nick on the campaign's polling data and how they wanted to beat Hillary Clinton in the 2016 election. The report also says that the committee obtained evidence that clinic may have been related to the Russian government hack and leak operations targeting the 2016. American election. NPR's to Mack reporting, President Trump maintains He wanted 2016 election fair and square, calling investigations into his campaign's ties with Russia, a democratic and media fueled hoax

President Trump Senate Intelligence Committee Constantine Kalim Nick NPR Paul Manafort Tim Mak Hillary Clinton Kremlin Chairman Russia Mack Officer
Anti-Kremlin protests continue in Russia's far eastern city of Khabarovsk

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:27 min | 2 months ago

Anti-Kremlin protests continue in Russia's far eastern city of Khabarovsk

"Thousands of people took to the streets again in Russia's. Russia's far, east and city of Khobar of yesterday protests against Moscow, and the Kremlin have now been going on for over three weeks. Joining me for more to mark. Gherman Russia analyst stunt senior associate fellow at the Royal United Services Institute Good Morning and welcome to the program Mark. Could we first recap what exactly has happened so far? The first protests were sparked by the arrest off a local politician weren't they? They were the local governor elected local governor Sergei for Guile, and this was on fifteen year old charges of involvement with some contract killing, which may or may not be true. He was set me involved in some questionable business. But the widespread assumption amongst the locals was that it was simply because the Kremlin was was peeved at him at the fact that he had stood against their candidate and then just simply rummaged around looking for suitable charges, and since then these protests have continued for, as you said, now, almost a month and it's really. So transmogrify from being about four, how to actually being about Moscow. About Putin and about the sense that in a way, the government in Moscow cares about the rest of Russia outside. It's ring road when it comes to taxing them rather than looking after them. Have those protests course most grow by surprise? Absolutely, an indeed one of the interesting signs of that is precisely that there has been such a clampdown on any references to the protests. In the official TV media, we've seen accounts in the newspapers and online sites, but very much from the televisions point of view, it's nothing and that's a classic sign off what what Moscow does when it doesn't know what to do. It basically tries to by itself, some breathing space, but the trouble is cost nowadays. Russians. Are Very Internet savvy and. And the news has gone out anyway, and at the moment I, think the Russians Russian government is essentially playing a waiting game. They don't really want to try and take on these thousand strong protests especially because the local law enforcement and security agencies frankly don't particularly infused to do so and therefore ain't now waiting hoping that it'll die down to the point when they can actually begin to crack down. Do you think that's going to to the protests? We'll just eventually die down. Well I think the honest answer is, yes. We saw the most recent protests are actually smaller than in previous ones and impact that was because it was rainy rainy day in such like. But because it's not as though, these can can go anywhere what the what, what are the real significance not that somehow this protest will, it will explode and expand. It's precisely what it shows about incipient protests potential within Russia because there's nothing particularly special about kebabs. He's not like he was unusually poor or badly hit by corona virus or whatever, and I think. Right. This is so worrying for the Kremlin, is that sense of fine we can ride out this one protest in this one city. But what does it say about the potential for more protests all across the country exactly disease dimension that. Putin rather strong grip on power buddies this. Really, the case everywhere in Russia also in more distant places such as city in the Far East? Well. This is interesting thing. It's that you might have protests the loyalty to the center. Until. Push comes to shove. We've seen as particularly in Russia east of the Urals for which there is classic. Russian proverb God is in Heaven Bizarre is far away where absolutely Moscow is a very distant force and we've seen it in the past where actually local authorities. Are often in cahoots with local security operators in their own corrupt deals and so forth. But also they feel the same kind of pressures and resentment as ordinary Russians. So I think one of the strengths of Putin's regime has always been that he's understood when not to push when to make concessions. But at the moment in a corona virus has eroded his personal support, the money is tight it's that much harder to make the kind of. Deals Shantou involve splashing the money around that. He has in the past. So it's an interesting question. I mean, yes, he's not gonNA be swept away by this. He's not disappear anytime soon, but the slow corrosion, the legitimacy of his regime is becoming all the more visible exactly, and let's remember this beauty can did now stay in power until two thousand and thirty six thanks to changes to Russia's constitution. Do you think he actually has to address this issue of erosion and do you think people are going to appreciate him for years to come? Well I mean who knows quite how history is going to take him. Frankly, I think probably quite harshly. He will have to address the question of legitimacy, but again I think the thing is that. Putting has been around longtime. He's been power twenty, two years I. Think if trump has exhausted his capacities to reinvent himself he's got these grand national projects that you meant to be about totally reconfiguring national interest structure and health and such like, and it's really quite telling that he's recently pushed back the timeframe for their accomplishment. He clearly has a very ambitious agenda. Agenda, but he doesn't seem to know either how to really accomplish it, and secondly how to afford it. So I think he's he's hoping at the moment that things just get better that do course the virus abates. The economy stabilizes and things will work out not sure how far holding your fingers. A crossing your fingers is really going to be a proper answer. The most go the Kremlin on Moscow seemed to be waiting that these protests were seeing in Cabbarov Squirrel, just gradually die away. But what if they doesn't what kind of a warning example this? Of Four four Moscow and UNFOR, Vladimir? Putin. We we have reached elections coming up rather soon. How can make sure that something like that doesn't happen in those cities in those regions as well? Well, here's the problem he can't because it's really about is going to catch nation of random factory in football was not particularly personally popular. It was more the just his arrest, which under other circumstances might well have. Have passed pretty much unnoticed. Just somehow catalyzed. They just general sense of being fed up. There was a coastal city. Now. Elsewhere, we have certain places I. Mean, for example, in in Novosibirsk in Siberia, there's sort of contested elections coming up where we actually have real opposition politics emerging. The government is going to hope that it considered squelch Shalit's, but didn't that it has to have these parliamentary elections however. Much the parliament itself is just a rubber stamp. Nonetheless, it has to have these elections and elections. Inevitably case it paces when situations are that, there will be discussions disagreements, it will generate or kind of precious. Again, what we're seeing something that means it's highly difficult to predict. That's irritating for an analyst like myself. You difficult to predict exactly what and where it's going to happen, but there is a prevailing sense in Moscow that. The country is entering some bumpy. Times? Would it be easier for peace in to lead his country. If it was simply smaller, it is understandable that Russians thousands of miles away from Moscow? Mayfield. They don't wants to be controlled by the capital, isn't it? Exactly. Eleven time zones away or whatever I mean the actually that sense that Moscow doesn't really care is really quite pervasive, but to be perfectly honest look I've traveled outside Moscow itself. Even within the Moscow region, you find these pockets of ticky rural poverty, where actually all the shiny new infrastructure, the bright lights, the hipster bars and things of Moscow seem alone wrong where way. So size does matter, but I think it's really not the key issue. It's about the extent to which this is a regime which is focused on Moscow and Petersburg, a handful of other major cities and really has developed them at the expense of the rest of the country. And just finally, Mark Looking at these protests and fierce Moscow and beauty may have. How can President Putin bring the nation together? Again is widely assumed that looking for enemies from the West has been one way for into boost his own popularity domestically. Do you expect that we may see some kind of new maneuvers from the president in the future if things get worse domestically. Well, there's this overwhelming assumption in the West that, yes, that he tries to distract attention this way we have to realize that with the exception of the two, thousand, fourteen annexation of Crimea. which was very, very unusual case. None of the various overseas adventures that Putin has engaged in Syria and so forth have been either driven by domestic considerations or frankly popular i. mean half the time. Actually the Russian regime lies to its own people to claim that it's at interventions abroad are much less than they really are. So I think what we're going to say is not some kind of adventure abroad, but we will. Will see a rising tone to this propaganda about the world is a hostile place and the Russia is beleaguered fortress. He doesn't make Putin popula. What it does do is it legitimises his Moose clamped down on the opposition because he can say, this is not a time to be divided because Russia's very future is at threat

Moscow Russia President Putin Analyst Khobar Royal United Services Institut Sergei Mark Looking Urals Novosibirsk President Trump Official Guile Football Crimea. Senior Associate Petersburg Mayfield
"russian government" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:56 min | 8 months ago

"russian government" Discussed on KTOK

"With the Russian government to influence the election is that true in any way shape manner or form Julian Assange's answer that is absolutely false and if you read their statements carefully goes on to give a more detailed as I put this up on Twitter if you want to watch the whole interview and then I go back again can you say to the American people unequivocally you didn't get this information about the DNC Podesta's emails can you tell the American people a thousand percent he did not get it from Russia yes meeting go to Russia or anybody associated with Russia answer we can say and we have said repeatedly over the last two months that our source is not the Russian government is not a state party and I I went back even more times asking Linda how many times I go back on this thing I went back again and again and again now here's my point okay they want to go after Juliana signage but the espionage act I might all hello Hillary is top secret classified our information on her secret server why don't we go after her how come we have this dole justice system we have somebody that we know bought and paid for a dirty Russian dossier to influence the twenty sixteen election all the things they're saying I guess it's in this extradition hearing about Julian a son Lee's Julian a son I did ask him at one point how does he view himself you know do you think you are a journalist what we know what is what do you think your role is armed and I hear but I asked about other things have you ever talked any surrogates of the trump campaign now have you ever talked to put no trump no any of his targets now not one no his report you may have talked to somebody is associated with the campaign Roger stone no that's false I mean we asked all the questions and then I said well how do you view yourself are you a journalist you view this as reporting and his answer was well there's a difference which is our materials better presented etcetera etcetera he likes to put out a whole information is what are you saying here the public responded to it more than say The New York Times that's interesting The New York Times and I think it has everything to do with the Pentagon paper case and and that's what the Washington post and The New York Times the Pentagon papers a series of documents put together about the Vietnam War and the publishing of a series from page articles based on the information that came from the Pentagon papers is a landmark six three decision of the U. S. Supreme Court this was a big deal ruling that the government had failed to prove there was any harm to national security in the publication of papers justified under the first amendment's protection of freedom of the press well this Hillary Clinton get that we have a dual justice system that is the biggest problem.

Russian government
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:36 min | 10 months ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"So you may have seen a strange and totally disturbing headline this week. Just that the entire Russian government resigned Including Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and a whole host of other top level officials. Now this doesn't mean that Vladimir Putin's regime gene is over in fact quite the opposite. We're GONNA talk about this week on worldly part of the VOX media. podcast network are the ways in which should setting up plan for succession for someone coming after Vladimir Prudent for Putin to take over in a different role. I'm ZAC beach in here. Is Always with generalize outward hit him. Hey what's going on. We are also here with dre. Kendall Taylor Taylor who is a senior fellow at the Center for new American Security very well-known Russia expert and particularly authored a paper on regime succession. Some really happy. Happy that she's here happy to be with you so I have to tell you guys. I was running a little bit late this morning. And part of that is that I had a dream last night. That and this is real. This is all real That I shot Vladimir Putin accidentally well visiting Russia and it didn't go over well with the Russian government and it was quite disturbing and so overslept alarm and kind of freaked out. I think even over. We're preparing for the PODCAST. A podcast stress the Russians. Back by making you late somehow in your dream no. I was just so stressed out when I woke up. Because because I'd difficulty differentiating reality dreamland. That I like overslept by alarm I looked at I was like okay. What's going on and then filled later? So you shooting. Putin could be a reality for you and your mind. It seems like I was in a shootout John. Krasinski was there. It was really cared that you didn't actually shoot Putin power correct. That's actually the thrust of this episode shows our guest Andrea. I want to start with you. Tell US exactly what these reforms reforms quote Putin proposed this week might do I think the most important change was Putin's announcement about pretty radical changes to the constitution That would shift power away from the presidency towards the parliament. I think quite notably he also talked about strengthening this kind of relatively sleepy almost defunct a funk State Council which I think gives some clues about maybe what Putin is planning so basically. He's announce these constitutional changes not only. Did he shift power or away from the president towards the parliament but there were some other rules about any future. President can only serve two terms so at the end of the twelve years. That's it taking away. Those consecutive terms as we know Putin served two terms stepped out and then was back that will be no more and there was another interesting reform to that. Talked about about Any future president has to have had lived in Russia for twenty five consecutive years. Not hold any resident permits. So he's basically saying no. The future president in Russia will not be Alexei. Navalny or Koepke or anyone like that so in many ways just like you said these changes should be interpreted as setting up Putin Hooton to continue to rule Russia for the foreseeable future. Okay and that's kind of what I wanted to know is like if you look at this on paper. It seems like you know he's Setting up term limits. So it looks like he would then be kicked out. He's expected to. He's supposed to step down in two thousand twenty four that's when his term is up and he's giving more power word of the parliament. Can you kind of just explain 'cause like when I just look at this on paper. It looks like he's giving away power right. It looks like he's you know. Moving power away from the presidency toward for the parliament telling the parliament that they can pick new prime minister. You just kind of explain how that actually may extend his power. Because I think just looking at it. It's a little confusing. Yes so we would the one thing that we were all expecting that Putin would do something. I think. That's the timing of this caught everyone by surprise rave but we've known for a long time that Putin's his consecutive term limits expired twenty twenty four so he was going to have to do something people expected he would do something that would enable him to continue to rule and so now he's creating a Russia currently under this nineteen ninety-three constitution has a very strong executive branch. It's a very very strong presidential system. The previous President Boris Yeltsin wasn't really able to ever to fully leverage the powers that that constitution gave him but Putin obviously has been quite effective at fully exploiting the powers that are are pro allowed under the nineteen ninety-three constitution so Putin now is basically saying like there will never be another president as strong as I am and so he you know. Oh He's come a long he has taken Russia out of that. Very turbulent transition wave after the fall of the Soviet Union and he basically wants to to create a system that is less allows for less concentration of power So no one can really benefit the way that he did He is then changing and shifting power towards the parliament and I think than the expectation would be that President Putin would shift he would move over and serve of either as prime minister or he would take over as head of the State Council and I think the the thing. That's interesting is that there is some precedent for this. And so you if you look at Turkey you for example I was Kinda thought about this as like an Air John but in reverse Amazon had served as prime minister for something like eleven years and then through change the constitution to make for a strong presidential system step down as prime minister was elected to President and now he's able to continue to rule there so that's one one option he's moved powers president. Putin now has moved these powers towards the parliament so he could step in his prime minister or I think the most likely option in my mind seems names that he will step into this role as head of the State Council and be able to rule from there and again. There's another precedent when you look Kazakhstan and so that's something that we saw just as recently as twenty eighteen and I think was probably something that Putin was watching very closely and so they are nozzle by was president for almost thirty years. changed his constitution to empower. This new you know. He stepped in as head of the Security Council empowered that gave it more powers stepped in in there and allowed his successor to rule so I think he was watching that quite closely. He's basically setting up a new system shifting power to an area where he would be able to. Let's stop in and continue to control an influence domestic and foreign policy. I don't know until the end. No like the obvious question or at least that I have thinking about this is is why doesn't Putin. Just change the constitution to get rid of term limits and stay informal power and my understanding is that there are real concerns about popular backlash in that world right. He is at a relatively low ebb. popularity-wise Americans are used to thinking of Putin is being spoiler strongman but in actuality the economy's not doing very well. Well it seems like just cemented. His time as a fallen authoritarian would risk some kind of more direct backlash from the Russian populations that wrong. No I think that's exactly right even stepping back before yesterday I mean there were. He basically had a couple of options disposal. That would allow him to stay on one option. One would be he could pick a successor handpicked. Someone step down fade into the to the background in allow successor to run in elections and continue on That's a model. We've seen in some authoritarian regimes. It hasn't worked out that well. There are some really cool political science research that shows when an incumbent authoritarian regime doesn't actually stand in elections that the opposition than has a much higher chance of winning so we saw that for example in Kenya when Moi stepped down his chosen successor Kibaki lost elections Another highly personalized authoritarian regime in Ghana. Jerry Rawlings did the same thing. His handpicked successor. reince stepped in ran in elections in lost their so. That is something that looks like. That's probably not in the cards for Putin. The the the other option that as is as you rightly said is that he could have just abolish term limits. And that's what we saw in China Xi Jinping. He did that very early in his term to set up the situation where he could be ruler for life and and it is interesting. That honestly what. I expected what happened. I thought that Putin would find a way to change term limits in stay on In part because there's also kind of a global trend towards that happening we're seeing leaders across Africa and also all across the globe. There's been an increasing incidence of leaders who using referendum or other kind of legalistic mechanisms demonstrating that it's the will of the popular vote to legitimize the action that they are extending term limits so in in all honesty. That's what I thought would happen but this is another what we're seeing now. This shifting powers to a different is a constitutional change of another kind. That seems I think. Think a little bit less outrageous a little less egregious probably from popular perspective. It is interesting that Putin van will take this to a referendum. We've heard now. Oh By may first. Because he is he he does want to try to legitimize these actions but I think the the term limit extensions probably would have been seen by Russians Russians as unacceptable. He did face when he stepped back into office. In twenty twelve those huge street protests. And so I think that was probably top of mind for him too so the timing of this. This actually is what's fascinating to me because basically anyone who's the thing about this including you came early right and so I think one of the reasons that I should say before I continue is that I talked to a friend of ours read standish who's a journalist Moscow so anything I say the smartest probably likely because of him But the the doing this early was one to to stop a popular backlash to make sure that there weren't those big protests that we've seen so far but another one is that he's trying to set the table Oh for the important Duma elections in twenty twenty one the lower being the president. It's a lower house of parliament and where that's where they're going to need to ratify a lot outta these changes and so having a year plus ish to work on this to signal that this is what Putin wants the kind of system emme wants. It gives him time to lean on a lot of these lawmakers which shouldn't be that hard gas but also to just kind of set the table for what's happening And I'm also wondering 'cause there have been some reports of infighting within the government that there have been some elites who have been trying to. I've been thinking about well. What does life after Putin look like? And they've been sort of jockeying and fighting for position and maybe trying to get ahead and I wonder if this is Putin like slapping his kids you know and just stop it. I'm going to be here for a while and you guys need to stop infighting and just kind of get along with the package. It's it's I mean Putin is a smart tactician. This seems like a really good sort of just political move and also public relations move And I think he's learned the lessons lessons of the past couple of years. Yeah I think it's incredibly smart it. It seems like it's relatively well played and now it seems obvious. You know obviously hindsight that this was something that is planned in part because because of the the way that it latches up with the Duma elections like you mentioned but there is something to be said that the timing came as a total surprise that what happened the substance of what happens opens isn't necessarily surprising but the timing. I think caught almost everybody by surprise. And you are right to note that this is taking place amid the context of a lot of in-fighting. I mean I think you can kind of think back to what it was like In around two thousand eight when no one knew what Putin was going to do them. The level of infighting is really intense hence. And there's been a lot of as you said elites jockeying for position using laws going after each other trying to eliminate opposition so the elite infighting has been intense and and also the public dissatisfaction. When you look at Putin's public approval ratings are down back towards the sixties down from upper eighties after the sixties? That's love love. Hello or the illegal annexation of Crimea. His public approval rating was in the high eighties. And so in this you know he's down around sixty three percent at the moment and so having kind kind of this elite intense in-fighting high levels of public dissatisfaction. I think when you look forward. I don't think that any of that was going to is likely to get any better. So certainly from an economic economic perspective Russia's economy is expected to grow more than one two percent of GDP. So I think if you're Putin you're looking forward. None of the elites are jockeying because there's all of of this uncertainty looming about what his future is going to be. The economy isn't gate set to to improve by any means. And so he does it now. I think to avoid having the pressure build up to twenty twenty four. If you're in authority leader particularly a highly personalized one like Putin leadership transitions and succession are really scary. Times and they have to be managed carefully and so to do it now. I think is in large part because because of the context of the discontent from the from the public and it is interesting. Like you said gives Russia time Putin time ahead of the twenty twenty one Duma elections because those those I think now will be a really are key I right now. The United Russia the party that Supports Putin Putin isn't the head of the party which I think is really interesting but kind of brush off a little bit because their popularity is suffering as well but it you know right now they hold a two thirds majority in the Duma which allows them to do all sorts of things and so I think having that majority continue in twenty twenty one is going to be critical for allowing Putin's plans to unfold smoothly early..

President Putin Putin Hooton Putin van president Russia prime minister President Boris Yeltsin Dmitry Medvedev Kendall Taylor Taylor Russian government senior fellow Jerry Rawlings United Russia Krasinski funk State Council Kazakhstan Andrea Soviet Union
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:36 min | 10 months ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"So you may have seen a strange and totally disturbing headline this week. Just that the entire Russian government resigned Including Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and a whole host of other top level officials. Now this doesn't mean that Vladimir Putin's regime gene is over in fact quite the opposite. We're GONNA talk about this week on worldly part of the VOX media. podcast network are the ways in which should setting up plan for succession for someone coming after Vladimir Prudent for Putin to take over in a different role. I'm ZAC beach in here. Is Always with generalize outward hit him. Hey what's going on. We are also here with dre. Kendall Taylor Taylor who is a senior fellow at the Center for new American Security very well-known Russia expert and particularly authored a paper on regime succession. Some really happy. Happy that she's here happy to be with you so I have to tell you guys. I was running a little bit late this morning. And part of that is that I had a dream last night. That and this is real. This is all real That I shot Vladimir Putin accidentally well visiting Russia and it didn't go over well with the Russian government and it was quite disturbing and so overslept alarm and kind of freaked out. I think even over. We're preparing for the PODCAST. A podcast stress the Russians. Back by making you late somehow in your dream no. I was just so stressed out when I woke up. Because because I'd difficulty differentiating reality dreamland. That I like overslept by alarm I looked at I was like okay. What's going on and then filled later? So you shooting. Putin could be a reality for you and your mind. It seems like I was in a shootout John. Krasinski was there. It was really cared that you didn't actually shoot Putin power correct. That's actually the thrust of this episode shows our guest Andrea. I want to start with you. Tell US exactly what these reforms reforms quote Putin proposed this week might do I think the most important change was Putin's announcement about pretty radical changes to the constitution That would shift power away from the presidency towards the parliament. I think quite notably he also talked about strengthening this kind of relatively sleepy almost defunct a funk State Council which I think gives some clues about maybe what Putin is planning so basically. He's announce these constitutional changes not only. Did he shift power or away from the president towards the parliament but there were some other rules about any future. President can only serve two terms so at the end of the twelve years. That's it taking away. Those consecutive terms as we know Putin served two terms stepped out and then was back that will be no more and there was another interesting reform to that. Talked about about Any future president has to have had lived in Russia for twenty five consecutive years. Not hold any resident permits. So he's basically saying no. The future president in Russia will not be Alexei. Navalny or Koepke or anyone like that so in many ways just like you said these changes should be interpreted as setting up Putin Hooton to continue to rule Russia for the foreseeable future. Okay and that's kind of what I wanted to know is like if you look at this on paper. It seems like you know he's Setting up term limits. So it looks like he would then be kicked out. He's expected to. He's supposed to step down in two thousand twenty four that's when his term is up and he's giving more power word of the parliament. Can you kind of just explain 'cause like when I just look at this on paper. It looks like he's giving away power right. It looks like he's you know. Moving power away from the presidency toward for the parliament telling the parliament that they can pick new prime minister. You just kind of explain how that actually may extend his power. Because I think just looking at it. It's a little confusing. Yes so we would the one thing that we were all expecting that Putin would do something. I think. That's the timing of this caught everyone by surprise rave but we've known for a long time that Putin's his consecutive term limits expired twenty twenty four so he was going to have to do something people expected he would do something that would enable him to continue to rule and so now he's creating a Russia currently under this nineteen ninety-three constitution has a very strong executive branch. It's a very very strong presidential system. The previous President Boris Yeltsin wasn't really able to ever to fully leverage the powers that that constitution gave him but Putin obviously has been quite effective at fully exploiting the powers that are are pro allowed under the nineteen ninety-three constitution so Putin now is basically saying like there will never be another president as strong as I am and so he you know. Oh He's come a long he has taken Russia out of that. Very turbulent transition wave after the fall of the Soviet Union and he basically wants to to create a system that is less allows for less concentration of power So no one can really benefit the way that he did He is then changing and shifting power towards the parliament and I think than the expectation would be that President Putin would shift he would move over and serve of either as prime minister or he would take over as head of the State Council and I think the the thing. That's interesting is that there is some precedent for this. And so you if you look at Turkey you for example I was Kinda thought about this as like an Air John but in reverse Amazon had served as prime minister for something like eleven years and then through change the constitution to make for a strong presidential system step down as prime minister was elected to President and now he's able to continue to rule there so that's one one option he's moved powers president. Putin now has moved these powers towards the parliament so he could step in his prime minister or I think the most likely option in my mind seems names that he will step into this role as head of the State Council and be able to rule from there and again. There's another precedent when you look Kazakhstan and so that's something that we saw just as recently as twenty eighteen and I think was probably something that Putin was watching very closely and so they are nozzle by was president for almost thirty years. changed his constitution to empower. This new you know. He stepped in as head of the Security Council empowered that gave it more powers stepped in in there and allowed his successor to rule so I think he was watching that quite closely. He's basically setting up a new system shifting power to an area where he would be able to. Let's stop in and continue to control an influence domestic and foreign policy. I don't know until the end. No like the obvious question or at least that I have thinking about this is is why doesn't Putin. Just change the constitution to get rid of term limits and stay informal power and my understanding is that there are real concerns about popular backlash in that world right. He is at a relatively low ebb. popularity-wise Americans are used to thinking of Putin is being spoiler strongman but in actuality the economy's not doing very well. Well it seems like just cemented. His time as a fallen authoritarian would risk some kind of more direct backlash from the Russian populations that wrong. No I think that's exactly right even stepping back before yesterday I mean there were. He basically had a couple of options disposal. That would allow him to stay on one option. One would be he could pick a successor handpicked. Someone step down fade into the to the background in allow successor to run in elections and continue on That's a model. We've seen in some authoritarian regimes. It hasn't worked out that well. There are some really cool political science research that shows when an incumbent authoritarian regime doesn't actually stand in elections that the opposition than has a much higher chance of winning so we saw that for example in Kenya when Moi stepped down his chosen successor Kibaki lost elections Another highly personalized authoritarian regime in Ghana. Jerry Rawlings did the same thing. His handpicked successor. reince stepped in ran in elections in lost their so. That is something that looks like. That's probably not in the cards for Putin. The the the other option that as is as you rightly said is that he could have just abolish term limits. And that's what we saw in China Xi Jinping. He did that very early in his term to set up the situation where he could be ruler for life and and it is interesting. That honestly what. I expected what happened. I thought that Putin would find a way to change term limits in stay on In part because there's also kind of a global trend towards that happening we're seeing leaders across Africa and also all across the globe. There's been an increasing incidence of leaders who using referendum or other kind of legalistic mechanisms demonstrating that it's the will of the popular vote to legitimize the action that they are extending term limits so in in all honesty. That's what I thought would happen but this is another what we're seeing now. This shifting powers to a different is a constitutional change of another kind. That seems I think. Think a little bit less outrageous a little less egregious probably from popular perspective. It is interesting that Putin van will take this to a referendum. We've heard now. Oh By may first. Because he is he he does want to try to legitimize these actions but I think the the term limit extensions probably would have been seen by Russians Russians as unacceptable. He did face when he stepped back into office. In twenty twelve those huge street protests. And so I think that was probably top of mind for him too so the timing of this. This actually is what's fascinating to me because basically anyone who's the thing about this including you came early right and so I think one of the reasons that I should say before I continue is that I talked to a friend of ours read standish who's a journalist Moscow so anything I say the smartest probably likely because of him But the the doing this early was one to to stop a popular backlash to make sure that there weren't those big protests that we've seen so far but another one is that he's trying to set the table Oh for the important Duma elections in twenty twenty one the lower being the president. It's a lower house of parliament and where that's where they're going to need to ratify a lot outta these changes and so having a year plus ish to work on this to signal that this is what Putin wants the kind of system emme wants. It gives him time to lean on a lot of these lawmakers which shouldn't be that hard gas but also to just kind of set the table for what's happening And I'm also wondering 'cause there have been some reports of infighting within the government that there have been some elites who have been trying to. I've been thinking about well. What does life after Putin look like? And they've been sort of jockeying and fighting for position and maybe trying to get ahead and I wonder if this is Putin like slapping his kids you know and just stop it. I'm going to be here for a while and you guys need to stop infighting and just kind of get along with the package. It's it's I mean Putin is a smart tactician. This seems like a really good sort of just political move and also public relations move And I think he's learned the lessons lessons of the past couple of years. Yeah I think it's incredibly smart it. It seems like it's relatively well played and now it seems obvious. You know obviously hindsight that this was something that is planned in part because because of the the way that it latches up with the Duma elections like you mentioned but there is something to be said that the timing came as a total surprise that what happened the substance of what happens opens isn't necessarily surprising but the timing. I think caught almost everybody by surprise. And you are right to note that this is taking place amid the context of a lot of in-fighting. I mean I think you can kind of think back to what it was like In around two thousand eight when no one knew what Putin was going to do them. The level of infighting is really intense hence. And there's been a lot of as you said elites jockeying for position using laws going after each other trying to eliminate opposition so the elite infighting has been intense and and also the public dissatisfaction. When you look at Putin's public approval ratings are down back towards the sixties down from upper eighties after the sixties? That's love love. Hello or the illegal annexation of Crimea. His public approval rating was in the high eighties. And so in this you know he's down around sixty three percent at the moment and so having kind kind of this elite intense in-fighting high levels of public dissatisfaction. I think when you look forward. I don't think that any of that was going to is likely to get any better. So certainly from an economic economic perspective Russia's economy is expected to grow more than one two percent of GDP. So I think if you're Putin you're looking forward. None of the elites are jockeying because there's all of of this uncertainty looming about what his future is going to be. The economy isn't gate set to to improve by any means. And so he does it now. I think to avoid having the pressure build up to twenty twenty four. If you're in authority leader particularly a highly personalized one like Putin leadership transitions and succession are really scary. Times and they have to be managed carefully and so to do it now. I think is in large part because because of the context of the discontent from the from the public and it is interesting. Like you said gives Russia time Putin time ahead of the twenty twenty one Duma elections because those those I think now will be a really are key I right now. The United Russia the party that Supports Putin Putin isn't the head of the party which I think is really interesting but kind of brush off a little bit because their popularity is suffering as well but it you know right now they hold a two thirds majority in the Duma which allows them to do all sorts of things and so I think having that majority continue in twenty twenty one is going to be critical for allowing Putin's plans to unfold smoothly early..

President Putin Putin Hooton Putin van president Russia prime minister President Boris Yeltsin Dmitry Medvedev Kendall Taylor Taylor Russian government senior fellow Jerry Rawlings United Russia Krasinski funk State Council Kazakhstan Andrea Soviet Union
"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

13:36 min | 10 months ago

"russian government" Discussed on Worldly

"So you may have seen a strange and totally disturbing headline this week. Just that the entire Russian government resigned Including Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and a whole host of other top level officials. Now this doesn't mean that Vladimir Putin's regime gene is over in fact quite the opposite. We're GONNA talk about this week on worldly part of the VOX media. podcast network are the ways in which should setting up plan for succession for someone coming after Vladimir Prudent for Putin to take over in a different role. I'm ZAC beach in here. Is Always with generalize outward hit him. Hey what's going on. We are also here with dre. Kendall Taylor Taylor who is a senior fellow at the Center for new American Security very well-known Russia expert and particularly authored a paper on regime succession. Some really happy. Happy that she's here happy to be with you so I have to tell you guys. I was running a little bit late this morning. And part of that is that I had a dream last night. That and this is real. This is all real That I shot Vladimir Putin accidentally well visiting Russia and it didn't go over well with the Russian government and it was quite disturbing and so overslept alarm and kind of freaked out. I think even over. We're preparing for the PODCAST. A podcast stress the Russians. Back by making you late somehow in your dream no. I was just so stressed out when I woke up. Because because I'd difficulty differentiating reality dreamland. That I like overslept by alarm I looked at I was like okay. What's going on and then filled later? So you shooting. Putin could be a reality for you and your mind. It seems like I was in a shootout John. Krasinski was there. It was really cared that you didn't actually shoot Putin power correct. That's actually the thrust of this episode shows our guest Andrea. I want to start with you. Tell US exactly what these reforms reforms quote Putin proposed this week might do I think the most important change was Putin's announcement about pretty radical changes to the constitution That would shift power away from the presidency towards the parliament. I think quite notably he also talked about strengthening this kind of relatively sleepy almost defunct a funk State Council which I think gives some clues about maybe what Putin is planning so basically. He's announce these constitutional changes not only. Did he shift power or away from the president towards the parliament but there were some other rules about any future. President can only serve two terms so at the end of the twelve years. That's it taking away. Those consecutive terms as we know Putin served two terms stepped out and then was back that will be no more and there was another interesting reform to that. Talked about about Any future president has to have had lived in Russia for twenty five consecutive years. Not hold any resident permits. So he's basically saying no. The future president in Russia will not be Alexei. Navalny or Koepke or anyone like that so in many ways just like you said these changes should be interpreted as setting up Putin Hooton to continue to rule Russia for the foreseeable future. Okay and that's kind of what I wanted to know is like if you look at this on paper. It seems like you know he's Setting up term limits. So it looks like he would then be kicked out. He's expected to. He's supposed to step down in two thousand twenty four that's when his term is up and he's giving more power word of the parliament. Can you kind of just explain 'cause like when I just look at this on paper. It looks like he's giving away power right. It looks like he's you know. Moving power away from the presidency toward for the parliament telling the parliament that they can pick new prime minister. You just kind of explain how that actually may extend his power. Because I think just looking at it. It's a little confusing. Yes so we would the one thing that we were all expecting that Putin would do something. I think. That's the timing of this caught everyone by surprise rave but we've known for a long time that Putin's his consecutive term limits expired twenty twenty four so he was going to have to do something people expected he would do something that would enable him to continue to rule and so now he's creating a Russia currently under this nineteen ninety-three constitution has a very strong executive branch. It's a very very strong presidential system. The previous President Boris Yeltsin wasn't really able to ever to fully leverage the powers that that constitution gave him but Putin obviously has been quite effective at fully exploiting the powers that are are pro allowed under the nineteen ninety-three constitution so Putin now is basically saying like there will never be another president as strong as I am and so he you know. Oh He's come a long he has taken Russia out of that. Very turbulent transition wave after the fall of the Soviet Union and he basically wants to to create a system that is less allows for less concentration of power So no one can really benefit the way that he did He is then changing and shifting power towards the parliament and I think than the expectation would be that President Putin would shift he would move over and serve of either as prime minister or he would take over as head of the State Council and I think the the thing. That's interesting is that there is some precedent for this. And so you if you look at Turkey you for example I was Kinda thought about this as like an Air John but in reverse Amazon had served as prime minister for something like eleven years and then through change the constitution to make for a strong presidential system step down as prime minister was elected to President and now he's able to continue to rule there so that's one one option he's moved powers president. Putin now has moved these powers towards the parliament so he could step in his prime minister or I think the most likely option in my mind seems names that he will step into this role as head of the State Council and be able to rule from there and again. There's another precedent when you look Kazakhstan and so that's something that we saw just as recently as twenty eighteen and I think was probably something that Putin was watching very closely and so they are nozzle by was president for almost thirty years. changed his constitution to empower. This new you know. He stepped in as head of the Security Council empowered that gave it more powers stepped in in there and allowed his successor to rule so I think he was watching that quite closely. He's basically setting up a new system shifting power to an area where he would be able to. Let's stop in and continue to control an influence domestic and foreign policy. I don't know until the end. No like the obvious question or at least that I have thinking about this is is why doesn't Putin. Just change the constitution to get rid of term limits and stay informal power and my understanding is that there are real concerns about popular backlash in that world right. He is at a relatively low ebb. popularity-wise Americans are used to thinking of Putin is being spoiler strongman but in actuality the economy's not doing very well. Well it seems like just cemented. His time as a fallen authoritarian would risk some kind of more direct backlash from the Russian populations that wrong. No I think that's exactly right even stepping back before yesterday I mean there were. He basically had a couple of options disposal. That would allow him to stay on one option. One would be he could pick a successor handpicked. Someone step down fade into the to the background in allow successor to run in elections and continue on That's a model. We've seen in some authoritarian regimes. It hasn't worked out that well. There are some really cool political science research that shows when an incumbent authoritarian regime doesn't actually stand in elections that the opposition than has a much higher chance of winning so we saw that for example in Kenya when Moi stepped down his chosen successor Kibaki lost elections Another highly personalized authoritarian regime in Ghana. Jerry Rawlings did the same thing. His handpicked successor. reince stepped in ran in elections in lost their so. That is something that looks like. That's probably not in the cards for Putin. The the the other option that as is as you rightly said is that he could have just abolish term limits. And that's what we saw in China Xi Jinping. He did that very early in his term to set up the situation where he could be ruler for life and and it is interesting. That honestly what. I expected what happened. I thought that Putin would find a way to change term limits in stay on In part because there's also kind of a global trend towards that happening we're seeing leaders across Africa and also all across the globe. There's been an increasing incidence of leaders who using referendum or other kind of legalistic mechanisms demonstrating that it's the will of the popular vote to legitimize the action that they are extending term limits so in in all honesty. That's what I thought would happen but this is another what we're seeing now. This shifting powers to a different is a constitutional change of another kind. That seems I think. Think a little bit less outrageous a little less egregious probably from popular perspective. It is interesting that Putin van will take this to a referendum. We've heard now. Oh By may first. Because he is he he does want to try to legitimize these actions but I think the the term limit extensions probably would have been seen by Russians Russians as unacceptable. He did face when he stepped back into office. In twenty twelve those huge street protests. And so I think that was probably top of mind for him too so the timing of this. This actually is what's fascinating to me because basically anyone who's the thing about this including you came early right and so I think one of the reasons that I should say before I continue is that I talked to a friend of ours read standish who's a journalist Moscow so anything I say the smartest probably likely because of him But the the doing this early was one to to stop a popular backlash to make sure that there weren't those big protests that we've seen so far but another one is that he's trying to set the table Oh for the important Duma elections in twenty twenty one the lower being the president. It's a lower house of parliament and where that's where they're going to need to ratify a lot outta these changes and so having a year plus ish to work on this to signal that this is what Putin wants the kind of system emme wants. It gives him time to lean on a lot of these lawmakers which shouldn't be that hard gas but also to just kind of set the table for what's happening And I'm also wondering 'cause there have been some reports of infighting within the government that there have been some elites who have been trying to. I've been thinking about well. What does life after Putin look like? And they've been sort of jockeying and fighting for position and maybe trying to get ahead and I wonder if this is Putin like slapping his kids you know and just stop it. I'm going to be here for a while and you guys need to stop infighting and just kind of get along with the package. It's it's I mean Putin is a smart tactician. This seems like a really good sort of just political move and also public relations move And I think he's learned the lessons lessons of the past couple of years. Yeah I think it's incredibly smart it. It seems like it's relatively well played and now it seems obvious. You know obviously hindsight that this was something that is planned in part because because of the the way that it latches up with the Duma elections like you mentioned but there is something to be said that the timing came as a total surprise that what happened the substance of what happens opens isn't necessarily surprising but the timing. I think caught almost everybody by surprise. And you are right to note that this is taking place amid the context of a lot of in-fighting. I mean I think you can kind of think back to what it was like In around two thousand eight when no one knew what Putin was going to do them. The level of infighting is really intense hence. And there's been a lot of as you said elites jockeying for position using laws going after each other trying to eliminate opposition so the elite infighting has been intense and and also the public dissatisfaction. When you look at Putin's public approval ratings are down back towards the sixties down from upper eighties after the sixties? That's love love. Hello or the illegal annexation of Crimea. His public approval rating was in the high eighties. And so in this you know he's down around sixty three percent at the moment and so having kind kind of this elite intense in-fighting high levels of public dissatisfaction. I think when you look forward. I don't think that any of that was going to is likely to get any better. So certainly from an economic economic perspective Russia's economy is expected to grow more than one two percent of GDP. So I think if you're Putin you're looking forward. None of the elites are jockeying because there's all of of this uncertainty looming about what his future is going to be. The economy isn't gate set to to improve by any means. And so he does it now. I think to avoid having the pressure build up to twenty twenty four. If you're in authority leader particularly a highly personalized one like Putin leadership transitions and succession are really scary. Times and they have to be managed carefully and so to do it now. I think is in large part because because of the context of the discontent from the from the public and it is interesting. Like you said gives Russia time Putin time ahead of the twenty twenty one Duma elections because those those I think now will be a really are key I right now. The United Russia the party that Supports Putin Putin isn't the head of the party which I think is really interesting but kind of brush off a little bit because their popularity is suffering as well but it you know right now they hold a two thirds majority in the Duma which allows them to do all sorts of things and so I think having that majority continue in twenty twenty one is going to be critical for allowing Putin's plans to unfold smoothly early..

President Putin Putin Hooton Putin van president Russia prime minister President Boris Yeltsin Dmitry Medvedev Kendall Taylor Taylor Russian government senior fellow Jerry Rawlings United Russia Krasinski funk State Council Kazakhstan Andrea Soviet Union
"russian government" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"The Clinton campaign conspired to violate among other laws the federal computer intrusion statute, and they have been so charged see United States v Nettie show at all. And then there are probably three and a half lines redacted for harm to ongoing matter. Second while the investigation identified numerous links between individuals with ties to the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump campaign. The evidence was not sufficient to support criminal charges. Among other things. The evidence was not sufficient to charge any campaign official as an unregistered agent of the Russian government or other Russian principal and our evidence about the June ninth two thousand sixteen meeting and WikiLeaks is release of hack materials was not sufficient to charge a criminal campaign finance violation further. The evidence was not sufficient to charge that any member of the Trump campaign consp-. Fired with representatives of the Russian government to interfere in the two thousand sixteen election third the investigation established that several individuals affiliated with the Trump campaign. Lied to the office and congress about their interactions with Russian affiliated individuals and related matters. Those lies materially impaired the investigation of Russian election interference the office charged. Some of those lies as violations of the federal false statements statute, former national security adviser, Michael Flynn pleaded guilty to lying about his interactions with Russian ambassador Kislyak during the transition period. George Papadopoulos a foreign policy adviser during the campaign pleaded guilty to lying to investigators about inter alia, the nature and timing of his interactions with Joseph Smith sued.

Russian government George Papadopoulos Nettie United States Clinton Michael Flynn congress Joseph Smith WikiLeaks principal official
"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Muller's alleged that the Russian government gave it to WikiLeaks. But we don't know with stone. Trump would they also aware of all of this to that here. Are you aware? Do you get that from? That they were aware that the Russian government gave it to them. He just throws that out there. Now, this is a guy who's not only to host of meet the press. He's the chief political journalist correspondent for NBC news. He just flops it out there. Go ahead. Then we have Jeffrey Toobin. CNN? Cut sixteen go. I think that may be an extremely important use of the passive voice in that indictment was directed. First of all he's supposed to be a lawyer. If a prosecutor a prosecutor's office rights. That stone was directed. What is stone say about being directed? Now, you see stone on TV's bit of a circus clown. But. Does he say he was directed by somebody? Where's the evidence for that? Well, no evidence is established for that other than the allegation. Using those words. In the charge..

Russian government Jeffrey Toobin Trump prosecutor Muller NBC CNN
"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"russian government" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Muller's alleged that the Russian government gave it to WikiLeaks. But we don't know is for stone. Trump would they also aware of all of this to the year. Also, where do you get that from that they were aware that the Russian government gave it to them? He just throws that out there. This is a guy who's not only the host of meet the press. He's the chief political journalist correspondent for NBC news. He just flops it out there. Go ahead. Then we have Jeffrey Toobin. On CNN. Cut sixteen go. I think that may be an extremely important use of the past voice in that indictment was directed. First of all he's supposed to be a lawyer. If a prosecutor a prosecutor's office rights. That stone was directed. What is stone said about being directed? Now, you see stone on TV's bit of a circus clown. But. Does he say he was directed by somebody? Where's the evidence for that? Well, no evidence for that other than the allegation. Using those words. In the charge. That's it..

stone Russian government Jeffrey Toobin Trump prosecutor Muller NBC CNN
"russian government" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:36 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"What these terrorists were doing were whipping these palestinians up into a frenzy and getting them to crash the border and getting them into scuffles with the israeli defense forces in these scuffles turned violent and deadly and now they're all martyrs and they use this for their cause they're just using these palestinian people as pause at least that's my position but we'll check it out with robert spencer coming up in just a moment here on case supposed to stick around for that oldest living person at one hundred twenty eight they say she's one hundred twenty eight soon to be one twenty nine the russian government says that her name is coco is istanbul lavar is one hundred twenty eight they've got a passport here that says she was born in eighteen eighty nine she says she's one hundred twenty eight she's she recalls a lot of things in this interview i'm reading in the mirror she recalls the scary nazi tanks passing by our home she talks a lot about the you know the the former soviet union and communism and how they didn't treat her all that well she's she's not happy to be alive and it sounds like she's never been happy to be alive she says she has lived a single happy day in her life she says her longevity is punishment hundred perfectly healthy this is depressing well it's just you know she's lived in a very depressed place her whole life she's seen all of these governmental changes and she seemed the worst of humanity and and now you know all of our friends are gone oliver families gone yeah i guess i could see that right but otherwise she appears to be in good health i mean seriously so she is she says i see people going in for sports eating something special keeping themselves fit but i have no idea how i lived until now she let me see in terms of she shut she doesn't eat meat she doesn't like soup she loves fermented milk jerry help us yeah i've heard of it before but i can't remember she loves fermented milk hook so is that what happens after milk goes sour ferments then you can drink it period where you can't drink it and then all of a sudden you can the fermentation process is increasing the shelf life of milk looks yeah.

robert spencer russian government istanbul lavar soviet union milk
"russian government" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The russian government at the direction of president vladimir putin waged a covert influence campaign to interfere in the twenty sixteen us presidential election with the goal of hurting democrat hillary clinton's candidacy and helping trump's campaign we further assess putin and the russian government developed a clear preference for presidentelect trump the intelligence community report reads noting later that the kremlin aspire to help presidentelect trump's election chances when possible by discrediting secretary clinton house intelligence committee officials said they spent hundreds of hours reviewing raw source material used by the intelligence services in the assessment and said it did not meet the appropriate standards to make the claim about helping trump the officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the intelligence material leak leak leak conway said there will be a second report just dealing with the intelligence assessment and its credibility now skipping down to the democratic reaction here which of course is the juicy hall cal part democrats have criticized republicans on the committee for shortening the investigation pointing to multiple contacts between trump's campaign and russia and saying they have seen so far too few witnesses to make any judgment on collusion now here's the problem with this narrative coming from the democrats on the committee because look on its face if we're being objective certainly this looks partisan right it's the republicans the republican control committee saying that the republicans sitting president is a okay and he didn't do anything wrong on its face that looks a little shady right from bloomberg special counsel robert mueller's investigation into whether president donald trump obstructed justice is set to be close to completion this is robert mueller this is the special counsel right like this is the guy who's running the show looking into the whole deal who's saying yeah we're about done here it's about closing time he may set aside continuing at bloomberg he makes that aside while he finished his other key parts of his probe such as possible collusion and the hacking of democrats according to current and former us officials that's because mueller may calculate that if he tries to bring charges in the obstruction case the part that may hit closest to trump personally witnesses may become less cooperative and other parts of the probe or the president may move to shut down altogether the.

president us donald trump secretary presidentelect trump bloomberg special counsel robert mueller russian government russia conway trump hillary clinton vladimir putin
"russian government" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"That the russian government was the primary cooperate when it came to the hacking of of the emails of john podesta and the dnc it certainly something that the united states and the russians do to one another and have done to one another for decades and so nobody should put it past putin or the russians to have done it in this case and it certainly also possible that there were people in the trump campaign who became aware after the fact that this was done in who somehow helped to decide how this information was going to be disseminated but i think given the implications that this issue has in terms number one of the relationship between two extremely dangerous nuclear armed powers which is moscow and and and and washington who on many occasions in the past have almost obliterated the planet through an exchange of nuclear weapons and who are in many places in the world at loggerheads with one another as well as the climate in washington in which any kind of interaction with the russians now become something that is a ground for suspicion what i've always says what we have to be very careful as journalists than as citizens to make sure that we don't get ahead of ourselves in terms of the claims that we're making it but we have to adhere to the evidence that is available before we decide that official claims from the cia and the nsa and the fbi agencies with a long history of lying and deceit an error before we accept them is true and one of the things that we've seen over the past year or a year and a half is large media outlets in case after case after case after case acting very recklessly publishing stories that turned out to be completely false that needed to be retracted that got just credited which is the thing that then enables donald trump to try and encourage people not to trust the media so no matter your views on russia and i think it's really dangerous at us and russian relations are probably up their worse point as they've been since the fall of of of the soviet union something that nobody should think is a good thing come despite all the claims that that that trump was going to serve the interest of the russians the.

russian government john podesta dnc united states putin nuclear weapons washington cia media outlets donald trump russia moscow official fbi soviet union
"russian government" Discussed on Trumpcast

Trumpcast

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Trumpcast

"So while it doesn't difficulty ferry that trump in fact was personally involved you're approved to have this it does uh say that he either knew or should have known what was going on or at least some of what was going on look is this collusion who is not a term with a real meaning in this context is this interaction between the russian government and the trump campaign over things like hacked emails and needing very cooperation between the campaign on the russian government should is seems to be when we say collusion your right it's not it's not a legal term of art but what i mean by it is did the russians intervened in the election in a way that that would have been criminal and did the trump campaign no about it and work with them to make that more effective to help them and are we there yet i mean of we got if you know by that definition have we his is top dopoulos acknowledging collusion well papadopoulos is uh acknowledging that he had conversations with people he believed could be representatives of the russian government and in one case even uh a relative of president unique in which they'd just got dirt by which meant they meant thousands of email about hillary clinton um you know you can say well that's kind of memo or to you know the trump tower meeting where part of emails or jerk was on offer right but i am hit or maybe they weren't here he asked about a but conner nothing came up here.

russian government russians president hillary clinton conner
"russian government" Discussed on The Global Politico

The Global Politico

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on The Global Politico

"The intelligence picture that we were seeing was in emerging picture and so by late summer it was pretty clear that the russian government at the highest levels of the russian government were behind the hacking of the dnc and once that picture became clear then we had to carefully consider what do we do about it my view in the view of others was we have to tell the american public what we know during the election season before the election it would be unforgivable we didn't tell the american public what we know and as a corporate lawyer the analogy that i used in the in the way i think about it is if you see if you're the public issue or of a stock and you see a powerful actor trying to manipulate the price of your stock you have a duty to tell the investing public what you know and so that was something that we had to very carefully considered because those of us in national security in the intelligence community did not want to inject ourselves into the midst of a very heated campaign and it was already being said that it without you know a federal government takeover to offer well you had one of the candidates saying the election outcomes going to be rigged and so we had to think very carefully about how to address this and this was not something you do one morning in a tweet so um we did carefully consider it there was a view.

russian government dnc
"russian government" Discussed on The Economist Radio

The Economist Radio

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on The Economist Radio

"And she's also lobbied against the magnitsky act which is the sanctions on members of the russian government who the us government believes were were kind of involved in the is essentially judicial murder of of sergei magnitsky who is a russian whistleblower she's not somebody who works for the russian government now you could look at that and say while she's just to kind of person acting on her an interest some people have talked to said well actually russian intelligence tends not to send people who all employees of the government's dudes intelligence work for it either they tend to use people who are connected in some different way so i think you can kind of spin that spin that both ways she's she's clearly not a kind of insignificant figure but nor is she a kind of colonel in the kgb this is yet another scandal in president trump's short time in office and you've covered the mall as you said earlier will this latest revelation rumble on in the background as the others have what does it feel different team in some way this one feels a bit different to me i mean that have been lots of different russia stories over the past six months of donald trump's presidency in an even before he took office war that was no evidence of before was kind of active collusion between members of the trump campaign and russian individuals in this case russian individual who is presented as as being russian government lawyer though if a fight us i tried to explain that's not quite accurate description.

murder sergei magnitsky russian government kgb donald trump us president russia six months
"russian government" Discussed on Pod Save America

Pod Save America

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Pod Save America

"So what was juniors response of course quote if it's what you say i love it especially later in the summer junior goes on to set up the meeting with the russian government attorney paul manafort jared kushner and then ford's the entire email chain to manafort an kushner just to make sure they have no plausible deniability fantastic fantastic and just the gut assisted cherry on the on the top of the sunday there uh goldstone the guy who set up the whole thing on the email a checked into the meeting using foursquare because it was the year 2010 ekeus affair with us about it out as my space the last person who still using force rare of the hall thank you know we have the longrunning sad joke on this podcast was if yes elector thinking that a if we if there is an email fell from raw the russian government to trump coordinating hacking of hillary clinton paul ryan was so do nothing and now i use that example as the absolute extreme thing would obviously never happened in lo and behold it us and everything we predicted what happened after that magical pretend email came out has also happened which is entirely publican party shrugging their shoulders and saying no big deal um okay so what is this tell us a number one who tells us without a doubt the trump senior campaign advisers were told that the russian government was supporting trump's candidacy a something that they cast doubt on when it was a concluded by our us intelligence unanimously a it also tells us the trump's senior campaign advisers were willing to collude with a foreign adversary of the united states in order to undermine their opponents campaign.

foursquare russian government paul ryan trump united states attorney jared kushner ford ekeus hillary clinton
"russian government" Discussed on Unfilter

Unfilter

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Unfilter

"Quote unquote islamic state in syria is mostly backed by the cia which is causing a lot of problems for russia's good buddy assad so there could be that motivation potentially to want to go for the kennedy be less likely to do something stupid there although that has not penned up um but i think i actually think if you look at the history of the clintons and their history of working on behalf of the russian government i would actually think if he's putin such the forty chessmaster the he claimed their own claims him to be he would actually perhaps wanted hillary an office yeah i i thought about that until the dawn junior emails and in seeing the connection with the the you know the the pageant the not the but the big guy with the music star and then i realized this is just one big business deal this is just another big continuation and they all they saw trump possibly knocking off hillary and they wanted to get on the winning side it to make their business dealings more profitable idle no no i i dunno if the comments of the russian government support and the russian we are credible in those emails that's because at because rob is not credible person but at the time though don jr is so inapt right to to are not an at they ever going back to russian government's motivation to to throw the really see hourly trump would have been their their chosen candidate because of his positive stance towards russia here but he would see inwardly if you look behind the scenes they've made a lot of money thanks to hillary area and the and her influence in the state department they played both sides to point and then they decided it probably go on on one side.

syria cia russia assad kennedy clintons rob don jr hillary russian government
"russian government" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

Erin Burnett OutFront

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Erin Burnett OutFront

"Backed out front and we are following the breaking news presidenttrump's eldest son donaldtrumpjr speaking out after releasing the bombshell emails about his meeting with the russian lawyer over alleged damaging information about hillaryclinton the supposedly it was said was being provided by the russian government in now donaldtrumpjr is admitting that he would have done things differently front nownationalsecuritycorrespondentthenewyorktimesmatthewrosenberg former whitehouse ethics lawyer under presidentgeorgewbushrichard painter and former attorneygeneral for the state of virginiacancuncinellimatt let me start with you here donaldtrumpjr saying now in retrospect t would do things differently how significant is it that he would actually admit that i am anger is significant i do however wonder and and i would certainly ask myth are sitting here with him as it did not occur to you or anyone with you at the time that it was a country that that many people in our government in our country gets that our adversary was reaching out to you to provide you dirt help you defeated domestic political opponent why that wasn't questioned at the time and and and what exactly you thought you might get from them and why he thought it was okay to get it i mean it does it there's a bizarre story and cannot question not only by donaldtrumpjr but by the fact that jaredkushner was in the room paulmanafort was in the room it doesn't appear that anybody questioned this or the source andi say that because paulmanafort of course is an incredibly experienced political hand.

donaldtrumpjr russian government
"russian government" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

Anderson Cooper 360

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"russian government" Discussed on Anderson Cooper 360

"This meeting was the newyorktimesi revealed on saturday keeping a modest for starters they expose his prior accounts of the meeting is simply untrue he wasn't as he i said motivated to meet this woman out of concern for russian orphans he certainly did contrary to how he described it on saturday discussed politics the woman though unnamed was not offered up simply some random acquaintance of our friend as he i suggested she was described as a russian government attorney with information from the russian government she did not as some trump surrogates have suggested on this program just last night just get walked into trumptowerone of the males discusses arrangements for notifying security she was coming much would donaldtrumpjr has said and much of how he's characterize the meeting is revealed to be untrue by his own email chain more important though is what today's revelation does to the longrunning long larger narrative about donaldtrump senior people close to him and russiai have nothing to do with russia to the best of my knowledge no person that i deal with us this administration disagrees with all of this stories that claimed that the president and his campaign colluded with russia in any capacity of course not why would there be any contacts between the campaign chris the the the this is all a distraction absolutely not at that but the president elect lack right as conversation never happened thursday no connection between um the president or the staff year and in anyone doing anything with russiai mean this is time and time again lie after lie you noticed you won't say welli say this we hear experts you know his house cat at home once said that this is what's happening with the russiansit's disgusting it's so phony i was donaldtrumpjr after he had that meeting everything just heard either gets dented or contradicted by these emails no contact with russians not true no politicallymotivated contact with russians not true no politically motivated content contact with the russians who have ties the russian government not true at least owns from junior believed this attorney had caused the russian government in fact these emails again in very plain englishenglish lay out even more politically motivated contact with the russian individual with claims of ties to the kremlin promising information that would help achieve what is billed as the russian goal of hurting hillaryclinton and helping donaldtrumpit is the.

attorney russian government russia president welli kremlin