19 Episode results for "rolf"

Deadly Home Invasions

True Crime Fan Club Podcast

25:48 min | 1 year ago

Deadly Home Invasions

"Just, a reminder I am going to be on the get vocal, APP every Thursday at seven pm central to talk all things true crime. It's a great way for you to interact with me and other listeners of the show had to get vocal. That's G. E. T. V. O., K. L. dot com, or download the APP on the APP store and I'll see you there this Thursday. Explicit content is bound in this episode. so listener discretion is advised. Welcome back to the True Crime Fan Club podcast I'm your host lean. It's terrible when a child loses his parents to violence, it's unthinkable to no child witness the murder of their parents. In this episode, we're going to discuss the case of the Ninja murders. Okay onto the show. Winter Days are short and the nights long in Alaska. Anchorage receives about five and a half hours of daylight around Christmas on. Christmas Eve two thousand, sixteen, the sunset and three, forty, four. PM. At three fifty, four, pm, a nine, one, one call was received Anchorage Police. Department reporting that a man had been shot and was on the ground in the area of forty, one, thirty, Turkey and Avenue. When the units arrived on the scene, they found a black male just outside an apartment building he sustained. Gunshot wounds including one to his head. He was transported to Alaska Native Medical Center where he died from his wounds. Officers believed this victim was Christopher Brooks, was only thirty eight years old. Additional officers arrived at the scene and found a second victim just inside unit number four at forty, one, thirty, Turkish Avenue. Police officer said the second victim was covered in so much blood they could not determine how she had been killed. The second victim was thought to be Danielle Brooks just thirty two years old. Danielle and Christopher were the thirty third and thirty Fourth Murder Victims in Anchorage Alaska in two thousand sixteen. A small child around six years of age was found wandering around the apartment complex parking lot when officers spoke with them, the child said Ninjas had come to his home told him to go to his room then killed his mom. The child was taken to Alaska cares for treatment and follow up questions. A witness came forward and said, he had heard gunshots and looked out his window. He saw three black males all dressed in black running away from the apartment complex. They got into what appear to be a green Honda pilot with four doors. At Four Twenty Two PM Anchorage Police Department received another nine one one call this one from a local hospital. A meal had been dropped off with a gunshot wound. Officer Carpenter responded to the hospital and found the Anthony Harris a black male. De Anthony said that he was walking with a friend Jalen Franklin and the mountain view neighborhood petting to a relative's house. The two men heard an argument. Then saw another man being chased de Anthony than heard shots and was struck in the leg. De Anthony was extremely vague with details about the shooting, but then medical personnel walked in. So the officer exit, the room. He relayed the information to other officers. Officer who you're located Jalen Franklin, who said he was with the Anthony. However, he said, they were in the mountain view area walking into a holiday station. He heard someone yelling for help and saw a man crawling upstairs and another man who shot this man several times then dee anthony was struck and fell to the ground. Jalen PIC. De Anthony up and carried him about a block before an unknown light skinned black male gave them a ride in a dark suburban. Another investigator contacted Providence Hotel and reviewed the security footage available. On the video they saw that Jalen Andy. Anthony entered the parking lot on the east side. Officer who you're observed blood on Jalen, close body and hands. He was also dressed inappropriately for the winter temperatures outside. Jalen was taken to the police department for a more in depth questioning. Jalen continued to hedge while being questioned but finally told investigators, he had picked the anthony up at work around one or two PM then drove to another friend's house where he met a man named Marcus and another unidentified man Marcus ask the two men if they wanted to make money and proposed, they rob a victim of drugs and money. Jalen continued that they had gotten t shirts for their faces and also gloves to wear during the robbery. Marcus said the victim Christopher was waiting on him to come over the unidentified male drove them to an alleyway near the victim's home and the three men got out to go into the home. They stopped to cover their faces and then went inside Jalen Indiana. fanie waited in the living room with. Danielle. While Marcus went to a bedroom with Christopher. A few minutes later. Christopher and Marcus came back into the living room while Marcus was demanding money and drugs. Danielle started screaming Oh my God oh my God. Marcus and Christopher began wrestling over the gun and the Anthony attempted to help. This was Wendy Anthony got shot. Marcus Shot Christopher. Several Times, and then shot Danielle from about five feet away. Jalen told investigators he thought she was shot to get rid of any witnesses. The men exited the apartment and got into the Honda and drove off for the Anthony to get medical assistance. jalen initially said Marcus was the only one with a gun but then changed his story to say that the Anthony had a gun to. Investigators, Jalen defined Marcus on social media in an attempt to identify him. Jalen found lamarcus man as a friend of a friend and said, that was the man he knew as Marcus. Jalen was then shown a photo array and he picked lamarcus man out of the photo lineup. Officers working in the neighborhood viewed camera footage from a home in the area they saw three men entering the alley and saw the Honda being followed by Nissan Rogue. The officers checked and lamarcus man had received a citation in that Nissan rogue. Fryer to this incident Jalen Franklin only had one charge of leaving the scene of an accident. He admitted he deleted text about the crimes because he was afraid of being caught. Jalen was charged with first degree burglary, first degree robbery tampering with evidence and two counts of second degree murder. His bond set at one hundred, thousand dollars. DMZ, Harris was also charged with first degree burglary, first degree robbery, and two counts of second degree murder. In the meantime police searched for lamarcus man, they issued a warrant and warned the public that he was armed and dangerous. He was arrested Tuesday, December twenty, seventh two, thousand sixteen and a local motel. Anchorage Police Department Swat and several police officers surrounded his motel room and ordered the other motel occupants out. lamarcus and an unidentified male exit, the room without consequence. lamarcus was charged with two counts of first degree murder, first degree burglary, and first degree robbery. lamarcus man was arraigned on December twenty, eighth two, thousand sixteen his bond was set at two hundred and fifty thousand dollars cash appearance and two hundred and fifty thousand cash performance in addition to ordering a third party custodian for his release. District Court judge. Brian Clark gave Deborah Brooks Chris's mother an opportunity to speak. Deborah said I feel like it was so unfair because you could have taken anything you wanted out of the house you didn't have to take my daughter's life. Baby if you've got kids, you'll never see your kids. This is so unfair. All I can do is pray for you and ask God to forgive you and give you the right path to take. In April two thousand seventeen, a fourth man savant Wiley was arrested for his role in the double homicide and robbery although he was not present, he had helped mastermind the robbery. He was charged with two counts of second degree murder and two counts of robbery. On March Eighteenth two, thousand, nineteen Jalen Franklin took a plea deal to counts of second degree murder. He was sentenced to fifty years for each count with ten years for each suspended. These must run consecutively. was also sentenced to another twenty year suspended and ten years of felony probation. Jury selection for Lamarcus man and Savan Wiley began in early July two, thousand, nineteen. It took two weeks for the jury to be selected. The trial took three weeks and just hours of deliberation. Both were found guilty of first degree robbery. lamarcus was found guilty of first degree murder and Savan was found guilty of second degree murder. Sentencing of the two did not occur until August twelfth and Thirteenth Two Thousand and twenty by Superior Court Judge Steve Cole. On August Twelfth, Savan was given seventy six years which twenty year suspended plus ten years of probation. Savan was subject to fifteen to ninety nine years in prison for each count of murder in the second degree and three to six years for the first degree robbery. UNAGI thirteenth lamarcus was sentenced to one hundred nine years for his role. In the crimes he was subject to thirty to ninety nine years in prison for each count of first degree murder and five nine years for the first degree robbery charge. De Anthony Maly Carris has not been tried as of yet, but data scheduled for November Thirteenth Two thousand twenty. Christopher. Brooks was thirty eight. When he was killed, he had six children and one sister. Chris was an avid sports fan particularly of the Seattle seahawks. Many said, Chris had a heart of gold would have done anything for anyone at anytime. Chris being outside barbecuing playing basketball or inside playing video games. His Obituary states. It was a simple things that Chris enjoyed most about life. Danielle Brooks was thirty two at the time of her death she and Chris had been married for less than a year. They were married on February twenty, six, two, thousand, sixteen. She was a certified medical assistant and loved her job. She adored her son and once said I love my son to death. He is a best thing that ever happened to me. When he was born I, changed my life for him. Her friends and family agreed she was driven what her loved ones Miss. The most is her smile which could make anyone. Happy. I'm going to pause the case right here. So you can hear a word from our sponsors. Mattera is one of the leading CD brands in the industry with a full line of functional CBD products. 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It's a natural combination of CD vitamin C., elderberry ECHINACEA, and ginger root. All scientifically proven to boost your immunity in addition to mid Tara's high quality, CD extract. So if you WANNA give it a try visit met Tara CBD, Dot Com and enter code t CFC at checkout to receive twenty percent off. That's med T. E. R. R. A. CBD DOT COM and enter code t CFC at checkout to receive twenty percent off. Our next story deals with another deadly home invasion. Halfway houses formerly known as residential re entry centers serve various purposes. Halfway houses of any kind make many residents in the area nervous and trigger the NIMBY. Affect the not in my backyard. Some halfway houses are focused on recovering addicts as a transitional point between treatment and returned to their normal lives. Others are focused on mental health issues and still others a transitional point between incarceration and return to society. Today we are going to discuss the latter halfway house and what happened. Rolf Tita and his family lived in Texas but every Christmas they spent the holidays at their isolated cabin? Oakley Utah. Extended family always join them and it was a high point of the year for all. In, the winter months, a snowmobile had to be taken for two miles to the cabin because the roads were not passable in a vehicle. In Nineteen Ninety Ralph and his wife K, her mother Beth pots, and the two t two daughters, Lynette and Trish all headed to Utah for their family vacation. Three days prior to Christmas the family had to go into town to get some more items mainly to finish their Christmas shopping before the rest of the family arrived. Lemay, her mother and grandmother whether I to return to the cabin. Linney urged her mother to hurry and unlock the door because it was bitterly cold and she was going to run some water hands. Then come help her mother. When she got inside Lanista, something flash around the refrigerator and thought some of the extended family had already arrived. Unfortunately, that is not who she saw. Lanista of frizzy headed man in a grey sweatshirt with a pistol pointed at her. Lana thought he was going to rob them and leave. But as soon as her mother walked inside, she saw another man come out of one of the bedrooms chaos, the men, what do you want? Why are you here? I'll give you anything seconds before Linney heard gunshots. She witnessed her mother falling an instant before she heard another gunshot and turn to see her blind in disabled grandmother came shot in the head. Linney started to pray and one of the men told her. It would not help because he worship the devil. The men duct tape liniers, hands, and forced her into the bedroom. A short while later linear hurts no mobiles approaching and with dread knew her father and younger sister were returning. Linney was trying to get the men out of the cabin and into the family car but before she could one of the men rushed outside and demanded and Trish come inside immediately. Lini said, one of the men had a gun to her back as her father and Trish came in. One of the men told growth to remove his clothing. So he took off some of his close then both men asked if he had any money. He took a hundred five dollars out of his billfold and tossed it at the men. He watched as one of the men put the money in his pocket. He had been back at the cabin for less than five minutes before the two men decided to kill him. One of the men pointed his weapon at Rolf and cockpit, but did not pull the trigger. The other man apparently impatient pointed his revolver at Ralph and pulled the trigger. He pulled the twice without anything happening but the third time it. Fired and hit Rolf in the face. He fell down and froze afraid if they knew he was still alive they would shoot him again. Wolf could hear the men talking and heard them say something about setting the cabin on fire. He heard more gunshots than footsteps approaching. Was Shot One more time this time in the forehead he then felt liquid splashing on his legs and back. The two men talked about taking and trash to use as shields then Roper D- snowmobiles leaving. Rolf got up and tried to get rid of some of the fires around the cabin but since he had been doused with fuel, he caught on fire. He ran into the shower where he tore off his snowsuit, get rid of the flames he ran outside and jumped on assume mobile but was not wearing a coat gloves or helmet his brother Randy had seen the girls leaving just minutes earlier and had waived but the girls ignored him hoping he would not be shot to. Randy then saw another snowmobile approaching and was sickened when he realized it was his brother obviously wounded. It was so cold Roaf had blood sickles. Rav quickly explained what happened and Randy started trying to call the sheriff's department from his cell. Phone. According to Randy Cell Service was spotty. So he had role in the back seat of the car and they were driving after the two men who had the girls by this time they were no longer on snowmobiles but enrolls car he kept trying to call nine one one without any luck. After several tries he got nine one one and explained what had happened which direction the car was going and what kind of car it was. Dispatcher said they had deputies in the area and Randy try to ask for a helicopter for his brother, but the line went dead. Randy went to a gas station and place a call to nine one one from a payphone. He requested a helicopter and explained his brother was gravely injured. While in the car with the killers Trish Tita saw a police car passed them and then turn around to follow the car. Both men begin to panic and the drivers started doing ninety miles an hour in an attempt to outrun the police. The. A right hand turn going towards a canyon and the car was suddenly on the road falling into an embankment. In an interview many years later Trish said she remembered looking up and seeing law enforcement on the road above them. But also seeing people from the area wearing street clothes the police officers were pointing guns at the four in the car and Trish said, no, that's my sister. One of the men pointed his gun at Deputy Sheriff Thomas Coleman in Coleman discharged his weapon. The. Killers then got down on their knees and put their hands behind their backs. The men were arrested and the girls found that their dad was still alive. He had been in pretty bad shape, but he was getting medical attention. When officers responded to the cabin they found an eighteen inch puddle of frozen blood in the garage. Rolf had been shot. When the officers went through the house, they found blood circles under the spot where K and Beth had been shot because the carpet was so through with blood. Officers. Also found were the two men had dragged their to murder victims outside on the deck once the men were in custody, they were identified as John Lester Taylor and Edward Deli. Both men have lived at the Orange Street community center. A state owned halfway house after being released from prison. The two men had left on December Fourteenth Nineteen, ninety search of job, but never returned. They went to summit county in the area of Oakley and stayed in Vaughan lusters father's for about a week. On December twenty first von Lester placed a phone call to the Fremont community sent her and asked to speak to Scott Manley another inmate Scott was not available and von Lester left a message. On December twenty second bond, Lester called Scott again and reached him von Lester told Scott where they had been staying and that they had broken into several cabins and stolen some guns. Von Lester said he was in someone's cabin with for them to return so he could kill them and steal their car. Both men were each charged with two counts of criminal homicide in the first degree. One count of attempted criminal homicide in the first degree aggravated arson two counts of aggravated kidnapping aggravated robbery theft failure to respond to an officer signal to stop and aggravated assault. Von Lester accepted a plea deal on May first nineteen ninety one where he agreed to plead guilty to two counts of capital murder with the other charges being dropped. However, his attorney did not remove the possibility of the death penalty and von Lester was given the death penalty. During Edward Delis trial, the Tita girls were asked to pick up the weapons used to kill their mother and grandmother. Lemay felt great resentment over that and neither girl understood the thought process. A camcorder had been recovered from the cabin. When one of the investigating officers was trying to protect property once he realized the cabin was on fire. To their shock and amazement, the camera ended up being evidence because von Luster and Edward had video themselves wearing growth close an opening Christmas presents under the tree. Edward Deli was found guilty of multiple charges but has murder charge was downgraded to second degree. He was sentenced to life in prison which came as a shock to the Titas. Not Nearly as much of a shock though as when Rolf Tita walked into the courtroom and Edward Deli was shocked to see him. Edward was not aware that Rolf had survived. Von Muster appealed to sentence and charged for thirty years until May of twenty twenty one is charged and sentenced where both vacated. A. Three hearing was held where ballistics and witnesses confirmed. Edward Deli had actually fired the shots that killed and Beth. Joint Funeral services were held for K., and Bath on December twenty eighth? Bath was seventy, six years of age when she was murdered. She had been married twice losing both husbands in automobile accidents. The reckless took her second husband also cost her blindness and other physical problems. K. was forty nine years old when she was murdered, she had been married to roll since nineteen, sixty three and they had three children, Lenny Trish, and Sean. Both Beth in K. were active in the Church of Latter Day saints. Rolf thiede rebuilt the cabin better than before as they said. The family refused to let the events destroy their family even more. Ralph told May Lonie, I know lightning strikes, but lightning never strikes twice in the same location. Rolf said we are trying hard not to let these criminals have their victory and ruin our lives entirely. Rolf was born in Germany and he emigrated to the United States with his mother in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty. Roughly married about a year after the murders his second wife Donna had two children of her own and Rolf died of cancer in two thousand eight. The two girls both married and still have the cabin they consider their father, their hero and know their loved ones are still with them. The two girls both married and still have the cabin they consider their father, their hero I know their loved ones are still with them. Okay Fan club members as I conclude this episode, my one question to you is. How will you sleep tonight? Thank you for listening if you enjoy the episode, please leave a positive review and rating on Apple podcasts or your podcast player of choice it really does help us out. You can find us on most social media channels twitter at t CFC pod facebook dot com slash TSE podcast Instagram at True Crime Fan Club Pod, and of course, our website is true crime fan club dot com. If you have an episode request citizen email. T CFC POD AT CHIMA DOT com. This episode was written and researched by susie Saint John content editing by Brittany Martinez and you already know this was produced by the best in the Business Nico at we talk of dreams check him out on twitter at we talk of dreams or we talk of dreams Dot Com.

Officer Jalen Rolf murder Jalen Franklin robbery Danielle Brooks lamarcus man Wendy Anthony Marcus Christopher Brooks Lenny Trish second degree murder Deborah Brooks Chris Beth pots Ralph Rolf Tita Anthony Harris Linney
Summer Truckin | Safe Driving Tips For Summer

Big Rig Banter

21:03 min | 2 years ago

Summer Truckin | Safe Driving Tips For Summer

"You're hitting the road or in back in the cab. It's time to take voted off with big rig banter, powered by all truck, jobs dot com. Your source for finding the trucking jobs drivers really want get ready to shift into gear and look the conversations role. All right. Hello. And welcome today is may first and it is the twenty eighth episode of big rig. Banter Linda, how're you doing today? Twenty nine try I this the twenty a little more excited to be here. Like it's may I all right. I'm sorry. I'm sorry, you're right. It is may first the weather's warm. I am feeling. Good. How are you doing? I've enjoying the summer weather, you're, you seem to be a Chipper mood. Yeah. I'm pretty excited because travel season officially starts in like two weeks. I leave for Utah, and then I have a bunch of trips planned, what else do you where do you plan on going, and then my included in these traps. You can drive if you want. No, I'm flying to Utah for a few days. One of my best friends lives out there and Salt Lake City. And then the next weekend, I'm going to Pittsburgh, then I'm driving from Pittsburgh to Woodstock New York. Have you ever been there? I have not. But I heard there is a big festivity that went down. Not too long ago. Yeah. So with stock New York is actually where the Woodstock music festival was supposed to happen, but they ended up, actually having the festival on a farm in Bethel, which is like an hour, maybe forty five minutes away. But anyway, the town of Woodstock is, you know, cute little hippie, town, lots of shops and stuff. And of course like the festival still put the town on the map. So it's a cool place in the I guess, the catskill mountains of New York. So it's beautiful up there. Nice. It sounds exciting them not gonna do much traveling and going to be doing a lot of wedding planning still. Yeah. That's right. You are still going through with that. Yeah. We are didn't run away yet. But I don't know how I know early September's the, the wedding, and so we'll be doing a lot of planning, I might take a beach trip or hang out with some friends, I do have some off days plan, but they don't know exactly. We're going to be doing a honeymoon up to Maine shortly. After the wedding. So that's going to be really exciting. That's the furthest all ever have been traveled. Gosh. Well, may, it'll be beautiful in the fall. Hopefully you can plan it out. Or you're there when it's like peacful EH for sure, I'm excited, but truckers we have an exciting episode for you today. We're doing some safe driving tips for summer. You know, we've covered winter driving tips before, but summer, actually, has some different hazards to look out for. That's for sure. Yeah. Definitely Troy was able to get an interview for everyone listening. And that will, you know, in that interview they kinda discuss the different things that you might encounter in the summer and I don't know if anyone saw on YouTube, but trion I published last week of video where we went over some ways to protect your skin from the sun, so you can check that out as well and feel free to share. It tag us hashtag bigger banner on Twitter. So we know that the conversation starting. But that's just, you know. Some tips to avoid that trucker tan. I know one time I was driving through them havi desert, and that was the first time I realized that you could actually get sunburn in the car, and my whole left arm was exceptionally Tanner than my right size. So I'm sure you all can relate to that. And we also want to know what you thought of my glorious outfit in that video. I know a big fan of it. It was her idea. Yeah. Right. I really wanted to give him some Willie Nelson braids, but he wouldn't go for it. Yeah. But we definitely enjoyed filling that video truckers. We hope you enjoy it. We wanna see what you guys think of it. But let's jump into the interview, we're talking with packs Rolf from Melton truck lines. But let's give that a listen. All right. I'm here with packs Rolf this safety generalists at Nelson truck line packed, how you doing today? Doing very well. Very well. Thank you. Good. You know, so the weather's warm enough, you know, and how does summer driving differ from winter driving. You know, obviously, there's no ice or snow to worry about depending on where you are. I guess, but there's still hazards while driving in the warm winter or they're not. Absolutely. I think unfortunately, one of the people don't think about summer driving as much as they do about the winter driving the, the, the weather changes, and, you know, you probably the first thing that comes out, we start talking about winter driving. And I do our publication safety topic guy that we put out and this article getting ahead of it is on hydration and some are issues. We really just kinda start having into heat injuries because that's the probably the biggest thing, that's going to affect drivers as we go into summer as they get exposed to high temperatures and being able to recognize when they're in danger and take action or recognized when other drivers are in danger and tech take action. And also the things that they can do to help prevent those he'd injuries. And what's the biggest misconception about summer driving? You know, I think a lot of truckers realized like it summer, and they can either just roll the windows down or just put on crank the air condition. But it's definitely more dangerous than I think people think. Absolutely. One of our terminals at Nelson truck lines down there in Laredo, Texas. And it's funny. I think probably if I if I looked at the temperature today's temperature full away, oats, probably in the ninety degrees might be touching hundred. So as you get down in the southern states, Florida, Texas, and Arizona, the temperatures can come up real quick, then early in even in early spring. So, you know, you got to be prepared. You've got hydration as one of the biggest things. Okay. No, that the weather's going to be hot that day. And you're gonna be out there working in it. You gotta be, you know, a thirst Issur guide if you're feeling a little bit thirsty, and then you should probably drink some water, and you also want to alternate some sports beverages, maybe in with that some Gatorade 's. Avoid caffeine which for truck drivers going to be horrible 'cause you can't give me without my coffee. And, you know, I may I may be an office now but I've got four or five years of flatbed with my belt. So then out there and done that, and experienced these things, I can remember a time when I worked at day and helped a couple of other drivers, get their load secured, 'cause they, they want experienced with the flatbed and so help them get their load security. And then I ended up having to do my load and then hit the road, and I probably got no more than an hour to into that drive. And I just felt I didn't feel well, and it was almost notice I wasn't tired, but, but I was still kinda just just really drained. And so I pulled over and I just stopped for the night and. I mean I can't tell you when I woke up it was just it was it was it was really odd. I recognize that, that point that I had been suffering from heat exhaustion. And, and so when you get to that point, and it's and it's not hard to do because it kind of sneaks up on a really got kind of be aware and be prepared for those things. So you know, we, we put the charts every every every summer in the bathroom so that you can detect the color of your urine. And, and so what's your hydration level is guys, don't turn that into too much of a competition and just how clear they can get. Before drivers hit the road. What are some things they should be inspecting? I know obviously with the hot mcadam that can put some wear and tear on the tyres for sure. What are things driver should definitely keep in mind before they even head onto the road. Absolutely. Because, you know, drivers big part of it at the metropolis the other other part of the equation, and, you know, tires is the first thing that your got your contact with the road during the winter months. You might actually get away with a tire that's not inflated as much as it should be and the danger. There is an under a tire on to get really hot and eventually blow out and the winter. It may not reach that temperature to have a blowout. But when you're in the summer, and hotter counters absolutely and under inflated tire, especially on your steer. Axle is going to be a huge a huge danger. So you wanna pay attention to tire pressures checking those on a regular basis pretty much. I fell guys every time you get fuel you need to check those brochures. And I think there's struck stocks that are doing higher pressure, check stations, also as a as a service. Yeah. You know. And every every every. Evening when you finish your day or at least that's what we teach. Our helping is, you know, you do really good post trip. A lot of guys call creature up. We do it supposed trip. And you know there's one hundred twenty inspection points that you do just on the Canada trailer. But the main ones in some of your really wanted to make sure of, you know, does your air conditioning. Does. That's what you're going to be using to cool off. And then from there you're looking at your your houses. Make sure those are in good condition and cracked, and the clamps are tight, and, you know, they look okay? And then, you know, you're pooling level, do you have some extra coolant that something that you might wanna consider, you know, putting in their side boxes? You know, you've got an extra a jug cool and for water to be able to in the replenish, that, if you lost them, you know, it's a good spring cleaning thing it's nice to just, you know, get the truck washed and get all the winter salts and stuff and. Know the inside of the, the truck cleaned out. This kind of generally make a healthier environment particular to flatbed, we've got some freight, that tends to be a temperature sensitive that will one guys about and, you know, not that it makes dangerous. But it's a it's a concern that you wanna be able to, you know, pay attention to that. Hey, this freight reacts to temperature rolled roofing and come to mind as stuff that we talk about. And then just having, you know, having some urgency supplies, you know, extra couple of gallons of water. A truck was to break down you may be in some areas kind of on your own for a while and out to be self sufficient, and I think most truck drivers are, are kind of that mindset that they like to be out there, you know, by themselves open road and and, and self sufficient. So I think a lot of guys think about that. Recently, we just put out a video talking about that driver's tan. That so you guys get where you kind of have the, the one armed sewn burn going on. Do you have had their tips for driving in the sun? I know that's a big issue. I know there is a photo circulating around online of a driver that actually half his face, you could tell that the wear and tear that the sun did on his face. And it was really drastic. Tell you that is not a rat. We, we, we get outside the truck enough. I'm working the son that we get a chance to even out that hand, but I can I can see how that happens. You know what comes to mind is, is, is. Predatory truck stops can be with the stuff that they sell the prevalence of cheap sunglasses. And, you know, having a few extra pair, just laying around at any moment, 'cause we have cameras on our trucks. And, and so we get to do a lot of after accident analysis. We really like it because in many cases of the camera footage exonerated are drivers and accidents or initially being blamed on us. But, but I, I saw a couple of accidents recently. And I don't know if it was due to the time change. But you could you could absolutely tell that the sun coming directly after driver was a factor in them, not being able to recognize but, you know, in one case, I'm a guy ran over stops on just green ran over a stop sign that was granted in the middle of the road. But he was making turn. And, and you could tell how much the sun will they factor? And as you coming up to traffic lights with the sun behind a lot of times it's hard to tell you know, good era of polarized lenses can be really helpful. And then I go back to a book read a long long time ago called Burma black sheep, and it was a about pappy Blankson based fighter pilot had a TV show or while to and a little trick that he wrote about in the book that he would spot an aircraft coming out of the sun was he would just close one eye and holders dumb over the sewn, and he said it, you know, you then see around and then and I've used that trick, you know, pulling out of my driveway in the morning, and trying to pull onto the highway when the sinus, you know, I'm looking into the sun to see on coming traffic, and I'll swint one I and then put my over the sun. And sure enough, I can see the you know what traffic's coming down the road at that point. That's really. Interesting. It's definitely cool. And if it works for fighter pilot, I'm sure it can work for plenty of truckers as well. But so what about storms? You know, we're, we're actually in the middle of flood warning today appear in Pennsylvania. But what's the protocol when driving during a storm or even worse driving during a tornado warning? Unfortunately, Milton has a has a unfortunate history with tornadoes in nineteen ninety three there was enough, or that nearly missed our Tulsa terminal. And then in April of two thousand eleven tornado that it Birmingham was a direct hit our terminal, and we had a driver. There was actually on premises at the time and was on the phone with our Tulsa, dispatch extended coverage and talking through it with them. And they, you know, told him that the, the shelters the bathroom in there. And that was the only part of the building survived and driver was unhurt. So that's, that's the main thing that got it and you gotta seek out the near shelter and for drivers. That's a little tough personally, I was still on the road and the tornado hit Joplin, and drove through there, the night, after and I was. Just amazed at just the station that, that happens with those. And, and I saw the the I think it was Love's or flying j truckstop. That was exit eleven there, I think in, in Joplin and just that it was it was levelled. It was it was incredible. Many drivers survived that, that because there was stories going around, you know, drivers on the CB going around the next day about guys that were in their trucks. And, and we're okay and then guys, you know, everybody dot into the building and and was able to cram into the, the shelter, you know, places that they've got into shelters and there. And so they go out allies saved. And speaking of is speak in the CB is that something that will get kind of relieved through the CB radio when there is a storm warning or is that more of something that truckers are relying on just the traditional kind of AM. FM radio to find say that most. Yeah. Most trucks, that I've been in have how a weather capable radio and that, that would be the first place that I would go to of course in these days of the internet, and everybody having a computer on their hip, and in their pocket. You know, you've got my radar with your with your weather app. And, and I know I've been around here when, when there's a whether alert and everybody's iphone just immediately goes, the and, and so. It's almost hard to not be aware of some of that stuff. But but doesn't driver. We should be planning our day. And, and you know, your, your day can start out one place and end up in another. And, and you've got to kinda, you know, have an is to, you know what my future holds. I'm going to be six seven hundred miles away from here today, know where that is and dig into the weather a little bit and see see what the chances are that you're going to be going through something like that. So preparation as always key. Packs, I thank you for stopping by speak with us on the podcast. Do you have any other summer driving? Tips. I would say, you know, in the summer traffic tends to go up a lot of people out on vacation, and, and on, on breaks and a lot more driving around goes on the, when the weather gets better and also say that you'd be aware that there's gonna be a lot more construction, because the, you know, the, the longer days and the better weather is going to allow the construction crews to get out there and do their things. So those are the those are the other things that I think of awesome move, once again, a big thing, sue packs role from Melton truck line packs, thank you so much for joining us. Welcome anytime. All right. And once again, a big thanks to packs role few provide a lot of great summer driving tips for you truckers. You know, you're not driving in winter anymore, but they're still tons of hazards on the road. So make sure you're keeping an eye out for that again, truckers. If you like what you're hearing, please field, or leave us a review on tunes and any other place. You're listening to this. We really appreciate the feedback, whether it's positive or negative wanna put out the best product for you guys. But a linear what you got. I just wanted to chime in and say that anyone who's listening for the first time big banter is powered by all truck jobs. All truck jobs is job board, you can visit that website, find tons of resources as far as where to find a job. Maybe even just how to get your CDL, and then a lot of blogs on there just with all kinds of tips for driving. Yeah. And we've got a lot of great content. Coming out, we're working on a ton of different videos, and animations as we speak, so feel free to check out the website. But once again, I'm your co host Troy differ. And I'm your favorite co co-host Lynn a role in this has been big rig banter. Thanks for tuning into another addition of big Rick banters or your next job checkout. All truck jobs dot com. The premier online source for finding the best driver jobs in the country. Browse hundreds of physicians by free or driver type to get back on the road with confidence. Could subscribe to keep the conversations coming until next time on big rig. Banters.

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Sad Satan

Clouded

09:32 min | 2 years ago

Sad Satan

"If you haven't heard about anchor it's the easiest way to make a podcast. Let me explain. It's free this creation. Shen tools that allow you to record at your podcast right from your phone or computer anchor will distribute your podcast for you so it can be heard on spotify apple podcasts. And many more you can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast best in one place. Download the free anchor APP or go to anchor dot. FM to get started this episode. It has graphic descriptions of violence illegal content and adult material. Please be advised. There is a horror video game that can't be bought any brick and mortar store or even online on a video game digital distribution service like steam. It was allegedly found via link an Internet forum and found only on the dark web when version of the game displayed visuals of Violent Gore child pornography. The game came to light after being covered by the YouTube channel of Scurr or corner on June twenty fifth. Two Thousand Fifteen. It would be the last video they would post before going dark. Are you ready to jump down the rabbit hole. AH THE GAMING WEBSITE DOT COM deemed sets the creepiest games. This year article dated July first. Two Thousand Fifteen. It is widely considered to not be very good video game as far as game plays concerned. The game play isn't what made the game infamous in this episode of clouded. We will try to answer three questions question number one. What is the game like number two but makes it different in number three? Is it real. Now what is the game like before we get into the game. Play a a brief history of its existence. A user only known as Z K purportedly posted linked to the game via dark web form. You're the link was then sent to the owner of the Youtube Channel obscure horror channel by an anonymous subscriber. The owner I named Jamie Sad Satan is a rudimentary game. Who's visuals are grainy? And Dirk it consists of a first person view of your character walking down hallways the hallways differ slightly slightly in darkness and aesthetics from almost completely dark to a hallway with a long streak of blood on the ground leading. You you to what you assume is the source of the blood. There's not much more gameplay than this walking forward down creepy looking hallways is all. Oh you'll ever do but I think the coolness of the game lends itself to the horror genre in a weird way it adds to the feeling that this game was found on the deep dark web. There are some random still pictures that flash on the screen while walking down certain hallways. There is a photo. Uh of Jimmy. Savile and Margaret Thatcher that appears for a split second they both are holding signs that say an SP CC is great eight. NS PCC stands for the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to children more still pictures. Include Jimmy Saville again. An and Rolf Harris both of whom were caught in a police investigation into sexual abuse allegations called Operation Uteri Japanese murder Souto me Miyazaki Undress Escobar. A Colombian football player killed after an own-goal the movie director Roman Polanski who was charged charged with the rape of a thirteen year old girl and images of accident. Victims and murder victims are also shown including the aftermath of a person struck by a truck cook. And it'll be heading throughout the second half of the game. There are nightmare children. You run into that simply stand there doing nothing except substitute and cry. The Game Man's when you encounter a child that decides to do something about you being there it follows you in creates contact damage. You have no way of defending yourself and then you die so the game. Playing visuals aren't great. But the audio that really gets people people the screaming seems a little too real. The interviews news with real murderers can be heard in the background. It's this overall creepy feeling. The game gives the players remember. What makes the game different? The game footage I I saw of the original obscure horror corner playthrough seemed to be making some sort of statement about child abuse not completely overt way but in a subtle way that being said the next editions of the so-called unedited versions were not subtle in any way. I've seen conflicting things about what what is in the original game and what is not in the original game we will now dive into what is said to be found in illicit versions of the game. The following excerpt was taken from wikipedia dot com quote. A new version of the game was posted to four Chan by someone claiming to be Z.. K. Claiming that obscure horror corner had not been showing their viewers. The true says Satan members of the four Chan community downloaded this version game and attempted to play it. Some users complained aimed at their computers began running sluggishly and a few even reported that their computers became completely unresponsive while trying to run the game a few users even reported that their computer would not turn on anymore after running this version of the game. One read it. easer attempted to play the game from a live USB instead computers main hard-drive later when they tried to boost their computer as normal home. The computer failed to load this version dubbed the clone owned by most of the ourselves Satan community contained images of Violent Gore and child pornography some of which were accessible right from the title screen screen resulting in another version of the game with this graphic material which is often called the clean version being created by raiders and subsequently redistributed redistributed end of quote. Apparently there are many versions of this game that can be found online but buyer beware illegal images and malware where are in most of them. Is it real this game name. Unlike our previous video game we covered in a previous episode called. polonius is completely one hundred percent real and the question really is. Do you believe its origin story. That Jamie from his cure horror corner told in his Co. Taku interview is it a deep deep web created game or did he make the game himself for more information and to get some links to articles pictures and videos regarding this story. Please visit clouded mysteries dot com. If you want an easy way to support the show please head on over to pitcher dot com slash premium and use the code clouded to get one month free of their premium service. You'll get to listen to some of your favorite shows. Add free. Sorry but CONAN. O'Brien needs friend. My favorite murder moving the loss trail. The fantasy footballers at science rules would Bill Nye plus get access to secure originals bonus episodes comedy albums and more once again head on over to stitcher dot com slash premium. Use the code clouded for one month. Free follow us on twitter and Instagram at clouded podcast and like our facebook page. Lastly please give us a review. Wherever you listen to podcasts? It really does help. Get this show in front of more or less. My name is Victor and this has been another episode of cloudy. Meets Mr

murder YouTube Gore Jamie Jimmy Saville dot spotify Bill Nye Rolf Harris Scurr Z K Roman Polanski Dirk facebook twitter apple Chan director Victor
How Sitting Too Much Can Shorten Your Life Span | And Do Other Terrible Things To Your Health...

Acupuncture is my Life

17:35 min | 5 months ago

How Sitting Too Much Can Shorten Your Life Span | And Do Other Terrible Things To Your Health...

"Hello everyone and welcome back to another episode punctures life now. Today's episode is pretty interesting. Sound simple but it's serious line. K had an interesting conversation. Telehealth conversation with an individual from the netherlands and The conversation took on a life of its own because there wasn't much expectation as to what's going to come or develop from the conversation when the individual although he requested i speak on it and the future podcast so i decided to talk about it. Today was he felt he was sitting too much and he just like his body change after the past year and a half almost two and a half he just feels less healthy and just pee feels as if his health took a turn in the wrong direction and he wanted to know what that could be about. And what can he do and can acupuncture help. Now i i didn't formed him that it's not just acupuncture. He's also going to have to to help himself outside of being proactive and pursuing acupuncture. You know he needs to look at engaging in. Let's say anywhere. Between sixty to seventy five minute of moderate slice exercise which would include walking as well to sort of counteract the negative effects that has overcome. His health has because shitting too much he. He was increasing his risk of early death. And this goes out to everyone. You know you wanna try and avoid here. A sedentary lifestyle. You know you you traveling to work you sitting whether a car public transportation for the most part you said you get in your office. You're sitting you go to launch shit neat to your fish sticks. Even if you're working remote working from home you're sitting then you go home. You shouldn't eat dinner. I mean you shit and engage in some form of entertainment whether it's talking to someone you're on your phone or watching television you're sitting and you really if you shitting so much you're waiting for heart disease or something along the lines that can just lead to an early death. You want to avoid shitting mentally now mentally sitting so much or sitting for long periods of time act can affect your attention span is well as make you more. I guess easily distracted. Here's the brain when you're engaged in tasks throughout the day. It's less easy to be distracted when you focus so that import and it has a positive effect also on your attention whereas when you spend more time life sitting to sitting around your more easily distracted so there's something to be aware of but that's not of a bigger concern. Studies have shown that sitting too much and not. Let's say taking long healthy walks so just moving in a meaningful fashion with purpose. You headed down a path for a number of helmet. Such as like. I said heart disease diabetes but another key areas poor mental health which could eventually lead to depression which acupuncture treat as well as heart disease diabetes. But you don't wanna get to the point we faced with these symptoms. You wanna try to avoid that. Just by engaging in anywhere between sixty to seventy five or even ninety minutes of just intense exercise and it's not at once you don't have to do it all you go for walks things of that nature sitting a lot can also lead to poor posture. That's because the the human body was designed to move when you're wait to move constantly and individuals that sit too much tend to eventually get rounded shoulders and axel these. Next aries acupuncture covers a lot. Which is the experienced lower back pain. Tight hip flexes neck pain period. Forms pain keep shouting lot. You'll you'll be seeing your acupunctures for sure. I slice you. You want to be active. So this is where i explained to the gentleman. It's not just acupuncture. It's being proactive to say. Hey this is what. I have to do for myself as well. I'm not just going to walk into an acupuncture softness in just drop of basket of problems health problems on him or her and this is why we hear. This is why acupunctures my life is here. We have you to to put so much information out there for your benefit. It's nothing to route it. This is for your benefit and it's free. That's why i'm constantly saying follow us on every social media platforms under acupunctures me. If you twitter person it's accu. Underscore is my life s. You can also go to our website to peruse tons of information there at acupunctures my life dot com and even subscribe to a weekly newsletter so much. But here's an interesting situation this especially if you're young slice us and talking twenties thirties early forties do not want to focus to find yourself sitting too much and i have patients myself that you know they'll complain. They're working remote from home. And you're constantly in virtual meetings and i understand but you have to put together some type of formula. That's going to allow you to take breaks every now and and engage in some type of movements walking jumping rolf stretching things like that because for both men and women sitting too much you can lose your ability to conceive ice. that's right that is an actual negative impact of shipping for long periods of time. As you can lose your ability to conceive children mean studies have shown that men that have chat or tend to sit around all day slice and this could be tied to profession and sports should become a couch potato. So they double the risk of sperm dna damage. Yup fine time to walk down a hall walk up and down a few flights of steps slice. Find the ties us. You know if you driving right now to me paper. Pull your car over to the side roads. Have you crossing the street. get across safely. Get yourself in a position where you can relax few seconds carrying lifting something heavy just rested down. I need you laxed as relaxed as possible. And i need you to close your eyes and save yourself. Acupuncture is my life and then open boom your brain. It all starts now you brand new now. Another issue is you can develop blood clots in your legs in which is called the vein thrombosis and i spoke about this and yesterday's pocket because this type of clock develops in your leg more times than not as a result of sitting still for too long clot breaks breaks off it can travel to your lonesome lodge in your lungs. Now yesterday's podcast. I explained what happened when this clock lodges in your lungs to is it really worth it to not find time just to my little his. Is it really worth it. Take a second and think about active another negative effect. Is you sleep slice. If you're sitting around whether to work home you sitting slice we're not gonna sleep. Well i mean there are several problems that's linked to sitting too and those can include snoring. Long sleep gasping. Your breathing stops for a sec. Not permit things and then you'll wake up became breathing again. Of course but then you can experience as well insufficient in restless sleep and you know terrible sleep habits. I tend to lead to vicious help cycles in long. Because i've spoken over and over about the importance of sleep. A good night's sleep you if you've if you're active throughout the day and you find time to moving to do what you have to you know to figure it out. Figure it all out you know regardless of the type of work. She do to get enough movement. Your body is going to bake for the rest at night. You sleep through the night comfortable more times than not undisturbed but you want to move. You want to avoid sitting too much you know what else is affected your digestive system believe it or not it all but that was supposed to relax as the conversation as the question is it was that i thought whistler relaxed after we eat a meal so that food can properly digest. Well guess what when you're sitting think about your stomach is compressed. Talked your stomach in apple. Compressed become compressed. Just look down at in this compression slows down your digest and what follows is blowing and some cases. Constipation all this worth it to not find minutes in between what we're doing at work while working well watching a program. Whatever is it worth it. Because i tell you guys who's constantly health is wealth. That's what a welded ten. You tonight in a bank It's not in your wallet. It's not in a safe not under the mattress snot doghouse in the backyard. To you slice slice to live a healthier lifestyle longer life. I suggest you try and figure out ways in which you can avoid sitting too long because the pain also dot com summit. I see tons of patients to treat. Pain is well and so does. My colleagues lower back cleans his pain. The legs neck shoulder chronic pain as a result of sitting too much. And let this go on for a long time. You're gonna shoeless serious problems slice. So it's about moving as much as possible stretching slice but it's all about who may to the toll about okay and this is why i'm constantly saying you must make acupuncture part of your life which is why i always ask because acupunctures my life what's yours.

heart disease diabetes the netherlands heart disease depression rolf twitter sec whistler apple
1.11 The Road Towards Stability

The Political History of the United States

28:05 min | 2 years ago

1.11 The Road Towards Stability

"Hello. And welcome to the political history of the United States episode one point eleven the road towards stability. Before we get started this week. I want to give you an update on where things are heading the next three episodes. I plan to work through a variety of topics on how James develops over the next few decades, we're going to be looking at primarily three topics moving forward. These topics include the economic changes continuing escalating conflict or the pouting confederacy and the evolution of the political systems after this. We should be in a place where we can set Jamestown aside. Emma launch discussing the colonies up in New England to give you all in outlook on where things are heading for the rest of the season. I into that we are want to spend a very significant amount of time on those New England colonies after that. I've got a couple more subjects that I want to wrap up and that is going to bring us to the end of our first season now before you fret too much and get to set about the end of the season mind his opinion is that we are not even halfway there yet. So don't worry. We've got a lot of ground to cover before. Then. This week. I plan to pick up right after the starving time and begin working our way back through the future of the colony as we move. We are going to continue to pay special attention to those three topics that I out lied to minute ago. The stemming time Marx that symbolic low point for the colony. However, it's incorrect pretend that they are out of the woods quite yet. The death rates are going to remain high for at least another decade. Likewise. There's now going to be periods of warfare between the native people and the English and this is going to continue to be a defining feature for decades to follow especially following the death of palate. All of this will be along the backdrop of a changing political reality for Virginia, which will see shift towards a more absolutist position followed later by the introduction of an actual local Representative governing structure immediately following that terrible winter Lord, Delaware, take ill Delaware headlong suffered from poor health. This has been what his delayed his crossing Virginia. The year before however, it appears that he recovered just long enough to border ship stopped the call us from abandoning Jamestown, and then promptly caught scurvy and dysentery Delaware. Never fully recovers by sixteen eleven. He himself is on his way back to England. His replacement was Thomas Dale Dale to control, the colony upon arriving with three hundred men in tow and may sixteen eleven when Dale assume control of the call and he brought with him new and harsher punishments looking at the new laws in the colony gives us some sense of the things that matter at the time for the colonists. When reading the new laws to themes become readily apparent I these laws are based on martial law and with come those strict punish us that you would expect to see under martial law system. Second these laws come with a very heavy dose of religion. Now, we have not really talked about religion in the Virginia colony over. I will take a detour right now to discuss it religion is a major part of life Virginia. And is something that was closely followed in. Moment when I discussed the laws of sixteen ten this is going to become clear religion in the colony followed the church of England, however, much how social structures in Virginia struggled to find any kind of foot. So did much of the social structure of the church. The brutal conditions of Virginia. Basically rendered it impossible for the development of an early era stock rec- in Virginia it may be through this that we fail to see the strict social hierarchy develop in the Virginia church as well. With these set the church inside of Regina often does appear more like what we will eventually see Massachusetts. Well, the settlers in Virginia were not Puritans. There is that same rejection of the graduates of the church that we will see from the periods. The Trish that emerges emerging will feature far less of the pomp that is associated with a church of England. And ultimately is going to have far more in common with the church that we see establish itself in Massachusetts. Of course in a few episodes, San we begin looking at the Puritans we. Going to spend much of our time focused on the religious question as that is so going to find the Puritans and will defend them far more than it ends up defining the settlers in Virginia. So with that introduction. Let's take a moment. And look at some of these laws of the Jamestown. Colonists had to obey first church service was mandatory in the colony with both a morning and an evening service required speak-out against God. Well, doing so is going to carry with a death sets us God's name in vain the punishment for a first time offender is an extremely vague description of simply severe punishment with a second offense being death. If you make a comment that might be taken as a shot against God the punishment. Is you guessed it death talking poorly? Appraise we'll get you three times in the public square, whereas acts of sodomy carried a death sentence. Mir fornication only meant a public whipping it is worth noting that of these new laws. The first eleven deal almost exclusively with religious matters beyond religion. However, we do see laws that are put in place to control the normal operating procedures of the colony the new co laid out that Indians coming to trade shell not have their goods stolen under the penalty of death intentionally break tool while that's gotta get you whipped conspiring against the governor steal fruit or vegetables or borrow a boat. Without permission all three of those are going to get a death sentence on your head these us breakdown. So specifically that we know that any banker who is dishonest about the weight of the bread he is selling or does anything other than spent his time baking lose an ear the new laws for the Connie are made up of thirty seven separate provisions, and I assure you are filled to the brim with brutal physical punishments as well as death sentences. If you have noticed that none of the punishments involve prison time, this is likely for two reasons first while the concept of confinement had existed since ancient times incarceration. For an offense really doesn't begin to appear till late seventeenth century with it beginning to become more of a popular option during the eighteenth and nineteenth century beyond that even had. They wanted to us prisons in Virginia. They simply had no pragmatic way to do this for the colonists prisons require manpower. And the settlers just don't possess that yet. We also do get a clue from the laws that there was a serious concern within the Virginia company that the settlers would defect across enemy lines attempt to join with Paladin for the settlers who did make this attempt. The accepted practice was to bring along something of value to trade with powered typically the items about most distantly wanted a needed. We're stealing guns. Those who brought nothing but themselves were at best turned away. In commonly killed those who provided something valuable out in. We're typically invited to stay based on the laws that we have already covered. It should not come as much of a surprise that the penalty for joining pouted was death in spring of sixteen to Dale men. Mr. capture several of these deserters the faith that met those whom he captured range from being hung shot Amberg at the stake. Elsewhere I've seen it said that some of the recovered colonists had their backs broken on the wheel. What remains without question is that those who defected about in were killed immediately upon being recovered, the harshness of these punishments was likely more in place to set an example for the rest of the colony rather than to punish those who deserted for the Virginia company. Defecting colonists present eighth threefold problem. The first problem is that in order for powered into except the person into his people he typically wanted weapons in return. The English wanted desperately to keep their firearms out of the hands of pouted. The English made no mistake in realizing that the weapons that fell into his hands. We're liable to be used against them in future conflicts. The second issue is simply manpower, the colony at this point was still small and the death rate remained high for the first decade. Plus, the colony needed all the hands. It could muster losing into pouted would have nothing but exacerbate the situation further keep in mind that the min defecting to pout may well have had some knowledge about English positions and tactics. This is not something that those back in Jamestown would want following into the hands of an aggressive force. Finally, there is the problem of optics the Virginia company by this point was shifting their pitches. Yes. Well, Virginia's no longer being pitched as a virtual paradise. They still didn't wanna discuss how hostile conditions could actually be between those emerging and the natives what is one thing to say that the land required hard work. It is another thing to tell people that things are so bad that settlers are defecting over to the Indians. This is something that the Virginia company was very very eager to keep quiet. These new laws would I begin to be implemented? Under Lord, Delaware's, rain. However as his stay was short and me is mostly bedridden. It is under Dale that. We really see the thrust of the new laws taking force Dale was asked with the seemingly impossible job of turning around the otherwise fledgling colony. They was not completely without success in this endeavor. We've spent the last few weeks discussing the care so people running the colony DALE'S going to come in. And he's going to be able to bring a new stability to the colony. For the next five years initially under Delaware. And then later Dale the colony would beginning new period that was far more authoritarian in nature blows that we just discussed describe a colony where punishments were harsh and death sentences for even relatively minor offenses were not out of the question. Dale institute. A twice daily church service work with something that just became expected bike Smith Dale stood fast on the policy that if you wanted to eat you had better work failure to work led to lashings amongst other things and day was not afraid of corporal punishment at all it was something that he often doled out himself. It is drained the time. The is governor that we see the first settlers who came over under term of indenture gained their freedom. Indentured servants were a fixture during the early years of Jamestown the standard for somebody who could not pay their own way over was seven years of working for somebody else before getting their own freedom. That means in sixteen fourteen the first injured survey. Who come over in had managed to survive? Everything else earned their freedom. Dale was generous towards the settlers and upon the of their time being indentured the a three acre plot of land. This wasn't effective system for the colony not only did it mean that the people coming over has something tangible to work towards, but it also meant that upon the innovate persons term of being denture. They now have three acres on which they could form their own farms and increase the overall yield of food in the colony Jason would enter a far more stable period following the starving time largely due to the leadership under Dale over the next several years. The call is also going to see a change in what they were to accomplish. By this point, it is becoming clear that the vast amounts of gold, president Mexico. Just don't exist in Virginia. However, the Virginia company did see the benefit of using Virginia as they place to grow valuable crops over the next few decades. We're going to see Virginia become an increasingly important producer of crops and more specifically one crop tobacco. The growth of tobacco is something that we are one. To begin talking about later today, and is going to be something that we talk about in episodes to follow the colony was changing in the period. One thing did remain a major concern, and that was relations with powered in people. The conflict would define the next decade and a half for both groups where we left off. We saw how it withdrawn his port for the Jamestown colonists. This will be one of the contributing factors that led to the master Vatian that we dealt with last episode. In fact, the last time that we actually talked about powered and specifically he personally was busy torturing and killing John Ratcliffe issue. Come as little surprise that following the execution. Iraq live the relations between the colonists. And the Indians were at a pretty low point the relationship between the settlers and the Indian people is going to go through several stages ranging from war in the years after sixteen ten to a period of peace, and then back to a time of increased ability, which sees massacres on both sides trade did not resume between the powder and people in Jamestown throughout sixteen ten. Powder, and realizing that his hopes of the colonists just up leaving was not gonna come to fruition return to a policy of containment, poet enlisted the help of nearby tribes and had them constantly harassing the settlers. This is going to lead to numerous violent ours between the groups throughout sixteen ten and these attacks proved to be effective way to keep the communist moving beyond the fortified safety of Jamestown as we've discussed previously the location of Jamestown was basically the worst possible place in the area and by pinning the colonists inside their four local tribes were able to recap Vic these attacks pushed the settlers to take increasingly violence against the Indians drain win incident. George Percy led a raid that killed over sixty five Indians mpn towns and crops during this raid, Percy amusement took three hostages a woman and two children on the trip back to Jamestown. The children were thrown in the water in shot as he tried to swim. And will the woman was initially spared. She was eventually executed herself upon arriving in Jamestown and Percy. Was reprimanded for not doing the job himself. This Marseille change in dealing with the relationship between the English and the Indians, the colonial leaders meant for this to be a display of power the thought being that if the India's understood the full might of the English they would come to their senses and realize that there is no point in resistance, and that it was in their best interest to do with the English told them to do this policy begins under Lord, Delaware. However, it would reach us big once Dale took over the colony upon Dale assuming control he had absolutely no problem taking harsher stance towards powered what ensues as a result of this is years of back and forth fighting between the groups from sixteen tenths through sixteen thirteen powder in the English continue to fight the slow war of harassment. Neither side really ever gained an advantage over the other. I have seen this period between sixteen ten and thirteen referred to as the first Anglo pout in war. However, it be on the harassment that we've been talking about as well as a few English rates like what Percy had led don't get the idea that there was ever. Oh, really a period of sustained fighting powered in wanted to check English expansion beyond Jamestown, which he did successfully for the most part the English for their part under Dale were able to capture. Some new lands. However, widespread expansion was suppressed well, skirmishes would continue for three years effective stalemate existed between the two groups and the sale would remain in effect up until the spring of sixteen thirteen. It is drained sixteen thirteen colonist Thomas all would have a breakthrough was in up and comer and had been the captain of the ship that brought Lord Delaware to Virginia well out on a mission to trade with the Argo learned the Pocahontas was nearby recognizing the opportunity this presented Argo moved quickly on the information pocano at this time was with the paddle people possibly visiting the family of her husband while the pedal were part of the pouting confederacy. They were at the fringes of an already loose confederation. The pedal MC tribe regularly traded with Jamestown likely. Didn't wanna lose the trade with the English wanted to keep the English happy when Argo came into Bandon that Pocahontas returned over the paddle MC people obliged poet. Obviously realized that the English had scored a huge victory when they took Pocahontas hostage. Potent did make an attempt to trick back for her offering eight English settlers that he himself had taken was holding hostage. However, the English knew that holding the daughter of the guy that they've been at war with the less of years was far more valuable to them than the eight settlers would be the English toll powered in. Thank you. No. Thank you and poke Lahana's was returned to Jamestown to be held as a hostage drain her time. And James Polk on us was by all accounts treated kindly, her jailer with the Reverend Alexander Whitaker and Whitaker was known throughout the colony as being intense in his beliefs. Even amongst the other settlers what had come from a successful family. His father was a professor of divinity at Cambridge would agree chosen to travel to Virginia to serve for a period of three. Three years interested in converting the local Indian tribes. Well, working the jailer for Pocahontas, whatever spend a large amount of time, teaching her English. And instructed her matters of Christianity, what are closely held the belief that the Indians were like the native Britons before the Romans brought them civilization Whitaker. Therefore was not surprised to find that. Oklahoma was a quick learner. Willing Jamestown poke honest, many twenty eight year old widow John Rolfe Roaf had come over to Jamestown. Just after the winter of sixty nine sixteen ten on the expedition that brought Lord Delaware himself. Rough is going to be somebody who were going to talk about much more and just a little bit. When we get to the subject of tobacco. Well, today, his reputation is so closely tied to poke Hanis who would eventually become his wife. His real legacy in Virginia is that he is the first colonist to successfully, cultivate, and sell tobacco the crop. That Virginia would ultimately become so famous for your after capture polka hana's will marry role for the Regina company. This was the finest advertising that they could have possibly hoped for polka Hanis was everything they wanted an Indian woman. She was smart. She learned English and she presented well the marriage. Likewise did much to bring an increase of peace between powered in the English polka hana's was initially a hostage in the traditional sense. She provided the English with leverage overpowered following the. Marriage. However, power was down more closely connected to the colony that he'd ever previously been before. After all his own daughter had married. One of the Englishmen the power of this alliance was not something that was lost on powered and he had been personally asked and did grant permission for polka hana's to marry Rolf. And well, it is possible. The Pocahontas did not feel as though she had much of a say in the actual matter powered did understand the importance of the marriage and the potential allies that it could form for him, regardless of his beliefs. The results of the capture of polka HAMAs was a temporary into the skirmishes that took place between the powered and people and the English. This would officially Mark the end of the first Anglo powered in war as for Pocahontas and Rolfe their value to the company now extended beyond the borders of North America. The Virginia company realize the power of polka Honasan selling the colony back in England and knew that their value in London far exceeded what they could provide in Jamestown following the marriage Pocahontas took on the Christian name Rebecca in sixteen. She enroll travelled to England where they were greeted with much fanfare poke Lahana's became bonafide celebrity in England and treated as such however just two years later in sixteen seventeen just prior to the return to Virginia poke Lahana's became unexpectedly in violently ill a short time later, she died cause of her death means unknown to this day. Ralph ended up returning Virginia and would eventually marry for a third time. We're going to return to Roaf in just a minute when we examined the importance of tobacco Pocahontas would leave. It importantly Gacy following her death greater time in England. She was treated well. And as discussed the moment ago, she was seen as a celebrity and was treated like royalty for the Virginia company, polka hana's was exactly the image of an Indian woman. They wanted to portray in the years following her does she would continue to remain extremely popular. However, the narrative around her would change as we will see next week following the death of powered in the English relations with the Indian ticket dramatic turn for the worst. By the time that John Smith wrote his Jenner. History of Virginia in sixteen twenty four the views of pouting confederacy had taken on a much much more negative look, and as we will see in the next episode in the years following powered his death. Both sides would launched Ruutel attacks against each other. And these go far beyond this commercials that we had seen before in sixteen ten and sixteen thirteen several of these encounters involve outright slaughter when Smith does published his general histories on Virginia, the narrative change of the point that Pocahontas was no longer seen as a Representative example of the Virginia Indians, rather she was the exception her popularity exemplified by using her in his runs in sixteen twenty four and as we've discussed several times by now her very name with something that could help himself more books, and is likely the reason for his story about how poke Lahana's had saved his life Pocahontas popularly has largely entered over the years as she has continued to be subject of interest for both. Academics. And the public at large the kidnapping of poke Lahana's led to a period of peace between the power and the English. This piece would prove to be a critical factor for the English. This ability that came along with the peace would allow Jamestown to begin producing the crop. That would become the most known for tobacco. No single film. It is going to be bigger for the stability of Jamestown colony than tobacco tobacco is going to forever change Virginia. And even today Virginia continues to produce huge amounts of tobacco with only North Carolina and Kentucky producing more the development of tobacco in Virginia was made possible primarily for two reasons grain the first years of the colony the Virginia company was applying to read control over the daily actions of the colony the Virginia company. However, had come to realize that this heavy handed approach was doing little for making the colony profitable. As we have discussed before the Virginia company had begun making private ownership more. Of possibility following sixteen fourteen the first indentured servants began to get their three acres, and we begin to former for themselves. Likewise by the middle of the sixteen tents had become evident that the largest gold precious metals just weren't going to be discovered as the Virginia company began making something that was available for private ownership. The company began giving who paid their own way to Virginia sizeable plot of land to do but they wanted with specifically settlers who came over and we're not indentured received a fifty acre plot of land. If that person brought over a servant or another relative at their own personal expense. They got another fifty acres. This meant to things. I encourage wealthy perspective settlers to bring as many people as they could to the call at their own expense. Remember earlier, I said that they were trying to populate the Connie and bring more people over. Well, this is how they were doing it for the company it helped them get more people there and shifted the expense onto the individual colonists. Instead of the company bring them in there for the colonists gave them a large plot of land, which they would then be encouraged to, cultivate, this would further help the colony as the person who now had a personal stake in the land is going to have financial incentive to make sure that land is as valuable as possible. General began to I experiment with planting tobacco in sixteen twelve tobacco. Head started becoming an increasingly popular planting Europe and Rolf discovered that the hot humid Virginia climate was perfect for growing it. This gave the colony a distinct advantage over the home island England proper is not exactly known for as long summers were as Regina provided that exact climate as tobacco continue to grow in popularity over Europe. They drove up the need for places to grow it as private land ownership became common in Virginia. It meant the settlers had these large plots on which to grow their large crops and food was obviously critical for the survival of the colony the Virginia company was interested in making profit it helped the situation further John Roth began growing tobacco for the colony at ten that it was entering into a period of relative peace following the capture Pocahontas and sixteen thirteen Jamestown entered into a period where conflict between the power and tribes and the English decline. And this period of peace allowed the English place. Their focus on matters such as cultivation instead of having to worry constantly about self defense from the Indians. Why is this allowed the colony to begin to expend passed its borders of just Jamestown? Remember that for a longtime powered its primary goal have been the containment of the English yet during this period of peace. The Connie was able to expand pass the four and take advantage of the vast amounts of land that Virginia had to offer. This makes it much easier for the English you properly, cultivate, their land and allow for the rapid growth of tobacco the rise. In tobacco would lead to a huge increase in population. As people flocked to verging to get in on the ground floor of this new cash. Crop tobacco is a labor intensive plan which drove up the number of indentured servants come into the colony as well further growing the population, for example in sixteen sixteen there are three hundred and fifty settlers in Jamestown by the time six fifty arrives. They're going to be more than thirteen thousand people in the colony and this is despite a yearly mortality rate inside the colony that remained close to twenty five percent. By sixteen. Thirty eight Virginia would become the primary tobacco producer for all of Europe. The five years after the stubborn time sees Jamestown begin to develop an identity that would carry not only through the following decades. But into the coming centuries Virginia would quickly emerge as one of the world's leading tobacco producers. It is drained this time that we begin to see the colony interim period of relative stability, no longer are the Jamestown settlers gonna find themselves in danger of dine out like the Roanoke settlers had. And this is not to say that life in Virginia had in any way, become easy mortality rate role remain high for a long time and life in the colony is undeniably rough. We will see next week the difficult times for the calling are not over by any means. However, the survival of the colony is never going to be called into question. Again, next time we are going to begin looking at what will become the defining feature of the next several decades for Virginia. Specifically the. Relationship between the English and the powered and people a relationship that is going to turn increasingly bitter and the to warfare massacres on both sides by the end of next episode. We are willing to be able to wrap up that part of our story. Until then I want to thank you for listening. And I do want to quickly mention that if you head on over to the website or to our Facebook group, you can see a picture of Pocahontas. If you are curious what she looked like we actually do have portrait of her so head on over to the website that is at US political podcast dot com or you can search for us on Facebook at the political history of the United States. I hope you guys have a great two weeks. I will see you back here then to begin discussing the conflicts between the powered and people and the Virginia Indians.

Virginia Jamestown Thomas Dale Dale Delaware us Virginia Indians Pocahontas Connie New England James Polk England Jamestown scurvy Jamestown Regina Marx Representative Emma San Rolf
They Called This a Movie Episode 87 - Tiptoes (2003)

They Called This a Movie

1:18:19 hr | 1 year ago

They Called This a Movie Episode 87 - Tiptoes (2003)

"Carolyn Stevens. Life together was perfect. I've got to get going. There's one small problem. Rather with twins. It can tear them apart looking to let me know that everyone in your pants midget. midget caroline doors. BRING THEM TOGETHER Welcome I'm Steven. There you are. This is Steven's father. Bruno his mom Kathleen over behind the Bar, students brother. He could have prepared us for this. Don't you think to me? I'll never speak to again just together? When the going gets rough, it's only the size of your heart that counts. That big of a deal for. You not this great gallon. You didn't tell us. He's probably to be lit I'm not like you. We also cute and cuddly. Don't discriminate against us. These parties while never this has your. Back off scolding, hawks by men can do what he wants to do. Ready, adult relationship. What does this mean? A Walk down the aisle last Abramson very lucky. Just, help us smart enough. Not screwing up is just a beginning. Patches Dad. Canal pull some Langley productions proudly present command performances from Cape Beckons, sale. Matthew, mcconaughey! Patricia Arquette and in the role of a lifetime. Gary Oldman. tiptoes. Welcome today call movie testing, the strength of friendships once movie at a time subscribe to the podcast and Itunes podcast services by searching. They called as a movie part of the main naming network to find more from us to the website at the maiming calmer on twitter, facebook and Instagram at the main naming Rosa now proud member. Geek Vibes nation. You can find them at GB. NATION DOT COM, welcome back to the goal is movie. This is anthony with me. As always is Dan acquaintance and Mark Meyer say Hello, gentlemen, Mellow Friends Hello. This. Is movie that we're doing here. I can't imagine how they talked everyone into this. Because I can imagine going to Gary, Oldman and going. Hey, you're going to do this for an hour and a half. You know on film. Are you ready? You know commitment to the craftsmanship. We've been thinking about that all day. Not now much of a you know thinking it'll be a good fit or anything, but that's been rattling in my brain since I saw this movie like I would love to be behind those conversations for. Is. Professional all right. He's a consummate professional and he likes challenges I think. Going to Polish off and Oscar. Oscar, being for sure Yeah, this movie's and other weird one, but before we get into that I as one of discuss what we watched this week. Sure essence in we're still stuck at home. I actually took full advantage this week I watched to new A. Brand new movies Netflix's, but I know one of them was I watched the disaster artist. James Franco and man. That movie is so out there. And it was a tough watch, but only because it's meant to be cringe-worthy, obviously with Tommy was so being just out of out of his rocker, but I enjoyed that movie a lot. It was a lot of fun, and then I watched uncut gems and I. Don't get it I. It wasn't a bad movie but I. Just it was so. There's so much anxiety in it. I couldn't really enjoy it. And Adam Sandler sounds like his buddy. Who Does the? WHO's The quarterback from? Talking about yeah, so his accent is just kind of all over the place, but yeah I I know everyone praised it so much I could see why, but it just wasn't for me I think. Brilliant Avenue Watch anything this week. The you know it's out of my normal. You know just things on the Internet. I think the longest thing I watched. This week was the entire show of less with tonight. That may that half hour might be. The longest thing I've watched this week. Just kind of trying to do things in short bursts, not as much as talked about his last week, but it's nice to hear Dan checking out of movies. Such a disaster artists knowing you'll like the room. Right Dan I've never seen the okay, then my goodness. Why haven't we done the room yet? I was GONNA. Say we should once you know the apocalypse ends. We should try to get to a midnight screening because I'll be closer to you guys now. So we can make that happen, so yeah I'm I am full bore into going to see that movie man. It's just it's out of control. Okay well I take back Mike Thought on youth. Artists because I thought you would hold off after seeing the room for some reason. Yeah, this week. A did a bunch of revisits can't really remember anything that I've seen this week that I haven't seen before I watch through each of the back to the future trilogy. I you know I usually watch the first one at least once a year, maybe not, if not more watch, the second one and the third one. I watched the first time in a very long time, and it's not as bad as I remember it. Being there's definitely not as big of a drop off between the second and third one as people want you to believe I think there are. Like the middle part of the second one is not as good as I remember it when they go to the House and you have Michael J. Fox playing his own daughter. It just Kinda goofy. What else did I want to watch clueless? Which is a movie that I've seen a thousand times I revisited black clansmen, and then I revisited a movie called. Stay tuned which I haven't seen since I was a kid, and it stars. John Ritter and Pam Dober- as parents. They get sucked into their satellite dish and it's got a whole bunch a whole bunch of parodies. It's like What's his name? I think it's the principle from Ferris Bueller. If I'm not mistaken Jeffrey Jones. Up Jeffrey Jones plays basically the devil slash satellite dish installer, and he sucks them into the TV to play some games from Hell and then they get sucked into a bunch of different channels that are all like sort of like things, but are have a weird twist on so like they get sucked into movie called Driving Miss Daisy. Among other different parodies and there's a moment where John Ritter. Get sucked into three's company which is a funny little nod. Pam does not get sucked into Mork and Mindy. So that's it and that's about it. I watched a documentary about What is it called? It's called have a good trip adventures in psychedelics, which is on Netflix, it's just a bunch of comedians and actors and actresses, talking about their experiences with the LSD and shrooms, kind of interesting nothing is going to light and You know interesting. stings on there and Sarah Silverman Paul Scheer. Think Rob Hubel and Nicole. L. Those kind of people talking about that stuff. Is Interesting and it's fast I. Find it fascinating. A couple of buddies of mine and I were talking about a deal Mel Toro and how he picks weird movies to direct, so you know I'm not. I like GMO. Del Toro. I, I've seen a few movies. I'm not a huge fan of a lot of his work, but I talked about how I enjoyed Pacific Rim because. It's just so ridiculous, and my buddy says you know. I saw that movie while I was on acid, and he was one of the best experiences of my life, because everything is like the monsters are already colorful, and there's a lot of color in the movie, so everything's just really coming. Coming at me and you know, my mind couldn't handle giant robots, fighting giant monsters and I was just free can out by loved every second of it like you know what I think that that I would make Pacific Rim, Hundred Times more enjoyable, just being on a being just tripping balls that would have made you more pissed off about the helicopter Dan I don't even think I would know what helicopters were if I were tripping. I was just see you know I probably see like rock robots coming at me or something? Yeah, so that's kind of what we watch this week. And now it's time to get into the movie that we watched this week and technically is was dance picked this week so dandy want to introduce. Your movie sure yeah, this so full disclosure. This was not my first pick. My I had my first pick ready a couple weeks ago and I was very excited, because it was very corny in very over the top silly, and it was an actor who we had not yet covered, and I had picked Jackie Chan's the Tuxedo and right before we were gonNA watch it prime took it down, and you know I'm I'm left scrambling for a movie, and I had a couple of movies where I wanted. Wanted to go, but anthony was saying you know. None of them seemed on brand, and I agree none of them were really our style, and he suggested tiptoes so I I looked at the letter box and Yeah. I was hooked immediately, just knowing that Gary Oldman plays a little person I needed to see for my own two eyes, and I'm disappointed that I did that because this movie. Who boy it's, it's whacky man, but not wacky in like comedy. Wacky it's just what were they thinking wack? Yes so this movie is tiptoes from two thousand and three directed by Matthew Bright who directed freeway with Kiefer, Sutherland and Reese Witherspoon, and it seems like this movie ended his career. It's. Dar's Matthew, Broderick netnam broader. It Stars Matthew. Makaay Kate Beckett Sale Gary Oldman Patricia arquette petered includes Debbie. Lee Carrington David Alan Grier and Michael J. Anderson has an. Score four point four and a rotten tomatoes score of twenty nine percent. So now where what's where are you coming with tiptoes? I guess yeah I mean I I was totally brand new to this movie I didn't know it existed I was content, not knowing it existed, and you brought it up in. It has such a nice like it has a caliber of stars here where you you hear Matthew mcconaughey Hey and everyone loves the guy, but you gotta remember. This is pre. You know Dallas buyers club. Obviously, this is early two thousands McConnell. Hey, you're getting. You're not getting the. Show some respect. It's the Mikan San's. I can't pronounce it correctly. I'm just trying to save face. And, then this this movie hit before everyone else hit right so you have pre game of thrones Peter Dan College. And then you have Cape Beckon Sale, who's always on the cusp of being a good actress? But then she chooses tip toes and just sets herself back to square one, so she's. She's always just behind the eight ball. It seems like yeah. I mean we've got. We've got three Oscar winners and we've got an Emmy Award winner in this and. So Yeah as you mentioned they're all kind of an interesting places in their careers. At this point so I kinda Before I do mark you. Go and your? Yeah, yeah, so the whole time Dan was talking I've been thinking of Matthew Broderick pointing the Matthew mcconaughey character. How much of a different movie that's? Just Vein complete any dire with so anyway. I haven't even people that. Many mccown ahead kill zero. I didn't even know so coming from this. I came in pretty much blind. outside of the fact that Gary Oldman and Matthew mcconaughey was in. It so when when Oldman I shows up. It took me five minutes to realize that was him and not a little person actor. it so then. I was like okay. I hope this is a wild ride here of you know just. Gary Oldman Gary Oldman stuff, but it just this movie I couldn't place if felt like you know. It was just a breeze like I never checked the time on it, but I can't really remember why things happened, but I'm glad we did watch. Yeah the I will say one thing about this movie moves pretty fast I. Mean because we've watched two movies back to back there ninety minutes long, and the the length of them are very different. I think love on a leash feels like it's two and a half hours. This feels ninety minutes It's that good in any way, but like this nothing happened. Really it's. It's one of those weird like mid nineties. Romance movies that are just kind of middle of the road, and they really inoffensive, but then you add offense to it by just having this really misguided plot about Matthew mcconnahey, hating his little person family. I've never watched a movie where what you assume is. The protagonist of the film is completely irredeemable throughout it. Anyway throughout it, he makes turn halfway through the movie. That is is scary and violent and upsetting. It was very confusing because in the beginning of the film Makaay is, he's a defender for little people. You know everyone's like Oh. You know they're dwarfs. No, you don't say that. They're little people earner midgets. Yes staunchly says midget like four times and keep correcting her. Then he corrects her once and she's like I. don't care about that stuff. Right Am Kate Beckon sale you. Kinda suck in the beginning of this movie, too. That's the thing there's like a total role reversal between McConnell, hey, and beckons sale, but yeah I I. It's made to your made to believe Makaay is the good guy here you know coming from a family of little people and trying to educate beckon sale. WHO's you know his girlfriend? Slash fiance, whatever, but then all of a sudden. Yeah, he just he gets scary at the towards the end I was not expecting that whatsoever that that twist. That was a twist worthy of Shamlan man. y'All my God in the hospital scene when he's holding the baby. It looks like he's about ready to throw the baby out the window. I was convinced it was going to kill the child. Sale don't give him the kid. He's got those wild that we saw in serenity. About to murder his baby. You can kind of see. The apprehension in becan sales is to look. Let me hold them just like. Okay, you know just you know. Try Not to bashes head, and if you if you don't mind. And I was convinced he was going to try it at a whoops, I dropped him, but mandate. That was a very tense minute. I would say of cinema yeah. To, just kind of wanted to discuss because we mentioned. This cast is pretty pretty strong cast. Just kind of want to go through. They were times of their career, so Gary Oldman was just I mean. Obviously he was big in the nineties. He had you know Fidel. Men Airforce One lost in space, professional And then he was just about to hit Harry Potter the preserve Aska Pam as well as Batman begins would have been two years after this Kate Beck and sale was coming off of underworld. Underworld same year underworld came out in two thousand three's tiptoes. Pearl Harbor was two thousand and one as well serendipity, so those were like breakout roles, and then we were just a short while away from her starring in in a Martin, Scorsese film the aviator and do this four well van Helsing, and then she just go onto underworld, and click call those movies down down the list, so she was right right in the heart of like her just becoming a big stars. I guess she'll she would ever be. She was just like I was saying it was always like right there, and then she decided to click and then yeah I. Heard decisions are in great to be honest with you. Exam leading this. Fine actress, yeah. She has marketable face. Oh Yeah! She's absolutely stunning and she's great looking in this movie it's it's amazing how she someone could squander such beauty she's. She's I think she's probably mid forties by now right early mid forties nineteen, seventy three. She's you know she's not far from fifty. Yeah, there you go, but she still looks great. But like yeah, there's not. There's not much great stuff I mean she's got. What do we got here? We got vacancy after Click got vacancy. Which I think is a horror movie. Suspense thriller with like. I think Michael Shannon. Is that right isn't that I'll Marsden. Distraught Sal Luke. Wilson Frank Whaley Ethan embry movie was so bad. I watched that for thirty one days of horror, right and yeah, that left a bad taste in my mouth, but then underworld sequels white out I remember she's got like a scene where she's just in like white underwear I think Michael. Movie, right, I think that's white noise wind noise. Okay? This is licking an Arctic. Never saw that. I haven't seen either as the pro like all the production stills, or just like she's in her underwear. In this, the total recall remake an end night. Bunch own heart asylum, absolutely anything we blame her Egypt. It's got to be a little bit of. And Yeah. She is not had a great turn-of-the-century. Math McConnell A. where was he? He's so two thousand three. He also had had to lose a guy in ten days before that was frailty, which is kind of similar to vacancy. and. Then he went on his mid-2000s run of movies like Sahara. To lose money failure to launch. This is the ROM COM era of Matthew mcconaughey. Tropic thunder thrown in there to Sir for common dude. Girlfriends passed, and then the Lincoln lawyer is kind of where he starts to turn it around in twenty eleven. Bernie killer Joe if I could describe tiptoes in like one sentence. It's a two thousand and three movie that screams nine, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, three. Sure yes. From the way everyone dresses to the writing style to even just like the pacing. It seems like this is a. A nine hundred nineties, Rom com movie. Yeah, but it just. It never got past nineteen nine. Yeah and then so port pair. There is a there is a matthew bright cut of this film that was shown at Harry. Knowles but John in Austin. Texas and they re cut. It was supposed to be like if Two and a half hours long our like one hundred and fifty minutes which yeah. This movie was two and a half hour long. That deserves to be cut. Cut It down to like minutes, and I think if i. if the wikipedia is correct, basically the at Sundance Film Festival Ninety Minute version screen director bright, criticized the film and l'ambassade the producers for hitting the editing, his film, leading them to drank him offstage Jeez. He made that might have been why this was his last movie. Subsequently Bright, not direct another film and later said that the film's failure hurt his career. Yep Make Sense, this movie doesn't need a director's cut, it was just it's cut and simple. You know you have a love triangle. That's Kinda weird and comes out of nowhere. Yeah, and that's it really you don't need it. You don't need two and a half hours of that now. It's just a really misguided movie, and it should it. There's a lot of reasons it's the picking Gary. Oldman, to play a little person is is a weird choice. I think this movie would have been better if he just leaned into more just more comedy like you have McConnell Hey and Oldman, they're not brothers, or maybe their friends, family, friends or whatever? They're trying to win over and sale and McConnell. As the obviously, he's the good looking guy where you know of normal height. He's Brash and Cocky, but Gary Coleman's character. Is You know if you want to keep him? As the little person for God knows whatever reason you have do that and he's, but he's just. The nicer guy is not crazy like McConnell hey, but he'll take care of you. You know you'll have you home by ten, and he'll the hug unite, and he won't be a jerk McConnell. Hey, you know he'll keep you out all night and he'll do. Blow off you and yeah, you might live the. Like, you might live on the edge of danger there, but you're not gonNA be fulfilled with Mattie MCI. You'll be more fulfilled with Gary Oldman sure. Yeah I kind of went off on a little tangent there. I don't. Where do we go from here? Ever been made. You. To compare about mcconnahey, Gary Oldman. Movie is forcing us to do, but it's funny that they're. They're supposed to be playing twins ten years part. Yeah, and look nothing like really. Want to get into the plot here. Already for. We do Dan for us. Okay, so you know the stick stick? Sorry time with Tia good friend of the PODCAST. She has her own podcast where her and her crew go down the top ten lists of the week, so for instance top ten villains or top ten onscreen couple, so make sure to listen to that. That's at Geek five-nation along with all the other awesome podcast. They have go check it out. And we're going to take a moment to listen to some messages from friends of the PODCAST, so we will be right back. This is kind of J. coach Duffy from the ultra. Daryl, partly our podcast every week yielded talking sports movies, TV comics and more. It's always folly topics on each episode. You can find the key H on. Google. iheartradio, spotify, stitcher, Parveen, and wherever you find great podcasts such as the one listen you right now. Don't forget the checkout ultra girl, polly, our dot com, where you can find links to all the social media accounts linked through bands whose music later each week on the show, cashback, six or seven podcast Info, and probably points are canyon blocked section of the show. Thanks for to. Now get back in regularly scheduled I can't. Welcome travelers seems like you're looking for a story. Got One four year. Involves venture friendship. Era Why are you talking about that time? Still that big ASS Mellon yet. I was going for more. You could come about the time I kicked her ass or I wouldn't evert tell. Refugee Ron okay. Everyone shut up now. Come with me. As I. Tell you a story from afar. Everybody my name's David. I'm the DM from afar podcast from afar. PODCAST is all about four friends separated by distance brought together by adventure. y'All stop by and give a listen thanks. And welcome back now it's time to get into the plot of tip toes. We Open on Gary Oldman, driving around the three wheeler, and then immediately the solvent something else. That's something else is keep pecking sales enormous painting of pink. Carl's and came back and sale is kind of dressed, and we're gonNA probably talk about. Her were a lot about this episode. She's dressed like someone from the nineties like from. reality bites or something like that basically Manica as shows up as even and tells beckoned sale, and he's got to go out of town for family stuff and he's very coy about what exactly he's doing. I, think CAPE could sales. Carol is her name She has a side comment about how he's going to meet his girlfriend, or whatever, and then beckoned sell tries to give him a blow job, and he refuses, which is ridiculous, the most ridiculous thing in this movie. I think the tramp stamp is pretty ridiculous. It was the mid-2000s though man. It was at prime tramp stamp. That's why low rise jeans are saying okay. This is like I. It was one of those where I'm like they're definitely. They're definitely GONNA stop the. But and it kept going. I'm like. Why did they do in the so early in the moving, they get. To, see his tidy, Whitey. Route Shit Right. Now getting interesting. So bad. And he was talking about. And then he leaves. About to get a blowjob, and then he's just like no peace at should have been our first nine. From, an early two, thousand came and Stanley reviews a blowjob ridiculous. This is this is pre. Pete. Davidson came back and sale. She's not tainted is what you're saying. Then, we dissolve again into Gary. Oldman Peter Dink Lynch pin on the side of the highway. Gary Oldman is playing a little person named Ralph. was playing a French anarchist named Maurice a bus pulls over and Kicks Out Patricia Arquette who sports some unfortunate Cordero's and English offers her a ride on his chopper then Matthew. mcconaughey arrives at benefit con benefit dinner for little people will people's defensely specifically where his uncle is one of the only leads of it and David Alan Grier is the MC with one of the worst weeks in history. He's playing David Alan grier playing some celebrity. They really never go into what he is what he does or why? He's famous as well known enough that someone asks for his autograph later. Yeah, it was almost like a James Brown and personnel. I kinda got from it. I don't really know what he was doing. Neither do I think Dave Down greer knew what he was doing there. Go Up there and be funny to Oh. Okay, whatever Maverick. Stephen meets up with his parents. His Dad's is played by the backwards talking little person from twin peaks, and they say that Steven's brother hasn't shown up yet and then Stephen. Go then goes dancing with some of the girls, some girls, and then at that moment outside Steven's brother role shows up on his chopper with Maurice and Lucy. Which is Patricia Arquette? Lucy, go inside while role and Steven talk outside mostly bad chopper, and his parents would not be happy of him riding around, and then Murray's and Lucy immediately get kicked out of the benefit stealing food. That whole thing Patricia Arquette. How can they say stealing food when foods from the Earth or whatever is trying to avoid that so? This is. It, this is an early theme that continues throughout the movie where Peter Dink klages character. wants to do something and has denied whatever it is. He wants to do, and he just goes off on a cursing spree. It's it's pointless adds nothing to the story. and. It just leads me to believe that you know. Maybe they just they just WanNa Dinka Jr for his star. Power at this point was I didn't get to him, but he this is rain around his breakout, which would have been the station agent, which was two thousand and three same year same year. He had station agent. Tiptoes and Elf your for him. But yeah I I would think that they probably had that role as as big as it is just so that they can not feel like they made a movie about little people with the biggest. The only a little person that have a substantial role was played by a person. That wasn't a little person. I will say he has a decent Frenchaccent. Yeah, I mean. Peter thinks a pretty good actor. He. Would you've been great and Gary Oldman's roll? Thank, you thank you. There's no reason not to have him switch with. With Gary Oldman. Gary Oldman beefing cranky would person or don't have a minute at all sure? Have Him as the they've done. With bad to pay? I mean you're making them be a dwarf. What's the? What's the difference of putting him in black face? Well. We'd have to ask I guess. Is, there term for for of a normal sized person playing a little person. I probably not right, this is. I don't know I was GonNa say maybe this is the only time it's ever but I mean they should do it on Martin all the time. You're supposed to be a cool kid and Tim Conway had all those Dorf videos so all I know is both of these guys are being totally wasted in this movie? Absolutely yeah. And even like the trailer has like a role of a lifetime Gary. Oldman He doesn't really do much in this movie. They must have been talking about the director's cut. Maybe, but do you think allman saw the script and was just like well. Wait a minute. This is daft. Why playing little person when we have other little people here and he showed up to the shop showed up the set like listen. You realize there's a ton point. There's a ton of other little people here. That could literally be in my character. They know, but you're Gary. All I appreciate that but. I can't pull off everything. You know what it probably was. Bright had probably seen the Lord of the Rings. It's like well. You know if they can get someone to play. Hobbit I can get Gary Oldman. The play a little person. Can't be that difficult. To figure out the camera angle thing right? Yeah, force perspective should. have been how they accomplish the stabbings. Great someone should taught him. So. He's just twelve feet. FITO further away, everybody. Yeah! To shouting his lines, I love you, too. Kate Beckons sale so Stephen and Ralph. They have their conversation, and then Stephen goes home to beckon and sales. We get some McConnell and some tighty whiteys He pulls the bed and he still in tell her where he was which makes her feel suspicious, and she tells him that she might be pregnant and he has a giant meltdown. So. Surprised that. It took them twelve minutes to get mcconaughey shirtless. We we had them pants loose in the first five. Million way his his facial expressions when he has his little, his little meltdown is Kinda of crazy. I sent the I took a screen shot of it and send it to you guys. It's like they. It wrinkled his brain man. How yeah it's kind of like an Zootopia when the the slots realized that the joke is a joke, so it's slow realization. Yeah! Oh Yeah. Total blonde moment and I'd like to cheat keeps going. Are you okay how you doing with this? First of all ladies I I'm not a siding with conohere, but don't bring it up at three o'clock in the morning. Just wait till breakfast let the man have his own Jay or a cup of coffee, and then drop the bomb on us all right. Yeah, it's. Did Yeah. You have to present it. She kinda. She brings it up to him like it's a problem, you know what it was. Do you. Remember that scene in the other guys where Eva was either Longoria, and it does even Mendez I'm sorry. Even Mendez and Will Farrell are discussing will Ferrell's passed, and she sings that song to him like pimps don't cry, and then she says she's pregnant like the worst possible transition ever. That's this. Yes, sure, where were you? Out. I'm pregnant. What's there's no buffer? Yeah, it's like we just want to sleep. Giving six hours. told me up. Give me the date. Now I'm not going to sleep. I'm going to be. This is going to have long term consequences Cape Beck and sale. You'll see. He gets mad at her and he gets out of bed, and then the next meanwhile, Rolf and Maurice and Lucy. Pull into a motel trying to room for the night. The owner thing is a prostitute or lucy as a prostitute for some resentment. What is it? Her name's Lucy Right. Sure. Last week's movie. The girls aim was lease. The thinks Lucy is a prostitute says he won't still to prostitutes then they tell him that she's not sells them a room at discount. MR, two little people get it. Then in the room recently to get drunk on morphine cognac while Rolf goes off, take shower so making out and then Maurice back hurts so at least tries to justify him, and he gets mad and drinks more than world comes out of the bathroom and tries to go to sleep, as Lisa and reese get to the fucking and reese falls off the bed, and then stumbles the bathroom to throw up, and while role tells Lisa Lucy that he has ulcers and herniated discs in his back. It's a little people problem. Off Costa August, call Dr Marie sales, not use or Rolf leaves several goals to an old girlfriends apartment and she looks like a little person version, gwen Stefani. She's living with some guy that says isn't her boyfriend, but they've fucked twice. Guys. She's living with comes home and says he's quit his job. He needs money for the bus. And he finds herself in her bedroom, and he freaks out and slaps Rolf. Right across. The faces are punching him until Sally. It's guy with a boombox, and then Saegusa called. Please Ralph leaves while Sally tells him to. Hey. We gotta wait. Tell him what he did. And he's like Nah fuck off. This basically. You tell them and that walks out. I'm way during this whole scene white. They do nothing to establish why he would go to her. At all like nothing that happens in the scene goes. Oh, I get it. In the bright cut. Yeah, they. They explain it later on better you know when he's doing his whole speech in bed in about raw, but at this point it's like it. It was I guess. Maybe it's in the the might matthew brain cut. What kind of guy do you have to be? beat up a little person by the way? I mean just full on pummeling Gary Oldman. It's not cool man. He he hit pretty hard, or do you think you think that's better than just being super disrespectful and just like picking him up and. Throwing, him outside. Him across the room. He does Ralph tries to keep like crawling out of the apartment. And he thinks upbeat takes him up on his legs and pulls back in, and also the guy has a cane. Gary Oldman has a cane. Come on, Dude. I guess they're trying to show that he's. He's a low life. Yeah, but I don't know man. Even lowlifes have some standard I guess or some code, right? They just Kinda take cain away. That's all I'm going to do to you. You've views it out the window. Go get it. Fifteen in style exactly. So a he leaves, and then we get in the morning. We get carol watching a pregnancy test reveal positive, and that's seen. Meanwhile, Steven goes to work as a firefighter boot camp instructor and he's enormous. Old Time I love the same. Just excellent guy named chuck for the entire time, and gets called out by a female firefighter who had a better movie would be the subject of some sort of subplot, but it's not. Again that could have been in the longer movie. Because it! There's another scene where that could definitely been a match. You know point. Later on when when they go to the party. But now. She just shows up and goes. I would get is autographing and leaves. Yeah, they're. Of Tension and drama between Stephen and Carol, but they aren't entire time. He's He's yelling at Chuck. I just keep thinking like this is the Cam cross the episode where we're not leaving here until this Christmas Ham gives me a pull up. Yeah. So then after that Ralph shows up carols and introduces himself Steven's brother, and we realized that Carol might not have even realized he had rather let alone a little person brother. Ralf mention say I thing. She believes him immediately. I mean I wouldn't you? I. Know What I. Got A. Mark. People with. I. Also a well known fact that little people are incapable of lying. I think I think that's I mean. To stereotype. One there you go. That's not a bad stereotype to have though. Sir Ralph mentions that he got the shit kicked out of him, so carol takes out a first aid kit alcohol and some of his cuts thank. Carol finds out that Ralph in Steven are brothers and Steven is never mentioned her to Rolf Rolf. Ghosts sit down. sit down on the couch where they've sewn Gary. Oldman the couch with a couple of fake legs. And then he falls asleep, so carol puts a blanket on them so the only thing diffusing, is he. mcconaughey character is supposed to be away for a week correct or something. A couple of weeks. And she still there's still the ability for her drive to where he's at. He's fucking that other girl right in. In the bright cut, he's fucking that other woman. And she was, she was intimidating that woman. She was like six six. Yeah. He's on. He's on the taller side and minnows can. Obviously she can carry a full grown man. I think you have to be able to be a firefighter. So, yes, our. She towered over McConnell. And that's all I know right and I. think that's what McConnell. Hey liked I the snacking him up a little bit well. He said well I guess he figures with his. He needs more chromosome, so she's tall and he's if he's dwarf. As he calls himself then maybe I'll cancel each other out right. Yeah, they'll. They'll get like a fly all woman to get an average kid he needs. Amazonian is what you're saying exactly. It's very sad how he? His character takes such a huge turn in this movie I. Know! Yeah, it's wild, it's. Such a weird choice yeah, it comes at left field really. When? He's talking to Ralph he loves him. They're joking around and they'll give you shooting the ship together and all of a sudden man. It's just like. I was. Sucks I, wonder if McConnell had never like questions of it was like so see here in this movie that's more or less very lighthearted and could be a real moment to showcase. Little people actors I just becoming enormous asshole the end for no reason. They even try to make make him see seem like he's on the road to redemption. And then they just cut that the navy right in the bud. nope, he's still a dick just like there's no reason why he has to be such a break in this movie new. Nervous Prick this like it doesn't need it. Because I don't think anyone goes from being a good person to just a total waste of human life that quickly I mean to be fair. We don't know that he's a good person. I, mean at least they make it seem that way. We. Don't see any character flaws upfront. They definitely rear their ugly head like immediately. He thinks about the idea of him having a kid. That's a little. He does fat shame. Oh Yeah, pretty harshly. Shiben first, sign. At the same time, that guy was terrible at putting out fires chuck, he's trying to shovel the fire out with you know. He's trying to shovel the dirt on the fire, and he's like missing completely, so it doesn't help. When Matthew mcconaughey a his beautiful faces, yelling at you or your feeling shamed by being in his presence, and then you can't even shovel dirt correctly again. Yeah, I mean it's. It's a firefighter dude, it's it's. It's not the military. Back a little bit. Right yeah, we're not in full metal jacket here. Like that intensity is not really conducive to firefighters. I think that's true because I mean, I don't know very many firefighters, but I can't imagine they had someone screaming at them. At all times I feel like you need to be calm collected in the face of of an inferno to be able to do things properly into clear out a building and the proper in the proper way. You don't have command screaming at you. I can get into that building. God it right now. And it feels like this is out of the ordinary. Because that the quote unquote loving trysts, person just basically tells them to stop, and then he goes off. Take Five. What we're saying is Hashtag de-fund. The Fire Department. Were saying right. People like McConnell shouldn't have those jobs. Listen! If if that's what the moral of the story is than sure. That's an abrasive fat the. Whole thing in the break. So. The back of the Motel Maurice's recovering in bed after Lucius put some gems on him because she's a free spirit, guys on the main maximum door because it's three. PM and she wants to go home I stand the made I totally get that Yeah Oh yeah. He's not getting paid enough to deal with this. So she goes against the manager who says checkout us at twelve, so Marissa's planets to shoot them, but instead Lucy goes out and beats the manager with a phone so then they have to pick up all this stuff and leave kicked out of the the motel. Carol shows up at Stevens. Work with. Lucky striped hat! Mason Beckett's agreed. Take scale if she were this hat. In this one scene and the producers had fit on set, the director on the argument might have been the the only argument. He went throughout this film but to be honest. This hat is at stretch. It has no place in this movie. Looks silly cat in the hat hat you're. Sleeping GA- cow. Tim Burton style like nightmare before Christmas hat. It's like. A night before the the night before Christmas this is. On her kerchief and I in my cap, this is the I in my cap sort of had. What a weird demand to Ha- I'll be in your movie, but I wear my Goddamn at. Got Yourself deal. She's had like a free couple months. She's like yeah, sure I'll do this movie from hat right. And you sure I'm sure it went. Can we see the hat I? No questions asked questions. I would love to be hot enough. where I could make outlandish demands and have met Bobby Great, yeah I'm I'm I'm going to be your movie, but I have to wear my slippers the entire time. What's Dan? This is set in. Alaska doesn't matter I wear my slippers or you don't get me gotta get. Some of that got some of that hot woman privilege right well yeah I. Guess that's what really turned out I mean she? She worked for scale, which helps obviously, but then yeah. You're getting an obviously beautiful woman, a good actress, but If you allow good enough for this movie sure. Came back and sells on a bad actress, but she but she's now great. No one ever said she should've got an Oscar for the aviator. which many people got nominated for that movie, so she's like she's like the dime store version of Jennifer. Connelly I think sure need I mean I like Jennifer Connelly Navy more than I should, but to me they're. They're very similar, but I just I put Jennifer. Connelly just a little bit higher. If you're the director and you allow this to happen I. Think you've already lost control of the set, and then you don't deserve your cut at this point. Well I mean like I said if if you're you've got to some sort of a comedy or a romance movie. That's eight hours long. You don't deserve your cut. A everything should be one hundred minutes maximum. Zach Snyder. Learn how to tell a story. I wish. mcconaughey would have pointed out the hat during their talk. That would have been so funny, right they're. They're having this serious talk and just rain, the Middle Villa. Hey, babe, what's with the hat? Just like totally derail the conversation. You know we're going to do this. We have to be in this all the way I agree with you, and and no matter what this child is. We're GONNA love him. What's what that fucking add? What are you doing? She and she didn't even have it in the other. Seem she decided? I'm going to go talk. Stephen gotta wear my hat. In this ninety degree California weather. Yes, oh she shows and she tells Steven that all showed up at the apartment and keep saying the and she keeps saying the word midget throughout this entire conversation. Even though Stephen keeps telling her that their doors, she wants to know if their kid might be a little person, says it's it's possible and Stephen says they could just adopt instead then tales carole go home. Basically Stephen is pro-abortion throughout the entire movie that is, that is the tension in this film. Is that his his? He really wants her to say. Let's get rid of this kid. It's it's without saying very much. Yeah, I think they do bring it up or they. I don't know if they've ever actually say abortion, but they have the talk and that's when he says we could adopt. I think this is when we start to like you said. His character chains rears its ugly head. we then seen were Maurice, and Lucy made out of the park and amounts to nothing back to the Ralph. Arguing with Sally on the phone and hangs up in anger and Suzette. Carol's apartment she tells role that she's pregnant and he says that he has a friend that referred her to a specialist doctor and enroll then takes caroline meet some family members as uncle and his cousins. They give her some advice about raising a child at the little person, and they're all super, helpful and supportive, and she gets very emotional about how nice they being turned, she cries. Late at night Stephen Calls Carol. He's avoiding her and she shot with a macro Lens. For some reason, we only see her. Persons of her face throughout the entire think. If felt like. Like it was shot in guess, Max. Report shed. It's very weird because it's just cutting between her shot like that and then matter Makaay shot in regular medium shop. Like she, she shot like she's on one of those sex phone hotline commercials hot girls. Hey studies like I- lips phone. Shots of parts of her face and he's so upset about being invited to a party with little people that he tells her. His phone is going to die, and he throws his phone in anger. He's invites the girl firefighter of the party. Amounts to nothing. I was like Oh here we go. It's GonNa. Get Juicy now, because obviously you bring another woman to make your girlfriend jealous. This is Chekhov's gun. Right never goes off and was. Still time of it doesn't go off. Bright, said. Fuck the rules. This check checkoff astle. I'll show him Michael produced. COPS SA- Carol Lucy Murray's and Rolf go to the Party at David Alan Grier House David outliers of famous person named Jerry who was infinity for people I mean starts hitting a little funny and Steven shows up with a couple of his firefighter hose tall immediately calls everyone midgets which carol corrects, and then she goes off to try and get a Dave greer's. Autograph. Then Maurice Inside get into a fight with Ralph sung-chol. Race hates them because we're all suncoast headed of the little people's Defence League and he feels like they don't take drastic enough measures. He basically thinks they should gain rights through a revolution Takes Murray aside and tells him to get the fuck out because he is just an agitator and he's being mean to perfectly Nice people so reason, Lucy leave elephants even have a conversation. Outside World Thinks Stephen is ashamed of him, and his family than Carol comes out and starts arguing with Stephen to Ralph goes looking for Sally and finds her fucking David Alan, grier, and then Steven goes to talk with Ralph and tells him to come home with him and Carol, and that's the end of that scene. What what a WEIRD SCENE MARK! You were saying how this party was going to get wild right? Yeah, yeah, let's Ralph says it to. Carol, or she says at the end like somebody mentioned that he has. This guy has wild parties and she's like I wasn't expecting it to be true. And and all that shit happens like a three minute period. You. There's no way first of all, but. The most disturbing part of the scene is. David Alan Grier, making love to this woman with people just like halfheartedly watching. No one's really interested in it. They're just kinda there. Okay cool. Yeah and also the marine spite. Everybody's just watching it. This is Kinda eight picks up. Sally puts her on the chair. Those weird move. Very condescending. I did notice that when I was like well, that was ob-. Putting her in time out. It's weird. Just a weird scene is yeah for not much to happen right? There's no development really. If anything I'd say the only development you get that beckon sales characters coming around to you know having possibly having a child who is a little person. She's working on terminology. Yeah, McConnell says, and that's about it. Yeah, which could have happened anywhere and sure? Could have happened in the next scene pretty much. Yeah, Yeah Stephen could have slipped, and said midgets, and she's actually like Oh look at you, excuse me. so Stephen Carroll have talk in bed and Steven talks. About how raising a kid. That's a little person is no picnic, and there are lots of complications and they were goes on to talk about how normal life Rolf had growing up. Even getting laid before he did then he might have been Stephen. Might have had a circle jerk with a bunch of little people when he was kid. Carol makes the leap in conclusion, but he never denies it so. Active. Steve Asks She's making a political statement by not wanting abort her child's carol suggests he sees six psychiatrists, regarding his ambivalence towards his family, and then he acts like she shot his dog after. He gets depressing from here, folks. Yeah, it's. It's a weird like he just can't not say something stupid. I mean which is. Super Realistic. and. It's nickel. If I had a nickel for every time I've looked back. It was like well. That was really stupid. Thing to say wasn't. And it's kind of on brand with early two thousands McConnell hey. Think about it. He says a lot of he. At one point, he was known for saying stupid things and doing stupid things, so it's not. Playing his bongos naked. Yeah, I mean people. He's still connected to that. People don't forget. And Yeah this movie is just a lot of people saying the wrong thing at the wrong time and awkward. The Awkward Silence so then we have a dinner scene where we dinner introducing sets of parents to each other. In the scene, I'm one hundred percent on board with Kate itself tire, which includes dot collar, and a like a pink purple dress was good. I liked it. It's all I got to say about that count. Carol's parents are surprised, but not particularly upset at the fact that Steve's parents, a little people. Her Mama's little more reverse, but her dad fits right in probably because he's an alcoholic. What is he order seven seven seven seven man? That's how you know. He's real alcoholic. Yeah, he's he's like. Alcoholic. But he's not because they're Jewish burial. And he just he seems like a cool dude. A digital dinner Carol's parents have something to bring up. It's a real switcheroo because it gets dramatic, but it's only because they want to make sure they get married in a traditional Jewish ceremony because they're. Her grandfather is getting on in years and he won't. He's an Orthodox Jew. so nobody has a problem with that which it's just surprising, because these are the wasp wasp is looking people ever I would have loved if they did have a problem with it. Because that would make more sense with McConnell. Hey, just like being a total jerk like no no way we're doing. Christian wedding even make the jokers like if he dies before the wedding, which back the Catholic. That'll overall. So there's a wedding in a in a park with about twenty people there and recent Lucy. I don't think get invited Suet. From a picnic blanket and Murray Snell has corn rows which is struggling. Watch. Stephen Carroll or about to leave their wedding, but then she sees Ralph, so she gets out of the car to talk to him. She just wants to say. Thank you and they talk about what are your plans? And he says that he's going to go to his parents cabin for the winter to get some writing done. And then she kisses him right on the lips plants one. Prize the county Hagan get out of car should. He would have been in his well. No, not really because it's not real spoiled. But. At least you know, have a stern talking to to both of them, Li? Listen. This is my wife. Hey. Listen, you're my wife. You can't do that anymore. Random? Ask people on on the lips care. It's my twin brother the time to do this was that the Bachelorette party. WanNa make out with my brother. especially. Don't do this in public right and time passes and Carol Hazar Kid. She had a boy, and he does wind up being a little person. Steve gets really upset and punches. The Wall with doctor suggests Stephen to seek counselling. Stephen doesn't need counselling. He said he needs new chromosomes. The hole in the wall would suggest otherwise. Yeah, it's a McConnell. Shavers Adam driver. Who Punched the wall better? I'd say McConnell. Right when driver does it, he gives it like A. Like A. This is. Kinda. Hey, that's probably probably wasn't supposed to happen. All also did they mean to go to a per person doctor, or was that just kind of throwing? Think so I? Mean obviously because we don't get to see any scene between like ever them going to a doctor, you know as most movies that deal at pregnancies. Do you get scenes of like? Oh, here's the ultrasound and all that kind of Shit, so you get to see. Was it just a coincidence, or do they go to a specialist like you know the uncle? Set her up with specialist doctor because he mentioned that, but we never see her ever go to it until she had the baby again, Hashtag released Bright Cup. So many questions left unanswered. Stephen comes back into the hospital room and tries to make up with Carol the whole time looking like he's ready to toss his own. Get out the window. I convinced. I got I was really nervous that that kid was going to meet a time. do or just like he's going to reach into the Caribbean, just like kind of like suffocate the baby with his bare hands while singing cash, little baby. We're just like humming it Jesus just staring directly into the camera McConnell just home. The Texas longhorns fight song. Somehow were creepy. This the LONGHORNS. Alright! Great him saying his catchphrase. Older, they stay the same age and they never get older. Jeez. I'm sweating so hard from laughing. Oh yeah, that took a dark turn. Even for our. Own saying. We don't. No Yeah we're completely sober. But yeah, that was. I'm glad he didn't do it. Yeah have been upsetting Nikki acquire that. I'm listening for our listeners. Who might have been thinking? I might have to dump this podcast. These guys are getting a little bit too much enjoyment out of. Matthew mcconaughey, Hey theoretically killing his own child. We do not condone that on a call. This movie No. It just goes to show how it's. It's just so odd as we've mentioned how they're seen a movie. Where we who we assume, as the protagonist becomes so irredeemable by the end, but here he is he just takes the baby from beckon sale, and just show suits so much disdain. And he doesn't smile now. He just looks at it. Like why are you here? Yeah, like my life is over. Tall? Later sit stinks, but. Later they're home with the baby and I won't stop crying. Stephen says. It's cost it hurts. Carols upset that he's just angry all the time and he says it's because he's a dwarf. The babies, the dwarf he hurts amador fee said, and then he calmed down and Stephen says it's not working out, so they want. He wants to separate because he can't deal with this shit. How do they say how long it's been from? Went Down Right for only know could have been like a month or so you couldn't like to right. So weak. Will on Matthew mcconaughey as part man? This isn't a puppy where you're just like you know this isn't working out. We'll have to give them back. Your kid dude. You would not for me anymore. It's half of you at least at least give Cape Beck and sell the decent saying. Go for some milk and never return right. WHO's living in the apartment to by the, is he because it seemed like it was hers, and he was just Kinda like they're, so it's A. It's a boo like it's a Bohemian. Yeah, it's seems more of her style art studio just Kinda squatting in it, and there's no way they could afford that by the way on firefighter and. Right right there in. San Francisco I think it's. An La, you're not affording that kind of apartment. I'm sorry at the cat so at the cabin Rolf was hanging out with Murray's Lucy and cal shows up with the baby and asks if she can stay with them for a while and then kisses role from the lips again owning. Margaret proves. I truly think that we missed out on their their relationship growing. Yes, movie right because it goes from zero to a hundred real quick. Yeah, there's no. There's no indication that it's appropriate for her to show up at the cabin unannounced, right? Get the phone. Call Right. No I mean in the in the movie in the in the film she she does. She showed up unannounced, but like they share maybe two three scenes at this point. Yeah, and there's besides like kissing on the lips at the wedding. Is Just Kinda like well? You've let me acknowledged that this baby. Even if it becomes a if it winds up being a little person that it can lead a perfectly normal healthy, happy life. That's really the crux of their relationship. It's not there's no romance in it until this point on really yeah, this feels like it should be the second half of the movie. The latter third of it right now, the last twenty minutes of it. Yeah, at dinner. Ralph says that his writings getting syndicated and some papers, so he starts succeed and We learn a little more about Maurice and his politics recess politics. What under one hundred percent finish today's? Today's discourse. Personally I'm on Marissa's side for this whole movie though he is pretty, misogynistic. Not One hundred percent on this side, but Then Lucie Marie spend the whole night fighting because he said some scientists, the things about women's liberation, and how they should all just be cooking and cleaning for him. and Lucy leaves in the middle of night, and then Maria sleeves as well at night. The baby starts to cry and Ralph Takes Him and coddle him while Carol Sleeps Showing Up, but role tells her to get some rest. He's got it covered, and then one day Stephen Immune say mark. I was GONNA say I guess this is supposed to be the point where you go. Oh, this is fell in love with grant. This is what a husband supposed to feel like husband and father one day stephen shows up to the cabin and Steven Carroll talk about their future. She says that he needs to be able to show that. He loves Vincent and he doesn't have. He doesn't have anything to offer this child as it is Carol. He needs to figure himself out before you come back into her life, she plans to stay with role for the time being because she needs help and Steven cannot provide that Stephen kind of looks over his kid doesn't really show any sort of affection towards him. It's so funny. Like, okay, but I see. Seen a couple of years. First Birthday. Steve Leaves Basically leaving his child to be raised by his brother Lee later Carol's bed, shaking up the conversation, Stephen Serov tells her to come with him. And he likes the fire outside, and then Carol tells Rolf. He can kiss her if he wants so he does, and that's the movie. Ends there what a terrible ending ramp before role seals the CUC deal. It's. Wow, I was flabbergasted at ending. It just fades out. Even you in fucking. The love on a leash had more complete ending that movie. That's bad. You know it's bad. When one of the worst movies ever made has more coherent ending. Yeah, it's like yeah, it's this is a scene that should have happened before Stephen shows up at the cabin. Yes, you know they should be having this moment that you kissed me. If you want to know us the viewer knowing full well like well, you're still married girl. You got your pants, but. In love with Ralph and his ability to act like a human being which some ceiling can't do. fucking that Tall Tall Firefighter Woman Definitely needed to be explored that he's having a pseudo affair with MS firefighter. Because then it just makes more sense why he so distant. I think you kind of have to remove Maurice and Lucy from his entire movie, and replace them with any sort of any scene that shows affection being grown between Ralph and Carol one hundred percent to be on I, think it's. Strange at Patricia Arquette is even on the cover of this movie. What is long? For her to yeah, it's like pointless. She's bigger than she's pretty big at this point, right? We didn't go through hers, but she had a legacy at this point, Ari. Lot like true romance was like ten years before this with. Where was she in her? Little Nicky was a few years before. Holes! She holes good movie that year Few years after she had stigmata bringing out the dead. I disaster was feared for that. She was an ed wood a few years before that. True Romance. I mean we're back in the early nineties at this point. I mean she's a household name. As far as you know, the ARQUETTE's are a legacy family definitely. And I agree I. Think Cutting Out Dink Login or cat their characters. You lose nothing from this movie because they add nothing choose also two years away from medium, which lasted one hundred thirty episodes so. He. Wasn't in. On the down downswing, no it's. You know what that final scene needed money. Kate back and sale on a strange hat. Just a really seal it. Like, she has this girl pants and that's what Steve Did you remember the lead singer from four non blondes. Yes, she should have been wearing the hat that the lead singer from four non blondes wears the. Yeah just the top hat. You. Kiss me if you want and. And Gary, Oldman, just like going in for the kiss, but constantly looking at the hat, he's GonNa wear this okay I! Guess we're doing this. Is there anything you do to make the better. Yeah I would make it a total comedy. I wouldn't have anything to do with the KID, or we don't want to see our main character hating his child. Don't do it. I would go full rom com between an IT's like a battle between McConnell. And Oldman, and they're buying beckon sales love. That's how I would make this better, and then you know like. She could wear her weird outfits, and whatever and. I don't know I I think at this point. You get rid of a lot of the fat pretty much. You get rid of David Alan. Grier character you get rid of if you're going to keep Gingrich maybe make him best friends with Gary. Oldman and he's like giving him. Advice on how to get kate back and sale. And that's kind of I would just make it not slapstick comedy, but just you know your average run of the mill Ram Com mark. I agree with everything dance it. That's real good. I can't add much that except a replace Matthew mcconaughey with Matthew Roger and we go and just have a lot of inner mama logging. Haven't break the fourth wall lot. Gone. The worst thing about glory is his voice over. A hundred percent. Okay, yeah I mean I already said remove Maurice and Lucy and just replace them with scenes of a a romance being formed Maybe bring in the firefighter. Girl is a point of tension between the two that adds to them designing separate because it just seems like. At this point Stephen just can't handle being a father in general. Because babies cry Stephen. Why didn't anyone tell me this so? That's all that's all I have to say about that. You guys everything else to to close out on before we get into anything. I was thinking. And you make a quick or however short or long you want it so how I was saying if I were a hot chick, my demands for being on a movie as something strange. What were your demands? Be To be on this kind of movie like if some unknown director. Really we want you. Name your name. Your price could want to wear like a t shirt for one seeing that has something really vulgar on it. For just one scene. The okay yeah, see get away with it. Actually pretty good something like Calvin and Hobbes or something like that that'd be good. On one of the the logos like the Cowboy logo whatever? Exactly I I guess I would want to. Maybe drive up in something ridiculous. You know like either some either go. One Way with were like really like impractical. Car That my character should not even be in the same ballpark as like Roddy or something. Or show up in a complete conquer. At the end of the goods that car that pulls out of the lot, took a larry. You, just roll up in like a penny farthing. We're driving goggles yea. Iran, paper, how could you afford a Maserati? And in both of them whether a massive routier, the model t I have the driving glasses that i. That I take off and that's the only time both of those things are in the movie. It's just pull up to. Be really good. Really Good Yeah I. Don't I. Don't know what I would do. I would want. Yeah. I would want it to be something very jarring. You know like like maybe like a huge mole somewhere on me or like I'm constantly changing my facial hair throughout the movie. Accent weird access something really jarring like in the first scene. I'm doing you know just a regular accent than in the next scene. Maybe I'm doing a slight British and it just keeps getting more and more British. Wouldn't it be Matt Damon from the wall? I at the end of the movie. I sound like I'm the street. Urchin from like Mary poppins. oops! how Sh- mile while to bits. Gives me anywhere. You don't actually even have to be a hot chick to do that. Marlon Brando is doing that his career. I, if if someone were if I were big enough. I guess for sure I wanted you something in. Just be completely outlandish something. Super Jarring you'd have to get pretty big to get the Marlon Brando within the his career. Yeah, I could I would never be able to do something like that I'm just saying. Is that enough milkshakes in the world to get you to that? That's. I. Don't I? Don't underestimate my love for milkshakes. Okay you guys WanNa. Play your ship mature at. One twenty two on twitter follow me there and also. A replay dean? D., podcast strangers Amy's is on twitter and instagram at Stranger Dame's for both of come. Hang out. Say Hi and let us know what you think. Stranger daime airs every Wednesday at Sardine Z podcast to Google play basically anywhere. POD CASTS OFF. It says strange Amy's ipod Dot Com and then we have gave all pod on Mondays every other Monday on just had one this week. Our we talked about her favorite arcades and picked out our retro game that we do that we play between the two weeks, so be sure check that out every other Monday, I two Google play a game. Game Ball Pie dot by been dot com. I believe it is We were lucky enough. We ended up getting everything to be the same after being kinda having different names for everything so dis- game bolt pod, and she find this anywhere twitter instagram. You know all that. Good stuff and are streaming schedule we definitely stream Thursdays and Fridays and Fridays alternate. Would Saturday depending on recording the PODCAST And then you know then Sundays Mondays Wednesdays are SORTA. You'll know day of maybe the day before If we come with something, so just keep an eye on twitter. I gave all pie and it will let you know when we're streaming by the time you listen to this, we will be. Recording the podcast on a Friday so. We'll be live on Saturday. Okay. Yeah, and that's GonNa, the we are. They called SMOOTHIE? Find us that they goals moved up hobby nut com. Any podcast streaming APP to search for. They called movie, and we will pop right up. We are the main dot com as the main website where we post everything up there, and you could find us on all social media at the main Daime, so you just search the main Damian will pop up as twitter, facebook and Instagram at the main name will be there We are also proud member Geek. 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Gary Oldman McConnell Matthew. mcconaughey Stephen Carol Steven Oldman Peter Dink Lynch Lisa Lucy Gary Dan acquaintance Ralph sung-chol Rolf Rolf Maurice Inside Matthew mcconnahey director Oscar Lucy Right Patricia Arquette Netflix Adam Sandler
068 - Why The Fear?

6IX & Friends

39:27 min | 7 months ago

068 - Why The Fear?

"On my heart. Is somebody say you know. Fear in essence makes you live through. Whatever team potentially happen right. So you're now and you're not only going through your body worrying about it happening but if it does lead to ease what everybody. Six in france podcast is your host. Cj six today. i got my home evan. On a mike ever how you doing is going on up. So i got a question for you. Why does and and i'm kind of asking myself to same time. Why does fear hindered my success. I think there's a loaded man eight by you know by by the person but i will say one way or another. He's going to have a fake on your ceiling right so you might you know. Have some level issues as right here but at some point needs to change over on away so fear in the race. Thanks for being here through us. Know lino shorter you know is is is this is over but it's kind of funny Than when you talk about that. Because when i was gearing up to quit my job i was talking to one of my friends and you know also though like i'm key scared to quit my job and work on know podcast channel fool of tom and not for the reason of you know angle had no money. 'cause i really ship on that part of it but i really was scared of mop potential. Because you know. I'll i'll work full time job so forty hours a week. I'm putting like imaging effort towards my job toys thing. I don't really care about towards the thing. That just makes me angry. Half the time and i started thinking when i quit. I guess i'd get to keep those same forty hours but now can apply them towards myself. And that thought that. Dr real deal kind of scared because like i've had as at work where i go like two or three weeks just grinding forty hours grinding. And if i could take note two three weeks and ground on myself like wait what happens. You know what i'm saying. It's it's almost fairly own. And i think that's part of to is like your success is unknown territory is somewhat. You've never been before something you've never seen before something you'd never achieved before because this is new and then new thing is just just frightening. You know what i'm saying. And i think that's part of why the fear to kinda hold you back. I agree wholeheartedly announcing the sense right. Fear is weird. Because you know reading. Come into fruition. Right those we fear. Even if you don't have really happen now seen is not exactly how we think have barriers of words. I don't know you at at some point probably early in college on my mind so might say you know. Fear innocent makes you live through whatever potentially happen twice right. So you're now leanne throw the. Wow your body worrying about it happening but if it does happen idir. You're going through the end. Slight window legal. You realize okay. These have that with absolute is going to happen. So we're not have regardless. I think you're better look saying. Hey at least on the face. It went on i was avenues. Id or or feeder bowel about eight leading up to and the funny thing about if you break down the psychology of fear. Fear is meant to help preserve your life right so if you if we go by the caveman days right you foraging for food or whatever and you see something that you don't quite understand and these new year i incident. It's a ni- approach because if you're protesting in his insistence something new. You haven't done it. It can kill you in. Say you know what i'm saying like your your whole mazdas for survival and you say we've kind of kept those habits to now whereas i we see something new even like there is no detriment you know. Try to be successful. You know what i'm saying. There's no real detriment but my brain is like. Oh this is new this my brain thinks it could possibly kill me so i'd let's relax for a second. Let's let's tiptoe around is let's let somebody else go. I let them see what happened today. Do you know what i'm saying. And as such a funny thing to think about an even. And i can tell you. There's even people who i can tell this psychology to them and be like is really just or burying trying to preserve your life but there's your life is not a steak so you should just go ahead and do it anyway. Like income kid. You like. You know the bill of me you know way of tom. Fear had been meghan isn't in the same right. If if you get on talking you want to do things you know to combat hunger you won't you won't find what you need is. Oh i think you know. Success is is like a breeze. Point right is you have to get to the point where you no longer comfortable raise so uncomfortable in my job. I live fear. Come in for me from taking the team. Right is not until idea wine comfortable or hungry level and like fear you push for out right. Let his to give space in. Comfort gives it a lot of space right places. It gives a lot of space because then we heard about preserving that point we were about. Our links is just a trick. Survival es hat is not your real life this will your actual day. You realized beard's bluff so now. How does your fear of success or your fear succeeding affect you. Has it affect you personally man. I think trues older into every already. So you know when the when i come. Loo- bay allies in a usually went danger right here on on on on racing school oregon good relationships with them. I freeze the finances box. There is on the up and up. The same is true on the other side so fear indian worker personal endeavors. The and i also have fear in your relationships and who also have failure with. You know your best ally mamounia my time your ears rightfully homes. If it's already back in one area there's also two sides of fear 'cause the common thing is fear failing right so people are afraid of failing because they might feel like a failure if they didn't try hard enough you know blase blase but the fear success. It's actually kinda funny because them both of them can stop you from starting but for two different reasons and i know for me. It affects me in such a way that We stopped me from starting. Because i know part of my success. Part of the challenge is going to do something new right. So let's say i got this. This goal of being in like a the cycle not a body weight competition like a. Yeah like yeah. Like say i want. I got golden in a weightless competition. Right so i know three biggest things i need to start doing eating better or cannot more hydrate. That's that's like the basis. That's the basic building blocks of what i need to do to put on muscle mass and i noticed right and now i'm looking at like okay. Cool so what are the change in my life. Well i need a diet. No saying i need to go to jim more. And i probably need to be more conscious of how much how much more water intake rate and kind of how you say. Earliest candidate complacency or. It's like well you know i do. Have this goal not do want to do. But i'm okay. Where i'm at you know what i'm saying is like you know if i if nothing changes nothing changes right as low low key profound if you think about it. Listen back to we're so and and and that's one of my own. That's a quote that quote. I tell myself all the time is to get something you never had. You have to do something you never done and with any anything that you are pursuing whether it be like this new goal whatever your definition of success is which we didn't say but i'll second but whatever your definition of success is it is something different because if you wouldn't be striving to you wouldn't be having success if you already have right so that's why i always. That's all. I always tell myself you know saying to get something. Never have to do something i've never done. And that's what kind of keeps me trying new things so much. It's like oh this. This didn't quite work. let me try something else. Oh this convert let me take this element added over here. Just keep trying to test things off. Something that does work. The way i wanted to work. i definitely agreement. I think These exists probably added humanities. But everybody mazars are gonna be different. Fear were listing says because usually veer as something. We've seen somebody else something that happened to somebody else. In based on disney we inherently believe our notes. Nali believe we have seen. Won't we heard about or right but we have different measures of success. Oh he counters be very counterproductive. Because i we're looking for it's totally different than what anybody else would looking for. Whatever bumps and wrong you're fearful so had. This is our imagination you know working against now be literally like i'm adding my sill. I understand you know. Benjamin conversing lever the incident very covering corporate america. Me and me weavers myself. There's actually one thing. I learned while ago as far as tackling any fear Use whatever your have as motivation instead of a-block right now wasn't mike tyson. It was it was a book. I can't even remember. Book was but i can't even remember how to even phrase it shoot. They might have got it from mike. Tyson put in the and and it was just lie. I'm trying to remember how was is basically if if you have a fear of like butcher this so bad but if you have a fear of dogs right and you need to you need to run a mile this is so crazy dollars you need to run a mile and you see a dog like up ahead of you. The best thing to do is trying to get their dog behind you because then you never turn back. You never turn your on faster because you don't want the dog coming after you but if you lead the dog in front of you that's when you stop you and i really hope that analogy makes some sort of sense. Basic in lady was saying. Just get past. It is reshape. Your mindset right. I'm trying to think of a better apple so okay. Let's say you wanna take a class that you heard them in in college is like the hardest class blase blase but you know take a night class will greatly benefit you. But now you're scared to take this class says because you think you'll fail because you know people have said it's hard it's a hard class i don't i don't know if i should take it. I'm probably going to fail. Blase blessed so what you should do instead is take the class but use their feel failure to fuel you to study more study harder. Pay attention in class because you are afraid of felony. But now you're in this point where you kind of put your back wall. Where like i'm my fear of failing is going to prevent me from feeling like i'm here now and i had to succeed because i'm too afraid to fail years opposite proc- right a yeah. Yeah like you. Yeah you basically kinda sorta make it work for you. Yeah you might. Yeah you might feel work for you. The best way right. That's the only way around it. Enter label really. Make up our mind to get past. The is not like any less ear. Talk about this. And i'm not raining anymore. Is this like say something. I pushed over that threshold. You're willing to you know you have to be willing person. Take like you saying tate airfare. Leonard fuel you. Let you know motivates you to achieve whatever that goal list but you know exactly is passing the class or you know. Of course you know what i'm saying now of before we go too much further Evan is anything like these. You wanna give yourself like a short intro shameless plugs. Now the top of all of that. Who my name's. Emma need a native of monrovia alabama graduate of our university fees grasp. Who is your mom's. Well yes in and do how flash publicy underscore is the agency. Will you come out on. I wanna take a loosening always had is passing. You know literature is my creativity is not what i'm doing is helping other authors workout. They're basically not knowing that industry allow you can over overspend all trying to get close. And they hit their rights taken away. So is a high riposte accompanied with lena. Cooperating oppose it allows you to keep one hundred percent of here created rice. We'll entity or having those righty reading marketing. All the a major present legitimate will only working right now in you know listen a year we already have nine authors right now possibly eleven. I'm by the time you would be released. So you know. I really appreciate his platform nc. You know actually how young you knew your hands and you hold that lets the pride on not happy beerman adult conversation so always always now. Actually you know. Let's let's take a personal anecdote so before before you started your Flash flash media before you started at were you afraid of anything from like afraid of felon but we afraid of anything else man. I'm not. I'm not us. Profane language. mom is it is. We're not yeah rolf reserved for sure on afraid that you know. The biggest thing is coming into industry that to know how neuberger so maneuvering for someone else. Don't care about their saying. Alan three is a different conversation. Now no this. This is compensation but my business partner another my best friend growing up another black african american meal so one into located. I'm only majority industry right. Not just play on but two black males starting a business an industry that you know. We're not as welcomed in right. Archiving is not as well in our creativity is not as well is it can be you know it can be intimidating because you need carbonate sealed. Starting you need other companies buying me you need to create a market writing and you have to have some type of embarrassment primaries from other policy prime so yeah man is deadly is definitely some fear off front. Wears like am i am. I made credits you cannot do this. Can i make it happen. Yeah that's i noticed a little bit but i'll just. This is something. I find myself talking about on this podcast. A lot is imposter syndrome year. And if you don't already know imposter syndrome is basically the feeling that you aren't enough and that you aren't capable or qualify for what you're doing and you're afraid that one day somebody out you as an impostor. It's such an irrational fear. That is hilarious because the phrase fake it till you make it is his army. His is exist for a reason because one a person about me. I've been podcast and for years and in my own opinion. I don't think just looking at the statistics. you know. A lot of people do say they love my pockets but look. I don't think my podcast is great. That's just how i personally feel about it. I'm not going to let those person film to me from china to make greater but again but then at the same time i'll have at least three or four people a year will be like. Hey how do. I get started podcasting. Hey i got. I want to see my pocket as what should i do here. Hey start my pocket. I said it was. I do here and they come to me and like in my head. I'm like i'm not in authority figure on podcast like i. I just barely do this. But then i yeah and i get under the as much knowledge as i have as much as they can. People always appreciate it. Any hours apply so now as i do. I know a lot about pockets. They do. i think. I don't know and i'm just telling myself that because things aren't where i want them to be. You know what i'm saying is is so crazy but meaning the same rate with talking to boyd or now so i don is a little bit different right but i can go into any into any new printer. He wouldn't and i could present myself actually articulate everywhere. You know what i'm saying. We talking right now and you know. Go back in hand with the best ill because i know what i don't. You said an impostor kind of fear. It is right. Because i know what i'm at. I know what i can give anything right. You are lanham out. Economies asians are well daughter will will. I'll say always know is no different right in is his popularity and what are real adman people go you your business however you because we hear house and i had got onto a slow start taking out more on december like me is is doing this. Show this hour. Filibuster in the other people started being all. Oh man. Not kobe around. They just don't think it's built by but everybody else is a weird contradiction that we have and we actually pay other people who have fears or you know what i'm saying weeks pay other people council when i feel the same way about slash with i got you know. In when he is right now up you know you got to feel the same way about whether one praising lousy or is empowering doubt may and i think a lot of seattle no such a lot of different points here You know. I'm gonna from the deep south our our raising in our low parise. That's one of the first things where it's a is great rain. You mean that you need for others right blade you can be so on board that you for day. You deserve to be at the table where you can be on the table. You can listen humiliating. Take you out the door. You know what. I'm saying so We lived in other people to chance allow fears. We lived out to bullseyes selfish name. The boosted our personal equity in our companies to haridas board. And i'm going to add you. I say gets awesome young media so many people ask me. How do this. No i asked him. Net is these. They just want to be that they'd said these so often. If you don't observe it is almost it really care about. They care about blame came down. A people can know sounds to alleviate combination and a little bit of back. He thinking i'm gonna best than i have nothing but fidelity my ability that i keep near the job done any know one percent and don't get me wrong when i say earlier about the packers i still love my pikers. Still the only reason. I'm big on the numbers is 'cause the whole reason started to podcast is cousin conversations. I have with people. There are so deep in thought provoking and so much knowledge that that i would have access to share everybody's heaters and so that's how i still feel now but i can get it to everybody and that's the problem i want. Everybody hit is. But i can't give everybody and it's like the only real problem. But i digress flowing into the next question what they. I just hate as a person. Don't bring me a problem without a solution. You know what i'm saying. So i brought the problems table. Why does fear hindered my success. And so now. I'm asking. I'm asking my ass you when i'm trying to get my all solution to wait. Why can't we do from here. If i if i am a person and i realized that you know i am afraid of mice. Says arm afraid of failure. I'm afraid of something. What can i do. now. I k- help those in. I resented out Way has the be internal. It has to be an intriguing raising desire to at one in that starts revenue recognition high. Before you get an stumbling blah have arabia's a you have to divide that when let's say something you're fearful or something you just might. Those are different teams merely. Stop something you can get pads. I say we saved sound. The fear is fear. You have the accept the fact that it exists and be realistic which are any indication of how far you get with that deal being gets a little. Id is the know me bay from his name is really no hope for you getting over it. It has to be something where you say. I need sell me. Not getting promoted because of kenny. Sell my personal business. Not doing revenue of this is because of this. I can't he sell Not getting to the next level starting a family because of this i can sell me not encouraging my friends are willing to go use this and once again to a point to where you can't silly foul as when you really start to giggle. Ball rolled right. You have to be realistic expectation. I'm going to work on it. I'm aware of it. I know seats here. You'll this to my man. You fear and emotionally similar. Physics experiments engineer busy. But you know you know basically you know we. We learned that. These are only transferred into physical. Always in getting into you know be able to go because a spiritual rise on the world war matter. Mass type things right. They're not created or destroyed. Digits transferred it might go to a different you know A difference. Really ms zion. We want to arrange retained destroy. We turned it in motivation. Right we can turn into a testimony. athletes you know longtime buddies is really just extremely anti from inside and others right so i think those are the keys handling via constant reassessment because once you get over their personal like us by do forever right now might. I don't like lying. We are alabama man. We liked to be on the ground. I know but it's a and and i enjoy it now because there's a lot we see. Different poisoned world allows me opportunities for where it conveys. Dad elza fear. That i was not gonna live into my knees level High school early highly. I wasn't the wasn't worth me. Cochran fierceful it wasn't worth me taken. The blank i know alcon became working to me. As when i desmond arkady. And i still play. And i'm not lay on just the most comfortable in prison right now where i'm confident. I'm cool collected this nation. In every time. I get a little bit more comfortable. So it's it's like everything and it practice zero saw everything and this is just me. Bring everything about stuff. So like my vice. Mas steps are like if you have a fear. And i also like to face everything head on me so have you. Have you gotta look at it. You gotta ask yourself question. Is it rational. Irrational like china. Lie penny boy down of you know fifteen degree slope best two hundred feet long and you never penny bowed before. Yeah that's a very rational fear because you could very possibly seriously yourself. That's that's understandable. But when it's like oh. I'm afraid to start as podcasts. Because i don't know what happened right. That's what you desert yourself like. I'm afraid to start. Because i don't know what will happen. That's irrational you'll never. You'll never get to that side. You'll never get to decide of what happens until you started. You know i knew how values we also so is any type of fear rational though or is it as disease become not the best option mate. That's what i would consider a irrational now harassment. That's i consider rational. Fear like a risk reward thing right so if the risks heavily outweigh the reward being. Yeah i consider that a very rational fear that something. You shouldn't partake in you know. Build your skills bill something else before you go try you know like the whole painting boy thing right if you want to visually get to there. That's fine but if you're starting from ground zero i wouldn't advise you can still do it. I just wouldn't advise it. It gets you build yourself up and then so say now you got experience. You got a bunch of experience period board now. You're afraid because it is new boy. You had concept confidence in yourself because you've done it before and now it's like alright. Am i afraid. Because i'm now i'm afraid because i've never done this before. How ever had this experience in these skews with me to go. You know to go along with it so an actual the i'll be fine. I can do this. You know what i'm saying. That's the does a different point out between irrational and rational fears. But once you figure out if you're actually irrational rational and it is an irrational fear meaning. You're just scared because his new dan. I kind of challenge you. And i've said this before too. I kind of challenge you to ask yourselves. The what if i succeed star kind of like change your mindset to be what if i succeed what happens if it does well and then you know kind move. Would that use that as your justification of start because like me park has because i wanted to show these conversations. What if she sees what you know. Number one society and culture podcastone items. you know. that's what happens if i started. I'll get there eventually. It might not be two days from now breakdown. The fears see. And you can even get to the point where you can see. Why a rational. All right is just a. I don't want to do something new and even look at yourself like this is what we doing. We're not doing new things now like last week trying to ice cream flavors but we can try new like source of income. We can't try a new hobby. You know what i'm saying. You re you gotta be real which itself but it's and it. It is introspective. And it is internal is. Is this a real fear night and if you can i know it i know it is easier said than done but once you can kinda convince yourself. That yoder's really isn't a real fear this. I'm not really afraid of anything. Actually life threatening you know. I'm just afraid of change. I'm afraid that something new then. You start working toys doing that. Then you're of and they use their fear to make you better does is my two cents on not on the topic do now just a good breakdown allergies you know wondering me away throughout his kind of wondering you know what is your definition of rational view. So that may that may represent. Ma'am ma ma ma sailing me. You know i. I used to be allowed more standing while as Reed our agency look at. You would always say you know Aroused by now where is taking a junk man. And i say army lessees eight months really uncomfortable. Where would started. You know you knows handsome. Me and i'll say analysis there's nothing wrong with analysis but once you get to eighty percent certainty into it. That's a good point. Road is greek. It means everybody. I because one hundred ninety is not is not. You should be things you we would even know man. We don't talk about you know we. We need to normalize taking that john at a majority readiness or semi. You're eighty and live a risk factors at each threshold. Hundred is never going to have an. And i blame engineering for that as few engineer. You know you'll have a class. Where a passing grade is like a forty five percent and it's like one no signs of a. I got a thirty three out of forty five. This steel passing so we can keep pushing you about. Mitt is right because we go. I know you longer than i have at this point but we go to work right. We have to be certain to ten thousand percentile in life is different. You can look through the same lens. It should a bridge to be built hispanics under percent right mypillow lab. More free flowing. A lot is not is outside louis. Math or as into near engage it is. He's is the lead on twenty fives a backdrop. Be green point bro. So talented everybody five. Zero fido percentage like what percentage can you take the bet like finding and committee so from here on out because mine is eighty so from here on out you find a percent whenever want to do something new once you analyze it today. Percents take delete donate more. Just fly skydiving. Just jump received a personal vision. You know what. I'm saying that we conversation now before we wrap it was anything that you want to lead to people with now on our platform. I hope out you know. Every time i go on a podcast through do something like this man. Just hold teams by a couple of wouldn't still. We'll let their personal endeavors are and understand your uniqueness. I talk about you know. Listen so as now because me growing up playing sports you know going to college. And everything is the most highly sought. After thing to do is wasn't it wasn't you know most fun. I the most you know lending a most girl you know wasn't do whatever you know. I was trying to do it right. And you embrace whatever your your town yields are on other stuff. You're more from your from your true passing the talentless that you would ever made trying to be in a place where weren't happiness is too key over financial security over our tony. Happiness is the true measure of says. Not only dane. You wake up in the morning and someone decided they're a little you or you know to transferring to a different department has to be based on your intriguing state of mind and and where you where you are. You can't hang out. That require a balanced man. So i hope. Hopefully i'll was. You know the by a good leasing for everybody man. This is a doe platform. Cj i know you know say more. We really need to get this out. More than i was angry at man so i appreciate you. Hand me always been built. Bees out with that has been another episode of the six friends. Podcast you can find this park. I tunes spotify. Google play anywhere else. You listen to podcasts. Also mom on youtube now blink blink and with that unless you page there's more for you but for everybody else v.

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K2: The Savage Mountain | The Final Descent | 3

Against The Odds

54:42 min | 4 months ago

K2: The Savage Mountain | The Final Descent | 3

"Join us to listen to against the odds one week early and add free and the wonderful app. Download the ones app in your apple or google. Play mobile app store today. It's pitch dark and cost. Vondra is exhausted but his mind is surprisingly clear not exactly sharp but at least his reflexes are decent after climbing for twenty four hours though his body aches and weighs he's never felt before he knows he has to keep moving out here on the mountain and at the south of tude if you stopped to rest. There's a good chance you won't wake up. This is cast as i climb above twenty six thousand feet. He was thrilled when his friend wilco. One rian invited him be part of the dutch nor team the to us to fix up houses together and he's joined him on several climbing trips while he knew the risks of climbing k two he knows wilco was a strong leader. He had planned the trip down to every last detail but cast lost him somewhere on the snowfield along with his other teammates. Now he's alone. Cast focus on the ledge under his feet. At least he's found the fixed line laid by the trail. Breakers the ropes should guide him back across the traverse down the bottleneck back to camp four. He just needs to stay alert. And the focus has only his ice axe and the crampons to help them along the icy ledge. It's slow going. The only sounds are his breathing and the ancient groans of the mountains shifting. Its weight when he looks up. He startled to see someone's headlamp and the distance someone wearing a dark yellow suit when he gets closer. Cast season belongs to a familiar face. It's huge job. Rate a french climber. He and hugh took pitches together on the summit just a few hours ago at sixty one years old. Hugh is the second oldest person to ever summit k. to at the peak he was overflowing with joy laughing and hugging other climbers but now he stopped his face pressed against the. I swat breathing heavily. He ran out of oxygen hours ago. Q r u k. Still here but you go first. And i'll follow your faster than me. Okay but don't stay too long. Cast clips his harness and steps around. The french climber thing continues down feeling his way with the dark mountain night. But then the rope comes to an end. Cass aims his headlight below piles of snow and ice debris litter. The bottleneck there must have been avalanche. Luckily someone has screwed in a new anchor close by and also tied on a rope cass clips on and begins to repel down backwards. The rope takes him to the top of the bottleneck but then it ends two. You'll need to make his way down the steep dangerous slope on his own with nothing to guide him. He glances up to see if hugh was falling behind but no sign of yet cast digs his axe into the ice and starts to make his way down step by step when he hears the sound at first. He's not sure what it is. He looks to the left trying to pierce through the mess of the night. That's when he sees a body plunging headfirst through the bottleneck recognizes. The suit is hugh cast takes a few frantic steps aiming his headland into the darkness but he used body is already gone swallowed up by the mountain. He tries to double his pace when he gets to the bottom the radio down and tell them what he saw. Maybe just maybe someone can help now. He needs to focus on getting down safely himself. We get support from. Adt no matter what you wanna protect. Nobody has more experience helping. Keep it safe than eighty. I mean check this out. They've received the most burglar alarm events in the industry and help save more lives than any other home security provider. They were called the best home security system of two thousand twenty by us news and the number one smart home security provider by strategy analytics in two thousand twenty eight t has over twenty thousand employees experience in helping. Keep you safe. That's twenty four seven peace of mind from the creators of the home security. Category experience matters. That's why millions of people trust. Adt to protect what matters most and to keep them safe get all the latest security upgrades from the largest name and home security by visiting adt dot com today. At stands for quality and timeless protection visit att dot com today brought to you by marvel studios loki and original series. Now streaming only on disney. Plus tom hit allston returns as everyone's favourite imperious god of mischief as he ventures outside of time and space in the six episode event. Also starring owen wilson google bath raw. And we'll miyako. The series takes place after the events of ventures. Endgame don't miss marvel studios loki key and original series now streaming only on disney plus from wondering. I'm mike corey and this is against the odds on august first. Two thousand and eight. A group of climbers from all over the world attempted to summit the world's most dangerous mountain a to within twenty four hours. Three of those climbers were debt. Free others are entangled in ropes hanging onto life by just a thread. The rest are making their way down the mountain in complete darkness. The hours spent in the auction draining. Death zone have sapped their energy. The altitude is playing tricks on their minds and the ropes. The climbers need for the most crucial part of the descent called. The bottleneck have been swept away by avalanches. It's a race against the clock for the remaining climbers to get off the mountain. It's too late. This is episode three the final descent pemba. Sherpa reaches camp four at one thirty. Am along with two other. Sherpas cheering dior jay from the american team and pasang lama from the korean team. They are greeted by two members from the american team. Doctor eric meyer and his teammate. Frederic strong they hand the climbers hot tea to help them more up. But ama- can't keep the t. Down he walks outside and throws up. What little there is in his stomach when he comes back. Eric gives him some medicine than the group sits down to speak tells them about the difficult journey down from the traverse. the rope line was severed. An avalanche cheering tells them how they couldn't get the other climbers to move. They had used all their strength to get to the summit and they were disoriented and losing muscle coordination. We tried to guide them to traverse but they kept falling asleep and clipping from. The rope was a disaster. There was nothing we could do. Eric nods every climber knows the risks someting mountain like k to each person needs to make his or her own decisions. No one can force anyone to anything. Pemba tells them about the conditions. He's never seen anything like it in his years of climbing. All the rope line in the bottleneck was gone torn to pieces and buried under piles of snow. They had to navigate down in the dark listening to the cracking sounds from the sarah above that threatened to crash down on their heads. An avalanche almost took the sang out but cheering dior. J. saved him when they reached the bottom. They tried to radio up to warn the others but there was no answer. It was with heavy hearts. They walk the last hours back to camp four. The americans also have bad news. Three climbers have died including rolf bay from the norwegian team. Swept away by the avalanche. Hembo asks if they've heard anything from his dutch. North teammates will go casts and jer. No one has pemba knows. They're all strong climbers. They came more prepared than almost anyone on the mountain. But no one is prepared for night in the death zone or temperatures can drop to twenty below. He makes his way to the tent. He shares with drew mcdonald but when he sees jurors empty sleeping bag and all of his things. He's overcome with sadness. Ger is a close friend. They climb mount everest together and often talked long into the night about life and their families. Now his irish friend is alone on the dark mountain and endanger. He can't bear the thought of sleeping in the tent alone. So he moves to the tent of talian climber marco comfort tola who is also still lost on the mountain. Pemba drink more water to hydrate and tucks into a sleeping bag. You'll need to rest and replenish his energy. If his team is in backed by morning he may need to go up and rescue them casavant. Behavioral isn't sure what time it is. When he finally reaches the bottom of the bottleneck. he knows his. He's lucky he pulls out his radio and spins through the frequencies trying to get someone on the line. He finally reaches roland one of his dutch nor teammates at base. Camp ro ro. i'm still in the mountain. but i'm through the bottleneck. I'm okay but the french clamor. Hugue i think he fell. I saw a body go by. I look from on the way down. But i couldn't find him and jer and pemba are they with you know no. We were separated. I don't know where they are. I'm going to make my way to camp four. I can't feel my feet. As cast begins the final trek across the snowfield. He sees headlamps approaching. Its two sherpas from the korean team. They're looking for their cousin. Julich and the other korean climbers cast asked if anyone has made it back down they not pemba sherpa. He was with cheering and pasang be passed them on the way cast. Ask them to keep their eye out for hugh but in his heart he knows the clamor is gone and then he heads for camp. Four gomez son battles her way down the mountain pulling freezing mountain air into her lungs. Her oxygen cylinder expired hours ago every once in a while she can see the twinkle of a headlamp far far ahead. It belongs to mr kim. The korean leader they left chewing and the others to try to find another way down now. She's lost at the top of the traverse. she finds the severed rope. But where is the line hocus pocus. Then she finds the second row hooked into an anchor down below. She can see mr kim. Making his way down the bottleneck. She climbs down and begins to pick her way along using her ice axes until she reaches the long angled snowfield at the bottom. When she looks she can no longer see. Mr kim's headland at all mr kim. Her voice echoes across. The dark slopes no response. She's alone on the pitch dark mountain and now the wind is picking up. She's climbed eleven of the world's tallest peaks. She's gotten through difficult situations before she can do this but as she tries to feel her way along the ice her mind starts to muddle. Her sense of direction is completely lost. Suddenly she runs into an outcropping check rocks. They're covered in ice snow. This wasn't here on the way that she could turn around balancing carefully she steps from one rock to the next but then she gets stuck. She can't move up or down and she can't see a thing for all. She knows she's about to walk off a cliff. She sits down on a boulder and puts her head in her hands. It's so cold. She can feel her body shutting down. She banks gloved hands together to keep the circulation going. Her eyes start to close she so tired. Suddenly she's sitting at a would table or eighty three year. Old father sits across her. Call me son. He says everyone is so proud of you. South korea is so proud. His face is round and warm like the sun inviting calling to her flight. Horizon snap awake. She can't fall asleep. she needs something to do. She takes off her headlamp and checks the batteries. Maybe the arc of light will guide someone towards her but with each passing minute. She feels herself growing colder and colder. She knows soon hypothermia will set in and then she sees lights moving up the mountain. Mr kim. dd. It's the shirtless. Serving and big. D is their pet name for her. It means big sister in nepali. They are jumex cousins. Her favorite sherpa as they draw closer. She cries out mr kim. Where's mr kim. don't worry he's back at camp four. He told us to come. Look for you and make. where's humic it's quiet for a moment. Then by son speaks up is still on the mountain. Her heart sinks. She was the one who urged to join the expedition. This her fault maybe she should go back and look for him but she can't think jimmy will be okay. He's strong. We need to get you back to camp. Four big pasang pollster free from the raw and clips for safety harness to their own the rope at four thirty a m. They delivered ghomi son to mr kim's tent tears in his eyes. Thank you searing. Thank you big pasang. The two men nod respectfully and head back to the mountain they must find germ mcdonald opens his eyes. It's five am. He survived the night on the mountain in subzero temperatures without a sleeping bag above them. The dawn is bathing k. Two's craggy flanks impeach colored light jerk can hardly see. His eyelids are encrusted with ice. But as the first rays of the sun began to warm him he slowly comes to life. Marco are you marco comfort tola quickly jumps to his feet. Were alive jer. Let's get wilco. Go and find a way down. A hundred meters away. Wilco is already awake stamping his feet trying to restore circulation and warm up his limbs. The ropes have to be close by. I think we should split up. If one of us finds them we can call out to the others. Wilco walks off in one direction and mark wgr at the opposite way but as wilco walks. He's just as confused as he was the night before. Everything looks the same and there is no sign of the ropes. He has a pounding headache. Why is the so hard then. His eyes start to blur and he realizes what's happening to him. His eyes are literally being burned by the sun's ultraviolet light. The headache is part of that. But it's also likely fluid building up in his brain from lack of oxygen a condition called cerebral at dima. If there's any chance of surviving he needs to get down now row or no rope. He quickly makes his way back to marco jer. Listen guys if i go snow blind. I won't be able to look for anything and you guys can't carry me in your condition. I just need to go down and then without a goodbye. We'll go walks away. Jer watches wilco. Get further and further away and says a prayer that is team leader will be all right. Then he turns to marco as find this damn rope already okay. They slowly trace their steps back to the rich under the looming ceramic and make their way across and then they find it. The first anchor tied around the rope. Marco this is it. He and marco quickly clip in and begin to make their way across the snow during the lead. he's so focused on the task that when he stumbles upon the scene. He's not quite sure what he's seeing on the snow in front of them hanging from row. His harness has wrapped around his feet. A camera dangles from his neck. His face is bruised and his eyes are closed. Another climber hangs upside down just below him groaning in pain attached to the same row. A third is tangled up slightly above them like a spider caught the mountains web. He's blue gray in color from frostbite and he's missing a boot but he's still alive. Jer recognizes them immediately. It's the sherpa. Boteh and two climbers from the korean team. But how did they get here. Maybe an avalanche swept him over the side. It calls a weekly lease. Do you see my boot jerk quickly and clips from his harness and makes his way down to the korean clamor caught upside down. He gently lift his head to help him breathe. Ger has always been deeply inspired by sherpa codes of loyalty and respect for human life. They will need more people to help free the men from the ropes but at least they can make them more comfortable. He tells marco to give him a hand to try and loosen the rope. He's afraid to cut it entirely and could send all of them hurtling down the mountain for marco fines and ice axe and a knife and quickly cuts off. Length the rope then he jams the acts into a crack in the ice and secures one end to the handle. He ties the other end around the clamps. Waste and the to open. The man's harnessed as marco cradles. The man's head jer takes the weight of the tangling body and the lower down as they tend to the climbers. Jerry leans down and whispers into each man's ear. You're gonna be okay helps here when you're managing a team. It can be hard to get everyone on the same page. I mean literally and figuratively. What page in that document needs tweaking of agreeing on the same problem. We're solving while giving and receiving feedback gracefully. It's all one big pain point and add freelances to the mix. How are you ever going to get organized. But with five or business. It's easy to find an managed top talent. Five or business gives you access to an all star team of super freelancers plus all the tools and support. You need to easily integrate them into your existing workflow. They've even got a team of dedicated business. Success managers to help match you with the best talent for your team. No more endless guessing and interviews once. You've found that perfect freelancer. With five or business you can collaborate with your team managed projects and even share freelancers. All in one workspace besides voice in this podcast for wondering. I also have youtube page. And i'm always managing editors and storyboarding and trying to get graphic designers altogether on the same page and it often gets complicated but with five or business collaborating online. Hasn't been this easy since ever and right now you can sign up for five or business absolutely free for your first year get one free year and save ten percent on your purchase on five or business with promo code the odds just to five dot com slash business. And don't forget the promo code the odds it's a case that has haunted jefferson township new jersey for more than thirty years on a snowy january night. Fourteen year. old. Tommy sullivan did the unthinkable. He murdered his mother in cold. Blood set fire to their house and then took his own life out of the flames of this horrible tragedy. Investigations revealed that tommy was himself part of a satanic cult sparking a nationwide hysteria now known as the satanic panic this monumental moment in american culture led to communities nationwide and forcing draconian measures to protect their children from what they perceived to be the devil's influence. Even the catholic church was convinced this was a case of demonic possession. On the new podcast. The devil within the truth of the grisly murder is finally revealed. Subscribe to the devil within on apple. Podcasts amazon music. Or wherever you listen to podcasts you can also binge the entire series right now early and add free when you join wondering plus in the wondering app it's seven am and wilco. Von on ruin. Feels like he's dying from thirst his throat as parched and his tongue drying he wants to put a fistful of snow into his mouth to ease the pain but he can't it would drop heat from his core. She desperately needs. He's completely lost again. He had climbed down as far as he could go and hit a steep overhang so he had to go back now. He has no idea where he is. His eyes feel like they're on fire and every few steps he falls asleep leaning on his ice axe. He talks to himself to try and stay awake. Okay wilco watch your step. He's setting now just three steps forward. Three steps can do three steps. Watch your balance. and then. miraculously. He finds the rope. He has no idea how it got here but he's filled with gratitude. He quickly clips on and makes his way forward only to find the same thing. Other climbers before him discover the severed rope. His vision is so blurry he doesn't see the second row instead. Like pemba sherpa. Before him he begins the climbed down past the first row alpine-style with only his ice axe and crampons but the sun is beating down on his head and he is so very tired finally he simply stops like a wind up toy on. Its last click. This is it. He thinks this is where it all lance marco. Comfort told us energy is flagging. But he knows he needs to help juror with the korean climbers who are tangled up in the row still. There's only so much they can do. They've been here for nearly two hours and they're both exhausted. But you're refuses to give up. As marco works on untangling a not. He looks up. Jurists finished laying the top clamor carefully onto the snow. The korean climbers are no shape to move but at least they're a bit more comfortable suddenly jour- starts up the mountain marco's confused. Why is he doing jerk. Where are you going. come back. But you're keeps climbing. Marco calls out again. But jer doesn't turn around moments later he disappears under the ceramic. Marco is stunned has the night spent freezing on the mountain. Driven jared sane. Should he chase after his friend or should he go back down he so incredibly tired if he goes up he may not make it back. He asked to save himself as he turns away. He sees a microphone. Peaking out of jumex coat but there's no radio attached. It must have become dislodged in the fall after a few minutes. Searching he finds it in the snow and radios back to camp four. Hello hello do you hear me. I'm here near the ceramic and there are people here they need help. I'm tired please. send somebody up. He listens for a response of voice on the other end to tell them. It'll be ok. help us coming. But there's nothing. Marco is on his own frederick strang peers up. The mountain. the day is clear but it looks like clouds are starting to roll. In certain altitudes strang has been monitoring conditions from camp four watching for climbers since dawn along with his teammate. Dr eric meyer now. It's mid morning. Occasionally they catch a glimpse of tiny figures high on the mountain near the traverse. But no one's come in since komi son was brought in by the sherpas then strang see something odd erik komo here. You see that. Eric pops out of his tent. They're right there above the ceramic. It's alone figure climbing in the opposite direction towards tibet. The altitude must have got to his brain. Can you see who it is. But the climate is too far away and growing more distant strang calls the other climbers together including pemba sherpa. Who knows the mountain better than anyone now. Should they attempt to rescue. But everyone agrees. It's not safe. Not with the unpredictable avalanches and the rope line destroyed. There are too few people without enough equipment. They hardly have enough food or water at camp four for themselves. Attempting rescue now would be a suicide mission so for now they'll have to stay marco. Comfort tola is somewhere on the bottleneck. At least that's where. He thinks he is. The rope is gone as he clambers down. His legs feel heavy like blocks of wood. He's not sure how many more steps you can take. And then he hears a familiar rumble somewhere on the top and avalanche when he hears the first rock and icefall his way he tries to talk himself against the wall and make himself small his heart is pounding and he starts to pray and then. It's hear thundering cascade of isis snow before it envelopes completely and suddenly stops marco looks up to see a few large chunks of ice and debris tumble passed along with a pair of yellow boots. He knows boots. They belong to german donal glass time he saw them. They were on jurists feet. As he walked up the mountain marco sinks to his knees. He can't do this anymore. This is too much but he can't die here on the mountain. He stumbles up again and he takes a few steps. Then he false. He's too weak. He can't even pick up his legs so he begins to crawl forward on his hands and knees inch by inch. Then emerging out of the clouds abc's to figures he must be loosening but as the get closer. He recognizes their suits. It's two of the sherpas and the korean team. Jumex cousins for the first time in more than twenty four hours relief washes over him and then passes out Pemba sits in his tents at camp for flipping through the walkie talkie dials. Trying to reach someone anyone on the mountain. Some of the others have packed up and headed down to base camp but penn bang casts have decided to stay. They still have to teammates on the mountain. Others are up there to at least. Eight climbers by his account. Bemba's seen miracles happen before. Maybe they'll find him on an expedition to show you the six highest peak in the world. He saw climbers survived for more than four days without oxygen. Sleeping bags or food. it can happen here to. His teammates are strong at mid-day. Here's the familiar crackle of the radio. It's jewish cousin big pasang. We found someone he crawled towards us and then he collapsed but he's alive. What color is a suit. It's black and green. And the knows who it is. It's marco compared tola the he's in pretty bad shape. We need to keep going to find you. Mick we're just below the bottleneck. Can you come. Pemba feels a jolt of energy. someone is alive. He needs the help them quickly searches the remaining tents for extra oxygen. Marco will need it then he talks to. The remaining climbers camp four to see if anyone else wants to go but no one volunteers. They're all exhausted. Conditions are too dangerous. The only one who offers to assist is his teammate casts but as soon as the to set out it's clear casts on even make it across the vast snowfield his descent early this morning depleted. Every last ounce of energy pemba tells him to stay. he'll carry on. Wilco is furious spent months studying k. Two and new the descent would be the hardest and most difficult part. Why did he leave. Gps device in strobe light behind is finally found a slightly flatter part on the route but now the clouds have rolled in grip fills. His is his mouth is badly parched and his anger turns to fear he turns around in circles but can't see through the fog he thought he was going down. Maybe he's turned in the opposite direction. He needs to do something. He pulls out his satellite phone but he can't see the numbers. He had programmed in the only number. He remembers his home wilco. It's his wife helene. Welcome where are you. I don't know helene somewhere on the mountain. you need to call martin and tell them to call basecamp. Tell them. I think i'm below the bottlenecks somewhere. He tries to keep his voice calm. We'll go with the others. No no we got separated. I'm alone okay. i'll call martin and wilco. Please hold on. We'll go hangs up the phone and begins. The blindly walked forward. Hoping it's down. It's early afternoon. When pemba fines. Italian climber marco comfort tola he knew marco would be dazed and exhausted. But it's far worse than that. He's missing both his hat and gloves. And as soon as unzipped his eyes are closed when pemba checks pulse. Marco's eyes fly open. Who were you. it's me. I'm sherpa the dutch nor team. I'm here to help. He gently places the oxygen mask over the climbers mouth. But marco's not having it he tries to fight him off. It's okay markle just breath. It's going to be okay. Here's the radio squawk it's big. We found jewish. He's alive bring him down and the breezes sigh of relief. Have you seen anyone else. We saw one other but he was hit by an icefall. He was in a black and red suit. Germ mcdonalds suit is black and red betrays to push the thought from his mind right now. He needs to get marco off the mountain. He's helping the climber into a sitting position when he hears the roar. Another avalanche moments later. A way of snow falls over them followed by fragments. Alexi wrong it sounds like hundreds of metal balls or through a shoot with frigid gusts of wind. You looks up and sees a tangle of bodies in climbing equipment. Berteling down the mountain and grouches over marco and grabs his soon to keep from sliding down when it's over pemba approaches the tangle of human wreckage. There are two bodies wrapped and ropes. Their suits are ripped. Her faces. bruce f- first pet doesn't recognize them but when he kneels down he sees that it's big pasang and his cousin julich the two cousins lie head to toe wrapped together in death's embrace beyond them are two more bodies in the snow. They are wearing red down. Suits like the ones worn by the korean team but also term mcdonnell. Pemba takes a few photos to show. The other climbers who are waiting anxiously for news of their teams. Then he heads. Back to marco marco. We need to go down. It's not safe. He pulls out a rope and attached himself to marco's harness and then leads him down the rest of the slope across the snow back camp for when they arrive. Pemba tells the korean team what happened to their teammates. And sherpa helpers they are utterly crushed but there's still one climber up there in the death zone and while pemba has gone word came in from base camp. That wilco used his phone to call home. He's alive but the sun will be setting so mba's slips into cast as tend. How are you feeling. I'm okay. let's go find wilco. Kick your summer off in style with the brand. That's reinventing men's basics. Mac walden mac. Weldon is so much more than just underwear. Their full collection includes t shirts polos button up shorts pants swimwear and so much more with light and breathable fabric technology macworld and keeps you cool and comfortable all summer from work to working out. Happy hour to playing with your kids. 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Am on sunday. august third. His feet are completely numb. He's nearly snow blind and every cell in his body is screaming for oxygen but he made it through another night on the mountain at twenty five thousand feet in subzero temperatures the night before he got a second wind after speaking to his friend. Martin by phone martin was trying to track movements by plotting the gps coordinates through the phone signals. Martin told him to hang on. Think of helene and your son he said and don't fall asleep so he tried to continue but when the sunset it didn't make sense to go on. It was too dangerous. He had to dig in. That's when he saw the bodies one in the yellow suit another a few yards further up. He had no idea who they were but it was too late to move anywhere else. He scraped out a snow hole with his gloves and settled in. He slept an hour. Maybe two it was the longest night of his life now here. He sits perched on a ledge watching the sunrise. If every cell in his body wasn't screaming out in pain he'd enjoy this moment the quiet of the mountain the sparkle of the snow. Not many people get to see rob. You'd like this but he needs to get up. That's what helene told them to keep. Moving chris clunky steps out of his tent at base camp. It's august third just after five. Am clunky has been awake. Most of the night scanning the mountain with his binoculars. He was certain he saw someone up there the night before he was wearing a bright orange suit he hopes the daylight more. Give him a better view. Clunky is on the american team. He's blonde and burley with a broad open face when he is in climbing mountains. He's an executive at american express. So he knows about risk management when he the other members of the american team. So the line of the bottleneck two days ago. They decided to turn back. They reached base camp yesterday morning and quickly set up a line of telescopes and binoculars. To monitor the mountain for survivors clunky squint into the dawn and brings his binoculars to his eyes. There is again a small orange dot slowly picking its way across the southern face of the mountain. Roland gal come out here. he's back. Roland is from the dutch north team. All four of his teammates are missing. He rushes over to the telescope. Yeah that's wilko's suit but what is doing. I can't tell he looks like he's about three hundred feet above camp three clunky. Here's another shout. Look another climber above camp three. It's one of the serbian clamours. It's cash they're so close to each other get him on the radio. He's up in camp. Three climber frantically searches through the frequencies. Himba hello hello are you there. Pemba jolts awake at the sound of iraq crashing onto his tent at camp three he in casts search for wilco. Most of the night but then they got separated. Pemba thought they meet up at camp three but cast never showed up. He spent most of the night worrying in his tent. Frantically calling down to base before passing out mba's which is on the radio pemba are you there. We'll go is about six hundred feet from camp three and we saw cast to. He's making his way to you. Penn steps out of his tent looks around. Cast is picking his way across the rock cast. Where were you. I got lost. I had to spend the night on the mountain. Pemba can see cast is exhausted but they both know this is their window. They make their way across the mountain. Keeping their eyes peeled. Basecamp does their best director. Go down down to your left. Showed his name. Maybe he'll you will will call. Yeah that's it. I think he heard you keep yelling. Keep going will go cease to flickering shimer's of color somewhere in the distance. But he can't be sure are they tend to people or is he hallucinating. Then he hears voices but it's like listening through water then the figures get closer. One of them is dressed in blue the other in orange that triggers something familiar in his brain but he can't play sick he staggers towards them but he's lost all feeling in his feet suddenly. He understands that they're climbers. And they're just six hundred feet in front of him. His brain suddenly snaps into focus. That's cass wilco. Stumbles forward into cast is open arms. They shout with joy into the air and cass starts cry. I didn't think we were ever going to meet again. Him calls back to base camp. We've got he's here we'll go was alive. He's alive he's alive. Yes oh my god. I can't believe it he's alive. We'll come up with oxygen and no. There's no time we'll come down. Cast help wilco back to camp. Three where wilko's sucks in oxygen from a tank and cast bulls water for tea when their bodies are hydrated. Himba urges them on they needed to get down before nightfall. Okay guys time to go as the three surviving members of the dutch team near the bottom of the mountain pemba sees something miraculous a dozen mountaineers climbing up from base camp to greet them yelling and cheering. If he wasn't so exhausted. It would feel like a party eric. My quickly brings them into the dutch mess tent which is converted into an emergency medical facility cooks. Boil water to bay the men's feet enhance cheering door. Jay and some of the other sherpas join them in the tent as pemba hot drink cheering tells him he got were dependence family. That he's safe. Eric gives wilco and casts a cocktail of drugs to arrest the effects of snow blindness hypotheses and frostbite. Then he injects them with morphine to relieve their pain. Both climbers look years. Older like the mountain has stolen ten years of their life. Their skin is gray and hangs from their faces cast. His hands are especially bad. The fingers on his left hand are gray and limp with purple streaks running through we'll go ask about the others. They tell him. Eleven climbers lost their lives on k. Two it's one of the worst mountaineering disasters in history. No one says anything after that most of them have lost friends and teammates. Pemba gets up and walks to his tent. He needs to be alone with his thoughts for a while the next morning. Military helicopter takes wilco and cast to a hospital in nearby towns for treatment. A day later a second chopper. Airlifts out italian climber marco comfort tola marco was the last to reach base camp shattered and broken but still alive when the sound of the rotors fade away. Pemba companies some of the other survivors to the art gilkey. Morial gilkey was a climber who died on k two in nineteen fifty-three since then people have decorated the karen of rocks with plaques and flags in memory of all the climbers who lost their lives on k. Two today one of the serbian climbers has made aluminum plaques one for fallen teammate dren mandic and the other for germ mcdonnell the loss of peres. Friend sure weighs on him heavily. It was the irishman who brought him back onto the team. Pemba can still picture him digging about on the summit waving his irish flag when all the plaques are hung the climbers watch quietly as the plates clink against one another in the wind the ting ting echoing across the desolate landscape. Two weeks later. Jurors family holds their own memorial in his home village in county limerick ireland. They hanged betton prayer flags inside the tent and more than one thousand people come pay their respects musicians play. Celtic tunes and friends bring gifts including a badran like the one juror used to play juror. Risk his own life to save others when he found. The three climbers tangled up in row. Though juror was last seen by marco comfort tola. He didn't simply wander off as marco thought he'd gone up the mountain. Secure an anchor and rope to take the weight off the bodies. It was jers way to help others. He is a true hero of the mountains. The recovery for jersey to dutch teammates is an easy especially for wilco. Who has all of his toes amputated to third degree frostbite from his hospital bed. He tries to answer reporters questions. Even though he's exhausted and on painkillers they want to know what went wrong. He tells them collaborating with other teams was the problem. He thinks the dutch team should have tried to summit on their own. He believes the sharing of rome was what caused the delay in the bottleneck will lead to climbers descending on the dark a year later a book about his near death experience. He calls it surviving k. Two three years after the tragedy. He'll climb the highest peak in antarctica. When he's not climbing he lives in a renovated barn in the netherlands with his wife. Helene and his two sons italian climber marco comfort tola has a longer recovery before he climbs again. He'll have three inches of his foot removed along with most of toes and will take them a year just to learn to walk again but soon after he returns to climbing by two thousand eighteen allowed several more stars to the ring of tattoos around his left. Bicep to commemorate all of the twenty eight thousand foot. Peaks is reached south korean climber. Gummy son isn't so lucky. Her goal was to become the first woman to climb the fourteen tallest mountains in the world but less than a year after she reached the summit of k. Two she runs into a wind and ice storm while the sending from her eleventh summit. Nanga parbat the ninth highest mountain in the world in whiteout conditions. She falls from a cliff to her death. Her body is recovered and brought back to korea where she is laid to rest surrounded by her loved. Ones cecilia spook. The other female climber who reached the summit on august first returns home to norway grief-stricken. She lost her husband to and for months she's plagued by thoughts should have gone back to the mountain to look for ralph. Could she have done more. She still has their monica. Roth took two k two a year after the tragedy. She feels the call of the wild again and crosses greenland on skis in twenty ten. She makes the first unassisted crossing event. Artika along with american explorer ryan walter later that year she swaps her down jacket for a sequence that had halter top to appear on dancing with the stars she tells reporters that she's dancing for ralph. Cecilia will go on to climb to more eight thousand meter peaks. The one thing she will never do is returned to k two. It's october two thousand and eight and pemba j. Sherpa stands with his wife and two children before an altar at the big metro. Monastery a holy site in the paul. The smell of sense fills the air pemba presses. His hands together fingers pointing upward. It's been hard for pemba to come to terms with the tragedy k. To today he has come to the monastery to pray with the energy of aspiration for the body sat away with a sense of deep respect and with as many bodies as adams of the world to all you buddha's visualized as real. I bow down pemba and his heroic feats on k. Two have been widely recognized shortly after his return from k. To he was voted one of national geographic's adventurers of the year. But the attention doesn't go to his head true to his sherpa ideals in the coming years. Pemba will continue to help. Save climbers lives in the himalayas. As a trainer in high altitude mountaineering. He often reflects on the disaster on k. Two but he refuses to blame the mountain. He tells a writer people. Call it killer mountain when they are not well. Prepared not have enough experience not enough manpower but it's not like that k. Two very beautiful mountain. This is the final episode of our three part series can to the savage mountain. If you like our show please give us a five star rating and review on our next episode. we'll be talking to one of the climbers who was on k. Two during the incredible events in early august follow against the odds on apple. Podcasts amazon music the wondering app or wherever. You're listening right now. Join us in. The wonder. Listen one week early and add free in the episode notes. You'll find some links offers from our sponsors. Please support them by supporting them. You offer the show for free and a quick note about our scenes in most cases. We can't really know what was said but everything is based on historical research. If you'd like to learn more about this event we highly recommend the book the summit how triumph turned to tragedy on qe. Two's deadliest days by pat balvi and pemba guilty sherpa and no way down by graham boldy. We also recommend the documentary the summit directed by nick. Ryan i'm your host might corey. Simon worrell wrote this episode. Our editor is more walls. Ryan white is our associate producer. Our audio engineer is sergio. And rica's vocal. Edit and sound design is by joe. Richardson original music by francesco. Apollo are executive producers. Are stephanie chance and marshal. Louis for wondering one of the most talked about podcasts of two thousand and nineteen is back hue code presents season two of blackout academy award winner. Rami malek returns in this apocalyptic thriller as a small town radio. Dj fighting to protect his family and community. After the power grid goes down nationwide up ending modern civilization season two picks up right after he and his family escapes. they cross paths with an old family. Friend who recounts her experience getting out of boston but can't be trusted. He won't want to miss this season of blackout. Where old friends and strangers must come together to survive and maybe escape. You'll see that. When all seemed lost to the darkness of the unknown our collective humanity will always shine. Listen to blackout on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever. You're listening now.

mr kim wilco marco tola Pemba Marco hugh Mr kim avalanche pasang marco comfort tola Vondra Wilco mike corey strang dior jay pasang lama rolf bay Hembo
How I Built The Tim Ferriss Show to 700+ Million Downloads  An Immersive Explanation of All Aspects and Key Decisions (Featuring Chris Hutchins) (#538)

The Tim Ferriss Show

3:02:07 hr | Last week

How I Built The Tim Ferriss Show to 700+ Million Downloads An Immersive Explanation of All Aspects and Key Decisions (Featuring Chris Hutchins) (#538)

"This episode is brought to you by athletic greens. I get asked all the time. What I would take if I could only take one supplement. The answer is invariably athletic greens. I view it as all in one nutritional insurance. I recommended it, in fact, in the four hour body. This is more than ten years ago. And I did not get paid to do so. With approximately 75 vitamins, minerals, and whole foods sourced ingredients. You'd be very hard pressed to find a more nutrient dense and comprehensive formula on the market. It has multivitamins, multi mineral greens complex, probiotics, and prebiotics for gut health, and immunity formula. Digestive enzymes adaptogens and much more. I usually take it once or twice a day just to make sure I've covered my bases. If I miss anything, I'm not aware of. Of course, I focus on nutrient dense meals to begin with. That's the basis. But athletic greens makes it easy to get a lot of nutrition when whole foods aren't readily available from travel packets. I always have them in my bag when I'm zipping around. Right now, athletic greens is giving my audience a special offer on top of their all in one formula, which is a free vitamin D supplement and 5 free travel packs with your first subscription purchase. Many of us are deficient in vitamin D I found that true for myself, which is usually produced in our bodies from sun exposure. So, adding a vitamin D supplement to your daily routine is a great option for additional immune support, support your immunity, gut health, and energy by visiting athletic greens dot com slash Tim. You'll receive up to a year's supply of vitamin D and 5 free travel packs with your subscription. Again, that's athletic greens dot com slash Tim. This podcast episode is brought to you by Helix Sleep, sleep is super important to me in the last few years. I've come to conclude. It is the end all be all, that all good things, good mood, good performance, good everything, seem to stem from good sleep. So I've tried a lot to optimize it. I've tried pills and potions, all sorts of different mattresses, you name it. And for the last few years, I've been sleeping on a helix midnight Luxe mattress. I also have one in the guest bedroom and feedback from friends has always been fantastic. It's something that they comment on. Helix Sleep has a quiz takes about two minutes to complete that matches your body type and sleep preferences to the perfect mattress for you. With helix, there's a specific mattress for each and every body that is your body. Also your taste. So let's say you sleep on your side and like a super soft bed. No problem, or if you're back sleeper who likes a mattress that's as firm as a rock. They've got a mattress for you too. Helix was selected as the number one best overall mattress pick of 2020 by GQ magazine wired apartment therapy and many others. Just go to Helix Sleep dot com slash Tim. Take their two minute sleep quiz and they'll match you to a customized mattress that will give you the best sleep of your life. They have a ten year warranty. You get to try it out for 100 nights risk free. They even pick it up from you if you don't love it. And now my dear listeners, helix is offering up to $200 off of all mattress orders and two free pillows at Helix Sleep dot com slash Tim. These are not cheap pillows either, so getting two for free is an upgraded deal. So that's up to $200 off and two free pillows at Helix Sleep dot com slash Tim. That's helix sleep dot com slash Tim for up to $200 off. So check it out one more time. Helix elix sleep dot com slash Tim. Optimal minimal. Altitude I can run flat out for a half long before my hands start shake. Can I ask you a personal question? Now we're just seeing the perfect time. I'm a cybernetic organism, living this year, our medical skeleton. Hello boys and girls, ladies and germs. This is Tim Ferriss and welcome to another episode of the Tim Ferris show. We have had three technical failures, but we've made it happen, and this is an improv episode. I'm very excited about it because my friend Chris reached out with many questions about podcasting. Good questions. He had already read much of what I had written. He'd listen to several interviews, and this is intended to be an updated guide to all things podcasting. The last time I wrote anything at length about this, I think the Tim Ferris had about 60 or 65 million total downloads. Now it's past 700 million. The show has grown a lot has happened, technologies have. I want to say developed, not always evolved as we may end up covering. But Chris, why don't you take a moment to tell people who you are? We've known each other now for at least 6 years, maybe closer to ten. I can't really even recall how we first met, but we have a mutual friend and Kevin rose and many other people. Who are you, Chris? So hi, everybody. I'm Chris. Chris Hutchins. I'm a bit of one of those crazy life hacker optimizers, take it to the extreme sometimes. And I host a podcast. Hopefully soon to be award winning podcast called all the hacks where I document my journey to upgrade my life, money, travel, all while spending less in saving more. Outside of that, I'm building new products at wealthfront. And before all of this, I've started a few companies sold a few companies, worked in venture capital, investment banking, management consulting and travel around the world for 8 months. So a bit of a seasoned set of random things Jack of all trades, maybe Master of None. And I'm excited to be here. Well, I am excited to jam because I actually haven't spoken at length in detail about the latest and greatest. Or in some cases, the old and the tried and the true that I don't think needs to change. But I want to underscore that you really do know what you're doing when it comes to certain obsessive deep dives that you've done. Particularly, I shouldn't say particularly, but including travel and points and not just saving or cutting costs, but improving the immersive experiences that you have in life. And so you've traveled to roughly 70 countries, mostly for free on point and there's much more to it. How many episodes have you recorded and published so far of your podcast? Just so people have some context. This is relatively new. I think I just released episode 19 when we're recording this. So it's been I started in May at September, so only four or 5 months. We'll come at this from many different angles. But where do you think it makes sense to start in preparation for this hoping this would be sort of the one stop shopping or at least the jumping off point for anyone who really wants to study maybe not best practices, but good practices within podcasting. Where do you think it makes sense to start? So there were two things that you've done that I think really gave me a lot of background. And one was the post you mentioned that you wrote in 2016. And then you did a maybe two hours or something interview with Rolf pots on his deviate podcast and talked a lot about this. So I thought maybe to kick it off. I'll just highlight some of my takeaways from doing my homework. And, you know, feel free to say, wow, that's wrong, that's changed, but we can kind of run through what I learned and then we can kind of run through that same series of getting started, picking gear, finding guests again and kind of dive deeper on what's changed and how it's evolved and questions that maybe were left unanswered in the original stuff. Let's do it. Perfect. So when it comes to getting started, this is something that I like you took a while to decide to start a podcast. And one of the pieces of advice that you gave that was really valuable to me was you don't have to commit forever. I think it always feels like a thing that you have to do forever once you start it happens every week forever. And you can kind of set a date and say, let's do 5, let's do ten episodes, and that's it and we'll reevaluate. So I think that's a really important takeaway is that no one you don't have to commit forever. And the other big one is it's a lot more work than it seems. And so you said only do this if you do it for free, which really means like it's gotta be you. It's gotta be what format excites you, the tone of voice, the kinds of guests, the questions that are exciting to you. Otherwise you'll get bored. And the final kind of getting started advice I took away was, look, if you don't have an audience, don't be afraid. Everyone started with some lack of audience at some point. And plenty of people with massive audiences have totally failed in podcasting. So the quick way is just get a couple episodes out there, keep it simple, do something you love. Don't worry about the business side and experiment. And I think that kind of sums up what everyone needs to know in a very concise way before getting started. Let me add to that. So I agree with all of that. And I want to add a couple of nuances are just additional comments. So it's helpful to bracket the minimum and then a check in point for your commitment to podcasting. In other words, you could say, I'm only committing to do it to X or for Y number of episodes. I decided to do 6 episodes to commit to 6 episodes in the beginning because I wanted to ensure that I could win even if I failed what that meant was, what skills can I develop, learn or improve what relationships can I forge or deepen that will be of value to me even if I stop podcasting? So the minimum effective dose for that is probably not one episode. It's probably not two episodes. Probably not three episodes. For me, I thought, eh, it's probably somewhere between 5 and ten. Let's just commit to doing 6. I don't know exactly why I chose 6. And the way I could win even if I failed in that case was by improving my ability to ask questions and plan interviews because I was already doing that in the course of writing books. When I did research, when I found experts, these were all transferable skills. And then I would also have an excuse to deepen relationships with someone like close friends because it's pretty creepy to do hours and hours of Internet sleuthing on your Friends. Otherwise. But if you have the pretext of an interview, you can actually learn a lot about people like Kevin rose, our mutual friend who is my first guest ever who's shaped my nuts really hard. It's pretty funny to listen to now. It was less amusing at the time. That's I think an aspect of the picking of the minimum dose that's important. Doing something you love is ideal. If you can do something you love fantastic. If you don't know what it is that you love or would love because if it's a new medium, you may have no idea. At least do something that is sustainable. Don't do something for, say, 6 episodes that you can't do for 500 episodes. That's my advice. And if you try to out this American life, this American life, you're going to get your face ripped off. There's a reason when they read the credits at the end that they have staff like 20 or 30 people. It is an incredible amount of work. And they work very hard for it to seem seamless and maybe even improvised. Wow, it's so conversational. They do this with the team at gimlet as well. You listen to me like, oh, they're just having a conversation like, no, believe me. They're not just having a conversation. So sustainability is super important and like you said, Chris, there's more involved than you expect. And you should ask yourself, this plus to podcasting, it applies to many other things. If this cost twice as much, took twice as much time, would I still do it? And if the answer is no, either don't do it or change the format, change the approach so that the answer is yes. And podcasting is not the native element for all people. So if you think about how people with large audiences have built large audiences, in some cases, they build them on YouTube, and then that audience follows them to new formats. In some cases, mine would be such a case. They build it through books, but books don't give you direct access to readers in the same way that podcasts do not give you direct access to your listeners. So I ported the popularity of the books into building a popular blog. The blog is what gave me an audience that then traveled in part at least to podcasting. So a lot of building a large audience, if that is one of your goals. And by the way, I don't think that is worthwhile goal in and of itself, I would ask why, why, why, why? At least a few times. Or so what? At the very least, then you need to choose a game you can win. And that requires some self assessment. But, for instance, if you decide you should do podcasting because everyone else is doing podcasting. You are going to be outlasted outsmarted out maneuvered by people who are really, really enthusiastic about the medium about the format. They're just going to be better and they're going to last longer. There's this gigantic elephant graveyard of three episode podcasts. So if you're likely to be a casualty, do something else, pick a different medium. And because I mentioned it, I think at the very head of the show, if I didn't, I should have. We had a number of technical difficulties in getting this show started. We had a number of false starts. We began sorry to throw you guys under the bus, but you failed us today. Zen Caster had a number of issues, then the plan was to jump to squad cast, but you have used riverside FM. All of these platforms I have seen fail. None of them are perfect. And therefore, on the technical side, whether you are in person or remote, the expression that I first learned from friends in the military, two is one and one is none. If you have a single point of failure, you are going to be fucked at some point. You will have a disaster and it will be a mess. Always have backup options. The calendar invite or in the email that was sent to Chris and also in my calendar, there are at least two backup options and both of us are currently recording local backup audio using QuickTime audio. So those are a few things that I wanted to add. Please continue Chris. So I do want to talk about gear, but I'll ask one question before, which is, in 2017, you said, yeah, it's definitely not too late to start a podcast, but that was a long time ago, 24% of people would listen to a podcast. Now it's closer to 60. There were a few 100,000 podcasts. Now there's over 2 million. You still think we're early in the days of podcasting and there's lots of opportunity or is it too crowded and people should consider new mediums for content? I think it's still super early. I think it's still super, super early. There are some indicators or maybe proxies that you can use for that. The percentage of say terrestrial radio or satellite radio advertising dollars that have migrated to podcasting is still extremely low. I don't know what the percentage is, but it's very low. I would anticipate just based on the types of brands that you see represented. And you can look at other types of media. So based on that alone, I think we are very much in the early days. Super, super early days. And that said, we've seen a lot of changes over the last handful of years. If you look at the charts, say, on apple or elsewhere, if you look at Apple, the one person shops or small team shops like mine are fewer and fewer and far between. Let's just say when I got started in whenever it was 2014, I think maybe a little bit earlier. You had Joe Rogan web at the top, of course, you had nerdist. You had Mark maron. You had a handful of others who were constantly in the top ten top 20 on what was then iTunes. What you see now is professional outfits. You see companies, you see organizations, WNYC. You see pushkin, which I think does a really nice job. You see actual companies you see also incumbents previous sort of terrestrial incumbents who are now investing dollars in the podcasting. There has never been more competition, but the analogy I might use is let's use startup investing, something that you and I are quite familiar with. So I had the very good luck of starting to do angel investing in 2008. Now this was perfect timing because there was a financial crisis, which meant all the fair-weather entrepreneurs, founders and investors ran for the hills. And that left the diehards on the true believers. Which meant that the playing field was very uncrowded, and you could actually find really, really good startups. I believed all over the place. In 2008, 2009, it was a great time to invest. In 2000 say, 15 or so, I decided to exit stage left, not because there weren't great companies, there were great companies, but it was a lot harder. The deal terms were harder. There was a huge influx of capital from all over the place, including China. Things were getting really weird for me. And I realized, okay, this just went from single deck blackjack, where you could have a system as a solo player as a team to multiple deck blackjack. And I don't have confidence using my own bankroll that I can win in this environment. So I took a long break. Similarly, you just have to be better now. When I started in 2014, and if you had an existing audience that would travel with you, you could be in the top 20, 30, 40, 50 on iTunes now, apple with relative ease. And you can still do that if you have a massive influx of subscribers over a short period of time. It could be a few days it could be a week, but you'll fall off. It's simply harder now. So there's all the more reason why you should have confidence that you're going to do this with some degree of dedication to the craft, like eucharis, you're taking the study of the craft and the practice and the deliberate training, so to speak, very seriously. And you have to have, I think, good reasons for doing it. And a good reason could be, I enjoy doing it. Great. That's a good enough reason. You do not need to be on the charts to have a quote unquote successful podcast, but you have to ask yourself why am I starting a podcast? Why do I want to start a podcast? So let me ask you that, Chris, why did you want to start podcast? Why did you decide to start a podcast? I think two things happened at the same time. So one was I found myself constantly whether I was with a group of people I knew or didn't know telling a story about a level of optimization that in the financial travel world that most people hadn't thought about and I thought, man, I love telling that story to people, could I tell that story at more scale because it seems like it's happening a person at a time? So that was a piece of it. And then the bigger piece was I loved that game, and I knew that the only way I would get better at that game and go deeper at that game was to learn and there are people out there that know much more about different types of ways to upgrade life ways to optimize ways to make more money or save more money or invest better. I was going to find those people and have those conversations anyway because I was, but I knew that people loved hearing those stories in small groups. And I thought, if I had a platform where I could have those conversations and share them, people just like I would see at a dinner table would enjoy listening to them on a run at home, driving in the car. And so I thought, I'm going to do this anyways. I love doing it. Why not see if other people really do want to listen at scale? And they did. Do you still feel like that is enough? The psychic gratification of sharing what you would have done otherwise. Because the reality is, it is kind of what you would have done otherwise. But the setup and the tech and the microphones and the post production. And everything else involved adds a layer of labor and complexity. So what, on top of that, if anything, there doesn't need to be anything extra, but how has your thinking changed on what makes it worthwhile to continue or not? Well, what's interesting is, let's take an episode I did with a writer Morgan housel. And it was all about the psychology of money. I'd read the book. I've been fascinated by it. I had questions I wanted to ask Morgan. I could probably just reach out and say, hey, I'm just a person, and I want to learn more about what you wrote. Can we talk? But I'm guessing I would have had better success, which I did, saying, hey, I have this podcast. I want to talk. I want to ask you those questions and share that with my audience. And so having the podcast lets you level up, I believe the people you can have those conversations with because there's a reason it gives a reason to do that and then as the audience grows, it gives a second reason. So one is you could just reach out and say, can we do a phone call? But there's at least a reason, and then as the audience grows, there's more. And that, I think, is worth the tradeoff of the amount of work you have to put into it. But, you know, you mentioned gear. There's a world where and I believe you can buy a microphone for under a $100 and use a pair of headphones you already own and keep it pretty simple. And I think to your original post and what we talked about earlier, the more simple you make it, the easier it will be to keep going. And the more authentic it will be, which, you know, you may think you want to say something because it's what the audience wants to hear. And there's this weird thing where it's actually just ask what you want and most people are more engaged by your engagement with a conversation than if you ask a question. They want to hear but your board having that conversation. Yeah, absolutely. And just to give people a sense, right now I'm using what I use more or less all of the time for remote recording. And I remotely record even pre COVID probably 80, 90% of my interviews. It allows you to get better guests, by the way. Generally speaking, unless you are the undisputed king of podcasts like Joe Rogan, then you can insist on in person visits, but very few podcasters have that leverage. And you will sacrifice some guests by having those conditions. I do everything remotely. It makes my life easier as well. I'm in a farmhouse right now. I've recorded dozens of podcasts here. I have a Logitech brio camera, which I do not use all of the time. I very frequently do audio only. We could talk about why I don't do more video. I have an audio technica ATR 2100 X, one of the more recent. It might be a 2500, but and you have that exact microphone in front of you. This is probably what would you say in 80 to a $100 microphone that connects to my MacBook Pro and then I'm using AirPods. For in ear listening, that's it. That is the sum total of hardware that I am using and we're currently recording on riverside FM, which you use, I typically use and squad cast, but all of these things break so have backup. And if this didn't work, I also have a conference line with no pin that can be set to record. So if my computer broke, I could call Chris on my cell phone and we could record the conversation. I have backups upon backups upon backups. And trust me at some point you're going to need it. Is there a point at which you would just reschedule instead of or how do you think about that? The quality of a conference bridge, being maybe not worth doing now and postponing to when your computer worked again. I will reschedule if the connection is really bad or if the audio on the opposite end is very poor. And to try to minimize the likelihood of the audio being poor on the other end, we ship every guest a microphone. Unless they already have a really polished setup, we will use Amazon Prime to buy an audio technica 2100 Mike and ship it to them. And it's very easy to do. It's 80 to a hundred bucks. And that may not make any sense in the beginning or be feasible in the beginning. But right now, for the type of operation that I run and very quickly, the cost of rescheduling is more to me than 80 to a $100. However, you can have a great mic and a really terrible room. So if someone's in a room with lots of metal, lots of glass, you could have a very bouncy room even with a decent mic. So there are other technical tricks that are not really tricks, but you could have a mediocre mic in a room with lots of carpet and drapes, and you're going to probably have better sound than a really nice mic in some highly modern metallic glass, bouncy room. If you end up in that type of environment, there are tricks you can use like putting pillows in the corners of the room. That's one I learned from Edward Norton actually. He was in a really bouncy room, and he said, hold on. I know how to fix this. And he fixed it. I was like, wow, it's genius. You do get better at these things over time, but I very rarely reschedule in less one of us is sick or the sound quality is absolutely abysmal. But a bridge line recording is not going to give you Carnegie Hall, symphony quality, fidelity, but nobody really cares is what I've realized. I don't use equalizers. I don't use any of these external devices that one might think or necessary. Yes, they can improve quality sometimes. But as Morgan spurlock said to me on this podcast, once you get fancy, fancy gets broken. And I prefer to have the fewest number of moving pieces possible. When I record in person, just to cover that, I use the Zoom H 6, recording device with XLR cables and generally SM 58 stage microphones, which are sure microphones. There are the oldest microphones you can imagine. Yes. So you have the H 6. You could take the SM 58 mic and probably throw it against a brick wall, and it would be fine. That's my guess. I can throw all of that gear into a backpack. I can travel with my entire podcast studio. So to speak, it's been good enough for between 607 hundred episodes and I don't have any plans to change. So that is the gear. I use a similar setup and I would say I don't know if you know a specific one. You could go listen to the episodes I've done. And one of them someone had no headphones, no microphone, we were just using a MacBook, and I'd be shocked if someone could actually that isn't an audio engineer could go back and pick out which one it is. Pro tip that we ended up using earlier in this conversation, which I picked up from Kevin rose, actually, who has a lot of experience with this kind of thing, is if you're doing a remote recording and you ask someone to check their source to make sure the inputs and outputs are set properly. They might say, my mic is selected. But if it sounds funny to you, ask them to tap the mic if they tap the mic and you don't hear that. That kind of punchy Tapping sound then it means it is not selected. It's probably their headset or the built in microphone on the laptop. So that's an easy way to test to see if the proper external mic is selected. All right. Chris, what else should we cover? So I think we covered gear a lot. One thing you mentioned was video. Early on your advice to people was, don't use video, it makes it easier for guests. You can look at your notes, you said that's evolved a little bit. We're recording video today. How do you think about that differently now? Or do you think about it differently in a way that wouldn't apply to someone else? I record video now if someone wants to record if I think it will improve the rapport in some fashion, I still frequently record without video because I like to have lots of notes. I do quite a bit of homework, my team does quite a bit of homework for each guest. And I like to have my notes in front of me, and it sometimes can be very distracting if you're having a conversation with someone on video and you're looking off screen like rain man. I also like the ability to set and I always set both the laptop and my iPhone to do not disturb because you might just receive a FaceTime audio call, and that can mess up your interview. It does happen. I've seen it. I've experienced it. It's not fun. So do not disturb do not disturb. But with do not disturb on my iPhone, if I'm not using video, you could also take yourself off video temporarily to do this or you could tell the guest in advance that if you check your iPhone, you're not checking email, you're Googling something. What will sometimes happen is a guest will say, oh, well, there's a book by so and so it's called this. Ah, I can't remember the author name. You can look that up. Or they will say, there are three people who are really good at X, Y, and Z, they'll name two, and then they'll say the second person. I think their first name is Laura, or Brian. And you can look it up so you don't have to deal with it in post production or put it in the show notes. You can look it up on an iPhone and no one who is listening will hear you tap the iPhone, but they will very often hear you tap a laptop. So I use my phone in that way. Now, you could have production assistant or a producer or an engineer or someone like that who would do this for you, which is what Joe Rogan does. But I don't do that. I have a smaller team. By the way, it works spectacularly well. Speaking of Joe, so Joe Rogan is fluent in video. He is absolutely adept and expert and comfortable being in front of the cameras and making really good use of cameras. I think one of the reasons not the only reason, but one of the major reasons that Joe has become as big as he has is his use of YouTube. I don't know if it's still the second largest search engine in the world, but it is an enormous traffic driver, particularly if you take not just your long form videos and put them online, but create clips as he has through Jerry clips and so on. And if you are bringing on guests who are going to be capitalizing on news or who are part of the news themselves, then people will be searching for these temporally relevant topics, whether it's someone who got fired, someone who got in trouble, someone who made a big decision, a CEO who just found themselves in the news. If you do that, you can drive a lot of traffic. I want to produce for the most part, evergreen episodes that will have very fat tails. They get listened to for years and years and years and don't lose their relevance. That's important to me. And I don't want to immerse myself in the news any more than absolutely necessary. So I don't do that. I also don't think that I am as good on video as Joe. He has a studio. He has a visually interesting environment. He is funny. He's a comedian. He's an entertainer, very smart entertainer, but he's a very, very, very skilled entertainer. And it makes sense. And they have just more production capacity. They've invested more in making that a core component of what they do. I just am not interested enough. Could I make my show bigger? Would it be bigger if I tried to do all of that? I think it would be. But this is an example of knowing where you are strong, knowing where you are perhaps not as strong and also asking yourself why am I doing this? Does my show does the Tim Ferris need to be two times bigger, three times bigger, ten times bigger? I can't come up with a really compelling reason for why that's the case. What I like it to grow, yes, do I need it to grow even if it involves doing things? I dislike. No, that would be so stupid. It would be so stupid, and I've made that mistake. Just a quick thanks to one of our sponsors and will be right back to the show. This episode is brought to you by LinkedIn jobs. Today, many small business owners like me are busier than ever. Time spent searching for an interview in candidates can take time away from managing and most importantly growing your business. That's why LinkedIn jobs has made it easier to get to the candidates worth interviewing faster and for free. Create a free job post in minutes on LinkedIn jobs to reach your network and beyond to the world's largest professional network of more than 770 million people. Focus on candidates with the skills and experience you need and use screening questions to get your role in front of only the most qualified people. Then use the simple tools on LinkedIn jobs to quickly filter and prioritize who you'd like to interview and hire. It's why small businesses rate LinkedIn jobs number one in delivering quality hires over leading competitors. LinkedIn jobs helps you find the candidates worth interviewing faster. Did you know every week nearly 40 million job seekers visit LinkedIn? So try it out. Post your job for free at LinkedIn dot com slash Tim TI M that's LinkedIn dot com slash Tim to post your job for free. Terms and conditions do apply. You're at a scale now that your show can afford the person to help you prep for guests and that kind of stuff. What do you think about people earlier? I'm at a place right now where I've recorded the video of a lot of my interviews. Yeah. But I haven't done anything with it yet. And I know it could help grow the show and the show couldn't monetize to support it. So growth is kind of a factor. It plays into the longevity of the show because it takes time and yes, I would do it for free, but you got bills, you got people have things they have to do. So if they want to do it more, it does need to grow. Do you think it would be different if your show was smaller and it couldn't afford all those things? Yeah, well, let me dig into a bunch of pieces of what you just said and ask some follow-up questions. So how different would my operation look if I were just getting started? Well, let's rewind the clock. I can tell you exactly what I did when I got started. I wanted to know how to do everything. And that's part of my nature, but it's also because I wanted to try to create as elegant and operation as possible. For myself, elegant is not, does not have the same definition. It doesn't have the same puzzle pieces for everyone. So I not only recorded everything myself. I edited everything myself. I published everything myself. I uploaded the file to hosting services. And so on and so forth. So in the very early days, I didn't have someone to help me with research. I still appreciate and value having someone to help me with research. But if for whatever reason, that weren't possible, I have full confidence that I could do that myself. But let's take a look at something you said. And that is, and it comes back to this question. I had earlier of is the podcast still worth it. To get to episode 50, episode a hundred for you. What does the podcast need to be for it to be worth doing? Well worth doing, easily worth doing. So you said, we got bills. Shit. Got bills to pay. Got to keep this ship afloat. Now, I don't have a perfect window into all of your personal finances. I have on some reasonable authority, sufficient belief that you could probably cover your podcasting bills. I know the costs involved with a lot of podcasting without having to monetize the show. So it would be nice to monetize the show, but you could make that money in some other way. So let me jump to a point about monetizing that I mentioned, I believe in that 2016 article and probably again with Rolf pots on deviate. And that is in the beginning I did not focus on monetization. Now it's very easy for someone to say, well, you already had money there for your advice doesn't apply to me. Your experience doesn't apply to me. I would discourage you from looking at it with that lens. You meaning listener because you can learn something from everyone and even if their decisions are not the decisions you would make. It's helpful to learn how more experience people have thought about it. So the way they go about making decisions. I felt, especially since I was doing the editing and so on myself, that any focus on monetization. Even if you think it's only going to be 5% of your time. And we can come back to preoccupation versus active time on something. I didn't want anything to distract from my focus on improving my ability to prepare an interview and edit. I wanted to focus on the craft the product. And that was it. That was to be my real soul focus, which the editing helps with, by the way, the editing forces you to listen to everything really carefully. Not saying everyone should edit their own stuff. I no longer my own episodes, but we do get everything transcribed and we go through and we look at ways to clean up and tighten and possibly cut or rearrange. We do that with a lot of episodes, not all of them. So I didn't focus on or pay attention to monetizing for the first I don't know. I'd have to go back and somebody could probably confirm this, but who knows, 60, 70, a hundred episodes, I'm not even sure. By that point, the downloads were such that I had a broader spectrum of possible sponsors to choose from and that felt better to me than taking whatever came over the transom early. However, I believe Chris one of your questions that you had for me was along the lines of should I say no to things that come over the transom. So let me take a step back and I will answer that. But how are you thinking about monetizing? Because it is very easy and I'm not saying this to you Chris specifically, but for people to get pulled away from the creative by the sirens song. The mesmerizing nature of monetizing because every time you go on Twitter, there's something trending that's like, here's how much top influencers get paid on Instagram and you're like, what? $100,000 a post, that's fucking crazy. I want to make a $100,000 a post, and then, oh, boy. Then you're lost. How are you thinking about monetizing right now? And I should say, Chris is smart. You're smart with your money. You are very deliberate and you've done a lot of homework. You are a student of personal finance and money. But how are you thinking about monetizing and what to do or not do with it? Yeah, so I think I took a similar approach to you and it was maybe for a slightly if your reason was to hone the craft mine was to prove out the longevity. So going to spend any time monetizing your podcast before you realize, this is something that I could do for a long time, which you will never know until you do it for at least you did 6. For me, it probably took 5 or ten, maybe ten episodes. Until that point, it would have been a complete waste of time to think about monetizing because I didn't know if I was going to do this. And the amount of money you're going to make on a ten episode podcast is almost nothing. So I said, let's make sure this is something I could do forever before I think about it. Then I thought, okay, let's also make sure that the amount of money it would generate is even worth the effort. Sponsors have reached out and said, oh, we want to advertise on two episodes. It's like, okay, but if I'm gonna sell two sponsors on a show, two episodes at a time, we're talking 50 calls a year to sponsors and that's just the ones that say yes. So maybe you're doing 200 calls to try to line sponsors up. That just seemed like a distraction for how much it would make. So I had a similar kind of thought, which is get to a point in time where the amount of money you'd make for the amount of work it would take to bring that money in is worth it. And the only deviation from that was when people called outreach and say, hey, can we just do this? And it's like, well, now it's no longer work, but even then I've since decided to say no, not because I think it would ruin the show. But just because I have a list of things that I prioritize. And for me, it's making the content great and finding the people to bring on. If I spend time on anything else, it takes away from that, and that is not yet on autopilot. And I think ultimately that's all that really matters. Your show's not going to be good if it's not something people enjoy listening to, which is usually a factor of who's talking and how much those people have thought about what they're going to say or at least prepared to have a good conversation. Yeah, I think that makes a whole lot of sense. A couple of thoughts also on monetizing, figure out what would be amazing from a monetizing perspective. And I'm very deliberately not saying sponsorship or advertising perspective because there are many different ways to convert a podcast into I shouldn't say convert. As a side effect of doing an awesome podcast to produce income. Let's just say you are a high priced consultant and you don't have any advertising. But you generate clients from the podcast. That would be a somewhat straightforward example. You could have as many people do, especially in the early days, affiliate relationships, very often, the most lucrative of which are going to be with certain types of products. Domain services hosting, et cetera. They have a very high stickiness with their customers. High level of stickiness, low churn rate, which means high lifetime value, they're willing to pay you quite a bit upfront. But is that what you want? Are those the products services, et cetera that you want? To be endorsing. Maybe maybe not. There are many different ways to approach this. Many different ways to generate income perhaps you have a newsletter that is paid newsletter and people sign up for that. Perhaps you have a different version of the podcast. Are you have a membership of some sort outside of newsletters? Maybe people pay for the show notes. These are all real examples that I've seen. For myself, I decided that sponsorship was the easiest. I've done some experiments with membership and they all just entailed more headache for me and I felt ultimately less value all around than sponsorships assuming in my case that I am using or testing everything personally. That is where the sponsorships are somewhat time consuming for me. But I don't mind it because I actually use like if you walked around my house, you would recognize all sorts of stuff from my sponsors. I don't just have them because they're sponsors. I have them because they are good products or services. Let me give a couple of examples of questioning best practices or standard operating procedure with sponsors and this may help people to simplify their approach. So I did not ask myself how can I make as much money with sponsors through the podcast? Because there are no constraints on that. You're not applying constraints in such a way to ensure that your life does not become a miserable existence of just being a pinata for every ask and request of dozens of sponsors. As it might be in the example that you gave. That could be a huge pain in the ass. So what constraints could you apply to ensure that it does not become a monster you have to feed or a huge distraction? A very simple constraint that I applied was a, we're going to have our own insertion order document that is going to be non negotiable and everyone is going to prepay for their spots. We will not have any terms. We're not going to have accounts receivable. We're not going to chase people for payment. Everybody is going to pay up front. And what do you think the response was from sponsors initially? The response was, what the fuck are you talking about? We get terms from everyone. That's how this is done. I said, that's fine. We don't have to work together. This is just what allows me and my tiny team to remain sane. So if it's not worth it, it's not worth it. I totally understand. Let me get back to work and make the podcast so good that there will be at least a few sponsors who are going to say, you know what? Fuck it. We will pay you up front. And that is something we have stuck to and I can not tell you how much that has simplified. Our lives and our operations. It also acts as a litmus test for commitment from sponsors. Because, as you noted, to fill, let's just say in your case, right? 50 different sponsors at two spots a piece. If you have a high churn rate, meaning a lot of those people take two episodes and then split and never come back, you're just going to have to do that again. Next year, that's exhausting. So I want to make sure there's a high level of commitment. But there's also a high level of vetting on my side. Therefore, a high probability that the product and the company will do really, really well in the podcast. I don't want them to do two or three spots. And we do insist on a test of multiple spots. Last year, it's two right now. It might be three. And my podcast is expensive. Very, very, very expensive. It's a premium podcast. I want them to spend millions of dollars on the podcast over a long period of time. Everything is geared towards that because it just simplifies everything for everyone. But the point I wanted to make is question best practices. And if you are not in a position to question best practices, your product isn't good enough, or you just don't have enough leverage for some reason. And you should take a very close look at those reasons. But it doesn't hurt to ask, for instance, what does every almost 99% of authors out there do? They publish a book in hardcover, 6 to 9 months later, the book comes out in paperback and they hit the press junket. Once again, and they go on tour to announce the launch of paperback. None of my books have ever gone to paperback. Why is that Tim Ferriss? I'll tell you it's because and the numbers vary but not by that much. Let's say that you're getting a 12% royalty. On your hardcover book. Paperback royalty is probably going to be 6%, 6 and a half percent. So broadly speaking, paperback royalties are you'll get paid 50% of what you're currently earning per book by going to paperback. What does that mean? That means you have to sell twice as many books to make the same amount of money. I'm skipping over some specifics here, but more or less, you have to sell twice as many books to make what you are making right now. What is the benefit to the reader of this? Well, we live in a world with audio with Kindle and the benefit to the customer. We also have libraries where you can get E format for free oftentimes, and actually I learned of a very cool, I think it was a Chrome extension on your podcast. In fact, about this, the benefit to the consumer used to be, they could save whatever it might be. $5 on cover price. With Amazon, which is generally selling it almost close to wholesale prices, that benefit is no longer exists. So for a marginal to nonexistent benefit to the end reader, you are going to voluntarily cut your royalties in half, which means you have to sell twice as many books to earn the same amount per year. That made no sense to me. So I've never done it. And to their credit, my publishers early on, were open to this logic for staying in hardcover, and it worked out really, really well. I did not have a lot of leverage in the beginning. I did not have Tim Ferriss and Mark he lights as people or some people perceive it today. I simply laid out the logic. So really question what you have to do because sometimes those best practices make no sense whatsoever. We've talked about getting ready and all of that. But I'm curious, I think the bulk of what goes into podcasting is finding gas, prepping for the conversation and having the conversation. And I'll tell everyone even if you don't have a podcast. Thinking about how to find interesting people and to have a better more informative, exciting conversation is probably valuable just in life. I mean, you said the reason you got started and if you never continued, you will have at least learned the skill that was really valuable. So I'll start with finding people when you first wrote your original post, there wasn't that much about finding people look for people you're interested in. The one thing that you said, maybe not in that post that I thought was really interesting was don't put as much value as you think on how big of a name they are that maybe half of your top episodes are people that your listeners had never heard of before. And so it just keeps coming back to content is really, really important. And people like good content more than they like bad content with a fancy name. I can attest to some of the episodes where I thought people had the smallest names that no one had ever heard of have far outperformed conversations I've had with ramit sethi who we had a great conversation and lots of people know his name and that is something that I don't think I thought going in would ever be true. Yes. Why, yes. Let's jump in. This comes back to the initial question of why do you want to do a podcast? And maybe you should be framed differently. What is so compelling about this that you're going to want to do a hundred episodes of this podcast? Maybe that's the question. What is so compelling about this that you will be so thrilled about doing a hundred episodes of this podcast? That you would pay. Not get bad, but you would pay to do this podcast. Chances are the answer is not banging your head against a wall trying to get through a phalanx of publicists and lawyers and managers and getting the runaround from Hollywood entourage for a year to get a guest. Chances are you wouldn't pay to do that. If you chase famous people, you are going to do that. Just to be clear. So maybe you should focus on doing something that really satisfies you and maybe in some niche God knows where some way somehow it's so fucking good that like a hundred people who might know famous people are like, wow, this is really smart. That's not guaranteed, but it's a possibility. For me, the answer is follow your interests and make it easy in the beginning. So in the first, I want to say 5 to ten, maybe 20 or 30 episodes. I only interviewed people I knew quite well. Because I didn't need the nerves of interviewing a stranger to add to what was already somewhat challenging. Does that make sense? And I remember, I think it was Ed catmull. The former president Pixar, who was the first person I'd ever interviewed who I hadn't had a conversation with prior to the actual interview. And it was nerve wracking, ended up being a really fun interview, but it was very stressful for me. Why? I couldn't really pinpoint because I talked to strangers all the time. And that's certainly true with the books. But it felt different. So make it as easy as possible in the beginning. Stack the decks so that you can win in the beginning. And for me, that meant doing it with friends. In terms of finding guests. There are as many ways as you could imagine and probably more than you could imagine. But the focus of the show will direct how you search. So in my case, the Tim Ferriss show has always been about world class performers and different disciplines and trying to tease out the habits routines, favorite books, et cetera that make them tick. Or that they think might contribute to making them good at what they do. Frameworks, decisions, thought process, all of that. Turns out that's very, very broad. So I have some people on the docket. There's a violin assessor, like evaluator, like someone who assesses and rehabilitates multi-million dollar violence. I can tell you with great confidence that that does not have a large built in audience. But it's interesting to me. And I also think about which guests will care enough to bring their a game. It doesn't matter how famous your guest is, it doesn't matter how good your guest is. If they don't bring their a game. Chris one of the things you asked me if I'd be willing to do is listen to a few episodes of your podcast and provide feedback. And the first episode I listened to is actually the first episode you published, which I learned later was the 5th that you'd recorded, which is smart. On pro travel hacks, is it Lee Rowan? Is that how you say the last name? Yeah, Rowan. And Lee is amazing. Lee is like Sam Harris. If he didn't have a teleprompter or something, that man speaks and finished pros. It's fucking ridiculous. So Li is one of those guests who clearly brought his a game and I thought you did a very good job in the interview and it's an area where you have a lot of domain expertise. But honestly, you could have been making zoo animal noises and he could have just run and it would have been a incredible interview slash monologue. Do you know what I mean? If you were just like, I'm gonna give you words. That I pull out of this hat and I want you to riff for 5 minutes and you're like, arthropod. Tax optimization. Grizzly bears. I'm sure it would have been a really fascinating conversation because Lee is just that good. Do you know what I mean? There are those guests. Is one who comes to mind immediately. Hugh Jackman was like that for me. There are many guests, including those you wouldn't recognize who are going to be really, really, really good. So a big part of guest selection is also improving as an interviewer in quotation marks. Ultimately, it is very hard to fix a bad guest. It does not matter how good you are as an interviewer. The only fix that I have found is if I generally budget 90 to a 120 minutes for an interview, I'll usually say 90. If I get 30 minutes in and I'm like, oh my God, this is a stillborn. This is a mess. This is we're not getting anywhere. Which, by the way, it can happen with people who are very, very, very good conversationalists, but as soon as you hit record, once it's an interview and not a conversation over wine at dinner, they get really stilted and weird and can't be themselves. That happens quite often. Then I will talk more. This doesn't work for everyone. It won't work for everyone. But generally, I'm going to come into the interview having done a lot of homework. I will have some domain familiarity, if not expertise. And I will then ask a question where I can reciprocate and give examples or buy time by talking about something else. In doing so, I will extend the time we might record for two to two and a half hours and then we can cut that down to say 30 to 60 minutes. It will probably include a lot of me. And the downside to that is people will be like, wow, this guy really likes to hear himself talk, and it's like, no, I just saved this interview. And at the end of the day, there will be some actionable takeaways within that interview. So that's one way to save it. I will only try to save it in an interview like that if someone is at least trying and they have done the prep work. So when I talk to people or I should say prior to ever interviewing, people will have a list of commonly asked rapid fire questions, which I have right here. People will recognize a lot of them from tribe and mentors. And other places, but there are certain questions I ask a lot. The metaphorical billboard question, favorite failures, et cetera. There's certain questions I ask frequently. I send this to people in advance. I generally don't send other questions in advance. And I always talk to people beforehand for 5 to ten minutes before recording to loosen them up, this is assuming they're not somebody who's got to publish this cracking the whip on my face. So assuming they have a little bit of slack in the system, we'll talk in the beginning. I will first say you like all of my guests have final cut. You can see a transcript beforehand. You can listen to the audio, any edits you want to make, we can make. This is not a show about gotchas. So number one, there's that. And I will say, I've been screwed by journalists before I've had my trust betrayed. I've had things cherry picked. I've been misquoted. It sucks. I'm not going to do that and you have final cut. Which by the way is what inside the Actors Studio always did. And what you might have seen on TV for those episodes, 45 minutes an hour was actually several hours of recording. They would cut down substantially. I'll do that first. In the warmup calisthenics, I will always ask someone what would make this interview a home run. When you look back three, 6 months from now, what would make this an absolute home run where when people ask you what are your favorite two or three interviews? This is one of those two or three. And people are always almost always surprised when I ask that because it's never asked. And I'll tell them because that can inform how I try to steer the conversation. It will also inform how we promote the episode. So let me know if you have an answer. And if not, if you have an answer later, we can try to customize things. I will also ask them, is there anything you absolutely don't want to talk about? Or something that you're really sick of talking about that you just don't want to rehash? I will ask that. And by the time you ask these questions, or these types of questions, a, someone is warmed up a little bit. They will think to themselves, okay, wow, this guy's really put some thought into this is aware that I'm coming into this with certain goals and hopes or fears. And this is not his first rodeo. And what I'll also then tell people is we can always cut things later, but we can't put interesting things in. So feel free to curse, be yourself, like let it all hang out, we can always cut things later, but we can't put it in. We can't put the fun in. Go crazy, and we can always cut. I would say out of whatever it is now 6 to 700 episodes. Less than 3% of the guests ever ask to see the audio or transcript? It's very uncommon. But I will take notes as we talk and if someone say mentions something like a lawsuit, which might be legally complicated for them. Broadcast to millions of people or just made public to honestly, an audience of a hundred people, or if they mention, say details about their family or where they live or they say, let me give out my email address. I will flag all of those things and I will talk to them afterwards and say, do you want to keep this in? Are you sure you want to keep this in? I would suggest you cut this to look out for them. Also, and then my team will also listen to things and review transcripts to try to identify other things that should be cut. Twitter is an excellent way to source guests to come back to that question you ask so long ago. Twitter is an excellent way to find guests, although part of my feedback to you on your podcast is you mentioned Twitter a lot and Twitter is a very, even though it's expanded a lot and I'm sure it rankles Twitter to death. Donald Trump kind of saved Twitter. How funny is that? It's still a very tech centric environment. And so I would suggest to you that you drive people to the website and preferably some type of newsletter so that you have the ability to communicate directly with your listeners. Podcasting is still largely a black box. It's very difficult to get good analytics. This is also why it's very difficult for me to give growth advice because it's very difficult to confirm attribution for different types of organic or paid acquisition or PR. It's incredibly difficult. We can talk about growth. I'm happy to talk about it. But the reason Twitter works specifically for guest recruitment is probably similar to how you could use other platforms. But my other platforms are completely deluged, for instance, maybe you could use Instagram DMs for this. But because I'm flooded by DMs and anyone apparently can send me a DM on Instagram, I can't use it. There's too much noise not enough signal. So it's an unusable tool for me. But on Twitter, if you follow someone and then you like something of theirs, and then you retweet and it's a lot easier if you have a verified account of course. To get someone's attention. But if you follow them, like something, retweet something, maybe reply to something there and do it all at once so that you occupy more of their timeline if they're looking at replies and things like this. If they follow you, you can DM them. And if you DM them and connect with them, you can do so without having any of their contact information. You don't have their email address, you don't have their phone number if they dislike you. They can block you. In other words, they don't have the same fear factor associated with you having a direct line to them in any fashion. For tribe of mentors, as an example, the book, there were hundred maybe a 120 people who answered many of the common questions for the podcast. The way I connected with Ben Stiller and dozens of the larger celebrities better known figures was through Twitter. That is how I made contact with them. It is also a very good way to make contact with well-known people or even if they're not well-known, difficult to reach people. And to circumvent around their multiple layers of entourage. Because if you email an agent or a manager, just get ready for the merry go round of bullshit to start. There are some great agents and managers out there. I don't want to imply that there aren't. But if you're dealing with anything related to Hollywood, 9 times out of ten, you are just going to get this incredible run around dance that can last forever. There are some incredibly talented and hardworking and great agents and managers. So again, not to malign all of those people in those categories. But you run the risk of an incredible amount of hurry up and wait that can last years. Even at this point, for me, by the way, that is true. Do you think if you had their email, you would use it over Twitter or is it you think Twitter is a better medium? It might be better. It may be less crowded. It depends entirely on how many people they follow. So it depends a lot. I will say that as someone who gets an incredible amount of bullshit sent to me through one means or another, that if I have channels that are intended for people to get in touch with me and they disregard those channels and think they're clever by barraging me somehow, they're immediately blacklisted. And most people, if they do get a random email from you, what I would suggest if you're going to take that approach that you indicate in the email how you got their email address. No one on my team will ever reply to someone who called emails or if they try to get hold on phones or anything like that immediate blacklist. But maybe via email if they reach out if they don't indicate how they found the email, no response. They need to clarify that first. If they have channels for getting in touch with them, I would suggest that first. Unless they're the agency. It's not the EU can't and should never reach out to an agent or a PR agency or a manager to try to reach, say a celebrity, or someone who's well-known. It's that you should expect that to take a lot of time. And an alternative or a compliment to that would be Twitter. With all of the time, and this is true actually for a lot of optimizing in general, for me, even though I am fascinated by we can talk about what optimize means. Optimize for what is a good question when thinking about a lot of these things. If I think about the number of pods, casters are would be podcasters who ask me about guest recruitment. And they don't need my help to get 90 percent of the people out there. So really the question is, how do I get guests who are hard to reach? That's the question. If they completely avoided guests who are hard to reach and just focused on fucking recording and out of ten episodes in the same amount of time, the same number of hours that they're going to blow trying to get Oprah on their podcast. God bless Oprah. I wish I could have her on my podcast. I don't think it's going to happen. I think they would be much further ahead at the end of the day. I'll say two things about that first episode I did with Lee one Lee had never been on another podcast. So Lee is not a celebrity name that I think anyone knows. And that podcast, that first episode has had two and a half times more downloads than every other episode. Yeah. So it's content way over the name. And the other thing just because I thought it was a funny example of technology failing. So in that episode, we actually recorded in person. We used a zoom, and we had a bad SD card. No backup. And so that episode was actually three days later, re recording the episodes. It was a little different than the original, but I will say, going into that, I had this huge fear that you'll never be able to recreate a good episode if you have to, and I'm not saying I would ever encourage it, but that fear was kind of busted. So I would rather have had the backup of the original because it's hard to try to keep it going, but if you have to, it's not always a bad outcome. Not always bad. So I should actually modify my gear recommendation and say that I also have redundancy. In person. So I have the H 6. I've got that usually I'll have another H 6. Sitting out and recording, but without the XLR. So it'll be a field recording setup. I may also have an iPhone with a lightning port connected sure microphone. They make some really really cool smaller microphones. I can't remember the exact model number. But I will have redundancy. In person as well as backup options remotely. Now, I want to come back to one thing and for those people who want to find this episode, we'll link to it in the show notes. Obviously, for the pro travel hacks episode number one of all the hacks. I have another piece of feedback there for you. Lee Rowan is LEIGH last name ROW AN. So two things I want to say. The first piece of feedback is that I would definitely transcribe all of your episodes and read them yourself in the beginning, especially and look for terms that you repeat a lot. And try to trim those down. So for instance, as essential as the term is to the namesake of the podcast, all the hacks, I would suggest perhaps dialing down on the volume of using the word hack or hacks. And thinking about it like a magazine article. If that word came up over and over again, the editor would be like, here is the source dot com. Please come up with some other words. So on the audio side, I think it's very similar. And we all have these ticks. We all have texts. And I remember, actually, after the Ed catmull episode, it was terrible. I looked on social to see what type of feedback there might be. And I saw many tweets with. MMM dot dot dot MMM dot dot dot MMM dot dot dot. You're driving me fucking crazy. And it turned out I was so nervous that every time he said something interesting about. Some cave creature and it was just cringe worthy to listen to. I had no awareness that I was doing it. And there are other words pet phrases, et cetera that in any given interview, I might repeat way too many times. So keep an eye out for that. The other way that I used transcripts early on. And one of your questions for me has been, how have you interviewing skills? Do you ask friends, mentors to listen to episodes and give feedback? Do you re listen to your own episodes? Let me answer those specifically, and then I'll come back to how I use the transcript. Do I re listen to my own episodes? No, I don't. I read the transcripts. Because it is more painfully obvious what you need to change. You can get away with things in conversation that work and can work really well. There is no one good style of interviewing or one great style of conversation. There are many, many ways to do this in many ways to play this game. So I don't think it makes any sense for everyone to emulate one particular interviewer or style of interviewing. However, reading the transcript will make you acutely aware of any repetition verbal ticks, things like that. So I do not listen to them. Unless I'm checking audio quality, which I used to do, of course, but these days I have a team to help with that and by team I mean a contracted post production sound engineer. I do not have I have two full-time employees for everything that I do in my life just to give people an idea of how small my team is. Do I ask friends or mentors to listen sometimes I do, but in the beginning, if I did that, and this is true with asking friends for feedback on writing as well. I don't think it's very high yield very helpful and certainly I think it's quite frustrating for the Friends you're asking for advice. If you just say, give me feedback. I don't think that's specific enough. So in the case of writing what I would do and still do. If I'm writing a book, I split up chapters, which are intended to mostly be self sufficient. They're kind of modular in that way. They're like feature magazine articles. The chapters. I will send say a single chapter to three or four friends. Ideally they are writers or lawyers, or are they gone to law school? This is for writing, although it can apply to audio as well. The reason for that is that both writers and people who have reviewed documents or learned to use a legal eye for reviewing text have a keen eye for ambiguity, they have a keen eye for anything superfluous that you just do not need that should be cut or can be cut. They're very, very sharp observation with respect to that. So they make good proofreaders in my experience. And I will say, among other things. Please read this. And if anything is confusing, please note that. You can love it, you can hate it, I'm fine with either of those, but if it's confusing, it's no good for anyone. So if anything is confusing, please note, if your mind starts to wander. Please note where that is. If your mind starts to wander, means it's dragging. So I listen to a few of your episodes. There were a few points where I was going on a hike. There were points when I was totally immersed in the audio, and then there are points where I'm like, the squirrel trees, a bird, a butterfly, which is fine, because I'm on a hike, but your intention, I assume, is to captivate me with the audio. And there are points where my mind starts to wander. You can ask someone to indicate if your mind starts to wander indicate the time code. Make sure you use the same application for the time code because it can vary from application to application. So if you're using overcast, use overcast, if it's pocket cast, use podcasts. Spotify, use Spotify, but have everyone use the same app. Okay, in addition to that, I will say if you could only keep 20%. If I were going to cut 80% of this interview, which 20% should I keep? And would you cut it? Hold on one second. I'll get to that. Then conversely, and you don't have to use both of these, but I would say, if I had to cut 20%, which 20% would I cut? I actually like that question more. But I do ask both for different reasons. If I give it to four people, if one person loves a section and three other people say cut it, I will keep it. If anyone loves something, I keep it, that's my rule. But very often, I wouldn't ask for feedback if I weren't planning on somehow using the feedback if I found it valuable. So the answer is yes, I very often make these cuts. But asking your friends to listen to audio and do this is really time consuming, and it's actually very hard for them to specify things. So what did I do with my transcripts? One thing I did is I ended up reaching out and finding someone who did research and guest prep and everything for inside the actor studio. And I asked them if they would be willing to read transcripts of some of my early episodes and to indicate where they thought I could improve what they think I should cut where they think the sequence might be off in terms of questions. And that's what we did. I would send them word docs, and they would add comments and red line and so on. You could certainly use Google Docs or something else. I now use Google Docs for this type of thing. But that is how I improved my interviewing. And interviewing just as a is an aside, but it's not really an aside. This is sort of a core piece of the discussion, is like anything else. It's like basketball. What makes a good basketball player? Well, which position are they playing? What is the other team? If they're boxers like styles make fights, right? Just because a beats B and B C doesn't mean a is going to be C it really depends on styles. If you look at salespeople, what makes a good salesperson? Well, what are they selling? Some people are so charismatic and have this reality distortion field that people want to befriend them, and they'll buy from them as a result of that. Some people are super, super technical and kind of dispassionate in a way. And others are really good at deal structure and figuring out conditional purchase orders and navigating the wants and needs of the other person and being very, very creative and how to structure a purchase. Maybe finance a purchase. These are all different characteristics and different skill sets. Yet all of them could be exceptionally good salespeople. The same thing is true in podcasting. You know, if you want to grow your podcast, turn yourself into a super hot woman and talk about blow jobs. I've seen a few podcasts that have done really well by doing that. In addition to many other things that you have to get right that is not necessary. But not sufficient. I wouldn't say it's necessary. But you can't do that. You could, I don't know. Maybe you'd find a market for it, but that's not going to work for you. If I tried to be Joe Rogan, with his knack and talent and developed skill for comedy, it would fall flat. I'm not gonna try to be Joe Rogan. James Lipton, when he ran inside the actor studio, never deviated from his questions. He had his list of questions. They were stacked in order on these blue cards, and he would never deviate, even if there was a side door to a topic that could be more interesting. He would not take that sidebar. Now, some people might judge that harshly and say, well, that's stupid, you should have taken the side door. Well, does anyone know your podcast? A lot of people know inside the actor studio seems to have worked pretty well. Maybe that format was exactly what he needed. Then you have folks who come in with meticulous notes, I come in with lots and lots and lots and lots of notes. That works for me. Larry King came in blind. Larry King, who also, one could say was early to the radio game in the same way that some people were early to the podcast game. So you have to take that into consideration and maybe discount things a little bit. But he would come in with beginner's eyes to ask the naive questions that a listener might want to ask. He didn't want to know more than the listener or the viewer. So this is all to say becoming a better interviewer is really becoming your best self as an interviewer. But no matter what reviewing transcripts for me is a core piece of that. And collecting questions, I remember I would effectively have, not a three ring binder, but a collection of questions. I would take photographs on my phone. Pre COVID certainly, if you're taking flights, the only time that I read magazines and you look at these in flight magazines are always introduce. And if I found a good question. Now, take a photograph. And I'll test it. If I listen to a podcast, and I heard a good question. I would note it. I've been interviewing people for hiring for a new position recently. And someone I was interviewing, I solicited questions and they said, how do you get feedback? Could you give me a few examples of when people have disappointed you and how you've handled that? And I thought to myself, holy shit, that's a good question. I might steal that one. So be a collector and a tester of questions also. So I have a bunch of going back, man. I have a bunch of follow-ups here. Yeah, let's do it. Backing up to the prep, how long are you spending? Let's go back to if you were doing this all on your own preparing for an interview. It depends on the interview. But I would say generally minimum a few hours. So let's just call it minimum two to four hours. And I have some approaches for that that I can share. And maximum, for instance, if there is a possible big break interview and one of those for me was Arnold Schwarzenegger, when that finally came together, I spent probably four or 5 days digesting everything about Arnold Schwarzenegger. Watching interviews watching movies, reading books, going through every past interview I could find. I wanted to be the best prepared interviewer. He had ever met. Basically. And therefore, I took it very, very seriously. But if we're talking about on the average side, let's just assume that's three to four hours. Now I spend less time because I have help and I have cultivated a system and also improve the system with the input of team members. How to prepare? Research documents? I would say two to four hours. I will also ask guests to send their favorite two to three long form interviews. I will ask them and not all guests are keen to do this, but some are very keen. For exploratory topics or questions that they think could be fun for us and the audience. And anything else that they would like to send. So I opened that door and all of those things are received. Typically, weeks or months in advance. Because the editorial calendar is built out quite far in advance. At least these days, it is. If you're doing prep from scratch, if the person has a Wikipedia page, I look for the strangest or most esoteric slash tiny unusual mention in Wikipedia and I do a deep dive on that point. And I go into these citations. I will certainly look at social. This is important. Because, for instance, in between the time that you book a guest and you record, they could have a family member die. They could have any number of things happen. They could have some type of disaster in the press. You want to be aware of what is going on. So I don't spend a lot of time on social, but I will check in and go back at least a month or two to ensure that I have a basic understanding of what is on their minds and hearts. That doesn't take very long. I would say that's less than. Less than 30 minutes. So you have Wikipedia and then long form interviews. So I will look at print. I will start printing text long form. Text interviews. I will look at the interviews that they've sent. And that helps me in a number of different ways. It shows me where they're good. It shows me where they stall out. Or don't have answers. It also helps me to gather what I consider greatest hits, stories. And here's what I mean by that. We all have stories that we have told more than once. Just like comedians who have worked on their material and refined over and over again. That's 60 minutes special. We all have stories. That over time, we have determined, get a great response. And I want to know what those are. And sometimes I'll ask them point blank. Either in prep, or while we're doing the warmup in the beginning, I'll say, hey, is there a story that I can cue? I don't want to hear the story now. But a story that's really funny or that always gets a response from audiences. Maybe you've done a lot of speaking engagements. It's something that people always come up to you and mention. Is there any story or anecdote or metaphor? Could be anything. Parable that comes to mind. And oftentimes they'll say, what do you think about that? Yeah, there is. Okay, ask me about the time that X, ask me about what I was in college and why happened? Great. I will plant one of those greatest hit stories within the first ten minutes. If I have one of those. To pull people in. And hopefully pass the driveway test as I heard someone from NPR. Put it, which is, and this happens with podcasts too. When you're listening to it in the car and you've got ten or 20 minutes left and you get home and you just have to finish it. So you stay in the car in the driveway and you listen to the end. I think it's helpful to plan that through. Those are a few of the ways that I do research. If we have any common friends or acquaintances, I will also ask them for topics and questions. They think might be fun or that might take us on the road less traveled. And I used to do this more than I do now, but I will sometimes post it to social and ask what types of questions people would love me to ask. Given the size of my audience on social now that makes less and less sense because it's very hard to filter. Very hard to gather them. I will sometimes do that, but not terribly often. Have you ever done so much research that you kind of knew the entire conversation you would have in advance? Because you'd learned, you'd read someone's book, you learned all this information. Coming in, Arnold Schwarzenegger so prepared, you know, there are probably things that you wanted to talk about that you knew the answers to, but how did that go? Because now it's not as engaging because you know the answers. Yeah, I will always leave lots of virgin territory. So I will have some familiarity, not with August, but some with greatest hit stories. So I'll plant a few of those. But generally speaking, my interviews are going to be at least 90 minutes. That will be maximum 5 to 20 minutes of the conversation. There may also be things that they've talked about, but there's some aspect that was left out and I'll ask about that. So my rule or one of the fundamental precepts of how I approach podcasting is if it's interesting to you, it will be interesting to other people. You can't fucking fake it. People can smell it out. It's like dogs can smell fear, audiences know when you are stoked and audiences know when you're faking it. You gotta make the interviews interesting for yourself. Even if it gets into some really strange topics that are going to appeal to a very small percentage of your audience, doesn't matter. You got to include it. And you can always cut it out later. But you got to make it interesting for yourself. In the case of Schwarzenegger, yes, I had consumed vast quantities of interviews and footage and commentary and still on a related to Arnold. But he has decades of time on this planet and there is a lot that is not covered. So it was easy for me to weave in questions that would take us to unexplored areas. That was very, very easy. I'll also say do not get too attached to your research. In the sense that 90 minutes goes very, very quickly. We've been recording for more than 90 minutes now. 90 minutes goes very quickly. So if you have tons of research in front of you. Pick the 5 to 7 questions you must want to get answered. That is for 90 minutes. Keep in mind, because I want the freedom and the slack to explore side doors and we may end up scrapping all the research that I've done and save it for around two, which is something I do quite a lot. And then I'll circle the things that we didn't get to with a highlighter and put R two on them, take photographs, put into Evernote and I share that with my team. And I'm like, this is what we'll use for around two. Don't be attached to finishing all of your questions. And very often what I will do to try to limit the impulse to do that is I will block an interview into sections. I don't do this always, but sometimes, to let a guest know what is coming, I will say for the first 30 minutes, we're going to bounce all over the place. It's going to be background, personal story, et cetera. And I always ask them for specifics and examples, high concept, abstract stuff, bores, the shit out of audiences, it bores the shit out of me. There can be some high concept stuff, but we need real examples, real details, and so on. If someone's not willing to do that, by the way, I will sometimes not publish the audio. So if they don't bring their a game, if they're not playing to win and really doing the prep, I don't feel obligated to publish. That happens very rarely, but I'd say, around a dozen interviews, I haven't published. If they're not actually trying if they're not attempting to do what will appeal to the audience, I'm not going to publish. Are you direct with them in your telling them why you didn't publish? Sometimes, sometimes sometimes, yeah. Sometimes you just lose the audio. Yeah, exactly. I mean, I wish I could tell you that I'm always a 100% honest about that, but sometimes, especially in the early days, I was not confident or comfortable enough to do that. There was a lot of audio that just vanished into the cloud. Hard to explain. But it happens. And sometimes there would be a make good on that. So let's say they have an excellent book. But the interview was just terrible, then I might offer to take an excerpt from the book from a particularly good chapter, put it on the blog and then use that as a way to assist in some fashion. One of the questions that you had and don't lose track of your follow-up questions. But one of the questions you had is, do I read the books? These days no. In fact, I get sent and have been sent. There's a point where I was getting sent 50 plus books a week from publishers, by the way, never signed up for these lists, never asked for them. So if any publishers are listening, please take me off your list. I'm going to start putting specific names on the public hall of shame for spamming me with physical books, you're killing trees, you're causing the decline of our earth unnecessarily with books that I'm just going to give away. Stop it. Stop it. Stop doing it. Take me off your list. But the point is, I was getting 50 plus books a week. And that's just untenable. I can't. Even the books from friends or acquaintances, if you consider the hundreds of people I've had on the podcast and many people that I know and have met over the years, it's physically impossible for me to read these books. And I don't want to have to pick and choose. I actually put up people can see it at Tim dot blog slash new books. It is the one decision that removes a thousand decisions. There's a blog post about that. And one of the policies is I will not read the books beforehand. I'm only reading old books, meaning books that have not been published in this year. So I don't do that, however, you can ask the publicist or the author to send you some high level concepts or a one or two pager if they're using that for interviews and so on. You can have them do that. But I do not read books in advance. There have been cases where I've read the book in preparation, like in Arnold Schwarzenegger's case, or if the authors are authors I've followed for a long time like Walter isaacson, for instance, who's written incredible biographies of Benjamin Franklin and da Vinci. And so on. Then I will read the books, but it's quite rare. Especially in the last two years. But in the beginning, yes, look, you get to earn the quality of the output in your interviews. And if reading is going to help, then do it. Because in the beginning, you're not going to be getting set 50 books. A week, you may have slack in the system to do that. What other questions or topics? In the beginning, did you ever as I've even found myself as your interview skills get better and better, it's easier and easier. But in the beginning, did you ever just take a pause in an interview and say, let me just take a minute to really regroup and replan where this is going to go. Maybe you don't tell them exactly why. But what kind of things might we have found on the chopping floor? I will always tell people in advance that they should feel free to take a water break or a bathroom break. And that they can also restate anything. So if they get two senses into a story and they're like, isn't that good? I want to start over. They can just say that. Let me just start that over, take two seconds of silence, start over. Then we can clean it up. That also gives me the ability and I'll say this. I may need a water breaker of bathroom break. That gives me the ability if I need a breather, water, bathroom, or just to clear my head and figure out where is this going? Where do I want to take this, then I'll do that. But my episodes are generally speaking minimally edited. Very minimally edited. Although the number of ticks will determine how much editing, it is incredible, how many smart people have atrocious verbal tics. They will say like literally a hundred plus times in a 90 minute interview. I do not exaggerate or someone will say, you know, you know? You know what I'm saying? It is actually a very I've noticed some gender patterns. I know it's very fashionable to talk about such things. But men that you know you know tends to be more of a male thing across the board and like a lot of men say like, but it's especially noticeable for a lot of women. A lot of female guess. It's kind of interesting that the ticks seem to skew in different genders and different directions. So, so dot dot dot so dot dot dot. Those are all very common. There was one guest. I'm not going to name them by name, although I think he'd find it funny. He said, he had a really good one. He said, and whatnot, and he'd be like, and whatnot. And whatnot. And he said it so often. And at the time, I just didn't want to deal with having to edit it. So I left it in. And he went into the office. The day after the podcast had come out and all of his coworkers started calling him mister whatnot. And you will absolutely notice that. So I want my guests to sound as good as possible. If they're nervous, I will tell them that my job is to make you sound as good as possible. If you're nervous, put that on me. It is my responsibility as the interviewer to direct and shape and prompt in the best way possible. Just be yourself, take any nerves and just put it on me. It's all on me. So I will also say that if people are nervous. So that would be a good example. Dot dot dot. If you do it once or twice, it's fine. And you can leave it in. But if you hear that at the beginning of every answer, then it's a problem. Another tick would be that's a good question. That's a good question. Oh, that's a good question. That's a great question. Oh, that's a good question. You might hear that literally 20 times in one interview. You got a clip that they just won't sound as good as they should otherwise. And that's part of your responsibility. And if you're just getting started, there's a product that I've used called descript or descript. I don't know exactly. It makes it really easy to find these filler words. I still find it needs some tweaking around the edges because they're not perfect, but it's a great tool for running through a transcript that's auto generated, but certainly cheaper than if you were paying someone to word for word transcribe everything. Absolutely. And looking at another question that you sent me because to lay out how this podcast came to be, you sent me a bunch of very good questions via email, which I requested after we had an initial conversation. And one of them, which I then asked to answer in this format so I could point people to it is you seem to understand your audience well. How did you build that understanding? Did you survey them? Ask for email feedback or something else. Okay, I'll give you the tactical answer and then I'm going to give you the principle behind most of my thinking. I have surveyed my audience, but I haven't done that at length in many, many years. The reason I surveyed my audience also was to gather demographic data average household income and many other things so that I could present that to sponsors because at the time I had dozens of sponsors coming in and I could not answer those questions. Now, with Facebook analytics, assuming you are present on multiple platforms, or your podcast is present on multiple platforms. You have many different ways that you can gather this data now. Facebook would be one. There are many other options. I did survey, but I would say the way I've gotten to know my audience is this is going to be very unsatisfying answer. Fortunately, I think there's a satisfying principle that comes after it is over more than a decade since four hour work week came out 2007. I started the blog I want to say in 2005 or 2006, I have been growing and learning alongside my audience for 13 plus years now. And you really get to know your audience and your audience will change over time. So since launching the podcast, I would say my audience, my readership was 80 20, 80% male, 20% female. Let's just keep it simple. I know that gender is a sensitive topic and there are more options. But let's just keep it basic for now. I would say as of a few years ago, it's more 60 40 female, male, and I've changed over time somewhat. Blog, social blog meeting blog comments. Social media feedback. These are all things that I pay some attention to. But that can quickly get overwhelming. So I would suggest that people listen to, I'll give you the upshot in a moment, but listen to my interview with Tim urban, who has an incredible blog called wait but why? And if he had followed any of the advice for how to create a popular blog, by the way, he would not have done what he did. Some of his pieces I want to say are 30,050 thousand words. Their books. Some of his multi part blog posts are effectively books. There are long, not all of them are long. One of my favorites is the tail end. It's not germane to what we're talking about with the tail end. Just the tail end of it Tim urban, everyone should read it. It will improve your life. It will improve how you relate to your family. It's a must read. It will take you ten minutes. But he has talked, and I think he also talked about this in tribe mentors about writing for his audience and he said it's really easy. And I'm paraphrasing here, but basically he imagines a huge stadium and each seat is filled by another Tim urban. It's an entire stadium filled of himself. And he is just writing what he would want to read. And it sounds so simplistic. It sounds almost ridiculous and if it is incredibly simplistic, it is incredibly effective as well. So if you know yourself and you pay attention to what excites you, you pay attention to your fears. You pay attention to the goals that you have. You pay attention to things that you struggle with, even though you've tried to fix them before. You pay attention to the things that bother you. You at least have a guaranteed market of one. A lot of people fuck that up. They start speculating and they're like a 22 year old guy and they're like, you know what? I went to Wharton and I figured out doing all these financial models and management consulting. There's this huge opportunity for new moms who need blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, for their kids, and regenerative blabbity blah. They don't know anything about any of these things, but they've identified a huge market opportunity. That is where they're going to focus their energy for building a company. That can work. I'm not saying it can't work in terms of good financial outcomes. Are they going to have a lot of fun doing it? Probably not. In the world of podcasting in the world of writing. Don't assume you are somewhat of superhuman empathy and that you can guess what other people need. Just focus on yourself. And the personal will end up being the most universal. If that makes sense. I'll give you an example. This might screw up the audio for a second. But I'm holding up an AirPods case. All right, now who else has an AirPods case? My girlfriend. And we mix up cases all the time. And it's a huge pain in the ass, because sometimes I'll pick up what I think or mine, there hers and the earbuds aren't even in the case. They're upstairs somewhere, and then I get to a coffee shop where I'm supposed to work or do something and I can't take a phone call and this problem has repeated itself over and over and over again. I tried to say use a sharpie to write a name on the outside. Anyone who has tried that knows that it immediately gets rubbed off, doesn't work. So the solution that I figured out is you open the case and you just put your initials inside the divots at the very top. So you can see there at the top never gets worn off, works every time, and we have not mixed up our AirPods since. This is the first time I'm talking about that. But I suspect, I'm not the only person who has had this problem. There is a piece of blue masking tape on my wife's AirPods case. Which does not fall off like marker. Yeah, so you could do that as well. You could use basking take. There are multiple solutions here. This is the one that worked for us. Great. We're too next. So, the audience thing is interesting. I know you're someone who likes stats and analyzing the data. There is some interesting data that I'm not sure if it even makes sense to do anything with. So you've got your downloads per episode. You've got these charts that Apple and Spotify give you of where do people drop off in an episode. Do you look at that data? Do you do anything with it? Do you completely ignore it? I do pay attention to downloads. Not a lot of attention. I haven't looked at my stats in weeks. But if an episode does unusually well, if it's several standard deviations, say, away from other episodes, and there isn't an easy explanation for it. So if I have LeBron James on the podcast as an example, which I did, then if that episode is a runaway hit, I'm not going to be that surprised because some of what was featured in the episode is picked up by ESPN and different comments are quoted all over the place. So there's a lot of carry. But if there's an outlier that isn't easily explained that I want to take a close look at that. If there's an underperformer that isn't easily explained, I also want to take a close look at that. Determining any causality whatsoever is really difficult. Unless there is a technical problem, so very often if there is an underperformer, the first thing that we look for are technical problems. Was there an issue with any of the major platforms? And that is important to keep an eye on. But I have not found the vast majority of data that is easy to collect or to find to be that actionable. But I'd be curious to hear your perspective because things have changed and the tools have become better. But still, I think it is tempting to conclude causality with say an end of one with one episode that does something strange and it's very, very hard with any conviction for me to say that that's going to be an accurate read. I have not found anything super effective to use with the standard platform analytics. Every now and then I'm like, wow, that episode did a little better. I haven't seen any major order of magnitude changes. There's been this one's 10% 10% down. I kind of attribute that to all kinds of randomness. Yeah, the one thing that I will say, maybe this falls under analytics and it's another tip from Kevin rose, was charitable is a platform that you can use for lots of analytics things. But the one thing they do that's really cool is if you put their prefix in front of your feed, which means every episode just gets hosted on a platform, you can tell your hosting platform, hey, make sure the URL include this other thing also so that someone else sees whenever that's requested. And so you can create a link. So if this were on my show, it would be link that charitable dot com slash ATH Tim. And then charitable will say, what IP address went to the link and then look for whether that IP address actually requested an episode. And so you can go and say, here's a link to promote an episode. You can put it on different social channels. You could give it to a guest if they want to promote it. And you could see which channels are actually converting to downloads, which I think is something that it's always easy to see who clicked what. But did they actually listen to the episode? Now you can't find out how many minutes they listen to or anything like that. But it's at least one piece of evidence to support what to do. And I used it to make a decision which was interesting when you are promoting an episode. You basically have two choices. You can send a link to every platform out there, which some people do. They go on Twitter and they're like, check out my new episode. Here it is on iTunes. And here it is on Google. And here it is on Spotify. And here it is here here here. Or you can link to a site like your own website, where it's click here, and now there's like 7 player buttons where the individual listener could jump off to. Or charitable will let you say, if someone opens out an iPhone, just directly take them to the podcast app, which is great if they use that. It's probably a terrible experience if they're a Spotify or an over cast listener. So I actually test it out one episode I did one way, one I did the other way when I did the next way, and I just looked at which one of those links converted better. And the best conversion was sending them to my website with the player links on it, then trying to guess or listing multiple things. What success is depends on how you define success and what metrics constitute success for you. So one could be increasing downloads. Another could be increase in plays, which is a lot trickier, although different platforms count downloads and plays differently. So you might have automatic downloads in the background on Apple. Things may have changed, but at least a few years ago, that was the case. And that would count as a download, even if it were never touched, never seen by the person who owns that iPhone versus say on Spotify if someone clicks play that counts. And then people might look at their analytics and conclude, oh, Spotify is only 5% of my downloads and quotation marks, therefore, I really don't need to pay attention to it. Whereas in reality, maybe it's 20 or 30% or more of your actual plays. So it's important to understand the limitations and the mechanics of some of these platforms. I would also say an additional benefit of sending people to your website is that you can offer or incentivize them to sign up for something like a newsletter. Because as it stands, if you are publishing through an RSS feed in the way that most people do, you do not have a direct relationship or I should say you don't have the ability to communicate effectively directly with the people who listen to your podcast. And I view that as a problem. In the same way that I view any business based on a single platform as highly vulnerable. I remember talking to somebody who had it was something I don't know, $10 million a year business built on a Facebook page of some type or Facebook pages, and I asked them how that was going for them. And they said, well, it's going great. But it feels like I have the most profitable McDonald's in the world, built on top of an active volcano. Any moment at any moment, the algorithm could be changed, suddenly, oh, you're a business page. Okay, now we're going to throttle your organic reach to 10% of your audience and you're going to have to pay to reach the people you thought were guaranteed to see your message. I don't like that. I don't like that risk. And therefore, for me, at least, one of the core drivers for using the newsletter as I have 5 bullet Fridays is the most popular aspect of the newsletter, which is free. So listeners, you can find that at Tim dot blogs last Friday. I've been doing that for a long time now. Is to establish a direct line of communication with my listeners and readers. And quite frankly, also, because text is my native language. Everything started with books. And so in the same way that Rogan is really, really, really, really good on video. It's also quite clever via text. I think there are many good reasons why he is incredibly popular on Instagram. Some of his some of his captions and so on are exceptional. And they're long, some of them. For me, that translates to feeling very comfortable, very competent, very good about the newsletter. Writing 5 bullet Friday is therapeutic for me. So it is in a way a diary and self therapy. And quote unquote marketing all in one. Which is great. So those are a few thoughts. But I don't pay a lot of attention to data, but I will look at trendlines over time. And if there's some type of catalyzing event or concern, especially you do to technical problems or new policies on platforms, then I'll take a quick look at that. But the fact of the matter is, I wouldn't pay too much attention to data or specific datasets until you've asked yourself what action will I take or not take or what behavior will change based on looking at this dataset? And if the answer is none and none do something else. Unless you're just it nurtures your soul and tickles your nuts to chew on data. That's just your fun. That's your recreation? Great, have fun. But otherwise, I wouldn't pay too much attention to it. So one of the most common things I think people look at data for. And it's not clear like you said that they would do anything about it is to try to see if their audience is growing. Yep. So I know you said, don't think about growth, but we can come back to growth. I think one of the interesting things is a lot of people have podcasts, good content, and, you know, I've been asked to go on some podcasts where they get a hundred, 200 downloads an episode. And they're just not breaking out, but it's not because they don't have good content. You obviously came into this. I remember you said that when you launched your podcast, it was the number one podcast in iTunes. Yep. I know you get a boost when you launch, but not everyone has that. Do you think other than good content is growth something you think people should spend any time on? Because people have to find that good content. Sure, I think growth, I think awareness is perfectly valid to focus on. And I do pay attention to growth. I do track I'm very well aware of the average number of downloads at week two at weeks per episode. And total number of downloads. I do pay attention to a handful of key metrics. I just don't I don't pay attention to them to the extent that they become a distraction from things that I think are more important. But in the beginning, for sure, I launched, like I said, in 2014, and the ecosystem has exploded since. Competition is probably a millionaire when it was. At least a few thousand X, what it was. Although I would say just because there are a lot of podcasts doesn't mean automatically that you have competition. Competition for what, what is the scarce resource that you are competing for? If not, why is it a competition? Is it an ego thing? What is the competition? I think these are questions worth asking. But to come back to growth. So when I launched in 2014, I should also say, there were people who said to me. That ship has sailed, it's too late. There's no point doing a podcast. In 2014, so I think they were wrong. Then, and the people who say that now, I also think are wrong. Still very, very early. Think about it. I mean, Amazon has only come into this space in a big way, very recently. And they're very quietly. I suspect doing lots of interesting things. But they have not thrown all their weight behind this. And they have a lot of weight to throw. That is just one example. We are so early still, I think. But with respect to what has helped increase downloads. I would say being on other podcasts first and foremost. Helped drive subscribers. You need to be explicit about asking people to go to the podcast and being explicit with the host that is why you are coming on the podcast. Otherwise I don't think there's automatically a high conversion rate. People who listen to podcasts probably listen to more than one podcast. So I do think that there is a fair amount of transference when you're on other podcasts. And it makes you a better podcaster to be on other well run podcasts. So you can take notes on process, how they prep you, what technology they use. What did they do or not do that you could adapt or not adapt? What are you doing that you might want to discard? So there is an educational part, also to being on other podcasts that you might not get from pursuing growth through other channels. I think that newsletters. Are also very powerful. Email and newsletters. They're powerful for everything, because they are one link. Click away from whatever the desired action is. So those would be two, that come to mind. And there are other ways to increase downloads and subscribers. Certainly big names don't hurt. But it's one thing to get somebody to your podcast. It's another to have them stick around and be an active listener. So if you get a celebrity on and they are mediocre at best, is someone going to listen to a second episode? I would guess not. They might have an automatic download, but what is it that you actually care about? The download number or the number of active listeners. I care about the number of active listeners for a lot of reasons. Hard to confirm what the active listenership is. But big names definitely help. The Arnold Schwarzenegger episode and the amount of promotion that I then did behind it. So I do use paid acquisition, advertising, things of this type. Having a name to really put a lot of the machine behind and muscle behind, which could be as simple as a basic campaign on your platform of choice. It doesn't necessarily having a blog and so on like I do. I think that is certainly helpful. But it's a temptation that needs to be tempered because you could spend all your time chasing big names. And I think it's a fool's errand, as I mentioned earlier. Certainly video. I think YouTube TikTok to some extent certainly, although I think Andrew Chen has written some very interesting pieces about TikTok and its effects on virality and some perhaps unintended or unknown consequences of sudden influx. So people can Google that and find it. YouTube can be extremely helpful. And I've seen that with many podcasts. Now it's not just limited to Joe Rogan. You have many examples. I mean, Jordan Peterson would be another example. There are probably thousands of examples, but I could certainly think of it a dozen offhand who use video very, very well. Those are a few. And PR, PR, if you want to practice your chops with getting out in other types of media outside of podcasting, then knock yourself out. You could do that as well. When you said video, I noticed you have two kinds of podcast videos on your YouTube channel. You've got the static image of the cover art and the guest and just playing the audio and then the actual interview are both of those effective or do you really think the real boost comes when you have video content? The real boost comes from video content, for sure. Yeah, the static images are placeholders from audio only interviews. Yeah. So to put them on YouTube, we choose a cover page of some type. And that is what people see. But for sure, actual video. Moving images makes the biggest difference. And I will say that I suspect a lot of people are going to be very disappointed with my answers on growth here. I will say, and this is such an old man thing to say, but I'll say it anyway. There is no magic bullet for growth. And the tools change. So I would suggest getting a book like the 22 immutable laws of marketing, reading a short chapter called the law of category. I believe I put an updated slash edited version of that in either tools of Titans or tribe mentors because I think it's that valuable. Read the law of category, read 1000 true fans by Kevin Kelly, which you can find on KK org. These will give you principles adaptable principles that will allow you to build a unique position in the minds of people who will become die hard evangelists. If you do that, which takes consistency over time, and it takes focus more than anything else. A lot of the other dominoes will tip over. Without any additional effort. But if instead of learning how to draw as an analogy, you're focused on whether you should use a ballpoint pen or a fountain pen or pastels or crayons or watercolors, meaning the different technologies and tools, Clubhouse for TikTok versus Instagram versus vine. Remember that? Oops. Uh oh. If your promotional engine was based on that uh oh. Facebook business pages? Oh, yeah, you're going to need to boost to reach your audience now. Sorry about that. There's too much fragility in a tactics or tools based approach. So I think the principles are most important. But I recognize also that perhaps I am just too far from the nascent years in which I built my blog following to provide a good answer. I will say, though, that I built a very, very, very, very popular blog when practically no one knew who the hell I was. And I did that by writing posts that I hoped 10% of my then very small audience would love. I did not write posts that I wanted a 100% of my audience to like. And I do the same thing with podcasting. I think it works really well. So I do not expect my entire audience to love any episode. And if I tried to do that, I think I would shoot myself in the foot. I expect that my active audience will be in a rotation in every fourth or 5th or maybe tenth episode. They will love so much that they will send it to ten of their friends. That is how I think about it. And I believe at least those so far it has been extremely extremely effective. One of the pieces of feedback someone gave me on my show was that not every episode is relevant to them. I did an episode where I interviewed a professional car buyer and they were like, I don't have a car. So this episode's pointless. They're like, maybe you should change the show so that everything's always relevant to everyone. And my answer was, I don't know. I'm gonna buy a car. I wanted to talk to someone that professionally does this, and that's super interesting to me. So just skip it and go to the next one. Do you feel similarly, you said one in 5 to ten people love that episode. Do you care or do you think they're listening to the other 5 to 9 episodes? I don't care. I literally spend zero time thinking about it because and this might sound strange, but for me to be for me to have fun. For this to be a joyful experience that I look forward to, the podcast needs to have a certain essence, a certain poll for me, and it has to have a certain dosage. So I have a very infrequent podcast. I do it on average for times per month. Or I publish for long form episodes for a month. We didn't really talk about recording cadence, which we could talk about. But on average, I published four long form interviews per month. At one point it was 6 episodes. And then I noticed a few months into doing that. I was starting to drag my feet a little bit. And it began to feel like a job like an obligation. And I noted that quickly, thankfully. And I said, this is no good. If I keep this up, I'm going to stop doing the podcast. Or I'm just going to be unhappy doing it in which case what the fuck am I doing? Because I don't need to do it. And I then ratcheted back the frequency of the podcast to the point where it felt good. There's a dosage question, IE frequency. There's also an essence poll question. So for me, I have to follow my own interest. And to be of a good steward of my own self care, but to also be of greatest service to the people who are listening, I need to keep doing this or at least I hope to keep doing it. Maybe I don't need to, but I would like to keep doing this and to be able to grow over time and share those lessons. The only way I'm going to do that is if I am drawn to continue doing this because I enjoy it. So if I decide to do an episode with a violin appraiser, and it gets ten listeners, I don't fucking care at all. As long as I enjoy the episode, I do not care. I will say that over time, that not caring is the ultimate form of caring because you can cultivate an audience who is interested in stepping into weird, strange corners of the world into interests and professions and lives. They perhaps otherwise would have ignored or avoided. So your audience will also change and how they relate to you over time. And at least in my experience, I hope have realized that sometimes it is the episode they least would have expected to want to listen to. They end up liking the most. Of perhaps, the last 20 episodes I've done. So I think my listeners are more and more willing to give me the benefit of the doubt and try something strange. Yeah, I got some feedback from Joe Saul siha who runs a podcast called the stacking benjamins, which is a funny kind of different style podcast. But he said, the interesting thing you have to realize with guests is someone might listen to the episode for the guest. But at the end of the day, they're subscribing and coming back for you. And so the nature of interviews, though, often is we're trying to highlight the guest and hear their stories, which inherently if done well is them talking more than you. You mentioned earlier, if it's a bad guess, it might be you talking much more than them. How do you make sure you interject enough of Tim into the podcast? That new listeners and recurring listeners get that when the focus of each episode is always on someone else. That is a really good question and the answer is I don't think about it at all. But there are some times when I will interject and it has a strategic purpose. Or a practical purpose. There are interviews where I basically don't talk at all. And if someone is just, you know, a woman or a man possessed, and they are in flow, I will let them riff. It'll just be an audiobook of that person. For an hour or two hours, you can listen to Tim Ferriss and biology as an example of that. The four hour every topic under the sun covered podcast, which was quite an experience to be on the receiving end of also great episode. Very unusual. And one of the best performing podcasts probably over the last year for me, which is saying a lot. People look up my name or just go to Tim dot blog and search biology, BAL, a JI. Yeah, put in a mouthguard and drink a few cups of coffee and prepare yourself for the onslaught. It's quite something. I will interject in a few instances. One is where I know I'm asking a question where I suspect I'm asking a question. The guest is going to have trouble answering unless they have some time to think about it. So for instance, if I ask them, what is one of the best investments you've ever made? Which by the way is better than what's the best investment you've ever made. In the same way that what is one of the books you have gifted the most for other people is better than what's the best book you've ever read. The search function is a lot harder. It's going to take that much longer to try to come up with a single answer and they all generally default to recency. They'll come up with something that happened recent. So you don't get the best answers. If I ask someone, for instance, what is one of the best investments you've ever made? And then I might buy them time by giving some examples. I'll say, let me give you a few examples and give you a second to think about it. It could be an investment of money, like so and so, say, Warren Buffett, who invested in Dale Carnegie's speaking classes for public speaking and he always cites that as his best ever investment because it is multiplied and magnified his ability to do everything else. It has been a supercharger for all of his other skills and talents. It could be buying an entrance ticket to a competition that allowed you to prove yourself that then led to X. It could be an investment of energy. It could be anything. Okay, I just gave everyone listening and you 45 to 60 seconds to think about an answer as opposed to off the cuff coming up with something as quickly as possible. Fortunately, you can take that approach or if you're not recording live. You can just say, take your time, we're not recording this live. You can take 30 seconds in science to think about it. And then we can talk. But that feels strange to a lot of people, even though you can do that from a production standpoint, sitting in a conversation in silence waiting for a minute for someone to answer, feels unnatural and weird. So I will interject in a case like that. Very frequently when I speak up, it is to buy time for the interviewe and to give them a few examples to act as auxiliary search functions in their own brains so they can come up with the best possible answer. I was thinking the whole time about my best investment. Well, what is one of your best investments? Well, it's funny. When I moved out of the Bay Area, I didn't know anyone, and I had recently been laid off. And so I didn't have any money, but I invested in a membership at the climbing gym down the street. And at the time I thought this is climbing gyms are not cheap gyms. There's cheaper gyms. But through the climbing gym, I met a guy named Daniel berka, who was at dinner through Daniel, I met Kevin through Cavanaugh. It's literally probably the investment that ended up building out my entire network, including being here, but at the time, it seemed like a hundred and 20 bucks a month. It seemed crazy, but that's amazing. Mission cliffs are where were you? It was mission cliffs. Yeah, yeah, that's a great job. I remember mission close back in the day. That's a fun question to ask. If I ask someone about favorite failures, just the phrasing of the question is very confusing for a lot of people so then I'll give them an example. And the other time that I'll chime in as if the interview is drowning in boredom. As a rescue attempt. So that's a lot about about Tim. So I want to talk a little bit about the transition early Tim was really just the four hour guy, right? You had three books in a row where that was the theme. Someone told me once they said, hey, you know, your cover are for an episode of podcast, everything nothing has anything about you on it. So I took a similar early on approach where this story of the show is all about what the show's about all the hacks. It's not about me at all, and people are like, well, who are you? And you made a transition now your podcast is the Tim Ferris show. Nothing to do with four hours. I get the sense that you're trying to run away from being the four hour guy. But how have you thought about that transition and making it and making a brand that is really about you instead of something else? I'm going to tackle this from oblique angle and I'll couch it under the umbrella of identity diversification. And also optionality. So flashing back to the four hour workweek. For our work week, was this huge unexpected hit just stayed on The New York Times list for four to 5 years straight every week. And it created an abundance of inbound opportunity. Almost all the requests were expectedly related to the four hour workweek. So I was the four hour work week guy. We want you to give a talk on the principles of the four hour work. You do consulting to help us improve efficiency and per hour yield within this organization. We want you to do this workshop. We want you to license the name so we can develop ABCD and E, we want to option it for a movie, which is almost always a dead end, by the way. If people are wondering, we want to talk to you about a musical. We want to do this we want to do that. Most of those things all came to zero. But all of the external pressures were to milk that for everything that it was worth. In other words, I would write this four hour workweek, volume two, or I would write the three hour workweek. I would continue to beat that drum until I had Shaggy gray eyebrows and could bang the drum no more. That was going to be me. And I saw many authors around me who I met on the speaking circuit early on when I did that. I no longer and for many years have done no paid speaking, which was a categorical decision and policy that was one of those decisions that removes a thousand decisions. For many reasons we could talk about the short answer is I was repeating myself. And when you repeat yourself, this is relevant to my point. When you repeat the same messages as my friend Josh waitz can point out to me, you begin to calcify your thinking. And you're also repeating it because you are being paid for this perishable product, which is speaking to audiences over and over again about the same thing. And I recognized I did not want to be many of the people I met who had been milking the same thing for a very long time. They didn't seem particularly happy about it. They didn't seem energized by it. They seemed drained. And they seemed to feel trapped to me, which is why, given the success of the book, I decided to maintain preserve the brand recognition of four hour, but move it into physical performance with the four hour body. Because I recognized, I might never have this chance again to step out to have licensed to go to a completely different section of the bookstore, completely different subject matter. But I could always go back to the four hour workweek. So I could always return to that comfortable familiar well worn path of these principles outlined in the four hour work week. This is I think an important part of the back story. So I decided to go to for our body for our body does extremely well. For our body hits number one New York Times still sells extremely well. And that then bought me the license to write the four hour chef, where I'm taking these principles, which also come up in your podcast fair amount with Andy Radcliffe recently. Of wealthfront, the 80 20 principle. So pareto's law and many different principles that you could apply to deconstructing entrepreneurship and testing assumptions apply equally to physical performance they apply equally to accelerated learning, language acquisition, cooking doesn't matter. So now I had proven to the people who pay me at least upfront, the publishers, and also proven to my audience that what was interesting was the adventures on the principles, not any specific subject matter. It's hard for me to overstate how important that is. I was no longer trapped in one section of the bookstore. I could write about anything I wanted. Now I had license to do that. Okay. The four hour chef almost killed me. It was an incredibly complex extremely difficult project. It was the first major acquisition by Amazon publishing when they were really stepping into publishing in a big way. The entire publishing world freaked out. Barnes and noble wouldn't carry the book. I mean, it was exciting and also a huge mess on many levels. And each book launch I would talk to bestselling authors who had launched in the preceding say 12 months. I would ask them which channels, tools and outlets did less than they expected or were waning and importance and impact. And which did more than they expected and seemed to be in a cent. So for the four hour workweek, blogs were neglected, largely. Blogs were incredibly powerful and neglected. That's where I focused. With the for our body, I asked the same questions and I explored a bunch of different channels for the four hour chef the medium and the tool, the channel that was most undervalued, but most impactful was podcasting. So I focused on podcasting for the launch for our chef, and these podcasts had incredible impact. Much more impact than huge television shows. And in the process of doing that, I really realized how much I enjoyed the long form conversations where you could be yourself. You could drop an F bomb if need be, or if that was your penchant for just speaking, casually and comfortably. Versus say being on morning television, which can have some impact, but seem to have less and less of an impact where someone is staring over your shoulder in a teleprompter and you literally have 30 seconds to talk after spending an hour waiting in the green room after having your face spray painted with makeup. And you woke up at 5 a.m. to get there. It's not that enjoyable and experience. I saw the impact I enjoyed the podcasting and decided at that point. I'm going to take a big break from books. Not sure I'm ever going to write another book. But in the meantime, I'd like to experiment with this podcasting format. And see what it's like to be in the director's seat, so to speak. And the only reason the podcast ended up with the Tim Ferris show is the name is I couldn't come up with a name and Kevin called it tempt him talk talk in the first episode, which long-term listeners still joke about, and I still Kevin and I still joke about. But came up with all of these different names for it. The fact of the matter was, at that time, there were only two things that had a lot of brand recognition. The four hour shtick, which I didn't want to extend, I wanted to retire that Jersey. Or my name. And that is the reason that I decided to use the name. But if you're just starting a podcast and you don't have any name recognition, I don't think that the logic automatically follows that you should use your name. Now it's been a wonderful trip. I will say that there are drawbacks to launching a podcast with your name. In the same way that their drawbacks to founding a company that can only be run by you. As we've seen in the news, there are a lot of big deals by podcast standards happening at the moment. There is a land grab for talent and big shows and audiences. Joe Rogan. Purportedly a $100 million deal. I actually think if I had to guess, I don't know this, but I would suspect it is substantially larger than that over time with earnouts and so on. And performance bonuses. I would guess it's much larger than that. I think there was somewhere between 60 and a $100 million deal for Dax shepherd, something like a $60 million deal for call her daddy. I think that's a three year deal. You will notice that the deal terms appear to be getting more and more onerous. Now, those are not all comparable deals. Those are different people, different properties, and so on. But I believe as part of the deal with call her daddy that Spotify has a first look or write a first refusal or automatic ownership of future properties and creations, not just current. Joe Rogan has a licensing deal. Which is very different from an IP purchase agreement. But this is all to say that if I had, let's just say, who knows? The four hour podcast. If I'd called it the four hour podcast, and I owned that trademark. And slowly brought in other hosts or co hosts to help. One could foresee an option of building that up into a property with many different personalities and selling that property. After which I, as the initial builder of that brand could be free and clear to go on and do other things. It is not possible to do that simply with a podcast called the Tim Ferriss show. So there are drawbacks, but net net, that's the story of how I got there. And I don't think about building a personal brand to be clear. You have a personal brand. Already, everyone has a personal brand. Guess what your personal brand is. Your personal brand is what your closest friends and family and coworkers think of you. That's it. What do they associate you with? If they had to pull four or 5 adjectives out of the air, how would they describe you? Whatever comes to mind, most naturally, when people think about you, that is your personal brand. So we all already have a personal brand. If you want to create a personal facade or a stage persona, not saying you, Chris, but just in general, you can do that, but you should be very careful of that. And I remember I was told and I'm paraphrasing here, but by Andrew zimmern, who is an amazing television host who is very smart and very, very thoughtful. Who's been on the podcast, his story is incredible. I mean, I think sleeping on a mattress under an overpass at one point as an addict and now is who he is. It's really remarkable story. When he was just getting started in television, and he and I spoke when I was doing some television, not too long ago, he had some choices to make in that first episode about who he wanted to be. How did he want to deliver his lines? Were they going to incorporate any particular types of shticks? Were they going to be funny? Were they going to make fun of certain things? Were they going to use the cheesy jokes? And he made a lot of decisions early on the ended up being critical to the future of his career, because he said, in effect, be very careful of who you are in episode one because that's who you have to be for the rest of the time you're on television. And I think that's true podcasting. So be really careful about what you pretend to be. Because you'll have to maintain that and you may actually become whatever you pretend to be. So I don't think a whole lot about personal brand. Although I do think about what I want to stand for and if I were really true to myself, if I were really true to myself, what would I do? Who would I interview? If I were just doing this for me, what would I do? And I always get the best results when I do that. When I try to predict the movement of the masses of some potential audience like this flock of birds, where I'm trying to guess which direction they're going to fly, it never turns out well. For me, especially. It's not fun, and it's not particularly effective. One of the things you mentioned in that story was about these podcasts getting these licensing deals or different things. A common thing that I know happens with podcasts, especially as they start to gain traction and has happened to me in the last couple of weeks is some podcast network will reach out and say, hey, do you want to join our network? Do you want to be an iHeartRadio podcast? Do you want to and usually get to keep all your IP, but they basically say, hey, we'll sell ads will keep 50% will help you grow your show. We'll do all this stuff. You don't have to think about it. We'll just give you the money we make. And it seems to your point about monetization, don't spend any time on it, spend time honing your craft, spend time making a good show. Is that a good way to kind of take all of that off your plate from thinking about it? Would you encourage people to take those calls? Because they don't result in having to spend time selling ads, though you lose upside for whatever term that deal is. This is a worthwhile topic to explore. Clearly, or maybe it's not clear, but I do not work with the network or a partner of that type. A lot of people do. A lot of people do. And I think it depends a lot on what you are trying to accomplish. So a question everyone should ask, because three years from now, your podcast is successful. What does that mean to you? What does it look like? Exactly. What is a month in your life look like with respect to the podcast? It's successful. What does that mean? What does it look like? So it depends on that, it also depends on your competencies, your willingness to hire or work with contractors or commissioned salespeople to sell ads. Or sponsorships or find sponsors if that is something that you want to do. Is it worthwhile to take the calls? It's always worthwhile to take the calls. Just don't promise anything. Yeah, definitely take the calls. And the question that I would ask myself in preparation for those causes, how could I learn as much as possible from this call so that if even if I never end up talking to this person again, I get a lot out of this. Can you ask about best practices of other podcasts? Can you ask about common mistakes that highly competent but novice or new to the game podcasters make in their experience? Can you ask them or indicate as a policy when you have these types of conversations you always ask, if I couldn't work with you, who would you recommend I work with? Can you start to get a better understanding of the ecosystem? Can you ask them about other players in the system? In other words, further your education and give yourself more and more of an informational advantage. Even if you never do a deal with these people. If you're willing to prepare in that way, come up with good questions. Absolutely take the call. If you're just going to fly off the cuff and see what happens, maybe it's still worth taking the call, though you won't get as much out of it. But yes, absolutely worth taking the call. And listening to their value proposition, there are a number of different ways that you can sell ads. You can publish on a platform that inserts ads automatically. And there are platforms. I believe Spotify has this ability. There are platforms that can do this. There are also hosting companies. I believe that will use dynamic ad assertion to fill at inventory for you. Your revenue from that, your income from that your CPM, the cost per thousand downloads that you get paid will be quite low for that generally speaking. You can work with a network. And that network may have people in-house, but the network could be a network, just like you and I back in the day could print a business card, which is like Chris and associates. And in fact, all they're doing is partnering with yet another company and then they're splitting the commission or the vig. Between them. So that's another thing that you would want to ask, although I would ask it at the end of the conversation in case it pisses them off. Are these full time employees of yours? Did you partner with other companies? Do you subcontract out pieces of this to get an idea of how things are architected? So you could partner with a network. And if they say we will help grow your show, I would find out exactly how they do that. Of course, does a good job of this as do many of the NPR shows because they cross promote new shows on existing properties. If they're going to do that, find out what the reach is. Find out if that's going to be for all geographies or is it going to be a geo limited? Is it time limited blah blah blah? All the specifics, right? That's probably for a second conversation. It's not that important. Compared to other questions you could ask. That's a network. You could work with companies who sell at that's it, that's all they do. They're not a network, but they will put sponsors in front of you and put your show in front of sponsors. And there are many, many different agencies that do this. Just like ad agencies for other types of media. And the economics will look slightly different depending on who you talk to, and they will be different, probably from the networks. Then there are very, very small shops with maybe a handful of people and they handle ads for larger shows. So I will not mention them by name just because I don't want them to get deluged. But if you're diligent, you can figure it out. Joe Rogan Dax, this American life all work with the same small outfit. Who only work with a handful of premium properties and they sell ads for those outlets. Then you can have a contractor or hire someone full time as I did to handle all of your ad inventory. I am comfortable as an operator. I'm very, very, very, very comfortable with sales. And I'm very, very comfortable with waiting until in this case my podcast had enough of an audience and not just a large. Audience in terms of size, but a powerful audience in terms of influence. Such that I would be able to say no very easily and still have takers. Does that make sense? And then to set terms like no payment terms, you need to pay up front so that we can keep our process extremely extremely simple. And in that case, I looked at it and I was like, okay, let's just take, I mean, you can do some back of the napkin stuff. But it's like, if I won't use Joe as an example, I'll let people try to figure that on their own. For him to do a deal of several years at a $100 million that would have to be a multiple of what he was making. He was making I am sure a lot. But let's say that you get to the point where you are making a small fraction of that and you make a $1 million in total ad revenue. Which, assuming you don't have much staff is almost pure profit. If you outsource your ad sales, I would say you should expect generally that at least 30% of that is going to go away. Okay, so I'm no mathematician, but that is more than $300,000. So then the question is, for less than $300,000, could you hire someone who is absolutely excellent to do it for you? And this is just as critical. Are you willing to have staff manage do the calls do the data analytics and so on? Everything necessary to ensure that those operations are extremely smooth. And the answer for a lot of people is no, even if you have the money, they would rather spend the 300,000 dollars plus in this case. Now keep in mind, if you're making 10 million a year, then now we're talking 3 million plus. It can be very, very expensive. But it's worth it for a lot of people. For me, I decided I had enough entrepreneurial experience. I am comfortable enough with operations and process and management that I am totally happy to hire someone full time to handle that for me. So that is what I decided. Okay, so we've hit a lot of things. We have. Here's a great question about a question, which is if you're interviewing someone about a topic and you realize well past the point that you've talked about something that there's a great follow-up, but you're now three turns down on a different highway. Do you ask it still and if you do, do you try to edit it back so it fits, or do you just save it for next time? I've done all of the above. So if we're down this road and there's something I really want to ask, you have many, many options. For me, one option would be, you write down on a piece of paper. This is why I like to have notes. I take a lot of notes as I'm writing on things that I want to come back to also or things that I want to ensure I don't forget. I'll take that, I'll circle it on a piece of paper, and I'll say, if you don't mind, I want to interrupt for just a second. This is going to be a complete left turn, and for all my listeners, sorry, that's just how my mind works. I really want to just put a bookmark in this. So please remember where you are. I'm going to write it down. I want to ask you about X and then we're going to come back to Y and Z and so you can do that. You could take a note of it, and then use a teaser at the end of the episode and say, we could easily keep talking for many hours. We might have to do around too if you'd be open to it. And simply circle that and highlighter R two, like I do, there are different ways to approach this. And for next time, you could try to edit and splice somewhere else. And Franken clip your way into some type of narrative. That tends to be or can be very clumsy and labor intensive. So I tend not to do that. Well, then I'll just throw it out here because it's about a guest. One of the things I found, I heard you say that you got a lot of guests by asking people, hey, you are a guest. Are there other interesting people I should have on the show? In recruiting, I've learned that when you go to people and say, hey, are there interesting engineers I should hire everyone has nothing. They have to use that search function. But if you go look at their LinkedIn and say, hey, here are four people that you know that I think could be good for this job. If you think any of them are, would you introduce me to them? That works well, is there a tactic you've used to find guests from your network of either friends or guests that helps them kind of jog the memory to find the people that might be interesting? No. This is the short answer. I don't have any particular tricks here. I will mention to people, I'll say, I really enjoyed speaking with you. You're excellent at what you do. And this was outstanding. If you ever think of anybody who you think would really enjoy being on the show, who I would also really enjoy speaking to. Please let me know. And I just leave it at that. I would say at this point, probably 80% plus of my guests come as referrals from past guests. And it will become easier and easier over time. When you have 15 episodes, it's harder. It's just a smaller sample size. When you have 30 50, there is a non linear kind of growth in the connectivity of the map that you're creating this constellation of guests and the types of people they can reach. So it gets I would say exponentially easier over time to get referrals. And I will also say, just as a side note, a question that you can ask to also improve your interviewing and podcasting is one that Adam grant asked me when he was a guest on the podcast. After we stopped recording. You need to be insistent, but he said, or he asked rather, what can I do to improve? And I gave him some throwaway answer because it's an uncomfortable question. So I said something like, it was great. It was really fantastic. And it was. He was really, really, really good. And I pretty sure he responded with, I appreciate that. I appreciate the kind of feedback and I'm not going to let you go until you give me one thing. Just one thing, anything. Could be small that I could do to improve as a guest. And I think he had a habit of I don't want to say nervous, but laughing a lot after certain questions or answers. And I said, that might be something that you could take a look at. If it was one thing, and I had to pick one thing, you're outstanding. It was absolutely wonderful as is, but if I had to pick one thing, that would probably be it. And he was like, awesome. Great. Thank you so much. And he was stoked. Yeah. If you want to get that type of feedback, you have to be insistent, I think. Because it's uncomfortable. You're putting someone in an uncomfortable position. Right after you've done this thing, you're feeling good, probably to deliver news that you might not like. And so you have to just say, look, I love this stuff. I'm not gonna let you go. Just give you one thing. Could be anything tiny thing, something that I could do to improve. And that gets result. That is my dog, barking, because I have a delivery coming to the door. I think we should probably wrap up in a few minutes since we're almost at three hours. But I know you have prepared more. And so who knows? Maybe there is around two. In our future. But what other boxes do you think we should check? I have a good kind of wrap up question at least is you launched your show and you said you'd commit to 6 episodes. And I've seen you say you'd reassess then, and then after deciding to continue, I saw you say you'd reassess again at a hundred. What kind of a process do you go through when you reassess? Is it just a gut? Do I want to keep going or was there more going on each time you hit that milestone? It's a pretty simple check in. I think most things can be boiled down to. How do you feel when you first wake up? And how easily do you go to sleep? How do different decisions affect that? Certainly true in investing. Big time. You could have on paper, the best investment of all time, but if you're waking up anxious and having trouble going to sleep, it's probably not a good investment for you. And this is true for podcasting too. How do you feel when you look at your calendar and you see that you have a podcast at ten a.m. or two p.m. or whatever it is? What happens internally? Is it a whole body yes? I mean, how do you feel mentally? How do you feel in your chest? How do you feel in your gut and really paying attention to that? It's a full body check in for me. Imagine, okay, it's Tuesday. You're tired and all you want to do is call it quits, but you realize you've got 90 to a 120 minutes ahead of you for a podcast. How do you feel? What do you do? What is your self talk? What does it look like? What has it been? Those are the types of questions that I ask myself. And I want podcasting to be something that nourishes me and refills me, not something that pleats me. And I think many if not most of my decisions these days with respect to just about anything, are framed in that way. And it's simple, but the implications are pretty far reaching. It has nothing to do with revenue, has nothing to do with how big the names are. It's really, how do I feel when I see it on the calendar? How do I feel? When I'm recording, how do I feel when it comes out? Is it net positive energy or net negative energy? And if it's net positive, keep feeding the dragon. That's how I feel. And also, you can build in the ability to take breaks. So for instance, to touch on one thing that I dropped a long time ago, which was recording cadence. And by the way, your brain is really incredibly trainable. You get better at doing this as you record more and more podcasts, just like mentally bookmarking things to come back to. Recording cadence. So I will very often once per quarter do a content creation week, which includes all of any social needs and all of my podcast needs for the next three months. And I will record all of them in perhaps one week, Monday to Friday, or I may tag on an extra Monday Tuesday and the following week and I will record all, which for me means 12. Episodes. For the next three months. And then if I want to do more episodes, if I feel compelled if there are things that pop up, like this episode, for instance, I don't need to record this episode. We're recording this early September. I have all of my episodes until probably December cover already. They're done. I don't have to do damn thing. I can just sit back and chill. But I wanted to record this episode because I get so many questions about podcasts. And I also want to answer your questions. So you can batch recording in that way. I batch any sponsor recording in a similar way so that I'm not doing, by the way, refreshes people who want a live read every time. Not going to do it. If you have an ad that is working, do you keep using it until it stops working in terms of your return on invested capital? You're multiple. Whatever it might be. And their answer is, we keep using them. That's exactly what we do. So once we have a good read, we keep using it. And for that reason, I'll batch recording for sponsors in a similar way. And any review of guests with one person on my team, we will know more than once a week for a very short period of time. Maybe 5 or ten minutes, review potential guests who have come in, typically from past guests. And decide how I feel about them. It doesn't matter how interesting they are, how good they are at what they do at the end of the day like zero to ten, no 7 allowed. What's my stoke level? If it's not 8 9 or ten, we do not presco. And that is also some of how I systematize the production and the editing and so on. Such that the tasks and the responsibilities of the podcast are not scattered. Kind of Willy nilly all over my calendar, which is very would be, I think stressful and ultimately a net negative energetically. So batching also helps to make things much more fun, much easier, much more streamlined and much less expensive. And ultimately, coming back to the very beginning, much more sustainable. And for all of those reasons and more, I don't have a set time to check in with myself about the podcast. I batch and I expect if you check in with me 5 years from now unless something really strange has happened, I'll probably still be doing the podcast. But was the batching always there or you only committed the 6 episodes at the gate. That means episode 7, you needed to find in those first 6 episodes of production, how long did it take to get to that batching versus just in time? I need to go set up an interview so that I can release an episode next week. Well, the batching is as needed. So they're batching has some practical utility in the sense that you finish everything in one week as necessary for the next two to three months. But I also get energized by the podcast. So I will sometimes decide you know what? I'm not going to batch all of my recording, but I'm going to do one recording per week or every other week because I find that it refills my tank. So it's not a burden to be lightened. It is also something that gives me more fuel for everything else than I'm doing. Therefore, I'm not going to record everything in the batching session. But I will record enough so that I don't feel like I have a gun against my head and oh shit. It's Tuesday and I need to put out an episode on Thursday. Fuck, now I need to reject my whole schedule. That's not an experience I want to have. And it's one that I can very easily avoid. The batching and the systematizing comes in my experience later. You've got to throw a lot against the wall and figure out what works and what works for you and then you can establish policies and rules so that you're making very few decisions instead of a death by a million paper cuts. I do think that striving for what excites you and striving for what nourishes you goes a really long way. And to come back to a couple of recommendations, the 22 imbalance of marketing, the law of category, read that chapter, even if the examples are outdated, read it, get the older copy, not the Internet, because I think the Internet was written like 98 or 99. And the examples are really funny. But get the older version positioning by the same authors, Reese ris, not Eric, but an older Reese and trout I believe are the names as well as 1000 true fans by Kevin Kelly at KK. Kevin Kelly, honestly, maybe the real life most interesting man in the world. And if you want proof of that, you can listen to my first podcast episode with him. Stuart brand might be also a close contender. I think Kevin would probably say Stuart brand is the one who wins that title. But it's a fun game. I encourage everyone to try it. You'll learn a lot about yourself at the very least. I definitely have. And with that, my friend, I think we can bring this to a close. We will link to everything in the show notes. All these various things we've talked about, including the article, the very, very extensive article I wrote in 2016. And the link to the podcast with Rolf pots will link to all of those things and more in the show notes. But I don't want to omit one very important thing. That is to mention Chris podcast. And we didn't get to go into lessons from different guests. I asked you to prepare. So maybe another time we'll do that. But I've listened to a couple of episodes really enjoyed the I listen to your first and your last. So at least on overcast, I listened to the first episode, which was with Lee Ron, which was outstanding, really enjoyed it, even though I'm not hugely obsessed with points and optimizing on that side. There were a lot of really good points. So I'm going to go refer to the show notes on that. And I listened to Andy Radcliffe who's incredible one of the cofounders of benchmark capital also, which is one of the most successful venture capital firms of all time. I think their initial fund I learned this from the podcast had what 92 X returns. It's just bananas. That's an episode on investing, as you might imagine. And I'm listening currently to episode 6 on the psychology of money with Morgan housel and enjoying that quite a lot. So the podcast is good. It's super solid and I think you're off to the races, man. I don't have tons of critical feedback for you. I think you're doing a good job and it's really about keeping it interesting for you and staying the course. But what else would you like to say about your podcast and where people can find it? I would just say, give it a listen and wherever you listen podcast, which you're obviously doing right now. So just search for all the hacks and reach out if you have feedback and there's topics you want me to explore. All the hacks dot com. Is that right? Yep. All the hacks dot com. All the hacks dot com. And this man knows of what he speaks Chris is optimizer supreme. And I don't say that lightly. It's kind of mind boggling to me. I'm methodical you are with optimizing so many areas of your life. This is a person who walks the walk and I've seen it firsthand. In many, many areas. I encourage people to check it out all the hacks dot com we'll link to it in the show notes. And it is good to spend time with you Christopher. Yeah. Thank you for co hosting slash hosting this episode. Yeah, I can now I guess I can put on my resume host of the Tim Ferris show. You said it had to be you, but here we go. Tim Tim Chris Chris volume two. Thanks for tuning in everybody. Hey guys, this is Tim against a few more things before you take off. Number one, this is 5 bullet Friday. Do you want to get a short email from me and would you enjoy getting a short email from me every Friday that provides a little morsel of fun before the weekend? And 5 bullet Friday is a very short email where I share the coolest things I've found or that I've been pondering over the week. That could include favorite new albums that I've discovered could include gizmos and gadgets and all sorts of weird shit that I've somehow dug up in the world of the esoteric as I do. It could include favorite articles that I've read and that I've shared with my close friends, for instance. And it's very short. It's just a little tiny bite of goodness before you head off for the weekend. So if you want to receive that, check it out, just go to four hour workweek dot com that's four hour workweek dot com all spelled out and just drop in your email and you'll get the very next one. And if you sign up, I hope you enjoy it. This podcast episode is brought to you by Helix Sleep. Sleep is super important to me in the last few years. I've come to conclude it is the end all be all that all good things, good mood, good performance, good everything, seem to stem from good sleep, so I've tried a lot to optimize and I've tried pills and potions, all sorts of different mattresses, you name it. And for the last few years, I've been sleeping on a helix midnight Luxe mattress. I also have one in the guest bedroom and feedback from friends has always been fantastic. It's something that they comment on. Helix Sleep has a quiz takes about two minutes to complete that matches your body type and sleep preferences to the perfect mattress for you. With helix, there's a specific mattress for each and every body that is your body also your taste. So let's say you sleep on your side and like a super soft bed. No problem, or if you're back sleeper who likes a mattress that's as firm as a rock, they've got a mattress for you too. Helix was selected as the number one best overall mattress pick of 2020 by GQ magazine wired apartment therapy and many others. Just go to Helix Sleep, dot com slash Tim, take their two minute sleep quiz and they'll match you to a customized mattress that will give you the best sleep of your life. They have a ten year warranty and you get to try it out for 100 nights this free. They'll even pick it up from you if you don't love it. And now my dear listeners, helix is offering up to $200 off of all mattress orders and two free pillows at Helix Sleep dot com slash Tim. These are not cheap pillows either, so getting two for free is an upgraded deal. So that's up to $200 off and two free pillows at Helix Sleep dot com slash Tim that's helix H E L I X sleep dot com slash Tim for up to $200 off. So, check it out. One more time, helix, H E L ix sleep dot com slash Tim. This episode is brought to you by athletic greens. I get asked all the time. What I would take if I could only take one supplement. The answer is invariably athletic greens. I view it as all in one nutritional insurance. I recommended it, in fact, in the four hour body. This is more than ten years ago, and I did not get paid to do so. With approximately 75 vitamins, minerals, and whole foods sourced ingredients, you'd be very hard pressed to find a more nutrient dense and comprehensive formula on the market. It has multivitamins, multi mineral greens complex, probiotics, and prebiotics for gut health and immunity formula, digestive enzymes, adaptogens, and much more. I usually take it once or twice a day just to make sure I've covered my bases if I miss anything I'm not aware of. Of course, I focus on nutrient dense meals to begin with. That's the basis. But athletic greens makes it easy to get a lot of nutrition when whole foods aren't readily available from travel packets. I always have them in my bag when I'm sitting around. Right now, athletic greens is giving my audience a special offer on top of their all in one formula, which is a free vitamin D supplement and 5 free travel packs with your first subscription purchase. Many of us are deficient in vitamin D, I've found that true for myself, which is usually produced in our bodies from sun exposure. So, adding a vitamin B supplement to your daily routine is a great option for additional immune support, support your immunity, gut health, and energy by visiting athletic greens dot com slash Tim. You'll receive up to a year's supply of vitamin D and 5 free travel packs with your subscription. 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K2: The Savage Mountain | The Death Zone | 2

Against The Odds

48:52 min | 4 months ago

K2: The Savage Mountain | The Death Zone | 2

"Join one replay to listen to against the odds one week early and add free and the wondering app. Download the free app in your apple or google. Play mobile app store today. It's four thirty pm august. I two thousand and eight. Cecilia school stands on a vast snowfield staring up at the summit ridge of the second tallest mountain in the world. She's been climbing nonstop for almost twenty hours except for a short nap can't four but for a moment. She forgets her aching muscles. The site is breathtaking. The snow sparkles in brilliant sunshine. And the top of the mountain is finally visible silhouetted against the immaculate blue sky. The most dangerous parts of the climb are behind her for now the icy traverse steep narrow bottleneck now. She just needs to put one foot in front of the other and dig in as she makes slow trek up the thirty degree slope through the deep snow. Her breathing is labored thin. Air at twenty eight thousand feet. Many of the climbers on the mountain are using supplementary oxygen but cecilio left her bottle below with her husband. Ralph without oxygen. It feels like breathing through a straw with a ten pound sack of potatoes on her stomach but she tries to keep her mind on the goal she turns to her teammate. Lars nessa. Have you ever seen anything so perfect. I've never seen anything like k. To lars is twenty eight years old and the most junior member of the four-person or weeds and team. He's not a full-time climber. Like cecilia. and rolf back at home. He's a nurse when he agreed to the trip. He never imagined he would make it this far if they reach the top. You'll be one of an elite group of mountaineers who summited k two. Cecilia looks up to see climber coming their way. He has a confident easy. Walk and he doesn't wear an oxygen mask when he gets close. Cecilia sees its alberto's iran q. Remembers him from camp to on the way up. He's a solo climber from the basque country. In spain she saw him helping pemba sherpa earlier. That morning laying rope across the traverse his faces ruddy from the fresh air. Lars is first to speak. Wow no one would guess you just summited the second highest mountain in the world. You're in really good shape. Suddenly cecilia feels strong urge to move. How much further is it. She sees alberto hesitate but she can't read his face. Finally he says at least two hours maybe a bit more cecillia nods and continues walking. She needs to hurry if she's going to keep her promise to ralph and get back to before sunset over to watch a cecilia as she heads towards the peak thinking of how strong and beautiful she looks in the sun. She's full of life. He wasn't sure how to answer when she asked how far he could take years. Maybe four what he wanted to say was it's getting late term back and it's not worth the risk. But he saw the excitement in her eyes and didn't have the heart to discourage her he's worried about. All of the climbers. Now making their way to the top the sun will set soon which means they will be coming down in the dark. we get support from. Adt no matter what you wanna protect. Nobody has more experience helping. Keep it safe than eighty. I mean check this out. They've received the most burglar alarm events in the industry and help save more lives than any other home security provider. They were called the best home security system of two thousand twenty by us news and the number one smart home security provider by strategy analytics in two thousand twenty. Adt has over twenty thousand employees experience in helping. Keep you safe. That's twenty four seven peace of mind from the creators of the home security. Category experience matters. That's why millions of people trust. At to protect what matters most and to keep them safe get all the latest security upgrades from the largest name and home security by visiting adt dot com today at stands for quality and timeless protection. Visit adt dot com. Today against the odds is brought to you by progressive. Are you thinking more about how to tighten up your budget. These days drivers who save by switching to progressive. Save over seven hundred dollars on average and customers can qualify for an average of six discounts. When they sign up a little off your rate each month goes a long way. Get a quote today. At progressive dot com progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates national annual average insurance savings by new customers surveyed in two thousand twenty potential savings vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations from wondering. I might corey. And this is against the ons on august first. Two thousand and eight. A group of climbers from eight countries set out to climb the world's second tallest mountain k. Two they were bullied by hope and optimism. They had spent months at base camp waiting out bad weather but a window of opportunity had finally opened their goal to make it up the steep face of the mountain by pm and descend before nightfall. The most difficult part of the client but delays lang rope on the trail. The climbers to hold onto have set them behind and another climbers fall has unsettled the group now. The summit is so close but so nightfall. This is episode to the hanging man. Cecilia scuba brushes by the korean climbing team and steps onto the summit. It's five thirty pm and the day is perfect. Not a single gust of wind. The sky is vibrant blue. She's the fourth climber up the day to reach the top just behind her teammate lars. Congratulations cecilia wow we did it. Cecilia grins back with pure joy and she looks around. The summit is small about one hundred and fifty square feet the size of a small bedroom but the view. It's glorious mountain. As far as the eye can see leading to china pakistan and india far below the glaciers carved soft billowy designs through the snow. Cecilia turns encircles drinking it. All in all would love this. She thinks lars. Let's take some photos lars polls norwegian flag from his pack while cecilia takes a banner from her hometown. Soccer team lars. Get the hat before. Cecilia left. rolf on the snowfield. He gave his pink bunny hat to lars and has long droopy years lars puts it on his head from the corner of her eye. Cecilia sees the korean climbers pulling themselves over the top. They are the largest team on the mountain. Its leader is a highly experienced climber known around the camp as mr kim but the real star of the korean team is going son. Better known a base camp as ms go. She's a stocky woman with apple. Red cheeks buff by the elements in her home country of korea. She's famous a household name and a seven-time champion games. Now she's halfway through request. Become the first woman to climb all fourteen of the world's highest peaks. Cecilia holds upper camera. Go we should get a pitcher. They're only the ninth and tenth women to climb to the top of two. It's a moment to celebrate but cecilia can't shake the nagging thought that the sun will set soon lars. We should head down it's it's getting really late lars nods. He's thinking the same thing. Cecilia takes one last look at the beautiful panorama a site not many people get to see then the to begin the long trek back down the slope pemba gil j sherpa steps onto the summit at six thirty pm. He's the first member of the dutch nor team to arrive. Even without oxygen feel strong. Now he's standing on what feels like the top of the world. The home of the gods pemba watches as more climbers arrive. They look wild the happy but exhausted as he waits for the team. He offers to take pitchers for the others. One of the french climbers handsome camera. His name is huge deal berate. He's sixty one years old and the second oldest person to ever climb k two. It's so beautiful pemba. My life's ambition. This is my last climb. What a glorious one. It is when they're done with the photos. Hugh offers pemba satellite phone. Call your family. Tell them about the glorious view. Pemba shakes his head. We need to go down. I can tell them in person soon. Enough as pemba watches. The sun slowly arch down across the western horizon. Cheering door j. joins him. Cheering is the sherpa from the american team. And the second to arrive the to hug and congratulate one another. It's the first time on k. Two for them both and they both summited without supplemental oxygen but under their smiles. Pemba and cheering are worried. It's nearly seven. pm it's unavoidable now. All of the climbers will be heading back down in the dark yet. None of them seem to be concerned. After twenty our climbing this altitude people are physically and mentally drained. The adrenaline used to get up. The mountain is now gone. The thin air and lack of oxygen to the brain leads to slowed reactions. The mind is confused. Physical coordination becomes difficult hallucinations. Set in and no one wants to be hallucinating in the dark at twenty eight thousand feet up pemba son. It's seven pm. There's maybe one hour left of light before. Dusk covers the mountain and hayes and his team still isn't here wilco. Von ruin hadn't imagined the climb up to the summit would be hard without supplemental oxygen. It's even harder. He takes a few steps at a time and then rests on his ice axe ten steps. Rest another ten steps then rest. When that word of mouth he falls to his hands and knees and crawls keep going when he reaches the top of the ridge he stands up for the last few steps top. He made it. He raises his arms over his head reaching into the sky and begins to cry k. To four members of the nor team reached the peak one after the next gen mcdonnell pemba sherpa and cast fonder hateful. They gathered together in a group hug. Laughing and weeping. We did it. We did it. The view of the mountain range from the top is so bright and clear. Wilco almost feels dizzy. Wilco calls back to holland on his satellite phone. Martin martin there. We're standing on top of k to the news of their triumph will be instantly relayed around the world germ donald wipes his eyes when he summited. Denali irish drum known as a badran. He joked that it sounded like a pair of sneakers. Tumble-drier today he pulls the green white and orange flag of the republic of ireland out of his jacket pocket. He unfurled the flag and extends it with both hands towards the sky jurists. The first irishman to conquer k. Two on the way up he had taught some of the other climbers in old irish phrase. Chuck gar- la which means our time will come. Now it has. We'll go hands him. His satellite phone. Call your family. Jer pulls off his gloves and dials home to ireland and he picks up the phone on the first ring. And you're not gonna believe where i am. Cecilia and lars make their way back down the snowfield towards the traverse. It's seven thirty pm. It's getting cold. Fast and cecilia is eager to find. Ralph the setting sun as the mountain in a soft dusty light. Cecilia stops for a picture. I think we'll just make it back to the ropes by nightfall. The thin air makes the celia feel weak her. She left her spare bottle down below for her husband. Laura's i think i need some oxygen lars knots. He pulls the oxygen pipes from his nose and hands them to cecilia base. Stay close trading them back and forth as they walked down. They walk for an hour. Cecilia squint into the distance. Looking for roles familiar coat. Ralph ralph cecelia's voice carries across the silence snowfields. Then she sees him. He's sitting on a small hill of snow as if he has all the time in the world as soon as he spots her he jumps to his feet and he gives her a hug. Congratulations you did it. We did but we missed you. Cecilia is proud of her husband. It took courage to go about so close to the summit. It just shows what she always knew about him. He's more interested in the spirit of adventure and the experience than risking his health for the end goal. How are you feeling now better. But my oxygen is almost out. We need to get back down to the ropes. Cecilia hands in the tubes from lars oxygen. Then the three of them head down the snowfield to the traverse. It's nearing eight pm. When the dutch team starts down from the summit they are the last ones to leave. Wilco can feel the exhaustion in every part of his body after the twenty hour. Climb on almost no sleep the adrenaline enjoy from reaching the top has been replaced by an overpowering need to sleep. Looks over at irishman germ donal hedger. We have any energy bars left but he knows the answer. The team ran out of water and snacks hours ago. Now is the time. He'll need to dig deep and find buried reserves of physical and mental strength but as he lumbers forward his legs feel heavy. He's so tired maybe if he sits down just for a minute besides his teammate. Cass is still up at the top with an italian clamor taking a few last final pictures. Hilda's rest for five minutes and then get up. When he comes he plops down in the snow falls beside him. Neither say a word only pemba. Sherpa remained standing looking down the slope. A puzzled expression on his face. Is that the korean team down there. They left an hour ago. Bay should be much farther wilko's quince but he can't think straight i dunno pemba. Pemba looks back at the summit. The final member of the dutch north team is making his way down followed. By the italian climber. Hembo looks at wilco injure their strong. He'd seen her on. He's climbed many peaks. Listen i'm going to go down to the koreans the help we need to make sure. The rope is laid down the traverse. They not but it's not clear if they heard him. Pemba turns around to show to pass and the italian. Hurry down after me emotions to jerem wilco. And make sure they come with you and then begins the long trek across the snowfield down the mountain when the norwegian team reaches the rope leading down to traverse. It's almost dark but cecilia feels hopeful role. Wanted to get to the rope before nightfall and they did barely. Cecilia looks at her teammates and grins. So who's going. First laura's volunteers. Cecilia watches him clipped onto the rope and dropped down. She follows behind. Rolf is on the line. It's an easier appel about one hundred and twenty feet. The giant column of glacial ice looms above them go sleep a night when they get to the ledge they stopped to regroup listening to the creeks and groans as the melted ice water inside the mountains crevices expand and contract ahead of them is the top of the traverse a path of ice and snow that wraps around the mountain in the dark it will be slippery dangerous and if they fall off the edge they will drop down thousands of feet lars offers to lead the way again but ralph says he'll go. Let's put cecilia in the middle. Cecilia watches as her husband slides. His carribean her down the length of rope and maneuvres steep icy slope. She follows the light from his lampedusa gets smaller and smaller and then disappears. She peers into the darkness and follows behind. She can hear her breath in her ears. It's hard to tell how far the bottleneck is after an hour. She figures there may be halfway there. The night is quiet except for the occasional creek of the glacier and the sound of her boots on the ice at first she hardly notices when she hears the rumble. But then it grows louder and the mountain starts to shake. Cecilia is thrown. Off-balance crashes into the wall of ice the rope holding her in pulls tight then releases. Everything's around her. It feels like the entire mountain might collapse shards of ice shower down on her head. She tries to hold onto the wall. But there's nowhere to grab what's happening. She hears woo vice. Falling a piece of ceramic must have dislodged but where and then it stops. Cecilia is now alone in the dark. Her headlamp is out. It's freezing cold. Whereas ralph she peers into the darkness whereas lamp should be rolf. Her voice is soft then louder role. Nothing comes back except the echo of her own calls. Ralph cecilia are you okay. Cecilia jumps at the sound of a voice behind her. It's lars lars. Where's role what happened. I wanna see rolf. Lars looks at the panic on cecelia's face and realizes he has to be calm. Wait here he moves along the traverse feeling for the ice screw that holds the rope but when he finds it is wrong. Hanging from the screw is an empty oxygen bottle. Lars looks down below the screw and sees nothing. The rope line just ends cut cleanly as if it was severed by a knife. His mind scrambles quickly the icefall must have sliced through the rope taking roll with it. There's no way he survived. He's gone he has to get back to cecilia. He can hear her calling for rolf again. He quickly makes his way back up. The rope think focus. He has to get cecilia down when he reaches her. She's clinging to the ice wall shivering. Do you think there's still hope lars shakes his head. No cecilia won't believe it. No we have to find him. We have to go. He reaches into his back and pulls at a row and quickly fixes it to an anchor. Maybe if they're lucky they'll have just enough to make the rest. The way down the bottleneck. Cecilia i'm going to go down. I'll find a way out. You wait here for me okay. Her eyes are wide but she knots then he slips down into the depths with indeed. You're closer than you've ever been to hiring candidates with the skills you need. That's because indeed is the job site that makes hiring as easy as one two three post screen and interview all in one place. You'll get your quality shortlist of candidates whose resumes on indeed match your job description faster. He'll also only pay for the candidates that meet must have qualifications. And you can schedule and complete video interviews right there in your indeed dashboard indeed makes connecting with an hiring the right talent fast and easy with tools like indeed instant match giving you quality candidates whose resumes on indeed fit your job description immediately and indeed skills tests that on average reduce hiring time by twenty seven percent according to talent nest indeed delivers four times. More hires than all other job sites combined. If you're hiring you need indeed get started right now with the free seventy five dollars sponsored job credit upgrade your job post indeed dot com slash. The ons that's a seventy five dollars credit at indeed dot com slash. The ons one more time that's indeed dot com slash. The odds offer valid. Through june thirtieth terms and conditions apply brought to you by marvel studios loki and original series streaming. This wednesday only on disney. Plus tom hit allston returns as everyone's favourite imperious of mischief as ventures outside of time and space in the sixth episode event. Also starring owen wilson google mathura and woman misako. The series takes place after the events of avengers. Endgame don't miss marvel studios loki original series streaming. This wednesday only on disney plus. Cecilia hits her headlamp. The light flickers once and has gone. She can't see thing and now she's alone on the mountain in the dark without ralph. Her heart is racing tears. Roll down her face. An image flashes into her mind his smiling face as he built so to dylan tune on his her monica blow in the wind. She shakes her head. He must be here somewhere. Maybe he's hurt waiting for them and then she hears a voice from below cecilia. It's lars cecilia. repel down. it's okay. Just hurry. She reaches forward in the dark and fuels for the rope. She gives it a tug and then slides down into the darkness as she repels headlamp flickers on and off casting eerie shadows on the ice and rock maybe lars found rolf. She thinks they'll be standing at the bottom waiting for her. They can go home together when she gets to the bottom. She looks around no roof. Only lars where is he she feels cheated like lars tricked her into coming down but then she sees lars face in the soft glow of his headlamp. It's gentle and soft cecilia. Listen he's gone. We have to go look for him tomorrow when it's light k. Cecilia stands frozen trying to comprehend it all just this morning. The sun was shining and she was looking down into her husband's smiling face. Now it's dark and he's gone. She puts one foot in front of the other and continues down. The pemba sherpa looks over the edge of the icy slope above the traverse. It's ten pm. He made good time down the snowfield and quickly found the top of the traverse. There's a problem. There's no rope leading down. The korean team took it after they descended. The only thing left behind was the ice axe. They used to anchor the rope now. The koreans are seated down below quiet and exhausted. This means the remaining climbers on the mountain will need to get down the one hundred fifty foot wall without the aid of a rope a drop. That's roughly the height of twelve story. Building he walks back a few paces and confers with sherpa cheering door jay. From the american team they decide to descend and wait for the others at the bottom. Maybe they can help. Guide them down while they wait. Pemba watches the korean team. There disoriented and their movement. Slow it takes some of them fifteen minutes to put on their headlamps a tasks that would normally only take two at last. Here's the voices of his teammates from above the ridge. There's no rope. He shouts be careful. Go very slowly. The men kicked their crampons and access into the ice for support and slowly carefully lower themselves down. Pemba is glad to see them. Along with the climber from italy when they get to firm ground they stand quietly against the wall staring into the shadowy darkness around them. One of the mumbles. Our we find the rope. Everything just looks the same there in even worse shape than the last pemba sabam the altitude and the climb up have decimated all of them. The korean team leader. Mr kim sits in the snow panting for breath. No one is leading the way or at all. If someone doesn't do something they will all die here on. The mountain. pemba quickly calls the small group of sherpas together. The four of them are the only ones still in good shape listen. The climbers need our help to get down the traverse. We're going to need to rope them together. Does anybody have a rope. One of the sherpa rustles through his pack. I have one. I saved and in case of emergency. That's great. we'll stand to at the front and two at the end will hold onto the rope. And the climbers can click on that way we can help them get to the traverse. Everyone nods then. They begin shouting directions at climbers clip on here. Fix your harnesses to this rope. But everyone is moving so slowly. One of the climbers just lays there in the snow unresponsive gazing blankly up at the sky pemba crouches down and wraps his arms around the man's torso hauling up. Another sherpa helps flipping the climber's harness onto the rope. Line get up. You have to stand now. There could be an avalanche at any time. He's relieved to see two of the climbers. Now appear alert. Cast his teammate. From the north team and marco comfort tola the only italian climber to make it up to the summit from the italian team. Marco was an experienced climber and guide having summited six of the tallest mountains in the world. Hembo is glad to have us help. Pemba checks the line and turns to the climbers. Let's go please. We need to walk but walking is hard for everyone with each step. The climbers feet sink into the snow. Making them think they're on a steeper. Climb than they are. One climber takes two steps forward and plops back down into the snow exhausted pulling others down with them. Some of them fall asleep. Get up please. You have to keep moving together. None of them can see the trail when they do walk they wander left and right bumping into each other pemba worries a disoriented climber street too close to the edge and they'll fall off dragging everyone else with them in the dark. It's hard to see anything but the ropes must be here somewhere all at once. The line of climbers stops and one by one they sink to the ground and relief then a few clip from the line and begin to wander off premise. Is this isn't working. He gathers the sherpas again. This is impossible to find the start of the fixed rope passing. You come with me. We'll go ahead when we find the rope. You signal back to the others and you come with your headlamp okay. Pasang lama is the sherpa from the korean team. He knots he in pemba moved quickly up the snow until they find the ridge of the rock down below embassies. The first anchor glinting in the headland saying this is it using them to the others and wait for them here. I'll repel down to check the rest of the anchors and make sure the rope securely fixed. When pemba gets to the first anchor he sees it solid. The second isn't a secure and the rope line is buried beneath ice and snow. He pulls it out and fixes a second screw next to him. He doesn't get to the third anchor because a few feet past the second he can see. Something's not quite right. The rope is hanging loose. It's not tied to an anchor. It's not tied to anything. It looks like it's been cut by something. But what pemba aims. His light around the bottleneck. The light cast shadows craggy rock then. He aims his headlamp straight up. A huge chunk of this is simply gone. It's collapsed there. Must have been an avalanche. He points his headlamp down the bottleneck below and his heart starts to race. The avalanche away everything including the rope. Now he has no idea how. The climbers coin to get down. It's almost midnight and cecilia. Scoop feels like asleep walker. She still can't believe all the rope. And the bottleneck is just gone. It's been completely swept away by the avalanche. The gully is littered with shards of ice loose. Rock she enlarged have to move slowly step by step lars climbs ahead using his ice axe and crampons to the footholds. In the ice. Every few yards he stops shines his headlamp upwards to help guide cecilia. She isn't sure if she will make it but then she hears lars is encouraging voice. Almost there a few more steps. Just keep going. After thirty minutes. The ground feels more steady flatter. And she's able to stand up straight and walk slowly using her ice axe to steady her progress and then cecelia's catches on one of the rocks and she's tumbling down the mountain. She screams for lars. But there's nothing we can do. She's starting to pick up speed. She grabs her ice axe and lifts it over her head and slams into the snow. Oliver might she comes to jet ring. Halt lars russia's down cecilia. Are you okay. She pats her hands over her body. Her pants are ripped but nothing else is broken lars polls cecilia to her feet and they keep going but cecilia is shaken cold. What's the point. She's so tired but then she hears a voice. You must go on. Go over to the rope clip on. Its ralph but he's not here but he is in her head. She wonders if she's hallucinating. But the voice sounds so clear. They're nearing the end of the bottleneck in there in the snow is the rope laid by the circus earlier in the day. She and lars both claybon. You got the rope okay. Good now check your equipment in the distance. They see a flashing strobe light. Someone in camp for must have put it out for the climbers. It's like a lighthouse. Signaling to a stricken ship on a storm tossed as she gets closer she starts to think wolf. We'll be waiting for her. of course he will. He's always so safety conscious. He'll be there she has to hurry. You might be worried when they reach camp four and she crawls into the tenth they shared. She sees data sympathy with ad. free listening. Find your next podcast with the premium personalized experience on one hundred plus like against the odds. These highly immersive series takes you straight into the action of the most thrilling survival stories. Here's a quick preview. But then something glints in the beam of his roving flashlight. A pair frightened eyes staring back at him. You can't believe there. In the shadows a few feet in front of him. Shivering yet alive is a child alot. The child says trembling voice then one by one more silhouettes emerged from the dark. How how many your little grigor. Rick looks back sean. My god we found them. We found all of them. Listen to against the odds early and add free by joining one plus amazon prime members can get four months free by going to www dot amazon dot com slash prime day wondering dri p l u s terms and conditions apply. Wandry feel the story. Ms go shifts from foot to foot trying to stay awake. It's been over an hour since the two sherpas left to look for the rope or maybe it's been longer. She can't be sure her mind is fuzzy like her brain is wrapped a blanket of cotton. She's still holding onto the rope. The sharpest had them clip onto so they wouldn't get lost. Mr kim look over his shoulder and clips from the line moscow. Please listen we have to go on ahead. We can't wait here any more when he defined the fixed rope to help us get down. Mr kim is not only careers team. Leader he's miss goes closest climbing companion last year. They conquered three twenty six thousand foot peaks. Together he's always looked out for her like a mother hen guarding and chick but right now she's not sure what he means she can't think straight but we have to wait here. The sherpas went on ahead. They told us to wait moscow. I'm afraid i'm getting frostbite. I can't feel my feet at all. We need to go down. Miss go shakes her head. But we can't leave the rest of the team jimmy with them. They'll be fine. And if we can find the anchor and rope we can bring the other there. Yes that's right. Jimmy carr's here. Dramatic boteh is. Miss goes favourite sherpa. She thinks of him almost like her own son. They can trust you. Hugh will make sure nothing goes wrong. Okay yes let's go the to surge forward past the rest of the team. Then they veer off. Searching for the traverse marco convert tola tries to pierce the darkness with his headlamp. He sees a few members of the korean team. Up ahead and germany donal. He's up there too. He agreed with pemba and the other sherpas when they suggested clipping everyone to moving rope line to look for the traverse but now the sherpas have left and some of the climbers haven't clipped others are inching forward or to the side with no clear direction. they're zigzagging like a crocodile with no idea where they're going. This is madness markle and clips from the rope and scrambles up next to jer- he thinks of jurors a friend. They spent long nights talking at base camp. He's even given him a nickname. Jesus because of jurors long hair and beard. He needs to convince him that. This is a bad idea. Walking around in the dark could cost them their lives jer. I don't think we can find the rope line tonight. I think we should just wait until the sun comes up. You know you're stares at him blankly the lack of oxygen as affecting him badly so you mean. Spend the night in the death zone. Both climbers no. Neither option is great. I just have a bad feeling jer. Crevasses all over the place. We could walk off the edge and never even know it. If we dig in here. I think we might have a better chance. Okay maybe you're right. Marco helps chur une clip from the line. A few yards away and find a spot to sit down together. They start to dig out two holes seizure look one for us to sit in together to keep warm and one for us to put our feet in as great perfect. They both sink into the snow. It's quiet except for their breathing. What's that sudden lane. A sound pierces the air. It sounds like a rocket ship crashing into the earth. And then it's gone. It's quiet again. Juror in marco look at each other. Was that an avalanche. Maybe an icefall from the distance marco. Here's people yelling. It sounds like there's shouting from beneath the saranac. But marco can't tell and suddenly silence falls again germans a little and gestures as if he wants to get up. Marco tries to soothe him. No we have to stay here anything else. Right now is foolish. Marco sits up and looks around in the distance. There's a light. He points at it and turns to jer. See jesus look that's camp. It's not so far away. We'll get there in the morning. But marco wants to be comforted to he digs into a pocket of his own down suit and pulls out his satellite phone. His teammate can't four picks up awake. Listen to me you sleep and you die. Keep your hands and feet moving. Marco knows he's right but it's so hard he's been climbing for twenty four hours. His body is heavy and then there's the silence he's never wished more for the sound of a saturday night in rome the shouting the music. The people the quiet is enough to drive a man crazy. Jer you awake. He can see the irishman nodding off. He has to do something jer. you know. The song super lay montagnier ski though. It's a song called la monta nahra in italian tune. Marco's father taught him as a child. Con chair begins to home along the wall. Or that's it that's it but the rhythm of the song is to soothing. Marco sees jurors start the does off again jer. Stay up keep moving. Clap your hands and feet together. Don't stop keep clapping. Marco coaches jer like a preschool teacher. That's how they'll live through the night wilco. Von roy stumbles forward in the snow. He has no idea where he is. He's gotten turned around so many times for all he knows. He's on the other side of the mountain on his way to china instead of pakistan. Which means he'll probably be dead in an hour. He has to find the rope line. During the daylight it would be easy but in the darkness. Nothing about the landscape looks like he's ever seen before he can't believe this is happening. He planned the expedition down to every last detail. The dutch team was here early. There's some of the best climbers in the camp and the most prepared. Now all four members who made it to the top are separated. And who knows where pemba cass enter. His mind feels like it's unraveling. He wonders if he is hallucinating. It's the sound of someone singing. The tune echoes around him. Then he gets to his knees and inches forward and then he stands then twenty feet or fifty feet or two hundred. Who knows he finds junior. And marco huddled together in the snow in the brooding shadow of the mountain. It's a brief moment of grace jer. Marco i got turn around. You've been here the whole time. We can't find the ropes. They're nowhere is total shit. Well let's try again together. Maybe this time we can find them. We can split up not go too far staying. Communication marco is so tired but he knows wilco was right and they stay here much longer. Gerbil fall asleep. Come on jer up. You go then. The three climbers set off again. Wilco is obsessed. This mountain is not going to beat him. He's stronger than that. He just needs to dig in and keep looking. He finds himself at the edge of the ridge. He feels the emptiness below him. He leans over trying to see down below. Then here's marco yelling. Wilco this is suicide please stop. We have to stop for the night. Okay okay marco starts digging another set of holes in the snow or injure but wilco builds his own one hundred feet away. They only need to make it through the five hours. He thinks then the sun will come up. It's two am and jimmy boteh sits waiting for a signal from pemba sherpa. Jimmy has been hired as the sherpa for the korean team and he. It's his responsibility to make sure. The korean climbers make it down safely. Jimmy met the korean team when he acted as sherpa for them on everest. It was ms mizuko who convinced him to come to cato. He wasn't so sure but he and his wife are having a baby and the money will go a long way to their future. He never imagined he'd find himself year. Twenty thousand feet up in the dark trying to lead people to safety and then pemba sherpa went off to find the rope line. And now mr kim. The team leader and ms ago are both gone. They must have unclaimed from the rope and set off on their own what he can't leave the three other. Korean team climbers behind. He wishes he would have listened to his instincts. Ketu was too dangerous. Maybe the mountain doesn't want them here right now. He could be warm at home in nepal drinking tea with his wife. The smell of dinner on the stove. His mind begins drift off. When suddenly allowed frat pierces the air and a white wave of snow horse down. The mount jimmy is hurled off his feet and sweeps past the koreans down the mountain in a soon nami of ice and rock the next thing. He knows he's hanging tangle of ropes somewhere over the ledge. He can't feel his limbs when he looks up he sees two of the korean climbers dangling from the ropes and the rocks above him both are hanging from their legs upside down clamped in from their harnesses dramatic panics. This can't be happening. This isn't where he's meant to die. He's only thirty two years old. What about his parents. What about his wife. They will blame themselves for his death for letting him take these risks. He can't let that happen. He takes a deep breath. His whole body aches but for a moment his mind is calm. I am strong. I can hike down the mountain on my own but no he can't leave the other climbers. It's his duty to help them down to safety. He musket down to help them but as he struggles to free himself from the rope pain shoots through his legs. He realizes even if he is able to free himself. There's still no way he'll be able to stand much less walk. He goes limp tangled in the ropes. Like a mary annette. His only hope is that someone will make it back down to camp four and send up a rescue mission in the morning. he shivers. It's going to be a very cold night. This is the second episode of our three part series k. to savage mountain. If you like our show please give us a five star rating and review. Follow against the odds on apple podcasts. Amazon music the wondering app or wherever. You're listening right now. Join one replace in the wondering out to listen one week early. And add free. In the episode known you'll find some links and offers from our sponsors. Please support them by supporting them. You help us offer the show for free and a quick note about our scenes in most cases. We can't exactly know what was said but everything is based on historical research. If you'd like to learn more about this event we highly recommend the book the summit triumph turn to tragedy on qe. Two's deadliest days by pat alfie and nba gil j sherpa and no way down by graham bully. We also recommend the documentary. The summit directed by nick ryan. I'm your host mike corey. Simon worrell wrote this episode. Our editor is more walls. Brian white is our associate producer. Our audio engineer. Sergio enriquez edit and sound design by joe. Richardson and original music by francesco. Butter la are executive producers. Are stephanie gents and marshal. Louis for wondering it's a case that has haunted. Jefferson township new jersey for more than thirty years on a snowy january night. fourteen year. Old tommy sullivan. Did the unthinkable murdered his mother in cold blood set fire to their house and then took his own life out of the flames of this horrible tragedy. Investigations revealed that tommy was himself part of a satanic cult sparking a nationwide hysteria now known as the satanic panic this monumental moment in american culture led to communities nationwide and forcing draconian measures to protect their children from what they perceived to be the devil's influence. Even the catholic church was convinced this was a case of demonic possession. On the new podcast. The devil within the truth of the grisly murder is finally revealed. Subscribe to the devil within on apple. Podcasts amazon music. Or wherever you listen to podcasts you can also binge the entire series right now early and add free when you join wondering plus in the wondering app.

Cecilia cecilia lars rolf Pemba Wilco ralph Hembo pemba sherpa Lars Mr kim Cecilia school cecilio Lars nessa mr kim alberto
Stormcast Eternal Battletome Preview | 3rd Edition Warhammer Age of Sigmar

AoS Coach

29:15 min | Last month

Stormcast Eternal Battletome Preview | 3rd Edition Warhammer Age of Sigmar

"Get i am welcome to. The iowa's coach sneak peek into the storm. Kosta turtles battle time. They games workshop was kind enough to send me an early copy to checkout in this video. I'm going to share with you. Some of my initial observations with matchplay focus as always with these previews. i'm going to avoid as many low spoilers as possible and really just focus in on the rules. Kitchen us off with one of the most exciting updates in the battle. Tones for third edition is a digital code. Now at the back of the book you'll find a unique card that you can say that you can cash in once once. You've regained that it's done. You've got it now at the time of recording the agency. My app is not fully released. And i've been unable to unlock the book digitally however for players like made this is a massive wing because i like to have all my books electronically it means. Carrie neely as much things to events allows me to list right on planes and trains and literally any way that i happen to be or from playing a game it means i can easily access it without bringing someone to carry on my book so for me. Massive we en- great step in the right direction. Now hunting in specifically into the stone cast the way that you build your army has fundamentally changed now to kick things off you've got you storm host. You storm host remained the same per se. You still get to choose one of the ice storm host whether it be has of sigma hallard nights you. You'll be indicate as your angles of held in hamma. That hasn't changed. But what has changed is the way that the sub allegiances a structured in the past. If you looked at previous battle times oh battle times. That are actually out there. That aren't even stone cost. You'll notice that when you take a sub allegiance it will give you a command trait an audifax. You'll give you a command ability and it will it will dictate often. You'll first choices with the stone. Cost sub allegiances. You are no longer required to take certain command traits or artifacts as your first choice and we'll talk a bit more about those options. light off. Plays from second edition will notice schalken or is no longer an allegiance ability however it is one of the four options for your command rights. Broken rooms marathi introduced a set of rules for the storm costs which were very different than what you normally playing. And that was something called a storm cape now what they've done essentially migrated the two sets of rules. You still got your science of the storm which allows you to put down a unit on the table top and then for every one unit on the table you can put one unit in reserves and bring it down you in your movement phase alternatively. If you don't want to do that you can tap into those broken ribs marathi roles which are now your legal roles and they are now counted as a stone cape. So you've got two options whether you want to build a sigh on of the storm army all you to build a stone cape bobby. Depending on which one you pick you will gain a bunch of keywords and there'll be some additional rules. I mentioned earlier about the signs of the storm which allows you to place one unit in reserve for every one you on the table. You put them down outside of nine. That really hasn't changed. If you weren't familiar with broker in marathi there are a couple of really cool rules that you're going to get access to one of the big ones ease. One in every four of your units can be a coalition cds of seek my units. That means you could bring in a unit of phoenix. God you could bring in a frequent general on griffin. You could bring in any anything from the stole from the cities of seek marange. That's just a couple. you bring a phoenix. You could bring a high dry. You could bring a girl basham age. Whatever it might be how they're awesome additional rules things like you'll cities of seek my units will get a additional bravery if within range of a cut stone caper dima and this also a really interesting rule. I didn't think it was in brooklyn marathi. But i really like it and what it is in the first and second battle round you'll friendly storm keep redeem. This is not signs of the storm. This says your storm cape side if that unit is contesting in objective partially or fully within the territory now each model is gonna count as three when contesting an objective so that's massive in addition to that starting from the third battle round That also then extends to object these outside of your territory so in the first couple of rounds really east defend your home objective because you're models accounting mall and then in lighter in in from around three and onwards it means any of your stolen costs so keep redeeming units that contesting objectives anywhere on the. We'll we'll count as three on top of that. If an enemy unit ends a charge move within one inch of that storm cape redeemer. That is within six of objective. Though on they'll do some mortal wounds on a three ops. Oh really great at your objectives. And if you don't go that route you can still go into that reserve that one for one. Preserved pays comedown burn innate. But at your opponent now the customization doesn't end there. I mentioned earlier. That your sub allegiances do not require you to take specific command trait and artifact which means that you've now unlocked so many great options. There are some changes but ultimately you got some really good stuff coming. You've got full command traits to choose from. I mentioned schalken all being one of them. You've got staunch defender that allows you to roll the amount of damage that you use with the shield of civilians days plus one say through some conditions through the envoy of the heavens. You got four options. You've got some some additional command abilities so instead of yo sub allegiance giving you command ability. You can choose one of six. You've got nine different artifacts to choose from three from being forged to stone forge weapons three from the heavens roth armagh and then three from the effects of the tempest. So there's a couple of really cool things things like the you know. The obsidian amulet allowing the beira tweak no spills and endless spells. You could be looking at some things now. If you are old stone cost you might recognize things like the The blades of heroes or even the hammer of might which are two of the three weapons a relatively unchanged between books but then you get some additional rules things like the things of toco theun does moshel wounds. In addition so these are little bonus there are there's a whole bunch of artifacts which is great You did lose though you stand at treasures. Your mystic lights your celestial staves and you'll scrawls of power they are no longer selection unfortunately so if you had like an zero for example with mystic lighter you had a wizard with you know scroll of power. They aren't as one of the selections anymore there are six bells to choose from from the spill. My personal favorite would be storm fall. We on a five has a range of twelve you a point on the battlefield within that twelve and you roll the dice for each enemy unit within three inch and a role of a three that unit co pilot. and so. it's a nice little way to defend yourself to restrict the amount of damage coming back to you very similar to the shock with the nets the other spill that. I really like you celestial blades that adds plus wanted the wound rolf from mla weapon within twelve all within eighteen of the cost if it is not lord or Ordure kofi and would there are three price to choose from these also seeks. Mount tries to choose from so the level of customization through storm cost is through the roof which is partially some of the challenges with may previewing this because he's just so much great information previously. When you chose your sub agents you had to choose a ability a command ability a command trait an effective powell defined by that sub allegiance. And i did mention earlier that than in the new rules. That is really broken down. So we've already talked earlier about the spells and the prayers. And the things that are coming to you already and you can customize but you are going to get some extra rules that depending if you take the hammer. Hammers of seek ma. The celestial will bring the astral tampa. Some of these are going to unlock unlock battleline. Which i'll talk about in a hot minute that you know you also get some additional rules to really double down on the type of army. You want to build some of my personal favorites early on will either be the hammers of seek ma which allows you to get a six six upwards safe while they're in range of an objective or it could be the knocks the nights excelsior which gained you a plus one to heat and weren't if there were more enemy models than your paladin. So if you'll someone like me who might be thinking about taking at least one or two units of annihilated. This would work really well. 'cause you're highlight is coming into three. You might want to not want to reinforce them. And as long as there's more than three models you're gonna get plus one plus one word which i think that brings them down a twos into his memory. Bits either way some really nice rules but as you can see on the screen is way more different roles depending on you know. Maybe you're an angles of health and hammer. If you've kept you. I on the latest white dwarf. You will notice. That army's like sons of behavior have been gaining faction specific grant strategies battle. Tactics and coal battalions. The good news for you is your now getting them to in this book. You're gonna get three new grain strategies to choose from specific to storm cost now from early observations. I'm believing that they are harder to achieve than the generals hamble choices. However we don't know how long are we gonna seat in general's handbook twenty twenty one so this might end in a month's time and it might become a whole lot hotter so you know ki ki that with a grain of salt. No that you've got these as an option and it's not forcing you to not take one of the other battle pack so if you like playing you go one you like. Hold the line You appeal of faith or whatever. It is You could always still do that. I was going to pick one of these new ones. i would probably pick one. That's more focused on the dragons like the jacuzzi in defiance. And i'm definitely going to be getting one of those dragon so probably i'll be a little bit biased towards drag. It's maybe in this video. I'll try to keep it at bay. I'm i'm very excited about dragons you've also got access to six additional battle tactics and Some of them kinda feel a little bit focused to the different builds. Whether it's a storm came so the signs of the storm. If again i was grabbing a one of the dragons or two dragons or building around you know some of the smaller dragons or even a star drake things like the jacuzzi and destruction or amana. A measure of on a would be popular to me. Some of the other ones seem situational and again. I don't have to just choose from his batch. I can still choose from the ones in the battle. Pack storm of also gained. Access to three core battalions out for matchplay now. These rules are not new. So you're not gonna get anything unique that the not getting in the core rulebook see still getting strategist magnificent reunified slayers all that stuff right. It's all very very soon. Love that way that you've seen the organizational structure will change. You'll notice there. The brotherhood command for example allows you to take two commanders which isn't really a thing in other armies. I would love by the way abroad. Command in some of my armies and two of those that you know if i was going to build my fullest i mentioned earlier to dragons different. Be thinking about the brotherhood command. However you know for me the other one the redeem redemption brotherhood would be a great way to reduce the amount of drops in your army. It might be a nice way to really boost at your false maybe in conjunction with the that a bring yourself down to maybe to drop as well ball while extending the amounts off by commander subcommanders as well as a whole bunch of troops in the force. But if you are going to go down the ballista route. And i think the ballista has changed a little bit. And it's looking at nasa. You may find the sole strike brotherhood equally valuable. Especially because you get that free all at attack or unleash shell. That doesn't require a lead. To activate one of the cool things for storm cost players is that you have gained unlimited on the unlimited. And it's twenty one different options to build your ideal army specifically around basha line. Now you judy kate. You liberate his liquid as you vanquishes. You've vindicate. I always better line regardless of which part of the book you to build around however there are fifteen other options that you can unlock either by sub allegiance. So you'll notice that nights. Excelsior hamlet hammas of seek ma the tempest laws and the astral templates ago unlocked battleline. All if your general is not judicata or keyword it star drake adriko theun. You'll also unlocks and battleline so may being a bit of a dragon person right now. i'm looking at. How do i make potentially stormed reich god battleline. Alternatively i mentioned a ni- light is annihilated a hot talk a bit about them a little bit later. But if you haven't seen the wolf's girl really good you might went on lock them as battleline so you may want to go down the not. Excelsior out. now why would you wanna make them battleline. Not just a regular troops. Will i guess it depends on if you want to double reinforce themselves knowing that A regular troupe can only be reinforced once and i could reinforce the annihilates from a unit of three up to nine if alabama line that is expensive though and That they quite costly in appoints bit. That's just an example of why this one might might be valuable to you. There's some other really big changes and smaller changes across the board Being that storm cost has almost eighty wall scrolls. You will notice that there are small changes. You'll see that some of your foot. Heroes have lost their command abilities. Which kinda came as a surprise to me and i wonder if this is going to be a trend moving forward with some of those five wound and seeks wearing heroes not having a command ability or if they do each just you can action all at attack for free let defense for free something. Generic as opposed to some of these quite meaty synergistic kind of command abilities. You will notice that some of your wall. Scroll have changed. You might have noticed if you're a sob- black grave world's playoff skeletons for example used to have two options swords of speeds and they kind of merge them into one profile and some of your units have had the same thing that kind of merged it into a single profile and phasing out some of those older rules. Some of the key changes that. I've noticed in the first edition style storm cost. This is the very early what's doesn't sixteen seventeen couple of things i'll call for you. Is that the celestin. Prime has gained a four plus ward safe. And it's already got the three of homicides this this lesson prime is a tank. Artie loved him. As the city's playoff. I am chuffed. That get yourself a less than prime. I think it's really quite good. You'll you'll not zero now. This was one that i was always worried about and it kind of happened. What i thought was going to happen and the not zero s- used to have a rere o one's ability of bubble and unfortunately lost it. It turned into a plus one to hit bubble. Probably no surprise given that rolls are being phased out of the game. It also lost. Its once per battle. Mortal wound lantern. Used to be able to do md three d six mortal wounds to demon unit within eight inches. I think it was but for a lot of cd's to seek my applies especially who would bring that stone cost unit in the The non zero st get them. That rewrote wants to hit I can see that the the non zero is gonna be working from home for a while. The the night geraldo lost. Its ability to make. Storm cost units retreat and charge us to be able to retreat. And or running judge gabriel. Show hot lost the three plus command -bility so it used to be able to add plus straight in the charge. Gav has lusted it. Liberators have gained plus one. They save as long as half. The unit still has shield. So as long as you're not reduce the shields and just keep with the special grain hammer or whatever it is you'll still get pulse onto your alma safe. And what's really cool is at the end of the combat phase. It will deal d. Three mortal wounds on a full plus if the enemy unit is within one each of the liberators out within six inches of the objective and remember earlier. The stone cape did have some interesting roles by being out to do some mortal wounds and do some protection around the objective. Liberators would just kind of seen a josh. We that style quite nicely. Also you drako. Theun god i know to seek my players. Were freaking out about this. Because there was some leak wall scrolls around the truck earthy and cod not having a shooting attack. Good news folks. They still have their shooting attack. Cedric earthy and. God still living cds. You're gonna get it. It's all good looking at some of the second edition changes. This is the the models it came at around seoul wars. Yeah eighth a wing surprised me. They went up six to sixty five points which hurts. They used to be what went from fifty to forty to forty five. They now sixty five points so they can still retreat in charge which is great but sixty five points makes you really reconsider. I wings me value. I bring endless spilled. Why go for the triumph. You not in canto lost eat spirit flocks so it used to be able to drop some bombs if someone charged you and do some more words. That's no longer available and really interesting update to the van. God raptors are always love the the long strike rep this having thirty inch range. The heat and wind profile had switched so it used to be. I think it was heating on choose. Wounding on threes now is hitting on threes winning on twos which is actually a really good change because you could always all at attack and get it on tuesday and twos. It still does the to mortal wounds when an unmodified heat role of six happens however the one thing that kinda shocked me was that used to be out to us eating combination with the eighth wings and then the eighth Wings could count a charge your opponent if they within a certain range but they've actually now lost that yet you can't use the wings to counter an opponent who is trying to charge your vein. God raptors the not aquilla ride. Roger of the wind has changed and instead of being generic ozaka random. Like you know it was sixty six or something that was. It's now just turn into a flat teleport so you could just teleport anywhere across the board. Nar dos role required as long as it ends outside of nine inches from an enemy so pretty consistent with traditional teleporting and units coming in from reserve in the game a mentioned earlier the solicitor. Celestial ballista had changed. One of the changes. I really liked was that the lightning shot has changed from Used to be on heating on threes now wounds on three twos and it's gained some extra rent so it's now three and it's doing damage. Although it did lose its exploiting day. Six hit so some slight changes but overall think celestial vista has gained a little bit of strengthen. It might work really well if you're looking at that artillery focused kohl battalion now. You third generation models which is a models that came coming in twenty twenty one these a lot of them as a lot of changes a lot of great models. I can't talk about them all right now on the walls. Ob for ten years so a call that a couple of ones that really stood out for me. First off the dragon's it's it's the thing that kinda dr- quote my attention. The dragons both have eighteen words both Both mu fossa and scott. If you haven't seen the main check it out it's hilarious. But both of the dragons do have by eighteen wins. They both cost six hundred points. They are three up saves. Neither of them have a wood. Which kinda surprised me. I expected them to either have a would save all have way more words than attain. I also expect them to the over six hundred points. They are unique as well and they will take up one of your leader and behemoth slot. So i imagine this is gonna be a big chunky model. May be on a one thirty one sixty base. Who knows me. It's time to tell right now now. The blue dragon is at kron. Kron now grandes. I think it is that is more of a utility wizard. So it's still packs a punch as a drag and like let's let's be real hits a dragon but it doesn't hurt nearly as much as the red one so the the wizard dragon will cost two spells and it will unbeaten two spells it signature spells interesting want it goes on a nine. So it's a bit of an aggressive hod spell to cost. I imagine you're probably sitting on the backfield near arcane because it is a ranch twenty full spell and if you successfully get it off you can either. Deep buff units rend to hit two attacks. All it's safe by one. You could reduce some things down which is quite fascinating on the other side. You've got a i i. It is Red dragon skoll. Eat is modest. Heating combat its tail profile is based on the amount of wounds within range of it which is really cool is going to do. A whole bunch of damage does like to damage. I think pop. He saw three were ren to united. It's quite quite aggressive. This is the combat dragon. And probably the one. I would go for the the rule that really interests me with the combat style dragon. Is that when it destroys a unit. It's going to gain some boost civilized gain plus attack if it kills a hero or a month stop against plus one to his running charge role if it kills a unit that has a wound characteristic of three or more. That wasn't a here. are all it heels. One wound if the enemy has a wound characteristic of two or less so depending on what you're doing and it it does stack. I believe from memory. But don't quote me on that one you want to stone cost chariot. That wants surprised. The heck out of me mostly because thought it was going to be a better a little bit better than the drake point chariots chariots on that good generally in the game but you are seeing that it is essentially a mini steinhorn. And why. I say to me stern hone. Why doesn't do the amana damage in combat. Like started home when it charges stone horns what they do in this rules in. Ogm all tribes. Is that when you roll your charge. Roll the amount of dice. You basically you you do. A heap of modal were in so i think he was at role of afaf five. I think it was a four. Let's roll the charter. All of nine. I i would grab nine dice. And i would roll them a full plus i would do emotional wound before combat started so This i know more trucks for example. They will use a command ability often to re roll the charge. If it's not a very gwen even if that were outside of three just to increase the amount of modal wounds that they put out. It is a twelve wound soil again. A lot of words. I i expected white less that twelve wounds on three up. Save doing mortal wounds. This is a wonderful little. it's a great model. i think it's i would definitely say them on. The table annihilated have treated for wolf scrolls very similar to the liberators. Where you had the hamas with shield or you had grand hamas so if you go with the hammers it is a chew up on a safe which is rock solid the guthrie wounds pace and they come in with three model three models per per unit obviously can reinforce or double reinforce if you get them as better line When they set up on the table unanimity unit within ten inches will take some mortal wounds on a three plus but why i really like annihilate as they get to re role they charge in the same turn that they set up. This will probably reward the The science of the storm hut builds more than maybe the stone cape. Who don't have that coming in. From reserve ability and being able to rewrote the charge is awesome. Finally the other unit of coal out you know no surprise. I talk about dragons here. We are the storm. Drake god now the still drake god are the smallest style of dragon. Certainly not as big as out too big boys. Or even you know the star drake. Why really like them is one. I can make them battleline. They have a lot of words. Have nine wounds three up honesty. They ignore spells endless bills on a full plus as a battle line unit. I take them in mean blocks of two but there is a separate option that i can take them as a single which i thought was really fascinating. A single is not bad line. I caught just cheese it out and just do three units of one storm drake and kind of get my battleline options. I have to take them in units of to the the they they're The two two of them with two hundred eighty five points or one for one hundred and forty five points but the other rule that fascinated main are really lock it is coherency is normally within one inch of the model that would suck with these type of dragon instead coherency with the storm. Dry god is within three inches. Not one inch so it allows you to take up a bit more board space and not just having to have them tag team to get super close. Which would be rather annoying. Not conducive when you. You're trying to move them around. So i really liked that. We see more of these three inch fajr. Asian a coherency in the future as always you know the true list tech is really gonna come out once we've have. Faq in the faq is gonna come out approximately full weeks off to the book. He's the shelf so we've got about a couple of weeks. Let's see what changes what doesn't change and then we can get really into the lay of the land and you know. I've only skimmed the surface in this video. Because if i didn't im- diff- video review of this particular book it would take ten years because there is like eighty eighty wolf scrolls a large. There are eight saab allegiances. There are two different ways to build. It's a sign of the storm or the stone cape. Then there's all the customization within that to the artifacts in steles and the command abilities this show much options whether you want to go liberators with you wanna go. Advocate is when you wanna go dragons with you wanna go You know there's so many different options and you know the storm cape is probably going to really benefit those old school liberators especially while you know some of the signs of the storm especially like we just saw the ni- lighter roles you know you could really see some of those new models doing really well but not to say that you restricted mix and match. You know find the combinations but you know there's a lot you can play around with. It doesn't surprise me that the roles have disappeared. The the older rules have been disappeared. Losing some of the war scroll command abilities for some of those smaller here is catch me off guard and like i mentioned my not zero so we working from home for the near utah. I mean the the plus one to bubble booby. Nice still especially You know not having to spend a command ability command point all if you happen to be dealing with leaders who often get rawdat. That might still be a way to get around it bit. Like cds of seek ma. I feel like it's gonna take some time for us to refine these lists and really find these. The nuggets of gold outside of what may be obvious. And as you can expect. I will be doing List reviews in the near future. I'll find a couple of storm cost. Players will find a couple of different builds out there. We'll talk properly and put this all into theory and try to find out what type of rules in combinations that they're tapping into to make the most of this. I would be curious to hear from you in the comments section. I know there's been a lot of previews. there's some leaks is probably other content creators. Who are doing their own version of this. I'd love to hear from you in the comments section. You know what units and rules are you most excited about and again i the only skim the surface if you are someone who is looking at building out a storm cost army. I'd highly recommend jumping into my discord. Click the link in the episode description. Because we talk chat we can chat about lists all the time and i have a whole bunch of passionate stone cost crew. Who are going to want to chat and break down. His book share their experiences. Maybe play some online games in kind of really work out what the goal is here. And how do we get ourselves matchplay ready but i appreciated these preview and united is going to be more of these coming soon. Thanks for sticking around until the end. I hope you found that video interesting and you walk through the new ideas if you did. I would appreciate it if you like on the video as well. Let's let me let me know what your thoughts are in the compensation. The conversation will continue over on each phone so lease large episode description. If you want to join the end continued. The seat called the station on a massive shot at as well to these absolutely plotting legends. These champions who have continued to support me through patriotic old youtube members that he's gone directly into supporting the maintenance and all these channel to thank you very much much appreciated at until next time role.

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Unleashing creativity and the art of selling incredible watches

The Men's Room

30:57 min | 1 year ago

Unleashing creativity and the art of selling incredible watches

"Hey this is a heck. Oh Eddy production. Hi everyone welcome to the show. If you're into watches you'll love this interview but even if you're not my next guest will have you thinking about watches in a completely different way. He's the founder and creative director of NBA NF a Swiss. What brand that makes the coolest time pieces I've ever seen and I've actually dealt quite deeply into the watch industry covering events like Dubai? Watch week which is great event if you'd like to learn about. Irala G and how brands create their products but MBA. Enough which is short for Maximilian. Bucer and friends is what you might call a niche brand. They only make around two hundred pieces a year. While companies like bright link for example make around one hundred and fifty thousand watches a year. They're watches are incredibly futuristic and complicated mechanical sculptures and they're also known for designing desk clocks that look and function like things like spiders spaceships and robots. Today we're speaking to the man who dreams up all these whimsical timepieces. Please welcome the unusually creative and talented. Maximilian bucer hi Max. Welcome to the show to be on the show. I really appreciate you coming on so first of all I love the name. Nba NF. Which is short for Maximilian? Shell and friends. Why did you choose that name when you started your watch brand in two thousand five and how did you arrive at that point? It's actually it's the whole question isn't an NBA NF. I chose because I actually hadn't found better name. What meant is. I only want to work with blue. Chevy same values the same enthusiasm passion. I wanted to follow what my parents tried to bring me up with the same values on share only with the people who've got the same values at the same time. Watchmaking saved my life. Practically thirty years ago I started creating watches. Yeagley coach that was in ninety one and I found a family. I found a passion. I've found meaning to my life but what I did was always create for the market. I was always creating to please people and it was a complete abnegation of me as a creative always created my whole life as a kid. I was creating all the time and I'd become a marketeer I'd become a guy who thought about what do others want and I felt really bad about it. I was the CEO of Harry. Winston timepieces at some point in my life to incredibly well we multiplied by ten the revenue in like five years and realized during those years that while I was getting what most men want. I was actually not getting what I wanted. The Tipping Point was my dad. Pulsing WAY BE GOING INTO THERAPY. Foreing that and realizing the loss day of my life. I want to be proud of my life and that means do not create for the others create for yourself. I started dreaming of what was going to become. Nba A very small super high. End Watchmaking company where I would create what I believe in an only co create and work with people share the same values. God's how it all started. That's a really nice story and it's it's a totally different approach than most of the other watch brands so obviously the watch. Industry is mainly based in Switzerland Your Swiss. But you're based in Dubai now. How did that happen to follow up on being happy? The quest for happiness actually The owner of a very famous watch brand release now Dan. Switzerland unfortunately passed role. Schneider built that brand living in Kuala Lumpur and twelve years ago. I had lunch with him there and said Rolf. What are you doing in Kuala Lumpur when your brand is in Switzerland and just looked at me and he said I'm seeing my children grow up? I didn't have kids in those days on it. Sort of made sense and when my wife got pregnant eight years ago I looked to turn. We were living in Geneva workshops I said let sleep nuts going what you're married to your company. I said that's problem if I live next to the workshops. I'm never going to see my daughter. My daughter's in this case grow up so basically gone find somewhere so we put the pinpoints onto a map. Came over to buy. Three suitcases are one year old daughter and started living here to see if it was possible. That was six years ago. And it's been fantastic ever since so you're basically running your company from like remotely. Guess what we're all living now living through zooms and all these videoconferences of being taped for six years for me. There's nothing really new. I know a lot of other people. It's a big shock. I've been doing this for six years and I would fly that the Geneva to the workshops or days a month and have and then the rest of the year or the week of the month. Whatever you want I would be working from home and at three o'clock in the afternoon when my daughters come back school I would stop working and we would be family doing stocks together and that's priceless. Well the good thing is now you can be with your daughters. All Day can do all. This is much more complete scheduled boundaries anymore we adopt human beings are resilient adapt and after the first weeks of going bananas more or less we found sort of routine. That's great so do you think covid nineteen will affect NBA NF operations moving forward considering how everyone is adopting this new way of working on. Let's not kid ourselves covid. Nineteen is going to change a lot of things to the whole world. Be All the schools wish that all of this is going to disappear like it was a bad dream in. I think it's GONNA is going to change a lot of things in the way we see The way we work first of all one of the first actions I took because I can I last minor slash production by fifty percents or only used to cross like two hundred twenty watches a year which is nothing. Because I've got a theory which is absolutely important. Trust is we always produced much less than what the market wants. That's one of the US to happiness as a creator and now we just slashed off of Eight. And we're doing the same for next year because I just want everybody to find it difficult to find one of my pieces now. I think most of the other brands can have to do the same thing. He's not GonNa be that easy for them. The other point. Which is important is that we've always worked where. Everybody's working in the workshops in the Office of course fall. Watchmakers is more difficult to work from home. But suddenly we've realized that it's okay to it from we're actually dealing with this. Not only us. Everybody else is seeing that our. Hr Departments GonNa react when somebody comes in and says I would like to be working from home fifty percent before it was no way Jose. Now it's GONNA be okay we're GONNA have to be able to consider it but why though I mean if covid nineteen if we find know therapeutic treatments or a vaccination and we kind of Why why couldn't we go back to a normal office setting we definitely could but we don't have any more excuses to tell our employees that they can't work from home because we've proven over the last months did we actually can manage the company with virtually everybody at home right. So and how do you think this is all GonNa Affect the watch industry? As a whole the watch industry has kind of been going through ups and downs of the last few years they have huge events usually annually in Basil Do you think that this will kind of make the take a sharp turn in any way and change the way? They market themselves. The Way people buy watches. Good question I think the only thing we can be sure today as we speak is that we can be sure if nothing meaning especially the watch. Industry has been a very evolutionary industry. Which hasn't changed much if anything in the last thirty years? It's just grown. It's grown because there was more and more demand and being very successful has not allowed the industry to rethink itself. The last three months has seriously made everybody rethink themselves and I think now the industry is going to actually be more creative. It's interesting we. We have been brainstorming over the last eight weeks with my team and we found all sorts of new ideas because we have to because ninety percent of our retail is closed and fifty percent of autism. Suppliers are probably going to go bankrupt this year and because we've got no money to communicate slash communication budgets and we found some fantastic ideas which we could have very easily found an enabled before cove it but we were not thinking that way. We will not pushing ourselves to the limit. We're not trying to find because everything went very well and okay. We had up some of the industry. We never had a down but the industry had its ups and downs and and of course then it was like Oh fire a few hundred thousand people and then rehired win. I don't think we're going to think that way anymore. I think we're going to rethink ourselves. What are some of the ideas that are mentioning that you guys have come up with just already in communication? If you look at three weeks ago I had never even heard of what an algae life was and instagram. Live than we've organized our own platform where I'm now interviewing other creators with adding thousands of dollars each of them and actually buying watches just often and when we were not inexpensive face. Average retail price is hundred thirty thousand dollars and every I g live we do an I talk about. Whatever the using what we're trying to do boom behind we've got retailers calling up some use SCOLD US UP. Heard you live is incredible. Would like to know more about the brand etc etc. So that's just one of the many examples. Give you another example. Every time we create a product and we've come out with eighteen calibres fifteen years calibrate like whole new concept whole you engine at that's exceptional industries. But she lebron's owners hours and I've kept one of every prototype. That's the one we would show to customers to take orders when you look at it today. We're sitting on ten million dollars. Worth OF PROTOTYPES AT RETAIL PRODUCTS. Which we always considered what unsellable because they were prototypes. Now suddenly you look at yourself and say we do something what that s of course we can. We're not going to start selling them to write less than center. That's not what we're interested in. Can we actually grow and create something even better with this incredible products? We've got at home. We've had create ideas coming out. You're going to see at the end of the year. One of the many ideas. We've come out with another idea on created a second brand in barrel which was a much lower price point rant which is not only watches before the whole process. The first prototypes. Everything actually killed the brand Before it launched in October twenty eighteen. Why because I don't have enough time already friend be and I don't have enough time for my family and I realized I enjoyed the whole creativity. Process is an enormous responsibility. It's you create a brandon later and I just was not ready to commit to that but then suddenly we've got all these ideas that we've already created and now at finding ways to actually make them come but in a different way so you'll see that also normally beginning of twenty twenty one again something we would not have dared. Do that's also interesting. We always scared what other people think of us. What are fanned try to follow is think of us. This is a moment where you have to stop being scared and take many more risks. We've always been enormous risk-takers but he now we're we're actually pushing this to a whole new level. That sounds super exciting. So just to give people an idea of how your creative mind works tell me about NBA NF latest release. Which I think is the latest really. Release the starfleet explored this clock which is a smaller version of something. You created Six years ago Your creations are really playful. They're almost like adult toys. If that's the right term. But they're very expensive toys. Of course this. Starfleet clock costs around ten thousand five hundred dollars retail There are limited editions right. Absolutely so starfleet explorers stuffy is a really interesting story so armee a timepiece create. I create kinetic sculptures which gives time average prices of ammunition timepieces between sixty thousand. Four hundred thousand. Us dollars and we have very few every month year and they're all autism. Pieces all hunch. In central nine years ago I created a gallery the mad gallery in Geneva. Mechanical Ought Devices Actually Gallery rates mechanical art and from there I had the idea of approaching other manufacturers of autism of beautiful mechanical objects and suggesting to them my crazy ideas so I approach lipid eighteen thirty nine which is the oldest high end clockmaker in the world. Basic Switzerland also went down very traditional classic. And they're not doing well because nobody buys clocks anymore and I came to them with the design of what was going to be the stall sleep very first one and basile instead of kicking me out as he probably should to me said. You're not let's do this. And so imagine that Super Conservative classic clockmaker. Creating an object. Like that and it was an instant success. They sold hundred and seventy-five because it was one hundred seventy fifth street in less than a few months and it opened a whole new world for them. Where then he came back to me and said. Do you have any other ideas? I said sure got tons of ideas. Just ready I will. I will draw at least new. Copsey your for you and that's what we'd be doing six years we've created twelve so the all my ideas but they actually engineer them and and produce that all handmade in the little factory moons. I've employs lab so we don't make any money out of this. Nba after make any money out of it really. Yes it is. It's not a business. It's a creative focus. I enjoy myself like crazy creating these pieces for them. We actually even help them sell them. We help MPR them and they give us a minimal royalty fee just so that my team stop bitching about the fact that we make no money we do that as Saddam happy be called but also to support a little company who without those designs which now represents seventy percent of that revenue wouldn't exist anymore and fringe benefits silver lining of being altruistic and not actually is made a lot of people discover all brand. I mean most media doing talk about watches anymore but when we come out with typically the starfleet we won't height beasts on gear patrol on all the cool blogs websites in the world. Wanted to talk about it. Because it's so amazing and we've actually without even thinking about it we've multiplied by probably two three on media footprint by actually helping other people help themselves. That's so interesting. So you said that your brand your story is that basically you were inspired by science fiction which you loved as a kid but when we think of science fiction of course most things related are mechanical combined with kind of fix fictitious ideas But today technology has come such a long way and your time timepieces are really fantastic examples of what you can do with mechanical movement. But what are your thoughts on technology like digital connectivity and I for example. And how does that figure in the pieces you've created and plan on creating in the future? I know we should never say never. But I'm going to say they will never be any digital smart components are eight I in creations and the reason behind it. It's not that I don't like it. I think it's whatever is happening is fantastic. Because he creates kinetic art recreate mechanical sculptures which needs to be repairable in fifty hundred two hundred years. And we all know that as soon as you put electronics into it you can throw it into the dust bin in the next eighteen months so whatever we do even if it looks completely outlandish has been machined by incredibly crafted artisans in stealing. Ross an I believe that hundred years down the road even if by any chance. Nba NF doesn't exist anymore. Maybe it would happen. A talented mechanical mechanic and a great watchmaker will be able to remake any part of what we do. So I don't think of all products handlooms but I really think it's important that whatever we create and there is a reason to that price whatever we create is incredibly complex to make but can be repaired in the future. That's an excellent point. So you're watches are timeless. We can say but So Imagine Tag. Schumer has a hundred and eighty thousand dollar connected modular model. So I mean you make a good point. What happens when it breaks? What happens in one hundred years from? Now it's going to be absolutely outdated we. We lived through that with the nineteen seventies digital watches. I used to love those watches Iran shortly and and so the these fantastic digital watches of the seventies fever member the the Boulevard Accu Trans should very first electric movements. That fantastic collect them. As soon as one breaks. There is no way to repair it because the technology which was absolutely cutting edge fifty years ago is completely obsolete today he can repair or technology. We don't want to go down that road. It's such a great answer that you just gave and it's funny because you know I've covered a lot of watch events and we've often had that topic and for some reason rarely do hear that point of view. Which is that you know. You're rendering your product basically You know what do you call it when it's going to be out of date obsolete? Yeah planned obsolescence of basically So so that's such an interesting point and it kind of makes you think about watches in a different way but you created the I watch for Your First Watch for women. Last year called the legacy machine. Fine T which has this super cool high dome by the way for people haven't seen it. It's one of my favorite watches. I The most beautiful watches I've ever seen. I would definitely wear that one but why did it take so long for you to make a woman's watch and do we really need women's watches in this day and age when most time pieces are kind of. Unisex a good point immunise was created an incredibly ego. Centric way I created finally be able to create what I believed in and what I wanted to win so for the better part of the first fourteen years whatever I would create what was to be on. I am not ashamed. Event and it's what enabled us to create these crazy ideas and have the courage to come out with them. When no marketeer a no market research would tell you there's any market rate and then one day because I'd settle down in a good way because I met my wife because we had one daughter in the second daughter and that there my only family today I realize I wanted to create something for them so it was my way of telling them I love them and it was incredibly complicated. Because it's very easy to say I love you but it's very complicated to create a watch for the woman you love when a Eurobond be. You'd actually get completely blocked because you're wondering will they like it and as soon as start going into the one will they like it then all your creative juices stopped flowing and it's only when I started thinking. Forget about this win. Like it. Creates a kinetic sculpture. You will be proud of and which embodies what you love in those women in your life and then maybe with a bit of luck they lie kid. But that's not the point and that's how the this incredible vertical flying to be on which represents my my seven year old daughter who up till recently wanted to ballet dancer and was all the time doing a little ballet turning a retired racing on herself so that was the idea the sun at the back. She's actually the sun which the road to which is winding up. The piece is actually a symbol of these three women in my life because I- gyrate around them today it's Cetera et Cetera. Was All these different. What they have enriched my life and day of made me love them in the peace and then of course I was terrified because I didn't show it to anybody specifically not to my wife. Before the day of the launch she discovered it the day of the launch and I was a beautiful evening. It was an event here in Dubai and in front of the IP customers law. Great partners here the Siddiqui's my wife. Tiffany discovered it turn when she stopped trying. She said she loved it. So there you go no God's glory that's that's amazing and it's it's nice. They the way you explain how the creative process is really driven by your own creativity and not what the market wants and I think as as we evolve especially post covert and we rethink this whole commercialism and mass production may be might change in some way. People are really looking for things that are unique and that feels authentic so. I think that that's kind of what you're creating with your product which is what makes it stand out so much from all the other watches on the market and the other pieces. So you're obviously someone who puts creativity at the forefront of everything you do but you also have to run your company How do you spend time with your family? So how'd you manage your time to make sure you don't get caught up? I know your days are really busy. You shared some of your schedule with me when we were trying to schedule this interview. How do you avoid getting caught in the hamster wheel of life that makes us kind of disconnect for creativity? I do my best but my best is not enough and I think that's the case for everyone so coming here and living in Dubai was a big step to. It's helping me be more creative. Created way more in the last six years than in the nine years before. Why because I was not the workshops that was not in the office in meetings all the time and therefore I had time to think go has changed that because because with Kobe where rethinking everything so we're in virtual meetings about will come down at some point. I haven't created a thing in the last three months. But that's okay because forty created for the next seven years and even if I was going to create something it will be the end of the bandwagon than it will come out and probably when I see it in eight years ago. I don't want that because the man I will be in eight years will probably not want that product. So that's also the other thing which is covered is that it's okay to let go. It's okay to have moments where you don't create creation. Creativity comes in waves for me at least long dry spells and then sunny the big wave arrives and Butler bubble. It comes out. I often don't know why when well the way near Saiga. The wind is when I'm always all alone. I always create when I'm completely disconnected from the rest of the world. Typically what one of the habits I took. When since I'm into by is when it's not too hot to maybe every two three days to sit in the garden to one hour without a phone phone emails and the WHATSAPP and the I G and all that is incredible creativity killer so without anything and I have four myself one hour to think now who had that luxury recently. Life an hour to think every two three days. Sometimes I'll think about create. Sometimes I'll think about my life. Sometimes I'll think about the business but I will not. I will not take anything else during those sixteen minutes. And when you let your mind wonder some you go to places you didn't expect. That is one of my greatest secrets. Let's true what you said. I really realized that recently. How you know whenever you're on instagram or on social media a really robs you of any of your own kind of freethinking and it's so important to make a point these days of kind of disconnecting Your your own name is quite something to by the way I looked it up and it comes from the Latin word that means the greatest d. Think do you think that's affected how ambitious you've been as a watchmaker and also as a human being in any way I used to hate my name. I told my parents like what was wrong with you. I mean I mean they didn't even think about. It didn't even realize that Maximilian comes most Latin. Which means that the the greatest name which was given to the efforts the story behind my name in the Busa family where where German Swiss peasants from the central next to Switzerland from father to eldest son of seven hundred years the father would be called medcure with then called his eldest son Baltasar? Who would then called his elder son? Milk cure and then bachelor. He would go and went on like this hundreds of years. My granddad was milk cure. He hated that name and so he had everybody. Coding Max and he actually stopped that tradition and my dad was not at all and so my parents wanted to call me Max. Fifty years ago the only people any on individuals were called Max with dogs just not. That's not mysterious. We call impacts because only dogs are comex so called me Max and growing look. It was horrible kid. You want to blend in Especi- as I was the queer kid I was a kid. Who's very different from everybody else? I suffered a lot from it so weird but not even a weird main. Initially when I grew up becoming my own self more selfish old because I lacked that when I was growing up that I realize is great. It's cool to be different now. Being the greatest no way being. I want to be the greatest. You know what I would like people to sail my eulogy. What I was able to sell my dad's eulogy. He was back if that's will resonate when I'm gone on. How about a Greater Life Max? It's been really really great talking with you. Thanks so much for fitting us into your busy schedule. Come and see us again. Okay thank you very much take care. That's it for today. I hope you enjoyed all the great stuff Max shared with us. If you like this episode V sure to follow us on Instagram at high quality dot. Fm AND IDEA Michelle underscore. You can also head to our website. The men's room dot show where you'll find links to all our previous episode and also some great original merchandise like jewelry laptop bags and other amazing stuff. All handcrafted in be by the best local artisans. And you can ship anywhere around the world for freeze. Hope to see you again soon.

Nba Dubai Switzerland Maximilian bucer Max Geneva US Chevy Irala G Shell Kuala Lumpur End Watchmaking founder Basil Do MPR Rolf Dan CEO Cetera et Cetera
2-9-2020 Worship Service

Shiloh Truelight Church

1:17:29 hr | 1 year ago

2-9-2020 Worship Service

"Rhys today was saying number. Two hundred and fifty one take the name of Jesus with you. It's number two fifty one Uh Uh you feel aw Hello mm-hmm uh-huh uh aw absolutely uh-huh mm-hmm AH MM-HMM UH that precious name take the name of Jesus with with you child of sorrow who would joy and comfort giving and those are the things that seemed like we talked a lot about recently about how the spirit of the Holy Ghost when we receive that can bring us that great joy and peace that he said did he send to all of those that come to me so let us this morning in the beginning of service let's give him our undivided attention. What more could we ask for? What more could be important for us this morning to have on our mind then he term life breath? We can be all kinds of successful here in this life and accomplish all manner of things but if we lose whose are so. What good has it done for saw? So let's all put it into his hands. Friends put it into our Lord and Savior's hands take our burden there and leave it there with him and then let's see victory in Jesus Christ our Lord and Savior Egger. I'd like to read some. I believe we've started this morning. Like read some in Peter Again. We read some in his in in his book last week. But this will be the first Peter and this is the fourth chapter. I Peter Mike Everywhere. We read anywhere we read. We can find help because it's all the inspired words of God. He had these letters in these books written so that we can be able now in our day to be able to read them and to be able to understand how he would have for us to Lille off our life and how we can encourage one another in his word for eternal life that we might have that gift of God that Free Gift of eternal life and avoid wages of seeing which is a term dare. So let's start reading here the first verse of the Fourth Chapter. I Peter for as much Dan as Christ suffered for us in the flesh arm yourselves likewise with the same mind for he has suffered in the flesh has seized from CNN. Now I want us to examine ourselves almost almost to apply these things right to our own individual self this morning for as much then as Christ has suffered for us in the flesh and I believe that everybody here I would say that Christ suffered on that cross in the flesh for us. I hope that everybody understands that because that blood that he poured out there is the cleansing blood for all of us but he then he says arm yourselves likewise with the same mind with the same they mine that Jesus Christ had as he was there with the love of God. We talked about last week about that. Charity that pure love for for all of mankind and he says here for us to arm ourselves yourselves likewise with the same mind the same on time he had for he that has suffered in the flesh has seized from seeing if we they have suffered him to come into our life if we have been able to receive of that spirit of the Holy Ghost and then we can be able to have how power over that with the power of God and cease from the habitual sins relieved him before that he no longer August should live the rest of his time in the flesh the lust of men but to the will of God what our Lord and Savior did. While he was here on Oh near-earth he didn't come here and live his life into the lust of the things of this world but he lived his time there to through the will of God and that's what he is asking for you and me to do today to live our life so that that spirit shines bright within within us in that light shines bright that others may be able to see then and give God the honor and the glory for what he has done for that he no longer should live the rest of his time in the flesh. The lust of man is that in your life and that is is that in mind today. How are we live in our life? France is in the lust of the things of this world. Or is it in the will of God odd for the time passed of your life may suffice us to have rolf the will of the gentiles us when we walked in last civis less excess of wine reveling banqueting 's abominable idolatry a dollar trees where they think it strange that you run not with them to the same excess of riot speaking evil of you who show give account to him. That is ready to judge the quick and the day first of all he's he brings to light some of the things things there of how our lives were spent before we were able to receive that before we were able to receive the spirit of the Holy Ghost. Ghost and Peter is talking to people there if you go back over to the first chapter in and look there in the first couple of verses. He says Peter An Apostle of Jesus Christ to the stranger scattered throughout posthumous glacier kappa dossier Asia but Sania elect according to the fore knowledge of God the Father Through sanctification of the Spirit unto obedience and sprinkling of the blood of Jesus Christ grace be unto you and peace be multiplied. He was speaking to people that understood something about the truth that understood what that spirit and that power could do four and they had left that type of lifestyle that he said he says when we walked in last savings lust excessive wine revelries banquet scenes in an a bomb on a idolatry all of these things he just brings them that that that that was the works of a carnal mind that was the works of the lust of the flesh and he says in and when now that you're walking in a different manner are you walking in a different manner. I'm sure you have seen these things before. How that people think it's strange of you? Maybe people that were close to you. You can be involved in that type of lifestyle in the more more and they think it's strange and they may even speak things bad about you for for this. Calls was the Gospel Awesome preached also into them that are dead that they might be judged according to men in the flesh but live according to God not in the spirit for this calls for the calls of people for you and for all of you being able to receive that spirit spirit of the holy goes he says for this calls these things were preached unto them. That were dead in that goes to each and every one of us we you were born year. We were dead spiritually. We came here on the Earth Day and spiritually and we will continue you in that. If we don't choose to let Jesus Christ be our Lord and Savior but now he says that they might be judged according to men in the flesh but Leo according to God in Spirit and again what is our life show is that spirit of God. Strong within you and you're living a life that shows that by the end of all things a hand be therefore sober and watch anti prayer and this was almost two two thousand years ago when this was being written and people looked opponent then he says but end of all things. This is at hand be there for sober and watch into prayer and that can be with any one of us the end of all things for us of our life life. Your phone near can be right hand and if it doesn't matter that you live to be one hundred years old it is still just right at hand it will soon be here and then what we are life be the end of all things are hand be there for sober have a sober mind. Don't be drunken on the things of this world but have of of mine that I want to walk in the spirit and I want to be strong in spirit and I want to be able to use that power. He says overcome Satan. He says that he has to flee from you if you resist him. In the only way we can truly resist him is with the spirit of the Holy Ghost and Watch unto prayer as prayer life. Today friends are you constantly in prayer to him. Are you asking him for goddess. What is your daily prayer? The first thing should be Lord give us wisdom and knowledge to do your wheel here bone near Al.. What can I do to help to promote your kingdom here on the earth? Not For all manner of things that we might as James said Devour Arup Abon our own lust. But why can we do to help to promote your kingdom here. And how can we encourage others in your work and show us what you'd how for us to do into us the things he's that you've entrusted into our hand to benefit your keen to be cost in prayer and above all things. How ferber charity among yourselves for charity show cover the multitude of CNN's? We've talked about that a lot last Sunday about that charity about what it'll l.. Do and if you go and we we read there in Corinthians. There's a short chapter there in Corinthians about charity what shall do but he says charity cover a multitude of scenes because that love of God and the spirit of the Holy Ghost that comes along and all of that is tied into together will lead us away from the scenes. Cover those things wchs. Let's turn to the thirteenth chapter. I Corinthians just a very short chapter and it's all about all about charity owner. Read that right quickly will come back to Peter. But let's look at the Thirteenth Chapter of First Corinthians though I speak with the tongues of men and of angels and have not charity. I am become as a sounding brass or tinkling cymbal. Absolutely nothing my life is nothing east because once that sound has been made by the trumpet trumpet it can be heard no more unless it was recorded on something but the original sound is gone and it is nothing more and he is. That's that's what he's saying if we if I live here we live on the earth and we're able to speak with tongues of men and the Satan is able to do those kind of things he is able to make himself an angel of light into look upon him and he worships in he he trembles about the Lord. He doesn't worship him but he believes that there is gone and he trembles in the presence of God but without charity. We're no different. We can do all manner of things he says and we're no different from that sounding brass. It'll go right away and though I have the gift of prophecy and understand all mysteries and all knowledge and though I have all faith so that I could remove mountains and have not charity. I am nothing talked about fe and that faith is one hundred percent confidence in. Jesus Christ iced. But he says I can have that I can have that fade but if I do not have charity that pure love for God the father and his son and for all of mankind. Nothing and I'll be still all my goods to feed the poor and do I give them a body to be burned and have not charity profitably. Nothing charity suffer as long as kind charity envious. Not Charity voted not itself is not puffed. Up does not behave itself unseemly. Seek not her own is not easily provoked thank with no evil rejoices not in iniquity but rejoices in the truth bear things believe with all things hope with tall things in rural things. And why. Don't you just look at the attributes of charity of what it what it is will do in all of us. Now do we have that Matt abiding in our life is our life the way we live. It is showing all of those attributes. Charity never failed but whether they re prophecies prophesy they shall fail whether there'd be tongues they show sees whether there'd be knowledge issue vanish away for we know in part and we prophesy park but when that which is perfect is come then that which is impart art. Show be done away that which is perfect. What is perfect? There's nothing perfect but God the father and his son. Jesus Christ Christ and if we live in accordance to him and we have full faith in him and then we have that charity is. He's talking about then. Week can be made perfect in him. At that final day we can enter into a perfect condition. We stand before Jesus Christ our Lord but when that which is perfect is come then that which is in part will be done away away. This life will be done away and that perfect life then throughout eternity will be there. When I was a child I speak as a child? Al Understood as a child I thought it was a child but when I became a man I put away childish things. What he's talking about there is when when that spiritual part he says when he was a child he thought it was a child? He did things in that child's not mature and did not understand understand things but now he says when I became a man I put away those things and now I understand the truth. I became a man with that new birth and now have put away childish things and now I understand the truth and now I am able to walk doc in spirit for now we see through a glass darkly but then face to face now I know in part but then I shall I know even as I also known and now by the faith hope charity these three but the greatest of these is charity. The greatest of these hope faith charity all of these things things we talked about that we must have because the greatest is charity and he's just explained all that to us doesn't matter what old we feel like that we are doing in the name of God in the name of Jesus Christ if we are doing it with the love of God in mind one hundred per se and he says it profits you nothing but if we do it totally for the love of Jesus Christ in his son. There's Great Prophet. Turn back to Peter the ninth verse US Hospitality One to another without grudging as every Man Hath received the a gift even so minister the same one to another as good stewards of a man. Afo Grace of God as every man has received a gift of every man woman boy and girl doesn't matter who has received the gift of God. What does that give the spirit of the Holy Ghost the comforter that he says he says even so so minister the same one to the other has that in our life he says that life? Let Your Life Sean. A minister to others. What are we doing today? Is that show Joann in our life that we have received that free gift and then now we wanna use that to help others to be able to receive that as good Stewart we read recently about the man who is unjust. You're any wasted his his master's good. Who are you and I today? Who is our master? Jesus Christ and God the father. He has given us the authority to use his spirit. Here Bonier to overcome Satan in US number one to be able to live a life that would be pleasing to him now. What is in your life? Are We using that grace of God to help to promote his kingdom here on Earth if any man speak let him speak as the oracles of God if anybody minister let him do it as the ability which God given they god God in all things may be glorified through Jesus Christ to whom he praised and dominion forever and ever eight-man listen carefully to that. If any man speed let him speak as the oracles of God if any man speaks let God be the one that is giving you the words to speak let you be a mouth piece for him if any man minister or let him do it as the ability which God giver and do you think that God will not give you the ability to do whatever he asks for you to do. I know him we. Aw I have seen these things and I know it will happen that if he calls you in whatever place it is put it into to his hands and friends he will abide with you and he will give you all the ability that you need to carry out those things but then give God God the honor and glorify Jesus Christ and what he is done for you. To whom be praising season dominion forever and ever a man beloved think it not strange concerning concerning the fiery trial which is to try you. As though some strange thing happened to you now we will be tried. There are certain things that we will go through here in this life. It will not g just a smooth road there will be trials and temptations -tations and he says don't think it strange concerning the fiery trial something to strong something that will destroy you if you allow it. Fire will destroy and he says there is a fiery trial which is try you as though some strange thing thing happened unto you but rejoice inasmuch as your takers of Christ's ice sufferings rejoice knowing that that spirit of the Holy Ghost is there and Satan is is GonNa try and do everything he can to destroy you but rejoice that you are a taker of the sufferings of Jesus Christ when his glory shall be revealed that you may be glad also with exceeding joy remember about the when the Lord San Dan out his disciples sent out them to preach and he gave them a commandment of what to do a few days later they came back can they were just so excited and tell him Lord about all the things that had taken place there and how they were able to cast out the devils and they were subject to his spirit he said. Don't I'm Gloria in that. But he said give. Thanks and be happy about this. Not just the devils are subject to you. But your name is written in the lamb's book luke of life rejoice in that and I believe that's what he's talking about here but rejoice it as much as your partake irs of Christ's suffering when his glory shall be revealed and you shall be glad also with extreme joy and you can see that if you put it into his hands. Be Patient when those trials and temptations come up on you as and sometimes it looks like that this will overcome me re patient pray without ceasing and then when the glory of the power of God is revealed unto you overcome be glad with exceeding joy. That's spirit within you but let none of you suffer as a murder. Listen about what he says but let none of you suffers I murder or as a thief or evil doer or as a busy body and other men's matters now he's saying these things here that he's talking about here can bring great suffering rain and tribulation upon you and these are things that man brings up on their their own self. I believe Rabe's talking about some of the other things there is that when Satan it when God allow Sake Detri- US but now he's talking about here. These are things that we bring up on ourselves that we make a decision to go out into do and to be involved in. He says let none one of you suffer as a murderer or as a thief or as an evil doer whereas a busy body and other man's matters there's not to just stop and think a minute about what he has lumped together there. He his lump sum of most I vow crimes that we might think about someone going out and killing someone all the way down to just being a busy body and other other man's matters and he said let none of you suffer and being involved in this this kind of stuff because these things here will great tribulation up on you and you may not be able to overcome it because you are not walking in the spirit. But you're walking in the lust of the flesh. He says now let none of you suffer. Offer those things yet if any man suffer as a Christian let him not be ashamed now he says said listen what he said if beanie man suffer as a Christian a follower of Christ who is Christ like he didn't say there if any man suffers suffers. Who is a senator who is he bitch will center who is ungodly unrighteous chest? He says if any man suffers a Christian let him not be ashamed. Don't be ashamed in these things but let him glorify thirty five God on his behalf if we're suffering because we are being tried by saying not by something that we bought a phone ourself yet. Any man suffers a Christian. Let him not be ashamed but let let him. Glorify God on this behalf for the time has come judgment must began at the House of God and if it first began again at us what shall the N. B. of them that obey not the Gospel gone for the Times Com. That judge must began at the House of God and if it first I began at us what she'll be the end of NAM that obey not the gospel of God. I want you to remember this verse for The Times. Come that judgment must begin at the House of God and that is dot com that all of those who do not hear his word all of those who do not accept his word and live in accordance to his word. He says they're the judgment must began at the House of God in the House of God where the word comes from and he says there's a fifth I began at us the righteous if it first began with them and the word of God in their lives when they see they have made a mistake if they see they have seen and and now broken. They're contrite and they are willing to go to him and have it cleaned up to have it burned up there but in any says what Sho- be the end of them that obey not the gospel of God. Now what should that be and if the righteous scarcely be saved Queer shall the ungodly in center appear those two verses. They're riding together to me for the time has come that judgment must began the House of God. He says by their fruits you show no them and our works and knew to the word of God is judging each and every one of us how we live our life the faith that we have the charity that we have whatever it might be. The word of God is judging you and me today. And we'll judges and that final day he says I didn't come here to condemn the world. He said I came to save the world will and his word is what will save us. We're each and every one already condemned friends but his word will oh save us. The rightist scarcely be saved. Where shall the ungodly and center here and I want you to think about that? Scarcely be we saved there to think about the parable. They're out the ten virgins how five was wise and five foolish rush. How did they were? They all went to the marriage. They were prepared. They were all or they thought they were prepared. And they all went to where they can meet the bridegroom and they took their lamps because as they did not know what our it would come but some took all with their and some did not some were not prepared. They thought they were they. Were just going to be there. And hopefully I'll be able to enter in hopefully will come at a time. When I can be a part of it I'll be able to somehow get into the wedding but there are some that was prepared totally whatever our Kane and when the cry came at the midnight hour for the five that was wise and they had all with their lamps they were able to light them and they were to be able to? They were able to go into the wedding and the other five did not and having the whole they went to them and they said. Give us of your Ol- and they said not so less. They're not enough for us. Also and I believe that they did not have they were. They had scarcely enough for themselves but they had all that they needed to go into the waiting. And I believe that that's somewhat like it means here. The righteous scarcely be saved we have been saved from danger. Save from hail by the Save and Power of God not on my own works but by accepting him and we have all that we need. But we don't have enough to try to give away we can encourage and we can help others to know about him but we've got just enough office that we need to be saved and you think about these things. Scarcely being saved if we are saved we we repent and we're except that spirit. The holy goes now we have that act now. We are out of danger just right before that we were in terrible danger of eternal hell see how scarce the we were how close we were to eternal damnation. The through the blood of Jesus Christ were saved scarcely but then he goes on and he says if that's the case if we have been saved right out of hail he says where will the ungodly and the center appear there's there's nothing between the righteous and the own righteous. There is no position between that you're either Rian a righteous condition or an unrighteous condition. You are either in a safe condition or a loss condition you are either in when I righteous and godly condition or in ungodly and sinful condition and he makes it very playing clear that there is nothing that is the file that will be able to enter into the Kingdom of God friends. So what is our life. He says if the if the righteous scarcely be saying where where shall the ungodly center appear. There is no other place but inhale but we have such a wonderful opportunity today each and every one of you today have the opportunity to know him and to walk in his spirit spirit and to be strong with that spirit and to let it overcome all things in your life he says wherefore let them that suffer according to the will of God commit the keeping of their souls to him in well-doing as onto a faithful creator wherefore let them that suffer according to the will of God that if we are if we are tempted according to the will of God that he allows those things to come up on us. He says then you commit the keeping of your soul comes. Have you committed your soul to ham totally talk to him. It is not by your works but it is by to begin with the way that we received it it it is not by your works you receive the spirit of the Holy Ghost by having full faith in Jesus Christ and then asking for repentance as the only way but through him but then once we receive that friends we gotta use that spirit to bring this body and keep this body under the subjection. I'm the spirit and be strong and walk and put it into his hands to commit the keeping of your of your their souls to him in well-doing as onto a faithful creator faithful creator. Jesus this Christ he created this world he and his father and he was here and he was there they created us and he has created a way for you to be able to receive the free gift of eternal life through Jesus. Christ he's created that not you. We've accepted in France. If you have but accepted that you need to look to him. There is no difference for nothing in between the Godly and the godly. You are either walking in his spirit are. You're either out of his spirit now. What is was the case with us which turn over to Thesselonians? This'll be uh-huh second thessalonian breath the start just not a good starting place you just keep going back further and further when I look at winched just one verse and then the other. They're so good the start at the sixth verse there. This is started the first verse. I the less. That's Romanians Paul and savannahs. And the most theus and to the Church Church Thesselonians and God our father and the Lord. Jesus Christ Grace Grace to you and peace from God our father and the Lord. RT'S ASS- Christ. We're bound to thank God always for you brother and his meat for you because your faith growth exceedingly and the charity every every one of you all toward each other abounded in that wonderful I hope best growing within us and we can say that each one of us can say that within us today that we are bound to thank God always for you. We're bound to thank God for what he has done for us. Brother and his it is me Eh. Because your faith growth exceedingly and is your faith growing and the charity of every one of view all toured each other abounded. Is that love abounding the day. So that we are sales glorying you in the Church of God for your purchase for your patience and Faye and all your persecutions and tribulations that you endure. He says you're going to endure these persecutions and tribulations but you'll be able to overcome them. For your patience and faith eighth in all your persecutions and tribulations that ye endure. You can overcome which is a manifest token of the righteous judgment of God that you may be counted worthy of the Kingdom of God for which he also suffer seeing it as a righteous thing with God to recompense tribulation to them. That trouble you and you who are troubled rest with us. When the Lord Jesus Xiaobin what we revealed from heaven with his mighty angels in a flaming fire taking vengeance on them that no not God and not obey not the Gospel Ospel of our Lord? Jesus Christ and of God raft of God. We'll be rained out upon those who no not God through route Jesus Christ and obey not the gospel of our Lord. Jesus Christ now listen carefully friends. This this is the truth of God and who should be punished with everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord and from the glory of his power. Uh when he sure come to be glorified in his saints and to be mired and all them that believe because our testimony in among us believed in that day. And do you believe the testimony of Jesus Christ today. Do you believe that he is has the saving power refer you wherefore also we pray always for you that our God would count you worthy of his calling and fulfill all the good pleasure of his goodness and the work of faith with power the goodness of God the according has done for us the goodness of his and the work of faith with power the work of faith. I'll give to you a spirit of power. Not The fear and of love and of a sound mind is what he has promised that the name of our Lord Jesus Christ maybe glory fighting you and ye in him. According to the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ according to the grace of our God and the Lord Jesus Christ now we beseech you brethren by the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ things that are gathering together unto him they to be not soon shaking in mind or be troubled. Neither you by spirit knew about word no by letter as from us as the day of Christ is a hand he says now. Don't be shaken bacon in mind. Don't be worn carried to and fro James's s an unstable mind and he's unstable in all of his ways he says the faster case he says don't be soon shaken in that he says. Let no man deceive you by any means let no man deceive you and a false doctrine or anything for that that day show not come except there come a falling away I and that man seeing be revealed the son of perdition and I believe no that the son of perdition and a falling away from the truth has taken place throughout the world. And how much truth is being preached and taught throughout the world. Today there is a broad road out there that is being being traveled today by most people and this is nothing but the law prophesied of these things and he said that there was a broad road there air and he said many there would be. That would travel that road but he says there is a narrow gate narrows a narrow way way that leads to eternal life that broad road he says leads to eternal damnation. He says leads to destruction. But that narrow gate narrow rather leads to life everlasting and I know that son of perdition sake needs to be revealed and when you look around and see how has got our nation so torn apart and it goes back that we have gone totally away practically from his word here on earth and it is destroying this this country but it is nothing more but Satan and Satan in high places and having people proclaim that this is the truth when it is nothing but a lie from hail be not deceived by any means for that day show not dot com except there come a falling away I in that man of seeing be revealed and that man of seeing revealed to the righteous and they are able to how now power over it who oppose and exalt themselves above all that is called God or that is worshipped so that he yes. God said it in the Temple of God showing himself that he is God now that is Satan. He says that's what comes upon. And how men are worshiping man. So that he is God said if in the Temple of God showing himself that he is got remember. Remember ye not that. Who went I was with you? I told you of these things. Be Not deceived is what you're saying. Don't don't let people say that you've got to be tolerant against seeing to towards seeing but you'd better be a strong and bone against San now with a hateful mine but with a mind of love. You do anything you could help someone to get out of that but you will never be a part of it and acknowledge San as being right and now you know what withhold that he might be revealed in his time for the mystery of iniquity. She does already work only he. Who now lead if will let until he taken taken out of the way? It's a serious thing. Rams extremely serious for us to think about. He says remember you not I when I was with you. I told you these things and we have been warned of these things. Jesus Christ warned into surveys. Things he says let no man deceive. He says there will be many enterprise. If it does not follow the word of this book it is alive alive and he says now you know what withhold that he might be revealed in this his time and yeah I know that righteous can see and that Satan is revealed to them and they can see the wickedness of the things of this world that is being told for the mystery of iniquity the already work only he who now lead us will land until he be taken out of the way if we continue on if we let ourselves be involved if we let ourselves be carried with by Satan Ayton he says you will be carried away. He also says there and that's final time. He gave a repairable there and he said that the man went out and he sowed good seed in his field. And that's Jesus Christ he sewing good seed he is so in righteousness opponents her but there are others there that comes along and he says his enemy came along long and he so tears among the good seed and say new sewing tears. He is so sewing bad. Ed seed sowing lives among the truth today and there are people that believe in those things but he says they come ebb both seeds come up they live together there in film and the people could look around and see in the righteous conceit today there tears among the righteous. Their hair's is being taught and Jesus said the people came and say should we route them up. He says Nah he said why. If you do that you'll route up the good seed. Also he said but let them both grow together. And in the end at the time of harvest I will send in fourth my reapers and way. We'll gather it out. They will gather the tears out a cast it to be learned and then they'll gather the wheat tweet and all of my wheat we gather together and they're not a grain of wheat. We lost but the tears. We'll be burned. Destroy be not deceived. I don't let say make you a tear sweat. He says he says for for the mystery of iniquity default already work only he who now let we'll let only those let those tears. I let your sales become tear. Let's put it that way. By being the C of Satan until you you be taken out of the way and then show wicked be revealed whom the Lord show consume with the spirit of his mouth and shall destroy with the brightness of his coming into their then shall the wicked be revealed field whom the Lord shall consume with the spirit of his mouth and shall destroy with the brightness lightness of his coming. Now let's don't let that be in us at that last time but less Satan be destroyed in us with the brightness of the spirit of the holy goes common within us now and destroy insight and in casting him out of our life now at brightness being us. Don't let it come at that final day. Then we have to be cast aside be cast away but let's do it now even him. Whose coming is after the working of Satan with all power and signs ends in line wanders? And that's what Satan will do coming working the works of Satan and look around throughout the world. Do you see men truly desire to walk in the spirit of God. How do you see it with a desire? The things of this world a desire to be drunken on the lust of the things of this world with aw disabled of unrighteousness in them that perish because they received not the love of the truth that they might be saved and I want you to look in his free France. There is nothing that will keep you from being able to be a part of this if you will only have with all Disabled Savan Righteousness that is Satan in them. That perish because they received not the love of the truth that they they might be saved and for this calls God sent into them strong delusions they should believe ally and I believe that that has taken place throughout our country throughout our world today. That people are relieving a spiritual La. Yeah they have a feel good religion at all I have to do is make a prayer that I am saved and then I can go and live in in whatever lifestyle I wanna live I am saved. I am protected but I don't believe that I've got to do exactly that. I've got to make that prayer and I've got to accept him but then I've got to live a life that with that spirit directing me and not busy says for this calls because of the unrighteousness and them that perish he says for this calls. God she'll send up on them a strong delusion that they should believe alive and there's people believing even that today and it is saying but we must walk in that spirit we must let that spirit direct dust us from that time forward and not live in San and not have that strong delusion and believe in a lie that they all might be damned who believed not the truth who believe leave not the truth. What is truth but it is written right here in these words that we are reading today throughout his Bible? Read Ed studying know what the truth is and be not deceived that they all might be damned. Who believed not the truth but had had pleasure in on righteousness? Is that our life I WanNa take pleasure in righteousness I wanNA take pleasure. And walking in his spirit in an ensemble and meek way whatever he's ask for us to do to be unbelie meek or bold and strong as he had his. Paul did as other writers have done. I want to have spirit to be able to lead me and be able to leave you in that day but we are bound but we are bound to give thanks always to God for you. Brethren beloved of the lower because God hath from the beginning chosen you to salvation through sanctification of the spirit and belief of the truth and I know that that's the way it is with all the righteous today. The God had chosen you because you ask him and then he chose you to be able to receive of that spirit of the Holy Ghost through sanctification of the spirit and belief of the turn in what is the belief of the truth but I believe in the gospel of Jesus Christ the Savior. He is the only way. There's no other way but through threw him his word. Here that we're reading is the truth and I must abide in it. I must believe where in two he called. You Buyer Gospel to the obtaining of the glory of Our our Lord Jesus Christ therefore brethren stand fast. Hold the traditions. which you you have been told whether by word or or pistol hold true? The DC. Stand fast what he's saying is don't let Satan. CBC stand strong in the spirit stand strong in the power lower of the holy goes stand fast entity says therefore brothers stand Dan fast and hold the traditions which you have been told whether by word or pistol now our Lord Jesus this Christ himself and God even our father which has loved us and have given us everlasting consolation and good Good Hope Through Grace Comfort your hearts and establish you in every good word and work and I know that will take place that will happen if we let him as stab us in spirit he says now our Lord Jesus is Christ himself this will come from him from him Jesus Christ and God the father even our father can we. He truly say that he is our father. Today are spiritual father which has loved us and have given given US everlasting consolation and good hope through grace giving us hope of eternal life given us hope of the power over Satan. We can resist him through the grace of God so through the power of God Comfort Your hearts and stabbed shoe in every good word and work only he can establish us in that. Only the power of God can establish you in that finally brother pray for us that the word of the Lord may have free course ambig- glorified even as it is with the pray for us and that's what I'd asked today friends that we may be delivered from from unreasonable and wicked man and for all that have not faith by the Lord is faithful and show stab you and keep you from evil and we have confidence in the Lord touching you. Are you both do. And we'll do the things we command you. And the Lord Direct your hearts to the love of God and into the patient waiting for Christ the Lord direct your hearts and I would pray and I beg that today that the Lord direct correct each and every one of your heart today in his word that you be not deceived by saying he is going around as a roaring land and as he said that he can set himself up as God and people think he is gone and they believe a damnable lie and Jesus and through. Paul are through Paul here he just saying that those things there they will believe those things and he will let them believe him and they will be destroyed. He lets them believe that because they won't he will let you believe in the true word of God and he will give view the power to understand it. If you won't ask and Ye shall receive. He said knock and he said I'll open onto you seek and you shall find and these are the words of Jesus Lord I pray that each and everyone have our minds open to the truth of God today and whic Sept- him as our savior and don't be lost. Don't put it off off. Think about this we everyone today ask yourself to question today right now right now. Listen to what I have to say away. If right now you had to stand before God the father and Jesus Christ where would he seem to you. Where would he saying you? If immediately gently he was standing here in front of you to judge each one of us where would you spend eternity. Do you know you should if you don't. There is a problem. Walk in his spirit walk in his word. It's just a sheer as I said if he was standing here. You and I will all stand before him. Very shortly. Doesn't matter if the youngest longest winning here is lived to be one hundred years of age it will be very shortly. Their life will be gone and we will be an eternity somewhere either saved or loss. The choice is ours. We have a wonderful opportunity to receive that spirit. The Holy Ghost and to be able to be counted with the sheep not cast into that lake of fire with the tears and with the goat's the wicked. I WANNA be a part of the righteous and I can be you can be and I want to see us all be victorious. I WANNA see us all on the other side with Jesus Christ. Our friends believe his word. Believe the truce that he has recorded for us and if it differs from that if it was truth two thousand years ago when these things were written is still the truth today. His word does not change man has changed man has taken his word and turned it into a lie and a lot of cases and he warned about that. Be Care for be not seved but follow him. We'll bring the meeting to close. We'll sing number one hundred eighty one. Jesus is calling may be someone might would like to make that commitment that they won't accept him and you can do so by coming forward as we say number one hundred eighty one Jesus Com Hello AH hello it hello uh-huh uh AH EH hello uh-huh aw Sir Ah Hello. uh-huh uh-huh uh-huh so there's a lot of beautiful words in that song. I believe that ties right into what we were talking about today. Jesus is calling tenderly calling. Why from the Sun Shines Jonah love with our own bring him the burden and now shelby blissed? Jesus is calling tenderly calling for us all to accept him for solve to move up and to walk in his spirit to be strong so in his love and his mighty power praise God through Jesus Christ let us pray to God the Father Through Jesus Christ our Lord we thank you for all you've done for us. We thank you for the many blessings that we have received. And Lord we beg for guidance in the upcoming days that your will be done in us and help us to use the things that you've entrusted to us to honor you and to help to promote your kingdom here on earth and how can we use that spirit that we have been able to receive to encourage others in your work and not be deceived by Satan but to be strong and the cast him out with the power that you have over what a day or that will be when we're able to see you and we're able to walk in that perfect light with strengthens be with those that are struggling lower and help us all to move we asking Jesus name Amen.

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98: Kilometre 0 Jeff of all trades

The Cycling Podcast

25:54 min | 4 months ago

98: Kilometre 0 Jeff of all trades

"You are listening to kilometers civil by cycling podcast power by super sapiens engine management for committee that leads and coaches francois when i started falling cycling seriously one of the foreign correspondent became aware of john. Francois kenny call them cycle sport magazine with the french perspective on european racing every month and it was a great window into a world. I really knew nothing about zone francois. Kenny was a name that to me was synonymous with racing on the continent. And we're going to hear from him in this episode and you know him very well. Yeah i've known jeff for many many years. I think the first time i really kind of hooked with a with jean-francois was in one of my. I remember when rav sorenson lots of yellow jersey by hitting a curb in stage. When was that a nine thousand nine hundred s something in one thousand nine hundred ninety something. I'm not sure well anyways that they You know. I was working for reuters and i needed stuff from rolf. Sorensen what what happened and quotes and whatever and this guy working for west false at the time in for for for another sighting magazine the from in brussels who now you know now fold in this guy came to me and said well you know i've got quotes from rolf sorensen and give me lots of information see well. This guy knows what he's doing and he's with jeff. I saw jeff many times. I mean we met many times in. Our career was in charge of actually Ah at a couple of olympics. Have covered Jeff was again shot of the french crowd of journalists. You know to take care of accusations was a case in sydney was in beijing. He was he was he was kind of. You know the guy looking after us. The crown of fringe endless. He's been a part of my long career as paul. Listen you travel to the end of the word to cover this event or cycling. Even the first person you meets is jeff you know he seems to all over the place and you never know what is exactly what he's doing for for for for for what meters is working. What what exactly is doing is doing so many different things like the is not really. Is your john lewis. Yes but he's more than this. And with jeff what what is he doing. Everybody knows him. That's lots of things. But i guess maybe in this episode of cumulous zero. We will find out more or less who suffer. Kenny is he wears many hats and then brittany and breast where he's from. You sat down with him in the pub where he used to go to. As a shouldn't on you spoke to him about his life and his career in journalism and in helping many writers including lots of australian writers come to europe and forge careers professional writers. Yeah th that's one of the thing i mean. Jeff is as a passion for australia at the patient. A passion for asia's well and e used that passion for and as a passion for the sport is a passion for sportsmen's was people in general and he used his is contacts links and affected is as you know. Several houses leaves part of the timing in his in all jay on the in the west of france. The timing kuala lumpur and an e e uses it is context is network and his passion for the sport. His passion for is many trades to do yet kind of helped as you said los overstrain writers making it in europe. He helped some some of the first british writers who made an impression in nineteen ninety s. Devil up find a club in france. getting to it and the thing gabon jeff in inevitably never did it. Did it for money you know i. It's not something interesting so it's funny because when you see jeff he doesn't is not variance. Suggested doesn't look like a passionate guy but to to have been doing what he's been doing for so long and just for the sake of it. I think that there's a word to summit up is got a real passion for the sport. Still run the. Let's hear ni- francois in conversation with jean-francois kelly. My name is ross mckinney. I was born breast as you said over time ago. Natale from here. I decided to become a journalist. The age of six when i learned Reading and writing. And i decided i would be sports journalist. At the time. I had two main focus on football and cycling and by the age of sixteen became sort of journalist or regional. Newspaper was false and around here. I was Covering football and basketball psyching. We didn't cover sailing by the way because sailing was not considered a sport it was in the marine section of the newspaper. So how did you become involved in cycling. We were you cyclist yourself. I tried i think i learned a lot by psyche myself but the first thing i learned is that was gifted but it helped me to to understand the sport and at the age of eighteen hours trying to be a psyche trying to be a journalist and trying to be a student. Eventually it happened. I was on the able to become a journalist. So for those of you who have not recognized that the voice of jeff. I mean you. You've heard this voice many times before if you're psyching fans because a definition of the water or all jiro. That's a man into the riders just shortly after they won the stage or took the leaders jersey and the voice. You hear jeff's voice on the tour not many of you in your ideas on tv at the finish finish because he organizes the and moderates and translates the press conference which does on the other grunts as well. So how many grants was. Have you covered fifty six. More than madam. Hansen at events in rhode twenty something of them consecutively. Now you miss it my in much more than me because it's much harder to do it on the bike but yeah fifty-six tools with to join world and i keep working at the three of them every so how did you manage to become the journalists that the grant was picked as a man was going to be in a way one of the voices of the of those tools. I never asked for job. Just that i was there available. Someone asked me to do it. In the past few years have been doing the fresh interview at gio. Also a few other races like to of your race in asia. And it's something. I've learned. Because i was not a tv man requires some different languages because we never know what the writer will be able to speak. We tried to do the international flash interview in english. if the rider knows english otherwise we interview. He made his own language. Sometimes we translation sometimes and probably what you heard. Is he gonna be crying in my interview when he won the state under startle. the talia. cry. Because when i asked the question in in spanish i mentioned the colombian riders who had Taken pictures before him. The trick is. I didn't mention the names of wuhan in tana caveat chavez but i mentioned their first name has in colombia the call people and when he heard those first names that put him into tears. You have a special relationship with the writers and for many reasons that is because you've been around for a long time but also we mentioned him hansen before but also because you you have a personal friendly relationship with them and in a way you've been the mentor of a lot of the notably australian who came to europe. Can you explain what you were doing. Exactly what with these young. Riders wanted to make a career in france or europe. I've always had a for scouting athletes not only cyclists but of course inciting it It became easier for me. I like to approach the riders. When they look promising to me probably. Now i have a good relationship with pre mortgage because i interviewed him toward under it. Is i world to race. He hadn't performed at all yet as appro- but i knew his story as a ski jumper. I interviewed him on that. I also have a good relationship with peter again. Because equally at the tolan under interviews peterson again after his first pro race which was the criterion before the tone under where he broke away with Lance armstrong when i interview him. I've never spoken any slovakian e e didn't know english in you just a few words of italian so it was quite difficult to communicate but it was willing to talk and any managed to tell me few things and i wrote a peaceful psyche news after his first hour as a pro writer in the ninety s. Thanks to my good mate rupert guinness. Who is verse in the press room. For many years. I went to visit him and i go to chance to catch up with brad mcgee. Who was a junior writer. Time because australia was so far away from european psyche. Those guys had no connection at all. They were almost no coaches for road racing australia. Australia coach off truck psyching on. I became the go between for strain psyches to want to come to europe. I wasn't the only one. I've heard a few some of them would have performed without my help like Brad mcgee or bayden kook but someone like Simon gerrans who Took up cycling a bit too late. was not known. It was nowhere he was he was not in. Disd australian institute of sport. I took him at home. I give him the key for the speaker. Gave you a credit card. And i put him in a norwegian continental team first and then a french club and eventually to eighty two are and ended up being the reissue strain riders to have won the stage in regret tool to have had the illegitimate till the franz the pink jersey editor of italy the first australian rider to win us nation. You also want ramo so that was a big achievement. Coming from very far away now. Australians don't need me that at the time that that's amazing that you you are not even their agent or anything and you would not. I know you well and you are not neutral money. I didn't make any money at all. I spent some for getting them to to to the pro ranks. No it was it was bashing. It's still of mine to To scout riders wave. I am. I could tell you a lot about You judging do. Judging from the name. I guess his chinese he's he's he was the best young mountain biker from china and it's going to represent china in road racing at the olympics. This year i go. I like to try and find out which cyclist as a to perform also in france. I I myself organiz races for us. Seventeen riders. It's called the the medio trophy. And we do that with mark uneven baio from group team. We have a series of racing. And that's where we first discovered are no who is now the star rider for. We'll go back to your passion for asia later. Because you spend half of your life in asia i think live in kuala important place there and and half of your life while traveling the world with citing the that place in france in the west of france where you turn to the home of simon guarantee and others that are another few rogers discover at a young age and namely bradley wiggins and chris from among them yes. I was fortunate enough to meet chris from at mass participation race in south africa back in two thousand and five and and then i saw him winning the meal. Turn around here. In two thousand seven when he was a member of the world psyche santa of the uci and then the after he came to breast for starting his first the france he just turned from kenyon to to britain. So i have not scouted. Chris from but i was rookie enough to To meet him. I didn't count weekends. But i ended up. Translating verbally is I pro contract with dj. Going to belgium with mark. Mitchell were bradley was going to raise the world. Tim chip in two thousand one. Another rider that I can say. I scouted and And i linked to To dj was nothing english. Speaking right up it was fitted who i found in semi pro race near paris told this mom. I was a substitute sports director for my local club. Not and i overtook the proton. Because one of my rider who was recruited from ukraine was in the breakaway. And bussing the brutal. I just saw magic billing stein. And being a journalist i took note of number and then reading the start list i so this was from beijing team purely flemish directed by the world and his name was french so the next morning. I asked him if he was doing. And it was and there. I met someone who was very friendly guy so then i caught up with him again. They were cheap and the year. After on the start line of twenty three race i introduced him to mc module. And that's how he started his pro career and again i was not an agent. We have remained good friends. Stinson has done his career. Without my help you are listening to kilometers. Civil by citing guest powered by super sapient energy management for committee athletes and coaches go to super sapiens dot com for more on to track you energy levels and fuel for success. I'm some brand and professional cyclist with team. Novartis at the worlds first all diabetes professional cycling team. And i would tell myself if i could have a conversation with my ten year. Old self. is this diagnosis. Was the best thing that's ever happened to me. And i give talks and a lot parents ask. How is it possible. And the thing is it gave me a structure. It gave me a routine. It empowered me to put in place a routine okay. It's not easy at ten years old. The routine i had to wake open. Check my blood's check my body. You know i'm kind of in a routine where people don't get that until later on in life and some people don't fully grasp routine unfamiliar it gave me a routine gave me a mission. It gave me a family on a community. And i can't ask for anything more than that. It's given me a mission and that's to help everybody around the world affected by diabetes and to this day it's honestly the best thing that's ever happened to me. Another part of your career of your life was not scout scouting. Riders would but in a way almost counting races. I mean you like to discover new racist new territory. You've been all over the world the launching races sometimes or discovering races and trying to make them popular. What what exactly are you doing. The kind of what made you turn into the cycling globetrotter australia in australia. I realized in the ninety s that tracks hiking strong but there was no road racing so when the tornado was created. I realized there was a lot to do. They're also by coincidence. Because i was always invited to return and we which was the the first big international race in asia then the militias asked me to help them organize little anka. We attracting attracting teams media. Because that's linked if teams from come from this part of the world media from the same part of the world will be interested in covering the race become passion for asia because this part of the world that has the biggest potential for psyching to grow and probably more in terms of race organization than cyclists. It's still a long way away until we'll have asians competing editorials. There have been a few one. Chinese do dip unease because there's also truck a strong track tradition in in asia and very good truck riders. So how come. They don't make the transition to the road that much. The culture of the world. We're racing is not very big. They have a big lack of coaching. They're very small national federations on the track. The have the potential to reach the world scale. The chinese have Studied in many sports how to transform their money into olympic medals. They're prepared to spend a lot for coaches or technologies to bring athletes to the ice level when they came to track cycling. They realized that they had the potential to deliver meals but when they studied how do take to have An olympic medal in road racing. The pro ability was always zero zero in for your time. Zero in eight years time Probably zero in twelve years time so they prefer to Invest money in organizing races because they also realized like we do in europe. How bike races can showcase. The provinces dow also very proud of their territories but it will take time before their riders reached the level that we have in europe pro. Us australia going back to your scout scouting days. I'm not saying that you're not counting the more. I'm sure you are and you mentioned the chinese right before as a potential road racing performer. The rider high mentioned. He said you chanting eugene jing was the best Promising writer for mountain biking in asia. And when he discovered road racing ended up being a nixon kleiber and judging represent china at For road racing this year while they're writer for mountain biking is another interesting one. He's mostly kazak but his name is Nasib beacon and he tried to become rhode rider with the middleton team. That was a chinese feeder team for the team. That is now a team bike. Exchange the of kind of failed with developing chinese riders. For different reasons. It will take a long time when we get chinese to come very young to europe and immigrant tour and we and we agreed to once again back to your scouting days and and your days in in brittany that there's young rider took to brittany or came to see you to visit you in brittany and that you kind of introduced to cycling in europe and france and his name is kind of you and can you tell us about that experience. I got a phone call ten years ago from brad. Mcgee saying i have a young lad. Here he's super talented but he knows absolutely nothing about what the real psyching is about. The recycling is is in europe. So said please get him to to see what it's like so i took him to a few local races. And you won one in this province. Here finish their where. We are now in breast in village called avenue but it's actually closer to the start of stage three of these franz when you look at the pictures of him winning house on a lot of spectators behind him. There was a big shock for him. Crowd even for local races and people already had each pitcher to get his autograph. And that's how he understood the passion there is over here for psyche and it gave him the the desire to other. The last thing. I did for him on his first trip to europe was to take him to the launch of the twenty twelve in october twenty seven. I took him to. Paris is first impression of the outskirts of paris. Was that was. And i said wait a bit. Let's go to say a. I stopped Where the finish line of the toll from his. And i said look. This is here and he said yes. I win here one day and he did on this i. E one conclusive state officials in china makes the stand on the. You've been listening to that episode of kilometer zero by the site clean podcast francois tommaso in conversation with jean-francois kenny supported by super sapiens. Thank you very much to them. And thank you to hugh on for producing this episode.

jeff francois france europe brad mcgee asia Francois kenny cycle sport magazine rav sorenson rolf sorensen gabon jeff francois kelly ross mckinney Kenny australia Jeff tolan yellow jersey olympics rupert guinness
iPhones, iPads, and iClinics? Apple's Foray Into Healthcare

The Journal.

19:25 min | 4 months ago

iPhones, iPads, and iClinics? Apple's Foray Into Healthcare

"Apple has revolutionized many industries today. Apple is going to reinvent the phone from the smartphone to the tablets. It is the best browsing experience you've ever had to the smartwatch. Apple watch is the most personal device we've ever created but in twenty nineteen apple ceo. Tim cook suggested that those innovations will pale in comparison to what it's working on. Now if you zoom out into the future and you look back and you ask the question. What was apple's greatest contribution to mankind. It will be about how we are taking what is been with the the institutions and empowering the individual to to manage their health. And we're just at the front end of this for years. Apple's been trying to figure out how it could disrupt the american healthcare system but are calling roaf. winkler who covers health technology. Says it's been a lot more difficult than the company may have expected. This is not an easy industry to disrupt the way. Technology is good at disrupting writing some software to make the process. Better more efficient. It's it's not quite that simple when you're talking about human biology and the complexity of our messy messy healthcare system but rolf has learned that one way the maker of iphones and i max is trying to attack. The problem is by setting up. Its own doctors. Offices testing grounds for new ideas. Can you imagine going to the apple store. And dr welcome to the journal. Our show about money. Business and power. I'm ryan could say. It's tuesday june twenty second coming up on the show. Apple's little known health clinics and challenges. The company faces to disrupt the entire industry. This episode is brought to you by aflac health. Insurance isn't typically designed to cover everything. That's why there's athletic. They pay cash to help with expenses. Health insurance doesn't cover to help give you peace of mind. Learn more at aflac dot com. Apple isn't the only company that's tried to get into healthcare. Not only do people in tech think that the healthcare industries broken. They also see the potential for a big new revenue stream. Healthcare is technologies white whale. It's this incredibly huge attractive market. That has always sort of escaped their attempts to disrupt. It's so complex. It's not like you can write software that just solves problems faced by the human body and all regulations pay schemes and just junk that goes with healthcare. Software doesn't eat that world easily nevertheless these companies are gigantic and they need these new markets and so healthcare becomes one of these things that they just want to attack refer apple. It's interesting health is also a bit. Personal apple has had interest in health. Dating back to steve jobs and his bout with cancer. There are some frustrating things about what he had to deal with as a patient and that in many ways kicked off some of its interest in health back in two thousand nine two thousand ten in two thousand fifteen apple introduced a product that would give the company an entry point into health. The apple watch apple bills great products that enrich people's lives in arguably we can take that to a whole new level with apple. Watch at first apple. Touted a number of features on the watch especially how fashionable it was but turns out to killer apps. Here are fitness activity tracking your steps. The little activity rings. You get on your apple watch. That was really ingenious. That tells you you know you've hit your exercise goal today. You've hit your standing goal today. These are killer applications people because they want they just want reminders to tell them to stay active during the day when they're sitting at the desk or get out and get some exercise. That's what people are using these devices for I remember when. I got an apple. Watch for a time became obsessed with tracking all my workouts on the watch where my heart rate was how long i was doing it. It became almost like a game of at a little bit totally absolutely. Yeah i do the same thing and you get that little dopamine rush that you had you know. I did my exercise today over the years. What you've seen them do is add more health and wellness functions to the watch. There's a decibel meter that will tell you you know what the sound around. You is so loud if you listen to it for an extended period of time you could have hearing loss. There's the blood oxygen sensor you know it's like it's like the little thing you put on your finger when you're at the hospital i'll tell you what your pulses and how much oxygen is in your blood one of their new things that they announced a couple of weeks ago walking steadiness. This is on the iphone. Actually it's to measure your gate as you walk. Is your gate changing right. Are you becoming less stable. All of these health sensors on iphones and the apple watch or generating mountains of data which is stored on people's iphones but the company wondered what if people shared the information with their doctors. Maybe that could revolutionize healthcare the apple executive overseeing the company's health initiatives apple's chief operating officer jeff williams thought that this could be key to fixing. Some of the industry's biggest problems. He'd talk about something. He called the three six three model of health care or the break. Fix model what he meant by that. Was you only see your doctor two times year. Maybe when something goes wrong and it needs to be fixed the other three hundred and sixty three days. You're on your own. Why don't we have healthcare system that continuously monitors you to try to keep you healthy as opposed to one. That only treats you when something's wrong or you're sick. Couldn't we achieve better outcomes. Couldn't we lower costs. This is a holy grail. For a lot of companies in health technology by tapping into a user's health data. Doctors could be alerted to potential medical issues earlier. But before that could happen. Apple had to develop the technology to make sense of all that data and accurately recognize when there's a problem so in two thousand seventeen apple partnered with stanford university to study heart rate information from the watches of four hundred thousand volunteers. What they were trying to do is figure out. Can we build an algorithm. Can we write an algorithm that content. Act evidence of a condition called atrial fibrillation. Fibrillation is an irregular and rapid heart rate can increase the risk of things like strokes or heart failure if the apple watch could accurately alert users that they might have ichiro fibrillation. It could help them get medical attention sooner. Ralph spoke to. Dr bob harrington a stanford cardiologists whose team conducted the research and you him. So what was the big takeaway from this heart study and he said well you know what the biggest game changer for us was. You could track four hundred thousand people at the same time. That's never been possible in the history of mankind before like to be able to get signals from that many people it's really it's it's really wonderful. And then the next question which is great. That's really cool and what did you learn. What are the clinical protocols that we learned. We should be doing based on this information you've captured. He said well that we don't know we're actually not sure that we're going to have to figure out. For researchers. the utility of the apple watch was clear but for doctors. It wasn't immediately obvious. How the data might be useful. What's really happening is. Apple is kind of throwing a feature out there into the world. the world doesn't yet know what do with it. there's no clinical protocol on the other side doesn't mean it's not good more information can be good but we just we don't know healthcare it takes time to really figure out what can change how doctors treat a particular condition. One place apple had been trying to figure that out how to take data from watches and iphones and apply it to medical treatment was that its own. Health clinics not many people know about clinics. Which are only for apple. Employees rolf learned during his reporting the company started operating them in two thousand sixteen had these clinics. These you know this is pretty standard for a tech company clinics on their own by their own headquarters. The treated their employees were run by startup called crossover health and they said to themselves you know what. Why don't we just take this over. We're going to in effect. Kick the startup out set up a subsidiary that can practice medicine. Have the doctors. Basically worked for the subsidiary that is part of apple now and they brought an executive to run this to run these clinics and basically use them as testbed for healthcare products and services. What what is the service that apple sort of envisions they could have like. It's a doctor's office and the doctor's plugged into all the apple devices that they're haitian is using and so when the patient gets the notification that their gate is a little off. The doctor will be kind of in the loop on that information and we'll sort of know what to do about it. Theoretically yes when they were first envisioning the service they were thinking about all of the different kinds of notifications that you get on your device all of the different health monitors and sensors that are in these devices and yeah feeding that back to the doctor. Does he know that you're getting your exercise in. He sees the aren't he c- he looks at your labs that you take and you know what it looks like your you know. Your blood glucose is really high in your now type two diabetic. We gotta know are. Are you exercising. Because that's going to be important. We need lifestyle improvement here for your type two diabetes to improve and so instead of the the three six three model where you only see your doctor. Two out of three hundred sixty five days a year now. Your doctor at the apple clinic has his or horizon you all year long through the the monitoring this taking place on apple devices. Yeah came up. With a primary care plan that would have included. Continuous health monitoring. You're gonna have your apple devices you're gonna have your apple doctor at your apple clinics. We're gonna be your first line of defense after the break tech. And healthcare collide. This episode is brought to you by code. Forty two picture this your organization's lead seller since a confidential client list to their personal email. An engineer shares the product roadmap from their phone an executive syncs everything on their desktop including your acquisition plans straight to their personal cloud. And that's just in the last five minutes all of this creates risk for your organization. Stop data leaks not collaboration. Protect your most valuable data with code. Forty-two insider learn more at code. Forty two dot com roy. Once the health apps on the apple watch caught on the company began receiving letters from customers who loved it and they put them in their ads dear. Ten customers described their health issues. And how they're apple watch help now get up at five. Am if it's five minutes to midnight. I'll do pushups in my bedroom. We'll take the dog out for really quick. Walk around the block. I walk around the house. My family thinks i'm a little crazy. I cheat flip. Blinds apple watch reminds me to stand up every hour but roof says even inside the company. Some staffers in a health unit fuel that apple might be relying too much on anecdotal evidence rather than hard data and not just in marketing but also in how apple analyzes its own success employees. Don't feel that the clinics as they handle data and the analysis of data. for how. well they're doing that. They are doing that correctly right. Are they doing it in a robust fashion where they aren't maybe leaning on patient anecdotes to say you know. We're doing a really good job at treating hypertension because you know bill over here had a had a great outcome and he says we did a great job. You know some folks that say well stop you do it in medicine. You don't lean on an anecdote or to. You have to go back and compile a whole bunch of data and really study it properly. The the company has done statistical analysis some employees in health unit of question its accuracy jeff williams the o face this kind of skepticism last march when he was giving an internal presentation on the company's approach to treating high blood pressure jeff williams is getting up and presenting and he's talking about at one point. How great the clinics are doing treating hypertension and he puts up this slide. The claims that ninety one percent of stage to hypertension patients. That's bad that's people with you. Know systolic blood pressure over one forty people with stage two hypertension ninety one percent of them treated by that apple clinics improved to lower stages normal but some employees in apple's health unit thought. The data was too good to be true other health. Startups that provides similar treatment. Don't claim anywhere near that level of effectiveness. One found that twenty. Three percent of patients saw their blood pressure improve. Compared to apple's ninety one percent employees inside apple health saw this and said wait a minute. Are we this good at treating hypertension. The clinics are people. Didn't feel right about it. Is this correct. Like is this fair. Is this right and apple. Spokesman said that it's hypertension treatment. Data was cross checked by multiple teams and that other companies analyze their hypertension data differently. Spokesman also added that the company doesn't rely on anecdotal evidence and that quote data integrity isn't just part of our process. It's the foundation. Every innovation is built on another issue. That's emerged with apple's health. Push is false alarms. The mayo clinic found that whole bunch of people were coming to their hospitals. Saying my apple watch just gave me a notification. Says there's something wrong with my heart. What do i do. The doctors at the clinics didn't know what they found was for every seven patients. The came in the had one of those notifications and symptoms heart palpitations. for instance. one of those seven had a condition that could explain the irregular rhythm notification the other six the kind of throw up their hands. I don't know so potentially a lot of false alarms. That's exactly what mayo said they said. Look this is interesting. But you know when i spoke to a doctor who had been on that research. He said one could drive up cost. Because when you get something like that you go to an emergency room often you want to get seen right away. That's expensive super expensive The other thing that that doctor said is you could have something called alert fatigue. If you keep getting these notifications on your device that something's wrong and you'll get a check out it turns out there's nothing there. Nothing happened and you start to dismiss that alert. It's the alert who cried wolf. We're not paying attention to it anymore. What it tells us is a fundamental issue with the apple watch and other health wearables that. Try to be healthy. Jason which is they can give us a lot of information. We don't know what that information means for us yet clinically wellness. One thing telling you got your steps. What your heart rate is while you're working out that's great but when you tip over into healthcare and you try to take these signals and do something with them clinically. Did sure he's still out. Don't know yet. The male clinic study focused on two hundred and sixty four patients. And apple spokesman said that in its own heart study stanford roughly two thousand people received a heart rate alert and the vast majority of them did have clinical problem. Apple is not the only tech giant is trying to break into healthcare and other silicon valley. Companies have also faced challenges. You have a whole bunch of people here who think about all of the opportunities for how technology could completely disrupt a particular old industry that leads to a lot of hubris but you know what every once in a while it turns out there right it turns out it took a fresh pair of eyes and somebody wasn't steeped in all of the reasons why it can't be done to just do it differently and it turns out it works. That's the magic of technology in silicon valley. Look around you today. At the ways you know the different parts of the world that software is eating up. It apple felt why not us. We're one of the biggest companies on earth with unlimited budget unlimited budget so people inside the company. Think why not think as expansively as possible. The apple spokesman said the company's work in healthcare is still in its early stages but he added that already. Apple's devices are improving users health and enabling new research apples clinics meanwhile are still treating patients. But ralph says they're more like the clinics that used to be there just to serve employees not necessarily ones that are likely to disrupt the entire healthcare industry. Still that doesn't mean the company won't figure out how to do it. Anything apple decides to do as the company that sells us our iphones Which have really become an extension of our brain you know. These are devices that people depend on in a way that people haven't dependent on devices in the history of humanity. What they decide do and what they decided to resources at even internally and think about what could that mean for. The rest of us could have big implications slow our own. That's all for today. Tuesday june twenty second the journal is a co production of gimblett and the wall street journal. If you like the show follow us on spotify or wherever you get your podcasts route. Every weekday afternoon. Thanks for listening. See you tomorrow.

apple jeff williams hypertension rolf Dr bob harrington Tim cook aflac winkler steve jobs the journal atrial fibrillation diabetes ryan stanford university heart failure Ralph cancer symptoms heart palpitations
Highlighting the Women Executives Leading Esports

Esports Minute

02:50 min | 8 months ago

Highlighting the Women Executives Leading Esports

"Happy International women's day. Let's celebrate some of the women Executives leading away in Esports. I'm the dreams. This is the Esports minute from E Sports Network, especially when compared to the sports world. One of the coolest things about e Sports is that they're quite a few women in leadership positions at Major organizations companies and leagues. But before I highlight those women I want to acknowledge that we still have a long way to go to make this an equitable industry that's being seen in the ongoing sexual discrimination lawsuits at Riot games off the added toxicity faced by female Gamers and the gender disparity at the top levels while it's important to recognize those issues. It's also crucial to highlight the women who are leading this industry in crucial ways starting with em ization Trisha's who Gita is the CEO of flyquest since she was promoted to that Rolf like what's been more successful than ever in the LCS. She's also spearheaded climate-related charity drives. Couldn't request and Seaquest under the Mantra showcase greatness sigitas evolving. The Flack was brand in one of the coolest nice sports with important causes right at Center over at Evil Geniuses. The oldest Esports organization North America, Nicole. The point Jameson is at the helm since taking over as CEO. She's led the organization through a Rebrand that got off to a rocky start but his landed with a flourish and it's helped e g and brave the evil nature of its name playing as a good-natured. He'll to the rest of these Sports both Tricia and Nicole have guided their organization throughout the pandemic a situation filled with tough challenges for CEOs as we leave the chemical both brands are stronger than when they went in. That's an impressive accomplishment over on the league side. Johanna fairies deserves a ton of credit after guiding the CDL through its first year as commissioner issues brought on to be the leader of the o w l ahead of its next season as head of leagues for Activision Blizzard's franchise leagues. She's in charge of two of the most important Esports leagues to ever exist. She and Ed. The league in a tough spot with the o w l and the challenge of a pandemic for both leagues clearly her work with the Call of Duty League during this pandemic season impressed Activision Blizzard enough to double up her leadership capabilities with the return of the o w l on the horizon. I can't ever highlight all the amazing women doing work in this space but suffice to say there are a ton of them from players like Potter Mel and Karma to journalists. Just like Erin Simon awfully May HP Duran and frost Karen to women-led companies like Queens game and Collective and Mateo. There are a ton of amazing women in this industry a link all these women Social Club under the show. If you aren't following them already now is a really great time to start happy International women's day. Here's to pushing this industry towards the equal playing field it can and should be as always. I'll be back tomorrow to talk Story the day in just a few minutes.

ization Trisha Nicole Johanna fairies Gita Activision Blizzard Rolf Jameson Duty League Tricia North America CDL Potter Mel Erin Simon HP Duran frost Karen Queens game and Collective and Ed Social Club
EP 102 Ari Gronich From Deathbed To Healer Motivation Means Nothing Without Action

Dark Horse Entrepreneur

56:41 min | 10 months ago

EP 102 Ari Gronich From Deathbed To Healer Motivation Means Nothing Without Action

"How can get any better than now. What would happen if have you ask yourself these questions should you have you ever thought the answer. All the way through. What would be impact if stay tuned to find out okay. Here's the question. How are we dark darkhorse. You know the ones everyone is betting against the ones they don't expect to win place or even show on the track and they'll even laugh on us when we talk about trying. How do we show the world or greatness and triumph. Come on well. That's the question. This podcast will give you the answers. This is the dark horse entrepreneur. My name is tracey bregman. Welcome back to you. Weekly dose of from the deathbed to a whole new life and new year learning. I'm dr host tracey bregman and you will. That's infinitely more important. You are driven entrepreneur or one in the making either way. You're here because you're ready to start restart kick start or just start leveling up with some great marketing personal or business results in order to build that beautiful business of yours into the empire. It absolutely deserves to be who who here. We have another big episode today today. Arne granite shares not only an amazing story of going from his deathbed to a whole new life but props us to ask the question. What if you want to check this out. Plus i'm gonna let you in on next week's interview. Guests who helps entrepreneurs and business owners to close more premium sales as per usual. The dark horse corrals chock full of personal business and marketing g. o. l. d. spilling from every corner of the dark horse. Hq so let's get to the starting gates and go all right my dark horse friends and families. Today's guest is none other than the performance therapist. Arnie is one of the most sought after therapists and for elite athletes corporate culture and wellness and internationally as an industry keynote speaker. He's he's not one of he's a bestselling author founder and ceo of achieve health usa end the performance therapist academy and could be found interviewing new world changers on his new podcast called. Create a new tomorrow. Arnie greenwich welcome to the dark horse. Entrepreneur how you doing brother doing great. It's globe. Good to be here. We finally are able to have this conversation. So i'm excited. I know we tried a couple of times to get this going in there. Just i know at one point. I had this. I was so stuffed up that i probably would have sounded like fifth on the microphone. Didn't think that would provide to well of an opportunity for you but all that said. I'm glad we're here now. I really want to step back from the mike in let you take front and center is all about you. Tell your story you know the good the bad the ugly all the things that brought you to where you are today and why you do what you do so much. There is definitely a lot of good bad and ugly in that story. Okay for sure i. I started out in life as a gymnast baseball player tennis player. Long distance cycler martial artists. I was an athlete growing up. I played baseball for eight years. And and i kept getting injured and it took a long time for me to recover and you know. My dad was going to a chiropractor so i went to the chiropractor that started at age five and i actually ended up getting paid for my first massage when i was five years old at a parents Party gets together. i started rubbing somebody's shoulders. They gave me to box. i said. Hey that's better that allowance. And i in round the entire party two dollars for a massage two dollars for massage and and so you know technically that's when i got started but At age seven. I literally on my birthday. I was having migraines and hot flashes in headaches throwing up and and what. I didn't realize what nobody realized was that it was the beginning of an autoimmune disorder. Now because i had a brain tumor and the brain tumor you know. Think about it age. Seven was when i started having symptoms age. Twelve basically said. I'm not going through puberty. I don't know what's going on. So i started injecting having to inject into puberty By the age fourteen. I had breast reduction surgery because i was is called gynecologic surgery and is because Obviously you know male bet. Breast tissue was was growing. Massive estrogen imbalances. And then. you combine that with So i have all this medical stuff going on and injuries going on and you combine it with the fact that i was molested and raped from three years old To my early teens multiple times multiple people different different people. And and you have the makings of somebody who's not a very happy person very very very unusual so you know in my high school years. I was in air force. Rotc and in theater and show choir so not to things that really kinda tend to go together right fox. I'm an athlete. And i'm and i'm a. I'm not a very good student. But i'm a great studier. And so i. I learned a lot of information. highly intelligent. So i'm thinking okay. So i'm learning teaching myself about history and philosophy and religion and having those kinds of conversations and yet in the medical side. I can't figure out what's going on. And so i turn eighteen a graduate high school. I go whitewater rafting with my with my parents. I'm taking a homeopathic remedy. Because the doctors haven't been able to figure me out. So i go to a natural path to see if he could figure me out. He gives me a remedy of I guess it was snake. Venom and whitewater rafting heatstroke sunstroke Kind of a perfect storm. I ended up dead in the hospital for twenty six minutes. Oh damn and so here. I am gone okay. what's going on. I'm you know. I've tried the traditional medical. I'm eighteen right. And i've tried the traditional medical. I'm attorney medical. What do i do. That wasn't necessarily the conscious thought that was going on in my head but i'm sure it was there somewhere but basically three four days in to being in the hospital after Finally waking up from this ordeal. I pop up in the bed and i said i think i need to be a healer and that my dear friend is how it all began will that is. You're right there's a lot of good in ugly in debt in that story and that's probably just the beginning of your journey at that point right. Oh that yeah that. That doesn't even. Yeah that's that's like a small part of Of what made me who i am. You know being jewish and catholic. So i was you know. I started Life as a jewish person my my mother jewish. My dad had converted but my grandmother peruvian catholic. So we have those mixed bags of things that don't really match right and then At age nine. My parents lost their business. Had it stolen from them so they literally their business partner locked. The doors stole about quarter million dollars worth of equipment. Left us having to sell our house in in a in a bad place. That was the first time. I tried to kill myself. That was age nine started doing drugs and so yeah. I've i've might. My past is interesting. I started studying buddhism. I had a girlfriend who lived on an indian reservation. So i studied indian culture quite a bit. I loved to learn about people. My favorite books have always been historical non fiction. Biographies it funny. Because i'm reading my on these value books that i read when i was a kid. And it's basically. I'll give you an example. We just just read understanding. The value of understanding and the character is margaret mead and she was an anthropologist who really sought to understand human nature and people in the nature of people in different environments. And so. I did that as a child. Now i'm reading those to my son who's six and he loves these and and they're all about values and stuff like that so i had all these mixed messages going on in life. I was very bullied for being i. I grew up in a town that it was not okay to be ju it was. It was not okay to be a big guy. And i had these hormone imbalances and i kept getting bigger and bigger no matter how much exercise i did or or anything just kept growing so i was this oddball out. Who spent a lot of time watching and observing the world. Because i wasn't really allowed to participate in it and i never knew how much that really affected me until i was in adult going hug will check one check shoe check three things that created me when people start asking me. Why are you who you are That was really help began and so at eighteen. I ended up for a year. In portland oregon. Which is very wet and cold and living under bridges and intense and in my car while i was working a fulltime. A graveyard job at seven eleven. I was training as security team in martial arts and at the portland saturday market and I was working at at my school. I ended up going to massage school and it was the best decision i ever made was going to this particular school because the things that fell into my lap were incredible in the industry. See it okay. You got you gotta dig in a little bit deeper right there so What i heard was you were homeless. This is the same timeframe right. Eighteen you're working at seven eleven graveyard shift your Martial arts and you decided to go to massage school and that was the best decision you made why some things fell into place. Obviously well i was paying for the school while homeless But by my third month in the school so the teacher the owner of the school had been a therapist for over forty years. Okay okay so. She didn't know how to run a school but she knew the top experts everybody in the industry and she would lie them to the school to portland to teach us that specific modality in and sieve. Way sure and so people like ida. Rolf zhenya kerr show who will item office. Roughing people have heard of roughing Jenny kercheval was one of the top rusher. Sports therapist are like stanley legacy in russian bulb. So we just. We had a shaman master. Who enough from hawaii come into temple lomilomi with us. We had an instructor Oregon health and science university do all of our anatomy and physiology kinesiology antique nets into the school. To elijah's you to do cadaver labs. Who's heard is that happening. Eight right in a in a massage. School for instance We learn tonsure. We learned rocky. We learned a foot reflects solidly chinese massage. We had a blindfold instructor or a blind instructor. Who would teach us and blindfolded while we were working in guidance and so just an incredible opportunity within the school. Sure but by my third month working there. I was running the clinic. Wow i was the only person that the owner of the school would have touch her. Which was you know. It's a nice complement your by my fourth month our school backed up to the campuses of intel nike and tektronix in beaverton oregon and by my fourth month as his running the clinic for a month than i was going. I think we need more or clients. So why don't we just go to these companies and thereby literally creating an starting three of the first corporate wellness programs in our country with these major corporations. How how that happened. Literally is is beyond me. It did By my sixth month we had an event at the the rose garden big health fair and so school had a presence at the health fair. I ended up working on richard simmons. Now people that listen to your show may not know who retired. Simmons's right. some of the folks that are not in my age bracket right okay but but you know who he was i do. And that's a pretty amazing experience. Victoria jackson i worked on her. She was in. Espn of like jane. Fonda rubik's instructor on economic and early nineties and then A couple professional sports athletes came in. And i ended up working on them. Well they liked might work so much that i ended up at the game that night on on the court and for the next year i was on the court with them watching surgeries learning from the athletic trainers learning from the personal trainers. Learning from the coaches. I mean literally. I got to be inside of a knee surgery. Things that you just wouldn't necessarily have the opportunity so by my third year in practice i had over five thousand hours of training and internships and just to give a little perspective on that The average medical school is thirty. Eight hundred hours to become a doctor. chiropractors forty two hundred hours. So you can kinda get the idea that the training i had was pretty extensive and very specific. It was kind of that master apprentice style of training. So i just From there have been able to work with olympic athletes paralympics. I was at the two thousand four olympics or paralympics. In in athens had amazing team that i worked with there and And some awesome athletes out. One of the athletes ended up putting a gold medal around my neck after breaking pretty much every world olympic and paralympic record. There is to break in his art. And so i've had a pretty interesting career. But i'll say has had a lot of good bad ugly. No that's that's a. I'm fascinated because. I'm doing the math here so if you started that day at the massage school around eighteen by about year. Three three years in practice right. You're you're in your early twenties in your already kicking it with you know big name. Athletes headed towards the olympics. And so that's an early start of what's gotta be amazing career going the rest of the way. Yeah i am. Forty four. And i don't mind saying twenty six years more than a quarter of a century in one job. That's never thought that was gonna happen. Do has been pretty amazing. What a what a accomplished. So clearly you love. Because i know you've started some of movements around I paradigm shifting and being active in alternative healthcare's. And what have you correct. Yes so you know i. I wrote a book recently called create a new tomorrow and it's really my frustration with watching what has happened to our world just in my lifetime with the onset of over seventy thousand chemicals being introduced into our environment right And then i watch people accept the reality of what is versus being so being proactive. It and outraged really. The word is outraged. It upsets me. That people are not outraged more than they are with what we've allowed to happen in the world and so create a new tomorrow is really the book a new tomorrow and the podcast create. A new tomorrow is really about. We get back to cognitive reasoning. You know eliminate the cognitive dissonance going on get back to critical thinking in common sense and and wind is somebody who works in a field. Like medicine right. Who absolutely knows that. What they're doing is not performing at the level at which they even would want to perform at but it's how the system is dragging them down. What is gonna take to get these. These amazing caring loving doctors to stop being afraid of the bully so to speak ama. The insurance companies the pharma companies. These are bullies. What's it gonna take to get them to organize and stand up and fight for themselves and for their communities. What's it gonna take in medicine. What's it gonna take in agriculture for the farmers who are having to her has met suits instead overalls right in spraying food spraying the pesticides on the food that they wouldn't put on their own food. That's gonna take for them to get loud. What's it gonna take to end in and stop the bullies in and i always say a bullies. Best friend is the silence of the victim aim. His silence of others is a bullies. Best friend how do we stop a bully. We get really loud about it. Yeah hey hey. You're bullying me right teacher. He's bullying me. And i think he's bullying this person and this person this person this person to yeah right we get loud about it to the point where they cannot do it anymore. So only way to stop a bully. Yup here's funny. You mentioned via the pesticides when when my wife my now wife who when we first met i was living in ohio and She was living out in the bay area and in northern california. And you know the long distance thing for a while. And i moved up into the wisconsin area southeast wisconsin just north of milwaukee and then eventually you know she moved out here so we i flew out there and we packed everything driving across the country and i remember driving through some of the you know the amber waves of grain that we here in the national anthem right. And we're driving through these just miles and miles and miles of you know this fields corn here. Whatever different types but there was a there was a A long stretch or you know when you're you're driving across country. What are the things you have to almost. Every time you stopped for gas is what you clean off your windshield because right right there. Was this long stretch. And we both looked at each other. We're asking questions. I there are no bugs hitting the windshield and it was like that and after we said out loud we. Purposefully were paying attention at this. You know we're pretty aware of a lot of the things you're calling out especially you know my wife is Very into nutrition and fitness. And she's made. She's raised my awareness. And i thought i was pretty good at it. She has leveled me up. And i know probably two to to your level awareness. We're probably like this. You know but still it was. It was really kind of a scary thought as we're driving easily hundred miles through like nebraska one of those states. Like that where you know. it's all about farmland. No notebooks listening to the dark horse entrepreneur podcast and it also made us notice. There were no birds you know. What are the birds. Eat bugs and you know. Maybe some of the produce in the birds don't want the produce the bugs don't wanna produce. God knows. I don't wanna eat it. And of course you see those signs right. whatever monsanto in some code. And you're like i get it. I know i know bugs here. You're really kinda scary. it is. It's it's not only scary for the health effects of us but the ecological effects that that people really are are paying attention to you know if if we were to do a natural farming cycle for instance there are plants that we plant next to the plants that we want that. Stop the bugs from getting on those plants. Every farmer in history knows what those plants are. There certain bugs in certain plans that will stop mosquitoes from coming there. Certain plants that will stop and those are all natural to the environment around. But because we have monoculture d- are cropping so every year all year all the time is corn here. Tayo oh here well. That's not how how seasons work. That's not how life works at the mother. Nature works nature works. So we have you know i. I would say if you're if you're a religious person who believes that you know believes in an almighty planner right and then you're also the person who's working to alter that plan that he created or she created or whoever it is created. You're right. I'd say you're pretty much being a hypocrite to yourself right because we're trying to do something as though we are gods. God made the environment a certain way so that it would function in that way and it will replenish itself in crete the cycle of living. Yeah right so when we alter it in one aspect of nature we alter it in every aspect of nature us because we are nature. We are nature. We're not outside of nature like it seems like a lot of people think that we're out that humans are outside of nature either above below whatever we're outside of of nature a little bit and we're not we are part of nature. We are a creature in nature. We just happened to have this cognitive ability and these fingers you know that oppose this guy right here out of the thumb. Yeah he's think these fingers so you know what we're doing. Cognitive dissidents is amazing. How much we're thinking that we have no effect on the rest of the environment on the rest of nature is unbelievable. I mean i just watched a documentary called connected on It's on netflix. Accent talks about how interconnected everything is basically talks about how the dust from the sahara in africa blows over to south america and fertilize the ground. So that the amazon could be the amazon right. You can't get more connected than that. So what is it with with people not thinking that we're connected trying to be god's instead of trying to understand what god's plan was the creation was the thing is that we're that we're trying to do and then not go against that but go with it work with. Who's that that work with nature instead of against nature so that we can still feed everybody. We can still create food. We can still create everything that we've created out of the figment of our nation right. But we've made this whole thing up and we and somehow we've gotten glued to the thing we've made up instead of getting glued to the creativity and the imagination that allowed us to make stuff up right now. I'm with you there. I think one of the things also The big players that are involved in a lot. I think what you're what you're talking about is You know they're in it for the almighty dollar. The power factor right I don't see the giving back part of it. You know and and i think back when maybe some when they first started right and we won't. Everyone knows the organizations were talking about. We've called out a couple of them. But i think maybe when they first started. They had intentions. They thought what. Hey here's what we'll do but agendas. It just know stepped up and stepped up and it spiraled in his filed. Maybe somebody grabbed a hold of man. I know what we can do with that. You know and now it's they're these big money machines you know pushing pills down our throats right pushing chemicals onto our foods to to produce more foods and gosh that that that kills the ground re pulling all the nutrients the ground. Well we have for that too you know and it creates this vicious cycle whereas if we could step back and look dude if we just did it like it was supposed to be done you know. Hey this year. It's corn next year at soy next year. It's beans one have you. What have you because like you said. Farmers know this. They're like dude. If if i stop putting corn and i put this there within the nutrients that core needs gets back into the ground naturally and then two or three years through the cycle. I put corn back there. And you just you keep that rotation cycle gone i. It's all good. There's there's power players in the mix anyway while we. We've we've gone down a rabble and i'm actually enjoying it. Join the conversation. I do want to loop back around though one of the things in. I'm a big fan of motivation. Right i say all the time. You find things that motivate yourself. And i know i do say it. A lot. motivation is enough. And i know that it's it's one of the things you kind of adhered to as well correct right. So mel robbins. You know who that is. I do okay. So she says motivation sucked sir. Motivation is meaningless if she has a lot of things about motivation because the fact of the matter is we're always we have motivation. Everybody has a motivation in life. Right the problem is actualising that motivation like go to one event and you get motivated at the event and then three weeks later you're not in that atmosphere of energy anymore and ation dies down. Well it's not that the motivation died down. It's the energy around the motivation that that died down. It's the experience of coming back and being amongst the people that you were around where their motivation and may not be the same level as yours and so you fall into the energy that surround you things like that but the fact of the matter is is that motivation means nothing without action and action means nothing without a plan and a plan means nothing without knowing who you are. Because if you create a plan for somebody else's life that you thought you wanted right you. I wanna be tim robbins. Tony robbins right. I wanted my twenty. So i'm gonna try to structure my life around the way. His life is well. Then you find out. Oh wait i. i don't like this life. That's not my life right so you gotta figure out who you are. I and in order to do that. You've got to take the pieces that are blocking you from being who you are and white them away. And so that's the traumas that health really the the food we eat that exercise we get her. Don't get the things that we do that we like to do. Do you like to go to the gym or do you like to play tennis. Do you like to play baseball. Do you like to play kickball. You like to do sports activities with groups of people or do you like to do them alone. okay now. we're starting to get the way that somebody gets motivated. Now this is this may seem odd right. But if i have an olympic athlete. Come in and see me for instance. I'm not just treating them for injury that they have or helping them to get to the goal. They want because if i give them stuff to do that they don't do because it doesn't fit in their life then i'm not giving them the service that they need writer so i spend about an hour to two hours sometimes longer asking them questions about who they wanna be about is that they've had in life about the things that are stopping them this things that are motivating them the things that make them who they are. So i'll give you an example. I had a good conversation with one of my ex clients on on create tomorrow. And you know this is a guy who has was in the top. Ten for over a decade went for four olympics. May to right and they chew were split so he didn't make them in a row and the ones the ones that he missed he missed by getting fourth place on both to win fourth place on both right so i'm asking him questions. What will happen will was that while. What were you thinking. What was in your head. Oh i'm supposed to be the best. So i should be doing this and i got in my head and i got the anxiety going and so okay so you have a you know. There's a mindset. there's a food. There's there's spiritual level there's traumas that you've been through in life that have both propels you forward and held you back and so we gotta figure out which one is which Right right totally that way. We get a full diagnosis so to speak of a person's life and then we can go about the process of guiding them into healing those aspects that they need to heal into accentuating the aspects that they need to accentuate figuring out the things that they are doing subpar or on par. What's in their mind. What's in there. I mean we go through a very very detailed process. Do this when i do. Mastermind says well with the people who come into a mastermind. Because if i don't know who you are. I can't ensure that you're gonna get the benefit of my work and if you don't get the benefit of my work than i have failed and if i failed nobody else is gonna come see me that. That's been my philosophy. If i was a doctor today. I would never have another client. Because i could never let a patient into wait in a waiting room for an hour to. I could never do a seven minute session and think that i was helping them with my recommendation. It's not possible. And the that is what the insurance companies have kind of mandated at this point. That's what's necessary for a doctor to even get money enough for them. To live let alone have a thriving practice. Don't understand this. There was a time when doctors were wealthy. Yeah now doctors are in debt and in some cases driving worse cars than their secretary because of the insurance companies because of school debt because of all these systemic issues. And so there. They are suffering this moral conundrum on. I went to school to be of service and be of help. The system i went into is not letting me do that. And they're threatening me that. If i talk about it right i'm gonna i'm gonna get sued. I'm gonna get Find up gonna get a licensed taken away. Whatever it is. Systemically ostracized Ostracize and yet you know i. I'm old enough. And i studied enough history to know that. What did the doctors do in the nineteen twenties. And before that yeah to your home. They spent a week there sometimes. Living with you to find out how you live and by doing that. They got a very well rounded version of who you are and you to be so that when they went to help you it was not a hit or miss. It wasn't like throwing darts at a dartboard it. I know what's wrong. Because i have experienced what you're experiencing so now i know what to do for you and that's the same way that i've that i've looked at my entire career but also the way i the way i talked to. What i consider is the people who really need to step up and activate themselves to change this this really broken really crappy system and it's not about. Who's the pair of this system right right. None of that conversation. That's being held. Politically is about the issues at hand right. I'll just who's paying for those issues right. They're not gonna. It's not gonna make a difference other than you know. Maybe in one system versus the other more people will be able to get seen get more intervention and anything that this whole pandemic has Has shown us is that medical intervention at the level we were doing pre covid was killing. More people at it was helping. Because we've had a massive drop in medically connected deaths. Oh massive. i'll have to go. Look that look at that one up. I'm sure you're right but i hadn't. I hadn't research that one at all. Well nobody's doing these elective procedures and even some of the things that we were having done with intervention. We're we stopped. That are more necessary that has only increased certain populations you know issues but the total death toll from medicine has gone down. Now he's while. I guess there's the there's the silver lining on this pandemic cloud going on right. Yeah you know. It'll it'll definitely take some time to really study. All of the numbers sure daily at entails. But the idea is that what we've been doing is not working. So let's stop doing that and do something different and i get. How can we get the people in the field and the people who are affected by by this stuff. You know to stand up and say no more diabetic if you're if you've got cancer if you've got heart disease if you've got any of these number one number two number three killing things. Ninety nine percent of that is preventable by your lifestyle and your choices. And the caveat is the system may not be allowing you to exercise your rights as readily as you might think because the organic food which is much much better healthier the free range chicken is not what subsidized corn subsidized so oxidized flour and wheat is subsidized. These are things. The government pays through our tax dollars to subsidize because they're much more expensive to produce however they need to be cheap to consume right. And so we actually every time you spend money on flower on corn on soy on any of these products and the and it's in pretty much everything now you're actually paying for those with your with your money right. You're paying the people down the line with your tax money to yup and you may not realize that you may not know that. But that's the facts. The facts man. Yeah no i hear ya. I'm lucky enough. Because of my wife. That i mentioned earlier. I'm i'm in the know of these things. And their pre scare them. And i thought like i said i thought it was in the know before but you know after she s shared more knowledge with me and continues to do so in helps me. Keep a abreast of things in That that makes me wanna go out in learn more. You're you're absolutely right. You're respond on. Yeah more power to you there. Okay so what is what is ari to these days and shared a little bit with everyone. That's listening about ukraine tomorrow. The podcast in what what all of our as goodness you have gone on these days. Yes so you know again. Create a new tomorrow. The podcast is really about getting this message across. And i'm interviewing olympic athletes. I've interviewed organizational psychologist I've interviewed regular psychologists doctors chiropractors. Pretty much anybody in this industry activists I've got a an amazing interview. That i'm doing on friday with a billion dollar woman who who you know is everybody will know who this person is. Because she's been in everybody's home for years and years and years selling them stuff you know also this is all. That's all about pitching. And what what is it that the message is that you're saying and what's the manipulation happening in the message so it's saying you know talking about talking to government officials about how we have. We change the system but really it's about the listeners. So the listeners. I want the people who listened to the podcast to really really really get actionable steps that they can take to change the world. Because i believe that everybody is passionate about somebody. Something enemy just don't know how to activate themselves to get that message across to the masses and so this is really about. How do we do it in actionable steps so every episode the end we asked the guest three actionable steps that somebody can take today tomorrow to start changing their world for the better because if we change our own personal world will start changing. Our family's world will then the community will then change this county will then changed the. It's it's it's a snowball right snowball. The better off we treat ourselves better. We treat others. You know i always used to say What would happen if you got pulled over for speeding and the police officer gave your massage instead of a ticket at the good quite salic probably relax. You probably calm you down. Maybe if you're really angry or frustrated after work and you got that little bit of a of a shoulder rub you drive a little bit slower. You'd get home. You're you'd be nicer to your wife or your children. You know you. You wouldn't have to drink so much or any drugs. I mean just little things that we can do. What if we planted fruit trees in a park and berries in a park instead of a oak trees. Take the same amount of maintenance but they don't provide food. What if we did that and people could get the really fast food you know and bring them with stuff because plants have been growing for a lot of years without chemicals. They didn't need the chemicals to survive. It didn't need to do it right in need asks. They didn't need the chemicals. They just needed the land and the water while right and absolutely so what if we were to do little solutions. Little bits of things and everybody. Who's listening to this. If you're passionate about you know there are so many easy sheep free kinds of solutions that don't take massive amounts of energy thought but what would happen if subdued question. What would happen if i did this instead of that tomorrow. What would happen. If i didn't have that cigarette if i didn't eat that extra bowl of sugar. If i didn't what would happen if i chose to exercise instead what would happen if we start asking this question. What would happen if and all of a sudden you get. How can it be any better than this. It's a it's a kind of pun question. It's a funny question. But how can it get any better than this. How can it get any better than this. And then your mind starts working on that question yet of. How can it get better than this. Unlike and as your mind is that question the solutions will come. And if you're passionate about something you know this is your audience to my audience to everybody's audience if you're passionate about someone something instead of letting it be a big wall that stops you. Let it be a question that consumes you so that you will do what you're passionate about and change the world for the better one percent of time so that's money right. There you heard from ari himself changed the world one person at a time art so mr been enjoying our time together here but i want to be mindful of it. What i wanted to check more ari and all his awesome this out work they reach you at yes you could go to create a new tomorrow. Dot com or achieve health usa dot com and argh raj at everywhere so whether it's facebook youtube twitter instagram. Argh ron everywhere. There's not a lotta me. i think. I'm the only one on the planet yet. You're probably an easy search to do right. Yeah with my first and last name. I don't think there's anybody else on the planet have that. So i'm i'm pretty easy to search. And i i just. I love connecting with people and being somebody of service so please do reach out and you know my last podcast interview went two and a half three hours. Almost now. i saw. That was. When i when i was on his show. He just did an interview this morning. And hugh hewitt was on my show and and it was almost two hours. I think it was a little over two hours for that. That show so you know. I can talk forever. I hoped hang has impact more than just me hearing myself talk. No i think there's definitely business gyms you have dropped in here that i think is going to move the needle on more than one person listening and if not you know they'll come back to it later on when they're ready as you know we're not always ready when we hear them rant is the first time they'll loop back around they're like i remember. That guy was talking. Let me check him out but I wanna make sure. I'm gonna get all those links to All of your socials in the websites in the show so people can find you really easy Any final thoughts before yet. Let you go. We've made this shit up and we. We can do better from the money to the buildings to the way in which we live. We made it up out of our heads came from our imaginations. We don't have to be married to our imagination. We can actually expand our imaginations and make it better make it more optimal make it perform. Better make it work better for everybody so just remember this world. This system is just one possibility. That happened to evolve out of our imaginations. There's infinite number more of possibilities that we can create so don't be shy. Get loud and start creating your new tomorrow today. I love it are thank you so much for hanging out with us tonight. I definitely appreciate your time. Absolutely my pleasure herreid. We went a little bit Deal different direction this episode. Didn't we right. I think it's good to do these. Things right to explore new areas to boldly go where no one has gone before think just dated myself by quoting star trek. But i want to give you a few thoughts. I walked away with from today's show up as i usually do. Thought number one whether it's a tough road or an easy one still up to you are like so many of my other guests has faced so many obstacles is life right be it his religious beliefs the persecution from others because of the way he looked whose parents were or any of the things that were in or out of his control look. Here's the thing everyone on. This planet yet faces some kind of adversity now. You're adversity mark. Might be far more excessive than mine or vice versa. But that doesn't matter to the person that's going through the adversity to them. It's just that adversity. So i'm not here nor are any my guest year to say who's is worse than yours. No no no no no what we want to impart is by sharing these stories that no matter what adversity you have or are facing that you can come out on the other side stronger and wiser for having experienced it now. Let's be honest. would you have choose not to experience. It pl- hell. Yeah mean but as a result of whatever series of events you or we have had to experience. In versity the question then really becomes. What are you gonna do now. Are you going to step up. Rise up start restarting kickstart all those dreams and desires. You have boiling inside you. Are you just going to continue to bitch about all the reasons why you believe you can't do it. You know but g you know like just saint all the reasons. You can't do it but you still know deepen a heart that you could if you really really wanted to all right thought number to learn whatever you can from wherever you can and go deep are shares. How he learned from such. He learned a wide variety of tactics and techniques within his area of expertise and this turned around and opened doors and opportunities that enable him to work on bigger industry names and that turned around in open up opportunities to work on sports celebrities which he leveraged to learn even more tactics and more techniques to the point that by his third year of practice he had over five thousand hours of training in for internships. Now has already noted this is the level way beyond what not way beyond its in level beyond even what it takes to become an md or a chiropractor see but to me. The key here is. He went deep inside his areas of expertise. He wasn't out there. Learning every single thing. There was out there to learn about this or about that no no. He focused on his areas of expertise in went deep into that knowledge. Base thus creating his expertise within that area me. We've heard this phrase before. And i've mentioned it don't go a mile wide and an inch. Deep go an inch wide and a mile deep. Yeah right thought number three and this one is going to be a little different than any of the other podcast. But i gotta say it. Stand up and fight for what you believe in now. Here's the thing. I don't pretend to make this pilot this podcast about any one political side or the other. I don't do lean towards anyone religious side the other anyone sexual side or the other. I prefer preferred to hear from all the sides and then make up my own damn mind incense. That's how i believe. That is how. I want to treat you as a listener because look i'm not here to thrust my beliefs upon you all offer them up as a side for you to hear from all over our other sides from those. I interviewed for you to hear from his. Well it's not about whether i agree one hundred percent or fifty percent in what they say it's about getting all the sides out there now all that said there's one topic to our brings up about standing up for the bullies. This is one. I personally am very passionate about for me. It's just not the bully zetter in big pharma or the insurance communities right it's about all the bullies out there that would have you believe that you should not step outside of this box and this box could be this predefined notion about who you are what you're capable of or what. They believe you should know what they believe that you're capable of handling or anything else. Look i'm from the usa and we here are we. The people and i'm doing that. An air quotes with the people. It is about we the people it's not about us it big tech about you. The big form. It's not about you. The prison in st with the tobacco industry or the alcohol industry other industry. You want to choose. It's about we the flipping people and the moment that you forget that eventually we the people that by your products and pay for your services. We'll eventually stand up against the very thing. You trying to get us to kowtow to ladies and gentlemen stand the hell up for yourself and for those other little guys out there that that cannot stand up for themselves and that do not have a voice for themselves through your product and through your vote your your service and through your damn voice. Stand up for what you believe in all right. I feel my blood boiling now. All right now thought number. Four motivation means nothing without action. This comes off the stand up for what you believe right. It's all good. It's all great tracy to stand up for what you believe in but if you don't take some damn action with yeah all that motivation means nothing right and then action without action means. Nothing was the plan and a plan means nothing about knowing who you are. Oh my god. How many times have you heard me on this. Podcast or in the dark horse tribe facebook group or my facebook profile. Say this very thing. You've gotta know who you are at the coriolis. Gentlemen this is an ever will be the starting point. Who are you and then what do you want. Then why do you want it right now. Let's look at those things and then once you know that right once you know that you are in what you want in why you want it then you can look at the things that are in the way those obstacles that her between you who you are and what you want those and how to get around those or through those are under those or or over those are smashing through those the your plan once you have your plan then you can start taking action towards your goal every single day like you hear me say every single day for me within all of that your motivation is stirred over and over and over again as you review who you are what you want what you stand for why you wanted in what the hell is getting in the way of you getting it. Each one of those things can stoke that fire burning within you get to rise higher and higher than all the shit you can start creating the plan to get from where you are now to where you wanna be right and that further stokes afire then you start believing even more and more and your ability to to reach that damn gold driving your motivation even further. Then you start taking action on that plan and you drive even more motivation shoe right and you get out there and you start getting shit done that you want to get done based on who you are and where you are and why you wanna get there right. That's it that's the end of it right there at all of it all wrapped up into one package. I all right let me let me dow is down just a little bit for you all right. So here's the question. I always ask you what ideas were inspiring tips or thoughts resonated with you right whatever they are. Take some time today right. If you're driving right now the minute you stop heck go ahead and over safely right now and write them down so that you can put them in the action today so that you can get out there you can run your race you can get your results and then you know what i wanna hear about them seriously. Email me at tracy at darker schooling dot com and share the tips or ideas that you came away with how you put them in action and what results you got from them so that you can share your win right. Tell me about it. And i'll share that. Share your win with the rest of the dark horse traffic. I'll probably even go ahead and bring you on the show so you can share it with them directly who got my backup my heart rate up and going today. Thank you ari all right next week. Our interview guests is going to be jason lynette jason. Lynette is a certified professional hypnotist out. Don't leave me at twenty me. Jason has dedicated about two decades to helping. His clients harness the science of positive persuasion strategies to quickly and easily rewrite negative thought patterns. He reveals the secrets of hypnotic communication in shares pacific business influence systems to supercharge. Your business growth. You're gonna wanna chick. This went out all right now. 'cause i know you wanna keep getting these valuable tips and who blood dwelling inspirational. Stories from his podcast. Please going down there and hit the subscribe button. There drop us a five star rating right as some kind words in the review. Tell us what it is. You believe in what you stand up for right and of course. Don't keep all this. Entrepreneurial g. l. d. to yourself share this podcast with other entrepreneurs and business owners. You know will get value from it and with that. I'm going to leave you as i always do. Think successfully. I take action. Thank you for listening to the dark horse entrepreneur podcast. Thanks for tuning in check us out at. Www dot dark horse schooling dot com. My name is tracey bregman.

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Books Ive Loved  Tims Four Must-Read Books (#400)

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

18:34 min | 2 years ago

Books Ive Loved Tims Four Must-Read Books (#400)

"Optimal minimal at this altitude. I can flat out and start shaking question now. It organism living tissue of metal skeleton. Still in this podcast is brought to you by the ready. State virtual mobility coach. What on earth is that? Well okay let me back up the first person I personally call for help with my athletic recovery or mobility training is Dr Kelli. Start at the ready state. I've known Kelly for more within a decade. I was introduced to him for a bunch of reasons. I've seen him perform near miracles on me and many others. He's a good friend but he's also mobility and movement coach for Olympic gold medalist role champions and pro athletes. You might recognize the name because Kelly was in the body. He was in tools of titans. He's been on this podcast he also nursed and coached me through the destroy my body for entertainment TV show. That was the Tim Ferriss experiment and I made aid through those thirteen episodes because of Kelly would not have survived now. Kelly has created a program called virtual mobility coach. It's like carrying a virtual Kelly star in your pocket because most people are not going to have direct access to Kelly. But now you do everyday. Virtual Mobility coach gives you guided mobility videos walks. You step by step. Step through Kelly's proven techniques to relieve pain improve range emotion improve performance on and on and on. There are a lot of things you can do with this program and you gotTA check it out. It's encyclopedic but simultaneously really easy to navigate. If you're in pain you can pull up a picture of the body. Click on what hurts. And from there get customized customized regiment. Help find relief if you're working out or playing a sport. Virtual Mobility coach offers all sorts of pre imposed exercise mobility sequences for more than fifty sports activities. Actually so those will help you warm up before you work out so you can run faster. Jump higher lift heavier all with a low risk of injury and if you're not in pain working out. Virtual Mobility coach also has a library of daily maintenance videos. Great Way to speed up recovery on your off days which also helps a lot with sleep much of that stuff and right now l. listeners. Of this podcast special. You can try virtual mobility coach. You can get the Kelly start in your pocket totally risk-free for two a week without paying a penny. It is a two week free trial so you should try it out. Kelly is super legit. He is literally the person I taxed in. Call with the most sophisticated slash esoteric questions about recovery injuries. I've inflicted upon myself. He knows what he's doing and has stuff really really works so try it for free for two weeks and then after that if you decide to continue you can get fifty percent off your first six months. The ready state dot com slash lashed. Tim and use code. Tim Fifty at checkout so again. That's the ready state dot com slash. Tim and use Code Tim Fifty at checkout. Hello Boys and girls ladies and germs. This Tim Ferriss. Welcome to another episode of the Tim. Ferriss show where where does usually my job to sit down with world class performers of all different types startup founders investors chess champions Olympic athletes. You name it to tease out the habits that you can apply in your own lives. This episode. However is an experiment in part of short form series that I'm doing simply called books I've loved? I've invited some amazing pass. Guests close friends and new faces to share their favorite books. Describe their favorite books. The books that have influenced them change them transform them for the better and I hope you pick up one or two new mentors in the form of books from this new series and apply the lessons in your own life. I had a lot of fun putting this together. Her inviting these people to participate and have learned so so much myself. I hope that is also the case for you. Please enjoy kick things off. Here are four of my personal recommendations which I had originally included in the back of the four hour workweek when it was published Bush in two thousand seven back when I had hair I called these four books the fundamental four and I still do recommend them to a lot of people they are so named the fundamental four because they were the four books. I recommended to aspiring lifestyle designers entrepreneurs prior to writing the four hour workweek. That was longtime ago. They're still still very well worth reading. And here's the sequence that I suggest for specifically the first is the magic of thinking big by David Schwartz. This this book was first recommended by Stephen Key. An ultra successful inventor who has made millions of dollars licensing products to companies like Disney Nestle. Coca Cola list is it's a very very long. It is the favorite book of many super performers worldwide. I've spoken with ranging from legendary football coaches to famous. CEO's we've most of my podcast guests have also brought this up and it has more than one hundred five star ratings on Amazon. The main message is pretty simple. Don't overestimate others. Underestimate yourself. I still personally read the first two chapters of this book whenever doubt creeps in note that it is a little dated. It is outdated in some respects in terms of tone so you just have to accept that as part of the package but nonetheless I find it to be a very very helpful. Philosophical and psychological reboot because in my experience especially in the last twelve months. I've realized that it's not just just enough to automate and streamline and I've noticed in the last handful of months stress creeping in in the form of having to fix a lot of things and I'm feeling strange for time to create much of anything and the solution is not just removing the Minutia that are bothering you. You need a compelling big goal you need an inspiring abnormally family large objective to chase and this book really helps with that type of reorientation. The next book is how to make millions ends with your ideas. Subtitle Entrepreneur's guide that is by Dan. Kennedy this book is also dated. Keep them on. These recommendations are originally from two thousand seven but but it still does the job. This is a menu of options for converting ideas into millions of dollars. I read this I when I was in high school and have read it many times time since. Let's call it six to twelve. It is like steroids for your entrepreneurial cortex. The case studies range from Domino's pizza to casinos to Miller products really lay out a spectrum of options. And that's kind of the point if you think of business and in quotation marks business represents in your mind a very specific one one type of business model a path that is co defied maybe calcified like venture backed startups. And you go from your seed seed round or your convertible debt to your this your that. If you only have one script that is associated with business in your mind this will help to stretch you. It is very very effective for that. I would also suggest combining and I'm cheating a little bit here and adding an extra book but there is a book by Steven in case. This is the amazing inventor who initially recommended the magic of thinking big to me. There's a book he wrote called one simple idea. That is the main title one simple symposia subtitle turn your dreams into a licensing gold mine while letting others to the work so compelling title. It's an excellent book about licensing so instead of venturing insuring instead of doing the manufacturing yourself instead of handling a lot of the nuts and bolts operations. How can you if you're good at inventing license products and I know readers who've read the four hour workweek one specific person to mine? Steve Hey Steve you're gonNA recognize this But I don't have permission to tell L. is full story who read the four hour workweek then read one simple idea. And he's now making up to eighty five thousand dollars a day with some of his products. that's certainly only on the high end of outcomes but it's not completely impossible and there are many other successes the next book. I WANNA mention so the third book of the Funnel Four Or is the myth revisited subtitle. Why most small businesses don't work and what to do about it this way? Michael Gerber this is a classic Gerber is a masterful storyteller and end this classic of Automation Discusses How to use a franchise mindset not necessarily the business model but a franchise mindset to create scalable businesses that based on rules and systems and not outstanding employees. I've certainly felt the pain of making the mistake of trying to focus on hiring Michael Jordan's as opposed to having sufficient systems in place and this can be very very beneficial this book. Either when I think of starting your first business. Or as another reboot reboot if you've strayed from the path of systems and rules and process this provides an excellent roadmap told and parable for becoming an owner instead of a constant micromanager manager. And for those of you have a lot of time in the trenches you will probably recognize that. It is easy to fall into the trap of micromanaging CRA managing or just looking for the superstar employees. Who are going to be completely self driven without any guidance to solve your problems and there are aspects aspects that we could discuss in separate forum but suffice to say if you're stuck in your own business this book can help you get unstuck? That's the myth revisited. The next one is and this is the fourth of the fundamental four is vagabond and uncommon guide to the art of long-term world travel by Rolf Potts Rolf Potts. What's is the man? He's great he's become a friend I read this book a long time ago. This is in fact the book that got me to stop making excuses impact for an extended a hiatus trip overseas e covers. Bits of everything and don't discount it because the subtitle has long-term world travel in it. Maybe that's not what you want to do but but it covers a lot. It's helpful for determining your destination or destinations if you're thinking about travel adjusting to life on the road and re-assimilating back into ordinary life but it also includes great excerpts from famous vagabonds philosophers and explorers as walls anecdotes from ordinary travelers. And this is really a philosophical. Lesotho Coal Reset. This book helps you to better value time. Wealth while recognizing the limitations of money money as currency in the end which most people want to trade for an experience which gives them an emotion. So it really helps to deconstruct your own thinking about materialism success as quantified by money and the trappings that we all fall into the trappings that we all succumb to at various points. It happens and this book is one that I've read at least ten times. I still have my original copy. This is the first of two books. The other was Walden that I took with me on my first fifteen month mini retirement around the world that was from two thousand and four onward. Where all the tango stuff off and all the craziness happened in my life and it really did change my life so vagabond is the fourth book of the fundamental? Four in the sequence. It's again that I recommend not mandatory. But that I would recommend is the magic of thinking big number one how to make millions with your ideas by Dan Kennedy End Or Stephen Keys. One simple idea. Then you have the EMA three visited by Michael Gerber and then vagabond but certainly you can pick and choose and grab one of those out of order a vagabond also. I noticed after many years had no audio book so I produced that audiobook myself and released it. You can find that in my audio book club on audible if you just go to audible dot com forward slash. Tim's books you can find that I'm going to give you guys one bonus book and I know I'm cheating adding but the bonus ebook is awareness subtitle the perils and opportunities of reality by Anthony De Mello so the book awareness earnestness subtitle the perils and opportunities of reality by Anthony Danilo. This short book has completely captured me and just in the last two years. I've probably read it five or six times. And when I feel myself bleeding into overwhelm or feeling scattered. This is one of the first break glass in case of emergency steps that I take I pick it up and I read a few chapters. It was first recommended to me by Peter. Muluke WHO's associated with wealth management management investing and finance. He was on the podcast because he said that it gave him peace of mind for weeks at a time. And it was a bit of a non sequitur in our conversation. Tation and I took a note about it. I grabbed the kindle version with very low expectations because come on the title sounds Super Generic in some respects awareness. Okay there thirty million in one books that claim to be about awareness. What the hell does that mean? Any way The subtitles more interesting the perils and opportunities of reality so I grabbed it with low expectations. Devoured it in three days and I have bought dozens of copies to give to friends. I mean twenty thirty forty fifty to give it to friends. I have an entire shelf in the guest bedroom in my house. That is Is Full of copies of this book for guests to take with them when they leave it found at the right time and it won't resonate with everyone but it has equally impacted several of my close friends and buddies. I've recommended this to so. It's checking out awareness by Anthony de Mello. Those are you wanNA count four or five four five six books and I'm GonNa leave it at that for now. Thank you for listening and I hope you check out one of those books and find any the of them even partially as valuable as I did and if you find that they will be worth the time guys this is. Tim begins a few more things before you take off number one. This is viable at Friday. Do you want to get a short email from me. Would you enjoy getting a short the email from me every Friday that provides a little morsel of fun for the weekend and fiber Fridays every short email. Rice share the coolest. Things I've found on earth I've been pondering over the week that could include favorite new albums that have discovered it could include gizmos and gadgets and all sorts of Weird Shit that I've somehow dug up in the world of the Terek as I do. It could include favorite articles that I've read and that I've shared with my close friends. For instance it's and it's very short. It's just a little tiny bite of goodness before you head off for the weekend so if you want to receive that check it out just go to four hour work week dot com. That's four hour week dot com all spelled out. And just drop in your email and you'll get the very next one if you sign up. I hope you enjoy this. podcast August is brought to you by the ready. State virtual mobility coach. What on earth is that wealth? Move back up the first person I personally call for help with athletic. Recovery recovery or mobility. Training is Dr Kelli. Start at the rim state. I've known Kelly fourth decade. I was introduced to him for a bunch of reasons. I've seen him performed for near Miracles on me and many others. He's a good friend. But he's also mobility and movement coach for Olympic gold world champions and pro athletes. You might recognize the name because Kelly was in foreign body. He was into his titans. He's been on this podcast he also nursed and coached me through the Destroy my body for entertainment TV show. That was the experiment and I made it through those thirteen episodes because of Kelly would not have survived now. Kelly has created a program called virtual mobility coach. It's like carrying a virtual Kelly starring in your pocket caused. People are not going to have direct access to Kelly but now you do every day. Virtual Mobility coach gives you guided mobility videos walk through step by step through Kelly's proven techniques to relieve pain range emotion through performance on and on and on. There are a lot of things you do at this program and you gotTA check it out. It's encyclopedic but simultaneously really easy navigate. If you're in pain you can pull the picture of the body. Click on what hurts and from there give customized regimen to help. Finally if you're working out of playing sport. Virtual Mobility coach offers all sorts of pre and post exercise mobility sequences for more than fifty sports activities. Actually so those will help you warm up before workouts. He you can run faster jump higher. Lift heavier all with a lower risk of injury. And if you're not in pain or walking out. Virtual Billy coach also has a library of daily maintenance video spray Berkeley to speed up recovery. And your off days which also helps all our sleep a bunch of that stuff and right now listeners. At his podcast special deal you can try virtual ability coach. You can get Kelly start in your pocket. Totally risk-free chew weeks without paying a penny at is two week free trial so you should try it out. Uh Kelly Super Legit. He is literally the person I taxed on. Call with the most sophisticated slash esoteric questions about recovery. Rian injuries inflicted upon myself. He knows what he's doing and stuff really really works so try it for free for two weeks and then after that. If you decide to continue you can get fifty percent off your first six months. The ready state DOT com slash. Tim Use Code. Tim Fifty at checkout so again. That's the ready state dot com slash. Use Code Tim Fifth at checkout.

Kelly Tim Tim Ferriss Tim Fifty titans Dr Kelli Dan Kennedy Michael Gerber Anthony De Mello Coca Cola football CEO Rolf Potts Amazon Disney Nestle Stephen Key David Schwartz Bush
Episode 35: Waking Up in Vegas (Steven Koecher/Sage Smith)

Six Degrees of WTF

1:12:57 hr | Last month

Episode 35: Waking Up in Vegas (Steven Koecher/Sage Smith)

"Today I have a story about a 30 year old man who's abandoned car was found in a Las Vegas suburb. The car showed no evidence of foul play nor any clues as to where he could be. I'm going to tell you about a case where we have not one. But three missing persons all gone missing at different times, but all connected to the same case. And I'll post things out with an in memoriam about a couple whose amorous encounter left them free falling for one another. I'm Odell. I'm Aaron. And this is 6° of what the. Hello. Hello. Have you noticed that you give a good synopsis of your stories? Like what you would find on the back of a book? And I give the blurb that would be in the short section of a newspaper. Have you noticed this? Or I give like the TV description. Right. And I've noticed that. And every time you do yours, I'm like, dang it, that's good. And what's funny is when I had to write descriptions for my books, I can never make them short. And I would get so frustrated. So I'd have to make a friend to it. Normally you don't. Normally, I would never say that you do anything. I am short. That's the only thing. You are short, but that's it. And so I just had to tell you. I know that we talked about some books that we were reading, scary books. Yes. Because I was looking for some for the summer. I've had a really difficult time finding time to really just sit down and really read a book because when I do read, I'm reading sweet valley high for other podcasts. Yes. So I re upped my audible account so that I can get some audience. That's really smart. I need to do that just to listen to while I'm cleaning. That's exactly what I do. When I go for a walk, when I'm cleaning when I'm cooking, what I'm doing things around the house, I feel so I'm getting my book time in. So I'd mentioned that book survived the night about the dude who are the woman whose best friend was murdered in hitches a ride from this kid from her college. To go home and she wonders if he might be the murderer. Right. Well, I hadn't arrived yet. I bought this other book by the same author, he wrote the final girls Riley's sacred as his name. But he had one titled home before dark. And so I started reading it, but then I couldn't ever get to it because I didn't have time. So I got the audiobook. And it's really, really fun. It's kind of a House on haunted hill ish and amity bar ish. In this one, it's a family who buy this house and they only live there 20 days and then they fled in the night, and the father was a writer. He wrote a book about it, but people are calling bullshit saying they made all this up just to sell this. This is scary House on haunted hill. Yeah, so the little girl because they had a daughter. She grew up thinking that her dad made up a story because she couldn't really remember what had happened there. Well, her dad dies, she inherits the house. She thought he had already sold it. And so she's going to flip the house so that she can sell it, but as she's at the house, she starts having these flashbacks of things and she's like, am I only remembering this because the book told me it happened? Right. What am I remembering this because it actually happened to me? But what I like about it is an alternate chapters between her dad's book and then the next book is her present time. I love books like that. So fun. It's what is it called home before? Yeah. Okay. By Riley sager. I need we need to put to do a book club. Established that too. But I'm like, when are we going to have time? To do that. We need this to be our full-time job. We could serve you all so well. We could. We could. So, that's a thought. That's what that. Okay, so how about we start with our stories? Yours is long. Kinda long, yeah. Oh, okay. So today, my true crime road trip has taken me from California where I talked about bare Diaz last time. Where now in Nevada, so we've driven east, but that's not where the story starts. We're actually starting in Utah, which is where Stephen kosher, the subjects of my story lived before his disappearance. So Stephen was actually born and raised in Amarillo, Texas, but when his family moved to Utah he moved to that area as well, he attended Rick's college in rexburg Idaho in 1998 and this is now known as BYU Idaho. And if you listen to the doomsday, if you're part of our stabby cool kids, and you've been listening to Doc watch, this is where crazy ass Lori fall. When her kids went missing. I have never heard rexburg until this podcast. Right, so congratulations. Stephen was the second born of 5 children. He was considered super outgoing. He was fun. He loved sports, but he was also really into the arts. He liked to draw. He liked to play the guitar and sing, and he really enjoyed writing, which led him to a career in journalism after graduating with a degree in communications, and his father rolfe was in the same line of work, Ralph was publicist and a newspaper editor. So Stephen worked for a few years at the Salt Lake tribune, but in April 2009, he left his job there and moved to saint George Utah, which is further south, being from Texas, he wasn't much for the cold weather in Utah. He said he was tired of the long winters and Salt Lake and saint George was a smaller town and the winters were less harsh there. He didn't have anything lined up as far as work went. He just decided that he'd find something when he got there. And from what I understand, this was pretty typical of him. He was kind of the, I'll just, I'll do this and see what happens. Everything's going to work out. So he found a room for rent in a house, he didn't have a whole lot in common with this guy that he was living with though. In fact, his family said that Steven described his dude as crazy to his family. Stephen tried to connect with him, but their beliefs and were completely opposite in case that wasn't clear. Steven was a very devout Mormon man. The roomie was absolutely not a Mormon. Steven would invite him to events at the church and whatnot, but the room he was like, yeah, no, we're not. I'm not doing that. When he moved to saint George, Stephen was very engaged with his church ward and award is basically the group that you attend church services and do things with. Where I lived, it was very small. So we had two wards and it's basically like there was a road in town that if you lived on the west side, you were in one ward if you lived on the east side, you were the other ward. And so you did all your church activities or whatever with your ward. His church life was very active, but is dating and his personal life were not at all. Stephen had dated someone pretty seriously back in Salt Lake, but he broke things up because according to his mother dean, he had a much deeper interest in the church than she did. He hadn't really dated anyone seriously since her and he was feeling a little lonely and a bit behind his siblings were all married with kids, and here he was, the second oldest at 30 years old, which is basically ancient in Mormon ears. Stephen really wanted to build a family and this is part of the core of being a Mormon. You basically get married and you reproduce as much as possible. And that helps you progress through the religion because why wouldn't we want to overpopulate this already crowded planet? First. His family felt as though Steven may have felt like a failure since it had been a while since he had had a meaningful relationship. Not only did he have a difficult time fighting relationship, but he also had a difficult time finding work. When he first moved to saint George, had worked for an Internet advertising firm for a few weeks. But that job ended abruptly. He was desperately trying to find another job. But this was 2009. This was the height of the economic recession, work was scarce everyone was looking for a job, especially in saint George, and his family offered to help him out and even suggested that maybe he moved back to Salt Lake temporarily, but he was very resistant to this idea. His grandparents sent him checks to help him out. His parents sent him money, but he refused to use the money. He never cast her to positive the checks. It was like, I created this problem. I'm going to fix it. Finally, in the fall of 2009, Stephen landed a part time job doing marketing and handing out fliers for a window washing company. The money helped, but it wasn't enough to pay all of his bills. And at the beginning of December, Steven's dad got a call from Stephen's landlord, who said that he was two months behind on rent. His dad called Stephen, and he said, look, I'm just going to help you out with a rent until you get on your feet and Steven, got super offended. He hung up on his dad, and this upset Rolf, but he let it go. And then the next day, which was December 10th, he got a text from Stephen that read, hi dad, I'm okay. I need to do this on my own. I wish I had that problem. What? Where I turned down money. I don't have that problem at all. I won't even fight you. I want you to pretend. Be like, awesome. Thank you. I will take that. And then you find out two days later, and we need that back with 500% interest. Exactly. And I'm like, oh, Aaron, who? Sorry, wrong number. She died. Go on. After he sent the text to his dad, he called his mom. She said he sounded very upbeat and he was eager to make holiday plans with her in the family. He promised her that he would be home by December 23rd. And since he sounded good and they knew they'd see him in a couple of weeks, they relaxed a bit. He seemed like, might have been a little stressed out about money, but he seemed fine. But in a week later, on December 17th, 2009, Rolf came home and found Diane city in the living room in the dark. He asked her what was wrong. She played a voice message from her phone. It was a police officer and Henderson Nevada calling to say that Stevens abandoned car had been found. And it had been sitting in the same spot since December of December 13th. And this was on wet date. December 17th. Four days later. And it had been oh my God. Talk to him. Yeah. No, for the record, Henderson is about two hours away from saint George, a little southwest, and then about 20 minutes from Vegas. The car had been parked in a cul de sac for four days. The police were wondering if they knew how to get a hold of Steven or if someone could come and get the car. His parents were totally like perplexed over this. They have no idea why Stephen would even be in Nevada and certainly can't imagine what he'd be doing in Vegas. That's like the devil's playground. Right? They try calling a cell several times. They can't get through. They had Stephen on their family plan, so they called their cell phone provider and asked if they could tell where his phone was. And they said the phone couldn't be reached and it looked as though the phone at either run out of power or that it had been turned off. Dean just had this feeling that Steven, all of his financial troubles and whatnot had just caught up with him and he had driven to Nevada and then walked into the desert just to get lost. His parents called the saint George police because that's where they thought he was, and the police assigned detective Adam olmsted to the case. They filed a missing persons report through them and then Rolf and his two youngest sons drove down to saint George. When they got to Stevens place that he had been renting, Ross let himself in, he had a copy of the key crazy as Steven described him non Mormon roommate didn't live there anymore. It was just Steven. And when they entered the house, Rolf said everything looked very neat and orderly. He would be home at any minute. Maybe he'd just stepped out to get groceries, and he'd be right home. His laptop was there, his bed was made, his phone charger was still plugged into the wall, nothing looked at a place or someone who wasn't any sort of distress, or who was maybe super depressed and just couldn't pick up after themselves. One thing kind of looked around the house. Just to see if they noticed that anything was missing. And they noticed that they couldn't find his passport. So this raised some concerns with them, but they still couldn't figure out why he would have left. And especially without any of his personal items, even if he decided he was going to go on a quick trip somewhere, he didn't have the money to go far, he hadn't taken his laptop. He was looking for jobs, so the laptop would have been crucial to that success. And he didn't have his phone charger, now granted, I have gone on trips before and forgot my phone charger and purchased another one at the airport or whatever. So these were just some flags that were going off. But without wasting any time, they went ahead and drove down to Henderson to retrieve the car. When they got there, they noticed that the car was parked in a retirement community, where residents must be 55 or older in order to live there. It was a very affluent area, so lots and lots of rich people. Also, quite a ways away from any main road. So it wasn't like he just randomly parked his car because he was having car trouble or something. It was like, you would have had to have gone there with purpose. Yeah. So he got in. He just wants to make sure that the car is okay. Started right up, so it hadn't broken down. There was still a half a tank of gas. He's like, I wonder if he was carjacked. Yeah. And someone just dropped the car there. So he calls a police. They come over right away, they inspect the car. Nothing seems suspicious. They immediately start in telling Rolf that we see this a lot and typically it's because someone has been high or they've been super drunk, and then they wander off and they get lost. Ralph was like, that's not Stephen. He's very Mormon. And he doesn't do drugs. He doesn't drink. He doesn't gamble. And police are like, well, you know what? Las Vegas is a great place to go if you want to get lost because we have roughly 3000 people missing from here every year. But Rolf was like, I don't believe that he would have gone to Vegas to get lost. He certainly wouldn't have gone there to gamble or party. He mentioned that Steven had CDs of scriptures that he listened to while he was driving. He didn't listen to music. He listened to scriptures. Yeah. So he felt confident that he hadn't slipped away from his faith or gone down some random devil path or anything. Inspect the car a little more, they notice that there are some receipts there. There was a pillow and some blankets in the back, so it appears that maybe Steven had slept in his car. They noticed there were flyers for the window washing company on the dashboard, so they thought, well, maybe he came down here to kind of maybe the company is going to branch out and he came down to put some flyers out or something. They then found a sack from Kmart in the back seat that contained decorated cookies in a baby bib in it and they assumed it was for the family had drawn names for Christmas. And he had drawn his brother and their baby or something. So they assumed these were Christmas gifts for the family. They opened the trunk just to see if there was anything in there. There were a ton of job applications and resumes, but nothing suspicious. There's nothing to indicate it might have been foul play. Police don't believe he was carjacked or anything bad had happened. They don't bother doing any forensics on the car. They believe that he wanted to get away. I need a time to decompress, error that maybe he had met up with a friend, and he would resurface in a couple of days. None of this reassured the family, though. They felt something was definitely wrong, so rough and his son since they're in the neighborhood. They go door to door just to find out if anyone saw Steven. Yeah. They found the first house that they went to, which was near where his car was. They found that that family, luckily, the man who lived there was a retired military. He had surveillance cameras set up around his house. So Ralph's brother had hired a detective. And so they're going to take it home through it and analyze it to see if they have any visuals of Stephen. They said, I could take a couple of days. Meanwhile, Deanna's home in Salt Lake, she's coming through Stephen's cell phone record. She's calling anyone who we add contact with leading up to his disappearance. She's hoping one of them might have a clue as to what he would have been doing in Vegas. There's still very perplexed about this. The last few people he talked to were members of his church. They had both called him the morning of Sunday, December 13th, before he went missing. One of them had called to see if he could potentially teach his Sunday school class for them. And Steven was like, sorry, I can't. I'm in Vegas. He didn't say why he was there, but he did tell both of them that he was in Vegas. He seemed fine. They said he didn't seem worried or stressed out or even irrational, and this gave the family some help because if he was trying to not be located if he wanted to disappear, he wouldn't have told them where he was. Right. That made them feel a little better. So next DN comes to his bank statements that she had access to and finds there's been no activity on his account in over a week. And this caused her to panic a little bit. So they take his laptop. His older brother was able to get into it. He's able to hack into his Yahoo email account, and they found several job application confirmation emails, several rejection emails, but nothing about Vegas, nothing to indicate that it considered harming himself, no indication that it planned to leave town. He had a diary, wrote in at religiously. There was nothing in it that indicated he was at the point of giving up. In fact, his only mention of any sort of stressor was the financial trouble that he had been going through, and his frustration with being single, but he seemed to believe that neither of these scenes would last much longer. He had high aspirations for the new year. Dean clung to the hope that he would show up on December 23rd, he had told her. But Christmas came and went and he never showed up. They then get a call from the private detective that Ralph's brother had hired and they finished analyzing the security footage and they found something. The footage showed Steven's car driving by the house, 6 minutes passed at almost exactly at noon on December 13th. You see someone, which appears to be Stephen, walking along the street, he passes in front of the house, moving away from his car, obviously, Rolf said it looked like he was carrying him another folder with him. He said after he passed out of view of the first camera, the second camera on the other side of the house caught him walking and he had crossed the streets. His family believed it was him, the footage was super grainy, and it was difficult to say for certain that it was, but they said, the walk looked like Stevens, the way he was dressed look like Stevens. They felt pretty confident that it was. Two weeks later, Dion's cousin , who worked at a dairy farm, had the idea, let's go back to the 80s a bit. Let's put his picture on our milk cartons. Because remember, that was a thing. You got the word out. We didn't have things like the Internet. So the dairy agreed, but first had to check with the police to verify the validity of the case. They didn't want to go put some picture on the needed to make sure that this was actually missing. So this is kind of, according to the family, what lit a fire under the police department's ass and realized that maybe we need to take this a little more seriously because of family truly does believe that he's missing because they're willing to put his face on a milk carton. So detective Robert McKay of the Henderson Nevada police department was assigned to the case. He and his police officers went door to door in the neighborhood where Stephen's car was found, no one had seen him, they then sent helicopter and ATV patrols to search the desert around the neighborhood in the event that he had hiked out there and gotten lost or hurt. On December 30th, the Henderson and Las Vegas police in several volunteers did a four day search of the area. The kosher family and friends went down to join in, but they were told by the people heading up the effort that you probably don't want to join the search. Because if we find remains, we don't want you there when we find the remains. And we definitely don't want you to be the ones to find his remains. Yeah. So while this was going on the kosher family visited morgues, they visited police stations. They went to hospitals, looking for Stephen. They also handed out flyers. But after all of this, all of these searches, nothing showed up. The family reached out to the public for help. This got the media involved along with the picture on the milk carton. Finally, the stories getting some traction in the news, Stevens cousin, Casey negal, created a Facebook page, and she put all of his pictures up there and a little bit about his story, just to try and get some leads several leads did come in from people who claim that they had seen him on a bus or at a bus station. There was another lead that came in from people who worked at an IHOP and the Vegas area who told them that a man fitting Steven's description had eaten there for three weeks straight. After hearing this, the family ate there for four nights in a row, hoping that maybe this guy would come in. But then one night they spoke to one of the employees and they were able to give them more information about the man who was coming in and they realized that that wasn't Steven. So police started looking at other potential scenarios. Had Steven maybe met someone online, gone to Nevada to meet them and ran off with them or worse was a catfish by someone posing to be a woman and then was kidnapped or maybe murdered. As they dug a little deeper, they noticed that his cell phone was used almost 5 hours after the security footage showed him walking away from his car. This was ten miles north of the community where his car was found. Okay. Then, two hours later, the signal was picked up in a subdivision near sunset drive and Stephanie street, which was another two miles north from the last location. There was no more activity that day within a 6 O four a.m. the morning after he disappeared, there was a call to his voicemail. It was later learned that the voicemail had been from his landlord. This signal came from U.S. 95 and Russell road. What they don't know though is was it Steven who was using the phone or had someone found his phone at someone done something to him, check the voicemail themselves, so they're still no clues as to where he could be. About this time, police get a call from a man named Steve Powell, who lived in Washington state. He told the detectives that his son's wife, Susan, had gone missing from Utah a week before Stephen, and he thinks that maybe the cases are linked. Now, for those of you, do you remember the Susan pal case? It was a huge thing. Huge thing. So for those of you who aren't super familiar, or maybe forgot the details of the case in a nutshell, Susan, Powell, Josh Powell, who was her husband, and their two sons were reported missing on December 9th. 2009. So almost exactly a week before Steven went missing. But then Josh and the boys resurfaced and Josh said that he had taken the boys camping. Like at midnight or something. Yes. And Susan at stay at home. Police are like, this doesn't make sense. Blizzard, midnight, whatever. They went up to where he said they had been camping. There was no evidence that anyone had been camping up there. They searched the house. They found fans blowing on a wet spot in the living room and after more investigation was done. There was presence of blood, some of it belonged to Susan. He Joshua became a person of interest and eventually left Utah and moved back to all of Washington to live with his dad, Steve , who had called the police, made this claim. So this is when the story that Susan and Stephen kosher had run off together started. And interesting. So the theory was that Stephen had best Susan when he briefly lived in west valley Utah, the two of them had run off together because Steven had done his mission in Brazil. The Mormon mission to your thing. He has no Portuguese. They thought maybe, since his passport was missing, the two of them had disappeared together to Brazil to start a life together. Since they wanted to check all leads, police checked to see if maybe he had, in fact, caught a flight out of town, but there were no records of this. There were also no calls to her from any number associated with Susan on his cell phone nor there any email communication with her on his laptop. In early 2010, some of Josh's family began making these allegations publicly and claimed that Susan had framed Josh for murder and eloped with Stephen. Steve Powell, Josh's dad went so far as to write the letter stating this to the police and the FBI. Detectives from both cases sat down, they discussed any possible links they looked at evidence or lack of timeline scenarios and nothing linked the two together. Not long after that, the kosher family found Stevens passport when they were going through some of his boxes. They knew he hadn't left the country. Investigators looked over some of his financial transactions. Notice that between December 10th and 12th, it appeared Stephen had made a couple of trips that seem strange to his family. On December 10th, Stephen had driven from saint George in southern Utah through Salt Lake in northern Utah and then cut over to window in Nevada, which is in northern Nevada and then back to saint George, all in the same day. They were able to track several transactions that happened on this day at various gas stations and fast food restaurants. This would have been a 14 hour round trip drive that was over a thousand miles. KC posted this information about this trip to Facebook to see if anyone knew anything about it, because the family didn't. And someone stated, well, yeah, I know Steven. And he actually had driven to northern Nevada, but it wasn't Wendover they went to he passed through on his way to ruby valley. He had driven up there to see a girl that he used to date. The family of the girl was interviewed, they said that Steven did come up, he told them that he had driven up to visit with her daughter that he was going to visit family and Sacramento, but he wasn't sure if he was going to make the trip to California due to all the bad weather that was going on. The since the girl wasn't there, he visited what her family, they had lunch with him, and then he left two hours later and drove back to saint George. What's weird to me is that this is the same day that that morning he called he texted his dad, he called his mom, told her that he had becoming home for Christmas, but didn't mention that he was going to make this trip. She also went through Salt Lake City on his way and didn't stop and see his family or even let them know that he was going to be in the area when he talked to them that morning. Who seems really weird for me. People do that. That's true. If he's like, I'm going to see you in a couple of weeks anyway. It's going to be a couple of weeks. It's fine. If I tell them I'm here, they're going to want to see me they're going to want to yeah. No, I get that. I'm going to be caught. But I also don't understand why he told them that he was on his way to Sacramento so that it didn't look weird that he had just driven up their specifically to see her. And he didn't even know if she was there or not. So it's almost like did he drive up there hoping that he was going to see her and they were going to reconnect, and he was going to finally get his wife, I don't know, but it just seems weird that he gave them that story. Because I couldn't find anything else about a planned trip to Sacramento. Yeah. The next day, Stephen was in saint George all day on the 11th, in fact, people saw him because he had been out putting up his window washing fires, had come across a couple of girls who had gotten locked out of their house. And so he helped them call someone for help to come home and let them into their house. And then the next weird trip was the next day on December 12th, they saw where his cell phone had pinged a tower and over to Nevada, which is about 80 miles southeast of saint George. There was a transaction at a convenience store later in the evening that same day and Mesquite Nevada, which would have been on his way back because Mesquite sits right at the Nevada Arizona border. And when you're driving from saint George, to Nevada, you cross through just a northern tip of Arizona. Later that night there was the transaction at Kmart, which was where he had purchased the gifts that were found in his car. No one knows why he was an overton. All of the trypsin Nevada make the police wonder if maybe he had been gambling to try as lock at winning some money, or worse, and maybe he was running drugs for someone to make some money. Oh, they thought also maybe the window washing business was just a cover business like we saw in Breaking Bad where they had the car wash. So this is when they start looking into some people and Steven's life and one of them was the roommate that he had lived with for a while and seen George. As a family knew he and Stephen were very different. They led different lifestyles so the detectives run a search on him and find that he did have a prior conviction for possession and use of a controlled substance, which more than likely was marijuana. But in fact, this would be devil's lettuce. The family's like, could he have been? Is that what it's called? You've never heard of referred to as devil as well. That's awesome. So the family's like, could he have been that desperate for money that he would have taken up running drugs? They don't want to think so. But at this point, there are so few leads. Let's check into it. So they had his car, they contacted the Salt Lake City sheriff's department. They brought their drug sniffing dogs over to thoroughly sniff out the car and they found nothing. There were never the dogs would have been able to find it, even if they had ever any time been any drugs in his car. They would have sniffed those out. And there was nothing. They also interviewed the ex roomi, and he said, Steven was absolutely not involved in drugs. And even though they were super different, he actually liked Steven and appreciated how committed he was to his religion and whatnot. So April rose around family and police are getting nowhere about this time a retired police officer turned private investigator named Craig Rett key, reached out to Steven's parents and offered them assistance pro Bono. He had seen them on TV, their desperation to find their son really struck him. He reviewed all the evidence starting with the video from the surveillance camera, and he said that Stephen appeared to be walking with purpose after he exited his car. There was no apprehension. No one who looked. Sad or scared that they were walking into something that they were comfortable with. He appeared to know where he was going, so his theory is that maybe while Steven was handing out window washing fires, he was approached by someone who may be offered him a business deal, and he was set up to meet them, maybe a job interview and he believes Steven had gone to a house in that neighborhood and never made it out of the neighborhood alive. He starts looking into tips that are coming in through the website and the Facebook page and one anonymous tip indicated that investigators might want to look at the desert south of Vegas near the Henderson Nevada executive airport. So Rhett and rolfe organized a search that took place on April 10th, 2010. There were over 70 people who showed up while searching the team came up on a tent that had recently been occupied by the looks of it, they estimated that someone had been living there for a few months, the tent had collapsed, though. There was no one there. There were food wrappers and other things around the general area indicating that someone had been there recently. Another person on the search team came up on several bones. But after testing the bones, it was found that they were actually animal bones, and after testing some of the things found in and around the tent. None of them contained Steven's DNA. So the family and investigators continued to look for answers, but were at a complete standstill. And it's still in that same state. There's just nothing. He just disappeared. He is. Sadly, Rolf passed away suddenly in February of 2011. He never stopped searching for Stephen. There are a few theories that have grown pretty popular on Reddit and web sleuths. And I spent way too much time Las Vegas combing through these. I'm nowhere near finished because these Internet detectives have done. I mean, I feel like they have looked at every possible angle. So that makes sense. Others don't, so I'm just going to share a few of them. There was one user on Reddit, who claimed that, and I quote, he was not a drug mule, he just wasn't. He drove to Las Vegas, looking for a job, stumbled across some losers on Craigslist that murdered him. Under the guise that they were hiring. And that was that. It was basically confirmed by our police department, this person claimed that they were from Las Vegas. They even know what House he was murdered in and who did it, but they can't get a case against them. Some people were finding holes in this person spoke with a lot of conviction. They had left a lot of messages on this forum, but their profile has been deleted. So if you're going to go on, and I don't know if they deleted it after making all of these allegations. Claims they had all this information about this, but none of this information had even been hinted at anywhere else that I could. One user on web sleuths, and again, I didn't write down the user's name. I've learned my lesson. Once I find something interesting, I need to write down who posted this, because there were so many. There were so many threads on web sleep. It's like one would get too big and so they're like, okay, new thread, and I couldn't figure out which thread this was. They said that they were a door to door salesman or a salesperson in the Vegas area, and what they think happened was, so they recognized the cell towers where the pings happened, and they were like, where those pings were when they found Stevens phone after the 13th, where it had been, those were all apartment complexes. And he's like, I'm a door to door salesman. I've hit all of those complexes in this area, because a gold mine. What they think is he drove and parked his car in this neighborhood and met up with someone there, and then the two of them went driving and hitting up these places to hand out flyers, Stephen was trying to make some extra money for Christmas. They think that either at one point it got to be too much because some of these apartment complexes were in very seedy questionable areas. And Steven just up and left the salesperson and got kidnapped by someone and robbed and murdered. Or he said that there are also some people who will pick random people up off the streets and say, hey, do you want to come and help me do these door to door sales, and then take all the money and then kill the person? They think that could have happened as well. Another theory, I don't know how I feel about this one because I feel like this is kind of a cop out that people tend to turn to a lot. Was that they think he was secretly gay and he had met a sugar daddy online and that's who he met up with in this affluent community and this guy had the money and was able to help him disappear to change his identity and live a life that he wanted but could never admit to you because the Mormon church basically, they've changed their stance on gay people now in that it's okay if you're gay, but as soon as you try to love someone else and try to have sex and be intimate, we are crossing against God. So I'm like, fuck y'all, which is why I proudly say, I am no longer a fucking Mormon. But I'm less inclined to believe this, just because if he was gay and fighting it. I mean, he was really fighting it with the scripture CDs and his car. I mean, for him to be fighting the urge or maybe he went to Vegas just to try to see what it was like and figured he was going to flip back to women and build that family that he had wanted after getting a taste of the D and was really, really fucking conflicted and messed up after he did it, and then maybe after himself, I don't know. The most common theory, though, and it's the one I read, most often, and even some of the police believe this is that Stephen had maybe gone to that neighborhood to speak with someone about a job and maybe walked in on something that he shouldn't have and was just a victim of circumstance because there was no record of him ever walking back by the house with a security camera. So he never went back to his car. So I feel like that theory that something happened in that house or the theory that he met someone and they went out and were hitting up these neighborhoods. The same the most reasonable. If you want to read more on Steven's case because there is a lot, like I said, out there on web sluice. And Reddit, you can check out our web page, we'll have links to all of our resources on the show notes page for this episode. You can also watch season four episode two of disappeared on discovery plus the episode is titled secrets of a son. Oh gosh. Yes. So let's take a quick break. We'll come back for your story. All right, Odell. So today, my road trip takes me from Washington, D.C., where we were last time, down to Virginia. The virgin and the verge, the virgin, India. The virgin. Yeah. Anyway, sage Smith. Okay. Miss our subject today. She was born Deshawn laquin Smith. Okay. On December 13th, 1992, two la Tasha Dennis and Dean Smith. Now not too long after her father was incarcerated on a drug charge, and eventually he would be let out and he would form a close relationship with sage, but he and his wife would eventually remarry new partners, which means sage has some new siblings, some step siblings. Sage was mostly raised by her paternal grandmother Lolita cookie Smith. Love her. Due to an unstable home environment. Despite having a low income and living in a poor section of town cookie was a very dedicated grandmother and she was kind of a fixture in her community. She served on both the tenants association and the residential patrol. When sage was 12 years old, she and cookie moved to Charlottesville's fife ville neighborhood, where she would meet one of her best friends, Shakira Washington. Shakira lived just two doors down. Eventually, sage was returned to her mother's care, but latasha was soon deemed unfit to take care of sage and sage was then placed in the foster care system. I'm not quite sure why she didn't go back to cookie. I couldn't find anything on that. While in her teens, sage came out as transgender. Telling friends and family that she identified as a woman. She considered herself gender fluid, she rejected just the norm, you know, the normal labels that you would put. Most of her family had no problem accepting this. They knew from a young age that she was that she was gay, but her dad dean did have some trouble at first when she told him he cut off all contact with her, but eventually reconnected when one of his other children reminded him that all he ever wanted was for his children to be happy and to be themselves. Sometimes we need that reminder. Right. So sage found her transition to be very difficult between the harassment and the bullying that she was experiencing for both she and her friends. Anyone who supported her was really experiencing it. She was always very cautious and she made sure she never walked home alone. She would never go somewhere with a person she didn't know. Sage was very charismatic and energetic. She was a social butterfly. One of her passions was dancing and she and her friends would dress up on the weekends and head out to the only queer club in Charlottesville. Or they would go to the strip club that was located near a University of Virginia. She made dancing videos for YouTube while she was in high school. She was very fashionable she took a lot of pride in how she looked. Always put together. In 2011 sage became the first person in her family to graduate from high school. Awesome. About a year later, in March 2012, she moved to her own apartment and she soon invited Shakira and her other friend Aubrey Carson to live with her. The apartment was dubbed the dollhouse mansion. I love it. It had pink walls. That's why. Why didn't we have pink walls? We should have. Why didn't we name our apartment? I know. We never had a name for her. We're boring. And the girls would host parties. So in order to pay for this fabulous apartment, sage worked at a hair salon, where she swept the hair, but she dreamt of becoming a professional hairdresser one day, and she was taking cosmetology classes in her spare time. So one night in November, there was November 19th, 2012, the girls had a party at their apartment. To celebrate Shakira's 19th birthday. At some point, a girl attending the party wanted to fight one of sage's Friends. Over a man, of course. And the altercation that spilled out into the outside. Right. Sage got involved and began fighting. She was fighting an acquaintance name jamel Smith. This dude. And the police ended up being called. Now, please stood up around 1120 p.m. and even though jamel filed report against sage for damaging his car in the fight. No arrests were made and officers soon left. Shakira was their sage got really angry with Shakira saying that she should have backed her up. Shakira contacted some friends in Norfolk Virginia asked them if they could pick her up so she could get away for a few days, let's sage cool off because she could be a bit of a hot head and so just let her calm down. So the next morning, sage called her dad to congratulate him on the anniversary of him being released from jail. And on this call, she asked him for money. Not sure what the money was to be used for. Thanksgiving was the next day and sage was excited because she would be traveling to Louisa county to surprise her stepsisters who lived with la Tasha. And her mom was also in a new house, so it sounds like the mom started to really kind of get her life together. In a new house going to see the sisters very excited. So around 5 p.m., sage was at home, getting ready for a date. At 5 40 p.m., she woke up Aubrey, who was napping in the living room and told her that she would be home later that night. Aubrey woke up a few hours later, the apartment was dark. It was empty or not empty, but there was no sage. Aubrey called her, it went straight to voicemail. No, this was very odd because sage always had her phone on her and she even always carried a charger with her. So that seemed a little weird. But she's out on a date. So Aubrey went to sleep, she just assumed that sage would be coming home later. The next day, sage still was not home. Aubrey contacted some friends to see if anyone knew where she was. And that's when she got in touch with sage's stepsister, one of her step sisters, Kiara Morgan, who had seen sage the night before, around 6 30 p.m. on Main Street. Chiara said that she was walking to the bus, and she saw sage talking on the phone, and she recalled sage saying that she would be there in 5 minutes. And so Aubrey called cookie to see if she knew what was going on in cookie told Aubrey, she may just be out. Why don't you wait until like ten tonight and then report her is if she doesn't come home, then we need to be worried. So the Charlottesville police department started their investigation into sage's appearance disappearance on November 22nd, 2012. Two days after she was last seen. Now according to police, they were immediately concerned about foul play because they were aware of this sort of violence, those who are transgendered face. And acknowledge that. I find that so many. Well, it's questionable. Did they acknowledge it? I know. At first when I read this, I was like, oh, great. Oh my gosh, this is different than any of our other cases. But they said that they worked quickly to collect statements from friends and family. However, according to Aubrey, the police weren't taking it very seriously at all, and they had only asked for sage's name, birthday and picture. Well, fuck them. I know. I know. It's very disappointing. Dean informed latasha that sage was missing. I remember she was going to be surprising them for Thanksgiving. So they didn't even know that they were expecting her. Or to be on the lookout for her. Investigators, subpoenaed sage's cell phone records. And as we know, going through the correct channels can take some time. So the family decided to take matters into their own hands and launch their own investigation. They were able to guess sage's password in the access to records. They knew her last known contact was with an unknown person who had an out of state number. Dean posted the number on Facebook and was soon contacted by someone named yami Ortiz, who told him that the number belonged to a man named Eric mcfadden. So according to yami, sage and Eric had been dating. Eric was not out about his sexuality. Yummy said that he and Eric used to, they'd exchange texts and emails and stuff. They had metal multiple occasions, but that out of the blue, Eric messaged him on November 21st and asked him to delete his contact info from his bone. It seemed weird, but Eric didn't or yummy did it and didn't think much of it. Sage and Eric had met online most likely through one of sage's casual encounter casual encounter ads on Craigslist. And they had been texting and calling each other for weeks. Eric was in a relationship with a woman at the time named Esther and he paid sage money to keep their relationship a secret. We don't know if this was money and exchange for services or if this was money. Yeah, we don't know what it was. But we know he paid her. Yummy provided dean with a picture of Eric, which he later shared on Facebook. And he didn't share this information with the authorities because he was worried that they would shut down their investigation. So on November 23rd, yummy got in touch with Eric and told him what was going on. Meanwhile, officers conducted a grid search of Main Street and the surrounding area, they checked open lots, trash cans, fields, parking lots, dumpsters, everything, they asked local businesses for surveillance footage. Unfortunately nothing had been captured. On November 24th, police conducted a search of Harris street and around the University of Virginia. That same day they learned about the connection between sage and Eric. After Eric's girlfriend Esther called them and asked them to do a well check on her boyfriend. They went by his apartment, but no one was home, and they left. Later that day, yummy visited the police and told them about Eric, their relationship, dean's Facebook posts, everything. So now everyone's on the same page. Police contacted Eric's work, they found out that he had not been there the past three days. Police went public about this information, and they put up posters of both Eric and sage's images and descriptions all over the place. Ester consented to the police searching the apartment she shared with Eric. They hope to find fingerprints, DNA, blood, any evidence that sage had been there. The only thing they were able to recover was receipt from CVS, which showed that he made a purchase on November 22nd. They got surveillance by the store, and they were able to confirm that he was there. Investigators thought he may have skipped town after dean outed him on Facebook. So during all of this, the family held numerous vigils to raise awareness about the case. Eventually, investigators got access to sage's cell phone records. And she had definitely been on a call with Eric the last time she was seen. Since her cell was turned off during her disappearance, though, the last peeing they had was close to her apartment. However, records did show that Eric and sage had texted numerous times during the night. From 5 17 until about 6 27. And it was after this last text where Eric texted that he was angry because she had stood him up. And that's when Kiara saw her walking down Main Street heading west. So it sounds like she was supposed to meet up with Eric. He was like, where are you at? She's like, what do you mean? And he's like, you know what, I'm done. You're standing me up. And then she's like, I'll be there in 5 minutes. That's kind of what we're hearing. So on November 25th, Eric, contacted ester. And told her that he was in Washington, D.C.. And he needed money. She told him that the police wanted to talk to him. And she gave him their contact information. Two days later, he called them from New York City and confirmed his relationship with sage and that the pair were supposed to meet up in front of the Amtrak station on Main Street, but she never showed up. Investigators asked him to come back to town, but he hung up. Later, Esther called the police and said that Eric agreed to return as long as someone was there to pick him up at the station. The Amtrak, I guess. However, he emailed Esther about an hour and a half before he was expected to board the bus and said that he changed his mind. So Eric's strange behavior confused everybody, and it led to them to believe that he was somehow involved. Right. If you have nothing to hide, then why wouldn't you come home? So on November 28th, investigators searched the streets in the wooded areas along west Main Street and they expanded the search to include around Eric's apartment. This is when they held their first press conference. And they said that it wasn't a criminal investigation, because there was no evidence of criminal activity. Right. On November 30th, police visited a trash expert, didn't know that existed. And it helped them determine that the dumpsters behind Eric's apartment were transported to a landfill 60 miles away in Enrico county just outside of Richmond, Virginia. So three days later, Esther came to the police station after receiving an email from Eric, describing the night sage went missing. Remember that he told investigators that he never saw her that night. Well, according to the email, he and sage did in fact meet up that night. And they were walking down the street when they were approached by a group of people. Eric walked away before anything happened because he knew sage had quite a few enemies. He also said sage had been blackmailing him for money, saying that she would tell us her about their secret relationship. So that's why he was paying her. He also said that he was heading to the Midwest, and he was sorry for hurting Esther. I'm out, sorry. So, of course, at this point, Eric shoots to the top of the list. Right. Warrants were obtained to search his computer, his email accounts, social media, everything, but nothing was uncovered. There was nothing out of the ordinary. Police searched through sage's social media accounts, which showed nothing after she disappeared. They did learn that many of her previous partners were not out and proud. According to one friend sage dated a man whose girlfriend found out about her through emails and he blamed sage for that. He attacked her one night while she was walking home. Charges were pressed. It was later confirmed that he had no involvement in sage's disappearance since he was incarcerated at the time. On December 3rd, the family made a public statement where they questioned the city's response to sage's disappearance, saying that it had not gotten the attention it deserved. That same day Aubrey was discovered Aubrey the roommate was discovered using sage's food stamp card at a local convenience store. When questioned, she told investigators that the three roommates would often share their possessions, and she was getting food for the apartment, you know. So, of course, this led to suspicion around Aubrey because the police weren't able to totally confirm her alibi for November 20th. Now, speaking as someone who has had roommates, I don't find that suspicious at all. No. Because I mean, honestly, when you're living together, when it comes to food and cleaning supplies and shared expenses, like you pay or I pay someone's paying. So anyway, they thought that it was a little suspicious that she was doing it so quickly after she was missing. The first main area of searching, of course, was Main Street in Eric's apartment. And one of the cadaver dogs, they brought them out, and one of them gave a slight indication that it had picked up sage's scent. But it didn't lead anywhere. And this could be from anything with cadaver dogs. They are looking for a multitude of things. And when they show slight interest, that's not a full on oh God, there was a dead body here. Right. That is, I think there may be some kind of odor here and it's not necessarily anything big. The second search was of a sediment pond, and it turned up empty. The third search was the landfill in henrico county where the trash had been deposited. Despite 12 people walking around the landfill that included Charlottesville, police department, officers from henrico county, personnel from the forensic and hazmat teams, two police dogs and a retired special agent who had extensive knowledge in landfill searches. Nothing of interest to the case was located. So toward the end of 2012, a reward of $10,000 was supplied by an anonymous donor in the hopes of prompting more people with information to come forward. The family was very frustrated with the search and they requested a meeting with the then police chief. It took 9 months before he met with them. And the family continued to make it public that they were getting no help in the investigation. Now, considering all the police records that they were canvassing and all of this stuff, I think the main problem was that there was no communication. You know, everyone's doing their own thing and no one's telling anyone else about it. So a new eyewitness named Monica Williams came forward in February 2013, saying that she had seen sage at wild wings cafe on Main Street around 7 p.m. on the night she went missing. Okay. According to Monica sage was alone, she was waiting for someone at the bar. Now this information caused police to reexamine their timeline because the cafe shares a building with the Amtrak station, where she was supposed to be meeting Eric. This led them to think that perhaps sage had enough time to meet up with Eric before seeing Kiera and Monica, which would mean that Eric was innocent of any wrongdoing. But of course, there's no surveillance. No surveillance cameras at the cafe. So there's no proof. So in 2013, investigators contacted the national center for missing and exploited children in the hopes of getting their assistance in getting the word out. And they also uploaded her dental records to the national registry. 2013 was the last time that Eric contacted ester. He would write her from various emails, but he would quickly abandon them. So investigators could never really follow where he was. Investigators have been called out to tidewater twice. Which isn't another city. Once because Eric was spotted and once because sage was spotted. So around the second anniversary of sage's disappearance, the police announced that Eric mcfadden was no longer considered a suspect because his digital footprint did not line up with someone who had the time to commit anything criminal that night. He also didn't have a car and he lived in a very populated area. So it's not exactly like he had the means or the opportunity to harm her. Right. In January 2016, police got a call from chinka tea. I don't know, Virginia, about 300 miles from Charlottesville, when someone thought they spotted sage. However, it turned out to be her former roommate, shook hira. Police questioned Shakira and asked about Aubrey and why she wasn't being terribly forthcoming. Because remember, they didn't really have an alibi for her. Shakira was very uncomfortable that Aubrey was using sage food stamp card and other personal belongings. It wasn't just that, apparently. Sage's stepsister Kiera was also re interviewed and she said that sage and Aubrey had always been in competition with each other in Aubrey was very jealous. Yes. You should never live with the front of me. That is just a terrible idea. Aubrey claimed it was all a misunderstanding. However, more holes were occurring in her story. It was discovered that she had seen Eric more than the one time she claimed, she said she had met him once. But no, in fact, she had met with Eric and sage the Saturday before sage disappeared. Aubrey was just also acting suspicious. Like, not being forthcoming. She's acting weird. So, but there was no evidence hard evidence linking stages disappearance. So in March 2017, police announced that once again, Eric mcfadden was indeed a person of interest. But more is a witness and not a suspect. They also announced that the case had been changed to a homicide investigation. Okay. Finally, 5 years later. In May 2018, investigators and a forensic unit took another look at sage's old apartment. Nothing is known about that one. Meanwhile, Eric's mother reported him missing in June of 2019. According to his mother, she hadn't known he was missing until 2014, and had been under the impression that his father had filed the report with the police back in 2014. So his father had filed a missing persons report in 2014. She didn't know that he was missing until 2008. That's 5 years ago. No. No, no, no. So she thought she knew he was missing in 2014. She thought the dad filed a report. He didn't. I guess he thought she did. So no one's looking. 5 years later, she's like, I should really check in on this. And finally does. Great family dynamic. I mean, this makes me worried. So she and Eric stepmother now believe that Eric is dead. We have no proof of any of this, but they haven't heard from him in a while. So, according to police, though, they have info that he may be in one of these cities. Baltimore, joppa, Maryland, Atlanta, Lake city, South Carolina, New York City, Rochester, New York, or somewhere along the West Coast. So basically nowhere in the middle, but he's on one coast. His own mother because a petition has been started to encourage the police to keep investigating and have better communication with the family and look beyond Eric mcfadden. Because over this, the sage's family and many others were critical of how they handled the whole thing. Aubrey said, she's not on the suspect. Listen anymore, but she said it was too weeks before investigators ever questioned her. She was her roommate. That would be like number one where you go. And it took them so long to request help from outside agencies. They were advised to prevent the trash from being collected around Eric's apartment, but they never did anything about it. Investigators said they were on top of it, but the new police chief, best stop that his officers had dropped the ball. This petition that's been going around is also ask that the department publicly apologize for mishandling the case. And it also requested that the media respect the pronouns sage went by. So as of May, 2020, sage's case is still being treated as a possible homicide and the reward is currently at 20,000. So here are the theories and there were a bunch, but there were three that I focus on that make the most sense. One, Eric mcfadden was involved. He was inconsistent in his stories. Left Charlottesville not long after she was reported missing. And of course, he's now a missing person. Mom thinks he's dead. Number two, Aubrey was involved. Now this is just due to the inconsistencies and the fact that she started using her possessions. I'm not too hung up on that one, but I do find it weird, but yeah, maybe she's hiding something else. Finally, jemele Smith. Remember, he's the one that sage got into a physical altercation with on November 19th, 2012. He doesn't have an alibi for the night that she went missing. And he was very upset with her about the fight. But guess what? He's missing as well. My God. They're all missing. Everyone's missing. I don't know what the hell is going on. Every one is gone. And they all probably died. I don't know. So for several months after sage disappeared, cookie would get numerous calls from a block to number between one and three a.m. a couple of nights a week. When she would answer there would be no one on the other line. Cookie lost her phone and had to get a new phone number and the call stopped. So since her disappearance, cookie has become seriously ill. She was diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. And as undergone triple bypass surgery. Dang. To sign up and in case someone knows something, sage went missing from the 500 block of west Main Street in downtown Charlottesville, Virginia on November 20th, 2012. She was 19 years old. Last scene wearing a black jacket, dark gray sweatpants, a black scarf, and gray and black rain boots with pink and purple lining. Sounds adorable. She may have also been wearing a bleached hooded sweatshirt. And at the time of her disappearance, she stood between 5 8 and 5 11 and weighed a 130 pounds. She has black hair, which is usually worn in braids, brown eyes, and was known to wear women's clothes and wigs. Her ears and eyebrows were all pierced. So those with information are asked to contact the Charlottesville police department, tips can also be called into crime stoppers at four three four 9 7 7 4000. Wow. I know. So much going on there that I can't really formulate in my own theory. I know. It's just so weird that everyone who might have an answer or might be involved is missing either missing or they were not really ever approached or taken seriously. But you hear, you read articles about the police investigation. Oh my gosh, it sounds like they were just all over the place trying to figure this out poor thing we know what happens. And the family's like, don't think so. Wait, what? How it was. But yeah. Not at all surprising. I know. All right, well, should we take another break? Yes. For updates in a memoriam. Do you have any updates? I do have an update. So remember, I told you about the Florida teenager Tristan Bailey who had been stabbed a 114 times. Oh yeah, that was on our loss. Yes. And she was stabbed by. She was 13 and she was out by a 14 year old classmate named Aiden Gucci. Well, he's been charged with first degree murder, of course. Now, when so this article came out that's just you. It gives me the heebie jees. But when St. John's county investigators brought him in to be interrogated, they told him of Bailey's death and that he was the last person to be seen with her and he replied, how is that my problem? Jesus. He's sucking psycho. My thoughts exactly. Yes. So detectives and I'm reading this from a news WFLA. I guess something with Florida. But detectives found bloody clothing in his bedroom, along with an illustration that depicted a satanic element to them to include a pentagram. We still have to still have satanic panic. But there were also detailed violent depictions of women. So that part I would pay more attention to. Yeah. So he said, Fuji, Aidan has started talking a little bit. He said that he tried to kiss Tristan. And she rejected him. And he pushed her down and hit her head. And then he walked away. We know that's not what happened. No. And so that's she was stabbed a 114 times like I've said. I think I updated another time his mother has been arrested for allegedly tampering with evidence. She washed his clothes or whatever. Yes. So we're getting little by little information coming out. I will definitely keep an eye on it and let you know. A lot more when the trial starts. Yeah, he just sounds awful. All right, so in memoriam. So where did sage's story take my skin? I was in Virginia. It was even just Charlottesville Virginia. Okay. So this one is the mention of the wild wings. Because this one has a tight wild wings. Oh, I love it. So, around 5 a.m. on Wednesday, June 20th, 2007, in Colombia, South Carolina, two 21 year old kids, Brent Tyler, and Chelsea, tumbleton, both of them were servers at a local wild wing restaurant. They were found naked, lying on the street by a taxi driver. Authorities were called the two were still alive when EMS arrived, but died later at the hospital. Both of them? Yeah. So police the investigation around the area where the bodies were they were found lying naked in the street. They found their clothing on the fourth floor of a parking garage that was next to where the couple's bodies were found. It appeared that the couple had climbed from the roof of the parking garage. Onto the sloping metal roof of the palmetto armory building, which was next to the garage. In front of where their bodies were found. According to the eyewitness accounts of two homeless people who were sleeping in the garage that night, the couple had taken off their clothes and climbed onto the metal roof and were having sex atop the metal roof. It appeared they slipped and fell 50 to 60 feet to the street below. They assumed that the humidity and the morning do had made the metal roof extremely slippery, causing them to lose. They're sweating. Right. Oh my sound that they had both died from injuries sustained in a fall. There were no drugs or alcohol in their system. Dumb asses, what is wrong with you? No. Last name was tumbleton. Sorry, you should have known. That was going to be your face. Honey, your name is tumble stunt. What's your name is tummelson? You do not crawl onto a roof. I feel like you never. You don't do it. You don't do anything. Girl, keep your feet on the ground. I feel like that is just a curse that has been put up on you. Because you know that that tumbles to name came from someone tumbling somewhere. Exactly. They all start somewhere. Oh my God. How old were they? No. 21. From what it sounds like, I read several accounts from their friends and their talking about how great they both were. It doesn't sound like they were dating, at least not yet. They just work together and I guess maybe they had a thing. Having a good time. Horny, so I'm kind of building on yours from last week where you talked about. Yes. A couple who decided to fuck on the train tracks and then just go to your room. Yeah, just it can be exciting. You can make it exciting. You can craft some sort of slanted roof right on your bed. I mean, I'd almost say if you want something slippery to get that sense of danger, just do it in the shower, but then I've heard stories of people slipping and hurting themselves in the shower and happening. You can emergency room. You can die. Yeah. No, y'all just come oh my gosh. I mean, I appreciate it. I have never been that overcome with love. And desire that I've been like, let's do this. And the fact that not only do they want to do it in public, I feel like just doing it on the roof of the parking garage should have been enough. The fact that you felt like you needed a climb over onto the slippery roof and do it. Oh my gosh. I wonder if they climaxed. When they tumbled, would that be exciting enough? I mean, where your body would be like, that was the sound of my name. Or the sound of it. Obviously. As you realized you were falling 50. Oh my gosh, I don't know. Yeah. There you are. Yeah, just don't do it. Don't. Stop. Keep your feet on the ground, especially get in the band. Figure out safer ways to get your rocks off. There's plenty you can do. Do you want a new backyard? Right. Give the neighbors a show. On the ground. Right, right outside their window. Yes, my God, there are so many safe ways to do this. You still believe. Yeah. Be smarter about where you are when you're getting poked. I want to try to make this a goal where we just do in memoriam speed while having sex and crazy places. We should probably be dying in the process. Seriously. All right. Well, that's all we have for you today, folks. Go do your thing. Tell people where you're going. I feel like that's the lesson. That's really the lesson in both of us. Both of them. So they touch. Who are you meeting with? Just makes a search easier. And we talked about that before. Yeah. Just check in, y'all, it's okay. And leave clues something. Just in case. Just be safe. Well, we will see you next week and go do things. Don't be savvy. Don't be stink. Goodbye. Hey, thanks for listening to ensure you don't miss future episodes, head over to Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast fix and follow us while you're there. Go ahead and leave us a 5 star rating. You know you want to. Do you want even more content? You should join our stabbing cool kids club. We have various ways to join and different levels, each with its own set of perks. To find out more, visit the members link on our website at 6° of WTF dot com. Speaking of our website, this is also where you can buy merch and find out more about the cases we covered today. See you next time. This podcast was brought to you by literally everything.

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