22 Burst results for "research engineer"

A Holistic Approach to Data Governance Through Self Reflection at Collibra

Data Engineering Podcast

02:07 min | 2 months ago

A Holistic Approach to Data Governance Through Self Reflection at Collibra

"Your host is tobias. Macy today interviewing stay in krisztian known stan about data governance in the enterprise. How khalib applies to lessons learned from their customers to their own business so stand. Can you start by introducing yourself. Yes of course. Thanks for having me over. Stan from libra one of the co founders of the company. That's two thousand eight. We've been doing this for about thirteen years now. And i've had a variety of roles in the company. I've been responsible for sales post sales partnerships. The whole nine yards the right. Now what i'm responsible for. And what i owned data office on the lake and on friday evenings recall that drinking our own champagne only mornings because eating and do you remember how you got involved in the area of data management. Yes i do and you're probably not going to believe it. But i i study doesn't mean you need like tropical engish but a colorblind so you can imagine me putting it was just one of the courses. We got there was sequel. And we've got this thick thick book of sequel the language and database. And i was thinking to myself who needs this. What is this mind you. This is nineteen ninety eight the year. Two thousand maybe something like that. I forget who needs to be money for such a book right so i was thinking as soon as i run through the scores of something that nobody will ever need. I'm going to sell the book. So that was the only textbook that ever sold the sequel book. So obviously i wasn't been bending to go into data management necessarily when i was in school but i went to a software company after my studies. Also did somebody ice. Obviously that they may be deeply comes back and then the company stints. I ended up at the university again but as a research engineer and then we were doing research into semantic slept startup semantics up to gatien's research slept with a database professor. So i worked there for about three years and there was really sucked into deep of the artist. She well when when did they go.

Krisztian Khalib Tobias Macy Stan Gatien
Speech Processing for Disease - Dr Ami Moyal, President, Afeka Tel Aviv College of Engineering

The Voice Tech Podcast

03:29 min | 11 months ago

Speech Processing for Disease - Dr Ami Moyal, President, Afeka Tel Aviv College of Engineering

"Center for Language Processing Quick Example was founded by eleven years ago after I spent fifteen years in the high tech industry as a research engineer vice-president technology, and CEO. Since then the centre has grown to be the largest research. Sentiment is bound helpless on Applied Research Field With project completed for the defense industry high companies, the medical field and more. Most recently, the language processing has been researching the use of speech processing, not sufficient diligence algorithms for providing a quicken, readily available three diagnostic assessment of Covid, nineteen infection we belden need for human intervention. When it comes to a rapidly spreading virus such as covid nineteen with millions of potential carriers Goud the global population. It is essential die identified like carry-ons virus at the early stages confection in order to private as testing efforts and break the chain of mission while it's great to hear there's just so much going on in Israel in the in the research failed, and specifically around language processing, you guys are really applying it to one of the most worthy and needed causes at the moment, the pre diagnosis of covid nineteen. Completely, understand the need to prioritize testing efforts. Tests are in short supply so you really do have to get to the right people i. I'm rendered. There was some talk around whether it was possible to use voice for the diagnosis of Kavita. This is a couple of months ago. Remember I'm on the on the what's that groups and things? I'm part of people were skeptical that it was actually possible. So tell us. Is it actually possible to use voice files, voice recording speech even coughs and non? Verbal. nonverbal recordings of of a human voice to be able to diagnose covid nineteen. That is precisely what our current research is into. After consulting with physicians specializing oratory disease and ear nose and throat, as well as with doctors conflict within coronavirus patients, we learned that among the earliest symptoms. So covid nineteen. Vocal the. And throat infection. These affect human localization patterns. We are modeling samples of speech coughing and breathing from both symptomatic and Azima the night to carry us to compare with models taken from healthy subjects. AUTOMO-. We are also modeling vocalisations subject the tested negative for covid nineteen yet are exhibiting similar symptoms shot such as those infected by the common flu. DC will a loaded the commodity who differentiate between someone who is likely a carrier and someone? Well. That makes perfect sense I mean obviously someone who is infected and is showing symptoms is going to sound different to someone who is isn't so I completely understand how you can train these machine learning models to recognize the difference I'm fascinated by the ability to be able to distinguish between different diseases though because I would imagine the you know if you have one type of disease or another, the reaction of your body would largely be the same the produce flam in the lungs which would come up in a fatal throw in different ways I'll be really really interested to know what the difference is. In how that sounds depending on the on which disease that you have

Research Engineer Vice-Preside Throat Infection DC Israel CEO
"research engineer" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"research engineer" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Means it's time for a listener mail. I'M GONNA call this the long-awaited fire safety email. Thank you can finally cleared out of my inbox. I know you've been asking me off and on since last. August has really been that long. Yeah but not like every week. It's not like I'm not a sadist Here we go. I'm a research engineer. This study's fire dynamics and material flammability. My group has developed campaign to educate the public about general fire dynamics fire safety and what to do in case of a dwelling fire. The cornerstone of this is this as good as it was hoped that would be. The cornerstone of this campaign is called close before you does and that C L O s e not clothing. I'm glad you said that It's focused on residents closing their bedroom doors for going to sleep because the strategy has been extensively tested in large scale experiments and provide. I'm sorry proven to slow down the advance of the fire to provide adequate time for firefighters to conduct search and rescue. That makes sense to close your doors when you go to bed. Yeah because if a fire does break out in your house it will keep the smokeout a lot longer than it would. If your door's open giving firefighters time come get you. Did you previously with your doors open. You always been a door closed sky Guilty must admit that. I still sleep with the door open. You do. I'm toast reason or just like Do not even care. I don't like at a conscious thing. It's more it just feels weird to me to have the door closed anything but yeah all right. I listen to stuff you should know during my morning and evening commutes really. Enjoy all the Research topics and it the fine and I find that the way Josh Chuck. That's US present. The information has always been very easy for me to relate to understand I think that is a great medium to help educate the population about the potentially life-saving difference a closed-door can make the event of a fire as truly stuff. Everyone should know and hope you think so as well and help us to get this information to the Public. A year later almost Let me see here. That is for mark or mark who again as a research engineer. Doing work in fire dynamics and safety nice work mark. Thanks Chuck for doing one I hope you guys listen to mark. Don't follow my example. Close Your door when you sleep. Yeah we leave ours up into animals and the kid it's like people need to get in and out if you want to be like mark and let us know a PSA to tell everybody we love doing those we'll get to eventually promise You can go ahead and send us an email. Wrap it up spanked on the bottom and send it off to stuff. Podcast iheartradio DOT COM stuff. You should know is production of iheartradio's house works for more podcasts. My Heart Radio is at the. I heart radio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows hey put on some Beatles no no the stones. How about Soup Pot come on you? GotTa Play Biggie. Maybe some Katy Perry Taylor Swift. Come on it might be time for another episode of arrivals rivals is a new podcast that exports famous music of the past and present. Join me Steven Hyden. 'em Meet Jordan. Run talk as we go blow by blow through the best music beefs and then debate. Who deserves the upper hand? Pick aside and may the best band win tune into rivals. Weekly podcast from iheartradio. Listen and follow rivals on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever us in the PODCAST? Hi Everyone. This is. Throw sending Sanchez and Eric Winter. And we have a podcast called. He said age The might even a part of the thing name. Say Your name. I'm Eric Winter. Wow interesting podcast called. He said it's about our conflicting personalities and our differences of opinion about everything guys. It's funny check it out. Fine he said A. Do on the iheartradio APP ON APPLE. Podcast or wherever you get your guess..

Josh Chuck Eric Winter research engineer iheartradio APPLE mark US Katy Perry Taylor Swift Sanchez Beatles Steven Hyden
Causality 101 with Robert Ness

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

07:35 min | 1 year ago

Causality 101 with Robert Ness

"I am on the line with Robert Osa Zoa Ness Robert is a machine learning research engineer at Gammel on and an instructor at northeastern North Eastern University Robert and I met at the last nerves conference where he had an accepted poster session around his paper integrating hitting Markov processes with structural. Causal Modeling Enables counterfactual inference in complex systems which he also presented at the black doc in a in a workshop This kicked off a bunch of great conversations between the two of US leading ultimately to collaboration. That we'll talk a little bit about in this conversation. Robert thanks so much for joining me on the Tuomo. Ai podcast thanks for having me Sam. You're injured us. It makes me think I should've. It came up with more clever name for that paper. You know what a lot of papers we talk about on. This show are quite the mouthful so yours is no exception exception Maybe someone will build a model. You know that. seeks to determine a inverse correlation or correlation between the lengthiness papers the title and It's number of citations or something like that. Let's set that aside for now and have you spent a few minutes introducing yourself. How did you get started in machine learning what piqued your interest You know ultimately will be spending a lot of time here talking about causality. How did you come to Become interested in that you know my path to machine learning was a bit. I'd say unconventional I started off working In Asia Tanna specifically I was the degree at Hopkins in International Studies and was planning adding to pursue a degree in economic In economics focusing on economic development I got involved with some Internet companies out in Beijing That got me into coding. And database is in data in general and I decided I was interested in in debt in that and went to apply for programs in statistics. Particularly with a focus on computational statistics I back to the states came back to the states went to Purdue University to do my PhD in stats My PhD work was on causal. Inference graphical models Basically how to learn causal models from data particularly in the context of systems systems biology and from then after I graduated I went to trade industry. Got It now. We hear very frequently folks refer to their path into machine learning as unconventional are indirect In your case you came into an interesting gaming net leads you to apply live for Or into Grad School for statistic. What was that particular connection really? It's when you're on the back end of an APP and you're looking at the data and you're realizing that there's a lot of insights to be had if only we could model this data and turn it into some service on the front end Um I realized I mean this was you know people had were just kinda starting to talk about data science and then Hell Varian had just recently came out and said I said that's the districts is the new sexiest will. I can't remember the exact quote was pick your Metaphor Metaphor New Black statistics is the new. I don't know Rockstar and so And Yeah that's that's kind of why pivoted to do the two stats in machine. Learning I guess through stats view. May people might argue whether or not stats machine. Learning Are same thing. Might the problems that I was working on my PhD or using Publicity graphical models so which has strong roots in artificial intelligence. So that was my introduction machine learning. Yeah one of the things that's come up in our conversations about causality and The work that you're doing with your courses is the idea that it historically talking about causality has been the you know the domain of statisticians and in Yeah folks like economists And that a lot of that conversation is inaccessible or isn't really tailored to do the needs of developers and data scientists machine learning engineers. I didn't realize all the time we were talking about that. That your background wasn't economics. You you have some of the exposure to the way that causality is has been traditionally kind of us and talked about. Maybe I guess I'll just use this as a segue to Kind of opening up the floor to to ask you. What how do you define causality? The interesting thing about causality may be part of why maybe is a challenging thing to deal with particularly for statisticians I would say is that. It's very difficult to talk about it without finding yourself having a philosophical conversation and you know so going you know this is something that fill in. What is the causality? These in that philosophers have been wrestling with through the ages. Right hume had has counterfactual definition initial possibility. That's you know a follows from being had a not happy would not have happened But you know philosophers going back to the Buddha all kind of take their stab at what is caused -ality so there's a different philosophical arguments for causality and what it means I think from a practical standpoint. What most people mean when they say? causal inference is. They mean the estimation of Causal Effects. So if you're safer example at a tech company and you want to run some kind of experiment about the about whether a feature will drive a click or some other key performance indicator or metric. You're asking you. Your experiment is essentially trying to get at the question of what is the causal effect of this feature on this outcome and you'll be using the assumptions and methods from Statistics to estimate assuming Air Assumptions are valid those causal effects. But when we've talked in machine learning where now hearing you know. So I hadn Europe's like you said This talk about having agents that can understand that. Causal Structure of the world and and that causes allergies essential from moving from system one system to cognition day Pearl was very preeminent. Causal inference researcher talks about causal reasoning in in terms of free will and the ability to understand Dan intention and so there are definitely definitely a lot of angles to tackle this question from the perspective of artificial intelligence is that you know people who are running experiments in facebook. Netflix are not really thinking about

Causal Effects Robert Osa Zoa Ness Robert United States AI North Eastern University Tuomo Purdue University Gammel Netflix Research Engineer Hell Varian Instructor Grad School Rockstar Beijing Asia Facebook Pearl Hume
Seeing Art in Science

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Seeing Art in Science

"To make materials better. Sometimes you have to start with a failure. And if you look hard enough, you can see art in the science. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future JAMES BOND is a research engineer at NASA Langley research center, he spends his days studying thin sections of materials using a scanning electron microscope. If something fails it will come to my lab, I can look at the fracture surface and determined. Why at fractured? It fractured James uses his background and photography and chemistry to make sense of the science, but he uses his imagination to see pictures. And those scans one of the things I did recently was the failure of a fire proofing immaterial, and I got up to about five or six hundred x and you could see the fiber. But it looked like a dark forest with a pathway going through. Do it. So photograph that so there's are everywhere is just that you've got actually look for and see it there for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer pulley have a story idea for innovation now searches on Facebook, and let us now innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V. Visit us online at innovation now dot US.

James Bond Nasa Langley Research Center Jennifer Pulley Research Engineer Facebook National Institute Of Aerospac Nasa
Art Is Everywhere

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Art Is Everywhere

"To make materials better. Sometimes you have to start with a failure. And if you look hard enough, you can see art in the science. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future JAMES BOND is a research engineer at NASA Langley research center, he spends his days studying thin sections of materials using a scanning electron microscope. If something fails it will come to my lab, I can look at the fracture surface and determined. Why at fractured? It fractured James uses his background and photography and chemistry to make sense of the science, but he uses his imagination to see pictures. And those scans one of the things I did recently was the failure of a fire proofing immaterial, and I got up to about five or six hundred x and you could see the fiber. But it looked like a dark forest with a pathway going through. Do it. So photograph that so there's are everywhere is just that you've got actually look for and see it there for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer pulley have a story idea for innovation now searches on Facebook, and let us now innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V. Visit us online at innovation now dot US.

James Bond Nasa Langley Research Center Jennifer Pulley Research Engineer Facebook National Institute Of Aerospac Nasa
"research engineer" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"She is held a number of positions in support of the operations of the space shuttle space station, commercial crew and expiration programs. A few of her NASA. Career highlights include she began her NASA career as materials research engineer, and the safety reliability and folly assurance directorate. She is trained astronauts as a life support systems instructor she helped the ISIS expedition crew train in the US and Russia as a Russian integrationist director and supported operations mission control Moscow as approved support engineer, helping enable humans to continually occupy the space station since October thirty first of two thousand which eighteen years of continuous humans on orbit in two thousand one. It became the first non astronaut ISIS capsule communicator emission control in two thousand five she became Nasr's, first female, Hispanic white director, she supported numerous ISIS and shuttle crews, including leading Lee assignments for expedition, fourteen and SEI's 126 since two thousand eleven she is hell titles such as deputy manager of the office flight director office assistant to the chief for I s I s manager of mission operations directorate and assistant director fi asus in f-, oh deep since August of twenty sixteen miscarry has been division chief for F O dis flight integration division, which focuses on f OD's participation in hardware and software testing for developmental programs assessing the operational safety of Nazis crewed missions. She oversees crew and flight control or training and reestablishing the ground aviation support required.

director NASA assistant director ISIS division chief research engineer SEI engineer Moscow Lee US Russia instructor Nasr eighteen years
"research engineer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Which is why I'm here nine tartikoff. They are beautiful websites, but one can only stare at a shirtless man on a horse for so long, even when he has such muscular breath. Out here. Our only salvation from boredom is the occasional sip of vodka and a small library of books. But all is not well in that realm. There is a man a man who makes life difficult a man named I league. Who's most frightening words are hey, brother. What are you reading? Oh, the interesting thing about that book. He and I come from opposite ends of Saint Petersburg. I am from the baroque Neha literally up the pond courtyard entry way in the hard-luck Kuptana district. Many of our countries leaders come from such courtyards and have had difficult child. Meanwhile is from Brighton area apartment and the petrograd scare side of the river where some of the courtyards are clean and freshly painted a real progress ski intellectual as they say hallways with a clean handkerchief, and as long Johns neatly tucked into his boots. Also, I believe his mother loved them. My mother not so much and yet I got better grades than in university. And now, I am a research engineer while he's only a welder, but still he puts on airs. He likes to wear t shirts with funny English sayings on them like this one that has the drawing of a famous German philosopher and the line. I just can't. Today. I.

Saint Petersburg Neha Johns research engineer Brighton Kuptana
"research engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Which is why I'm here article. They are beautiful websites, but one can only stare at a shirtless man on a horse for so long, even when he has such muscular breasts. Out here. Our only salvation from boredom is the occasional sip of vodka and a small library of books, but all is not well in that realm. There is a man a man who makes life difficult a man named a league. Who's most frightening words are hey, brother. What are you reading? Oh. The interesting thing about that book. He and I come from opposite ends of Saint Petersburg. I am from an. But but literally the palm courtyard entry way in the hard luck Kupchak the district. Many of our countries leaders come from such courtyards and have had difficult childhoods. Meanwhile is from Brighton area apartment and the petrograd scare side of the river or some of the courtyards are clean and freshly painted a real Gretzky, intellectual as they say always with a clean handkerchief, and as long Johns neatly tucked into his boots. Also, I believe his mother loved them. My mother not so much and yet I got better grades than Elliott in university. And now, I am a research engineer while he's only a welder, but still he puts on airs. He likes to wear t shirts with funny English sayings on them like this one that has the drawing of famous German philosopher and the line just can't. Today..

Elliott Kupchak Saint Petersburg research engineer Brighton Johns Gretzky
"research engineer" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on KCRW

"Which is why adhering Antarctica? They are beautiful websites. But one can only stare at a shirtless man on a horse for so long, even when he has such musket abreast. Out here. Our only salvation from Gordon is the occasional sip of vodka and a small library of books. But all is not well in that realm. There is a man a man who makes life difficult a man named I league. Who's most frightening words are hey, brother. What are you reading? Oh, the interesting thing about that book. He and I come from opposite ends of Saint Petersburg. I am from an the button literally the pond courtyard entryway in the hard Kupchak the district. Many of our countries leaders come from such courtyards and have had difficult childhoods. Meanwhile, is from a Brighton area apartment and the petrograd scarce side of the river where some of the courtyards are clean and freshly painted a real petrograd ski, intellectual as they say always with a clean handkerchief, and as long Johns neatly tucked into his boots. Also, I believe his mother loved them. My mother not so much and yet I got better grades than Elliott university. And now, I am a research engineer while he's only a welder, but still he puts on airs. He likes to wear t shirts with funny English sayings on them like this one that has the drawing of famous German philosopher and the line. I just can't. Today. I was lying on.

Saint Petersburg Elliott university research engineer Gordon Brighton Johns
"research engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Removes just one ton of co two from the air each day and produces only about two barrels of synthetic fuel. Oldham says his company along with investors that include Bill Gates, spend thirty million dollars. A nearly a decade perfecting this process. He says they're ready to build much larger plants now the company says it can extract carbon. Dioxide from the air for less than one hundred dollars a tonne. But some experts are skeptical. It can be done that cheaply. Howard Herzog is senior research engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of technology energy initiative to reality is it's a lot cheaper to keep CO two out of the year than the capture it once we get it into the air. But many of his colleagues argue it's too late to rely on only reducing emissions with projections of dire consequences from climate change. Jennifer Wilcox is a chemical engineering professor at Worcester. Polytechnic institute early in light of the recent climate report, we don't have the option simply avoiding carbon emissions anymore. Now, we're at a point where we need to start removing directly from the here. Wilcox and others say the technology needs more, research and development. I see this industry similar to the renewable energy industry. Maybe twenty or thirty years ago, Noah diet heads the California group carbon one eighty and says direct air capture needs the kind of private and government investment that helped wind and solar grow earlier this year, congress gave the fledgling business a hand expanding tax credits for extracting carbon. I think an even bigger opportunity on the policy front is in California. Died says the state has a carbon trading program for transportation fuels like gas that could be a big boost for carbon Engineering's fuel back at the company's plant in British Columbia. Ceo, Steve Oldham wants more government programs that put a price or tax on carbon dioxide emissions. It will force companies. Have a carbon footprint today to find ways to mitigate that carbon footprint, and we're a very good way of doing Oldham says his.

Steve Oldham carbon Engineering Bill Gates Jennifer Wilcox Massachusetts Institute of tec California Polytechnic institute Howard Herzog senior research engineer Ceo Worcester Noah
"research engineer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Removes just one ton of co two from the air each day and produces only about two barrels of synthetic fuel. Oldham says his company along with. Investors that include Bill Gates, spend thirty million dollars in nearly a decade perfecting this process. He says they're ready to build much larger plants. Now, the company says it can extract carbon dioxide from the air for less than one hundred dollars a tonne. But some experts are skeptical can be done that cheaply. Howard Herzog is senior research engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of technology. Energy initiative. Reality is it's a lot cheaper to keep CO two out of the year. Then the capture it once we get it into the air. But many of his colleagues argue it's too late to rely on only reducing emissions with projections of dire consequences from climate change. Jennifer Wilcox is a chemical engineering professor at Worcester. Polytechnic institute early in light of the recent climate report, we don't have the option simply avoiding carbon emissions anymore. Now. We're at a point where we need to start removing. Few directly from the here. Wilcox and others say the technology needs more, research and development. I see this industry similar to the renewable energy industry. Maybe twenty or thirty years ago. No diet heads the California group carbon one eighty and says direct air capture needs the kind of private and government investment that helped wind and solar grow earlier this year, congress gave the fledgling business a hand expanding tax credits for extracting carbon. I think an even bigger opportunity on the policy front is in California. Died says the state has a carbon trading program for transportation fuels like gas that could be a big boost for carbon Engineering's fuel back at the company's plant in British Columbia CEO, Steve Oldham wants more government programs that put a price or tax on carbon dioxide emissions. It.

Steve Oldham Jennifer Wilcox carbon Engineering Bill Gates California Massachusetts Institute of tec Polytechnic institute Howard Herzog senior research engineer Worcester congress CEO
"research engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on KQED Radio

"One ton of co two from the air each day and produces only about two barrels of synthetic fuel. Oldham says his company along with. Investors that include Bill Gates spent thirty million dollars in nearly a decade perfecting this process. He says they're ready to build much larger plants. Now, the company says it can extract carbon dioxide from the air for less than one hundred dollars a tonne. But some experts are skeptical. It can be done that cheaply. Howard Herzog is senior research engineer at the Massachusetts Institute of technology energy initiative to reality is it's a lot cheaper to keep CO two out of the year. Then the capture it once we get it into the air. But many of his colleagues argue it's too late to rely on only reducing emissions with projections of dire consequences from climate change. Jennifer Wilcox is a chemical engineering professor at Worcester. Polytechnic institute early in light of the recent climate report, we don't have the option simply avoiding carbon emissions anymore. Now. We're at a point where we need to start. Moving to directly from the here. Wilcox and others say the technology needs more, research and development. I see this industry similar to the renewable energy industry. Maybe twenty or thirty years ago. No Edite heads the California group carbon one eighty and says direct air capture needs the kind of private and government investment that helped wind and solar grow earlier this year, congress gave the fledgling business a hand expanding tax credits for extracting carbon. I think an even bigger opportunity on the policy front is in California. Died says the state has a carbon trading program for transportation fuels like gas that could be a big boost for carbon Engineering's fuel back at the company's plant in British Columbia CEO, Steve Oldham wants more government programs that put a price or tax on carbon dioxide.

Steve Oldham Jennifer Wilcox carbon Engineering Bill Gates California Massachusetts Institute of tec Polytechnic institute Howard Herzog senior research engineer Worcester congress CEO British Columbia
"research engineer" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Oh that's what we did toward the end of the summer like come on we gotta go so he went to coop office i'm like tell them well know ginger did a really good job this summer and i said yes and not only him and these other individuals think that too and he says i think she should move her into the pathway into the coop program and they said okay so what was so intriguing about the op program that you work so hard because that was a promise so the internship i come work here i go back to school nasa doesn't me anything but if i got into the coop program that it's a partnership i worked for nasa semester i go to school i worked for nasa semester and back then you know upon graduation pretty much guaranteed a job more so than if i had just been a one shot intern so that was my way of making sure that you know i got into a recognized agreement with nasa okay so you worked hard in the summer internship to sort of get into this debut yes more stable and then you get hired on as a civil servant too right yes yes so you get to do a lot of different things as a civil servant right it seems like whenever you did get to nasty eventually you moved around quite a bit oh yeah so when i first got back when when i first started that was may of ninety four and i was hired by safety reliability and quality assurance and i worked in the bolts testing laboratory and the calibration laboratory and then after about a year doing that i was converted to materials research engineer where i just supervised the quality and in of some of the production that was going into the space shuttle and early on in the space station and after a year of doing that and my boss knew that i wanted to be an astronaut and so i went down and turned in my astronaut application and duane ross suggested that i get out of the area that i was in and get some exposure to operations duane ross introduced me to the concept of a rotational assignment and.

ginger nasa intern research engineer duane ross
"research engineer" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"That war though end up meghan are in all gushed with georgia hey guys how are ya hello there and payday for grave goulash lioma screen your debt free how much of your paid off we must say five hundred ninety three thousand honored goodness how long did that take we do that in twenty four martin hoke andrew range of income during that time well we start at two hundred ninety thousand and they're not the ones the anyone down to two hundred on 45 due to a career change made my made by megan wow what are you guys do for a living a little bump civil engineers and workers like research engineer okay i also worked in construction engineering at the beginning of the journey but more recently made a career change and i now can do engineering design while working remotely in um so people to be closer to the kids now very cool good what kind of was five money well we own two hundred and sixty eight thousand dollars loan out rental properties uh we had a car loan and everything else watch out were home you paid off your house we do so you must have sold the rentals we did weed so both of the right now and then we sold the caller as well okay wow and what does the reynolds bring uh they brought over well we had a tall five two hundred sixty eight thousand on the ran on on all wrong now eight hundred thousand dollars above that yes okay so you sold on for three 68 then you use the 100 to apply to the loan right other lines right that's right okay so of the five ninety three three 68 came from the sale of the reynolds paid off the reynolds and other 100 went to the debts and how much did the car cell for hours.

meghan research engineer reynolds georgia megan eight hundred thousand dollars sixty eight thousand dollars
"research engineer" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on KTRH

"The toll roads are a way to get the roads done faster and uh certainly there is some uh angst uh for folks who haven't had a road experience uh you you you see that early on every city or region that starts doing toll roads the first one or two are uh met with a lot of consternation n discussion after that it's sort of well this is the way that we're going to address the growth challenges we have certainly after awhile you you get into what you might call toll road fatigue and uh i i think it's important to connect the public with those projects and that the public supports them much do them the bubbly doesn't support him let's think about other ways to do a more we just accept some more traffic congestion the i think part of the problem is as that mostly stole roads are sold was with the idea that uh bogus charts the tools that we takes the road it hyundai days of the road and the george seen the tolls so they can use the money used to be ten lightly yeah i i don't uh uh i don't think you're gonna see that obviously if you have a road did where you were you pay off the bond you still got to maintain the road and then uh uh th i think one of uh uh things that you can do with that continual revenue stream is uh particularly in houston a place it's going to grow another two or three million people over the next couple of decades uh is address the challenges that have arisen over the y you know over that two or three uh decade intervening period you probably need to widen the road or you know look look for some other projects to improve uh transportation on the in in that same corder well it's good to hear from you thank you tim max research engineer with texas anm transportation institutes you're on newsradio seven forty ktrh another round of traffic and weather let's get you caught up on seoul's congested roadways all hasn't been do that this money julie darty well and you do need to be careful though especially if you're on the outskirts because we are getting reports of some ice on the.

george research engineer seoul julie darty houston
"research engineer" Discussed on SaaS Insider Podcast

SaaS Insider Podcast

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on SaaS Insider Podcast

"Thank you for having me share a pleasure i'm really excited to happy says the search started in two thousand in twelve yep you come trimming engineering background and not a sales line no there is a lot of story here for sure so let's start a little bit with your background we'll get into lead shifted minute but let's start with your background what's your back tell us aca so i'm originally from india i was born in calcutta india and i moved to this town call halifax nova scotia in the in atlantic canada for by university so i came here to do computer science at it got house university and um and i love the city and i after graduation i decided to work here as a research engineer the company here and then i join my masters while working so i did continue doing their masters and and my work and i was my background is in information retrieval and and natural language processing um so that's that's that's really my background um i i love mining data that's that at at a high level so that's that's my bagger on an and while a wall playing around with data with couple of my cofounder and trends we stumbled upon the idea fleet served uh which which has pivoted quite a bit since then but but that's that's that's that's how it started so let's talk about chief sipped now let's sheets if do now yep super high level leaks of is a sales intelligence platform that helps btob sas companies.

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"research engineer" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:46 min | 4 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on WTMA

"By monday sometimes i give their low quicker sometimes a little bit later but that's the goal so how many of you are using the blue smartphone b l you have you heard of that particular smartphone well you know last year believe it was a gatt in some trouble or got called out on sending out text messages to a you know shanghai location so fewer had one of the phones and you're sending text messages and so forth for some reason they were capturing that and that information of being set out and so a company called call him out on that and they said yet okay well you know i i think a lot of these companies kind of they don't really wanna fess up to it and they said yeah whoa whoa whoa picks up and so they did fix that i think they were centred step over to shanghai and so they corrected that and a company called a crypto wire at the recent black hat conference they said that the blue is added again and says that some of their best selling bones like the blue advance volvo is still contains some um spying software and the software this is created by shanghai am i hope when pronouncements right shanghai eight up say dup f technology now of course these guys are denying their telephones contain any kind of mao wear or secret kind of software spyware and so on and said you know they do have some policies in place in the day you take cuffs schumer privacy and security very seriously and they confirmed that there's been no breach or issue of any con with their with their phones so crypto wire said not so fast said that the software still quietly sending information from their phones to a server in shanghai without informing people so they supposedly replaced the previous software with a different kind of software and the crypto wire cofounder in a research engineer said that they had captured the network traffic of them using this command and control check now when they were doing it so crypto wire say hey listen folks we.

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"research engineer" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

O'Reilly Data Show

02:25 min | 4 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

"Welcome to though riley data show i'm your host bandarenka before we jump into today's episode i wanna remind our listeners that we do have to event series dead they can go and at the end and learn more about the topics covered in this podcast the first let us called strata data conference which you can find at strata hans dot com the second one is the artificial intelligence conference which you find at the a icons dot com in this episode of the data show i speak with some each in dhaleh he's on a i research engineer it's facebook among his many research projects so meat was part of the deem behind dc gan deep constitutional generative adversarial networks a widely cited paper the introduced a set of neural networks architecture for unsupervised learning our conversation however centers are up by torch the successor to the popular dortch scientific computing framework while is relatively new by torch a spin embraced by the deep learning research community i hope you enjoyed episode somme chantale la welcome to the data show while at my pleasure to be here so before we jumped into our discussion i just wanted to ask you about your job title cheryl artificial intelligence research engineer so i've seen the tidal a i engineer and i've seen the tidal research engineer so year or somewhat of a hybrid between our oil said there's a tidal a researcher so through a day so it's the title does it actually made much it's just to make sure people get context on what i work on just by the can't the title by actual title is research into their ad i work in the ai division of fair boise great so welcome back to facebook i research are later but the best start by talking about a new deep learning framework i buy new i mean not 2017 uh by torch of which are heavily involved with so first of all describe how by torch came about in what convince you folks to build it.

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"research engineer" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

O'Reilly Data Show

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on O'Reilly Data Show

"And then the astronaut you i was working at the mine for a bit and my role at the mind was assize research engineer there might uh the research scientists why was started up with was really drested in sort of like cognitive signs so how a human some very good understanding about how the world works about you know what will happen if you drop your pen if you throw something if pull this block out of a tower un they also have a good intuition of you know like a lay out like it eager to house you can sort of expect this eastern things salon our researchers focused on how do you sort of incorporate this you know this information about the world into your algorithms or happy maker algorithms like adolf hitler in these easters so for our listeners out there who are the aware of the minds or some of these positions in general so hot what's the distinction between the research engineer on the one hand and the research scientists added look yes of the research engineers those are usually the more just like veterans of the field so these were mostly like professors or people have completed their ph ds core like who are very very good each adjourns the research engineer as a are less they were less academics they were and they were just bettered engineering right so like my job would be to work with the research engineer in you know till i understand what he wanted me to do and basically make that run up to you on a yeah scale on on google infrastructure yeah wish yet opposes a lot of challenges you know just by itself fry like how do you you know how do you paralyze these algorithms have you make it effectively ron non like internet resources sonnen support so that's all go after hoy the or a good opportunity from you for you right so he started out on youtube demon ended up with the mine.

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"research engineer" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Our safety has been gradually tests in hundreds of model sony whereas concluded that eleven bottles offer poor headlights twelve fall in the marginal category twelve are acceptable their position right in two thousand seventeen models based on the best available highlight packet had vantage in each vehicle fears and twelve of the twenty one small as he the muddles tested by i ate i i age as of two thousand sixteen delivered poor for performers and only former acceptable so something is improving were noted in the right direction but they're still coming up short of coins i ages senior research engineer man from belo he says menu event hers are responding and some of the quick fix says has already taken place so the models ranked the best are the volvo exceed fifty the hyundai santa fe but the poor performers were the car infiniti q eggs sixty the lincoln mkx lincoln mkx dodge charity ford edge for explore gmc terrain hyundai santa fe's board jeep wrangler yes we have achieved prager pierce rental until toyota a forerunner some automakers are offering new lights that swivel what the curvature of the brown but there necessarily better than the stationary headlights for example they say there is an optional curve adaptive won't be light on the volvo xc sixty it provides a bright.

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"research engineer" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"research engineer" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"And the message for that uh imaging requires that the sample of material is extremely thin uh around fifty nanometers which is about twenty times smaller than the flag pole that i have their well so it has to be that sin for the electron beam of that microscopes to pass through it what was your point in carving the tiny we wanted to demonstrate or showcase some of our science instrument here could return recruiting tool kit to get science outreach and to get electron microscopes than materials research out in the public as a topic of conversation and we thought that combining this with canada one fifty would be quite interesting because we're a national facilities so having a national focus is a good thing for us it clearly work to getting the attention that you wanted a lot more than i thought it would actually lie attended i wanted to surface or the material to have some kind of canadian connotation i think the ideal choice i would pick something like a beaver to throw a moves antler but i don't have those readily available fresh out of fever teeth so a penny was a pretty good compromises out of circulation which which is probably a good thing and the material that behaves weight well onto the focused on being all right we'll leave it there chavis thank you you're welcome to be here nice to taxi by thank you by helen travis customer 'grande is research engineer with the canadian center for electron microscope be there we go get at this time we reach mr cassagranda at mcmaster university in hamilton ontario.

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