19 Episode results for "reiter"

Stay Healthy! Chiropractor Self-care Practices with Dr. Michael Hall and Brandi MacDonald

Breaking the Underdog Curse

55:49 min | 1 year ago

Stay Healthy! Chiropractor Self-care Practices with Dr. Michael Hall and Brandi MacDonald

"Welcome to breaking the underdog curse for chiropractors. I'm your host. Dr dawn McDonald, author of the bestselling book, the underdog curse, we give vita Listrik carb Rackers, a chance to learn from the best around the world discovering how they overcame their challenges and chief success in order for chiropractic thrive. We must have bribing chiropractors bell. Listen up this time to crush the curse. Hello, everybody. Welcome to another episode of breaking underdog curse. And this is not only any normal episode. This is the one hundred episode and, and celebrate the hundred episode I was gonna go back and find out what were the top downloaded episodes over the last year. Or since we started the buck is actually gonna be year and a half, and, and we had a really close tie. And it was two two different guests that tied they're only a hundred downloads apart, and, and Randy was brandy. Obviously, my lovely wife, she came out at four thousand six hundred ninety seven downloads, so, and then doctor, Michael hall is right close second at four thousand five hundred ninety five downloads. And so I thought, what a cool idea actually brandy had this great idea saying, hey, why don't we just have a nice conversation about what was similar about those two episodes in the episode of brandy Hata so popular was all about building? Long-term healthy relationships. Like that was hers that, that seems to be the top one and then doctor, Michael hall. It was changing lies by restoring the curve, which helps with the stress response. So we're always trying to acquire factors help their practice members with stress response. And, and now I think we're going to be talking to, you are breakers. Yes, you listening to this five s right now we're talking to you and Brian, maybe you can expand a little bit or on. Why we wants to kinda get this combination together for today? I, I didn't really know what we are. The top two was number one. I was like I talked to my. So then, really the similarity I'll be there, totally different, but then team, I think, like twenty different things obviously, but I think this team is, is that in with Michael's episode he's talking about how important it is to restore that cervical kurban. What happens when lose it and the impact of that on somebody's physiology, and in minor talking about the impact of stress, long-term stress on, really being pathological in long term relationships because people's brains don't work properly. So then they ended up being in relationship with one another, but they're braised over properly is pretty hard to build a sustainable long term health relationship with lotta healthy brain. And so I think this, I think similarities were really around just the impact stress has on all of us, and we spent a lot of time talking about how we can help our people. But I think in over the last couple of years in all the mentorship, we've done, we've actually way more time working with tyrod actors. On their level of awareness about how much stress they're under. And how much it's actually impacting their ability to view the world, properly byu, the stimulus at hand, not the percents. Perceive scary stimulus as it impacts, like everything impacts, our health impacts relationships in impacts our practice their staff members as pretty hard to make sustainable changes in your practice, when your brain doesn't work properly. So I think I thought today will be cool to talk about that as it relates to all of us not all not about the people. This is really what does it mean to all of us because I think if we can a healthier than we're gonna have held your practices in healthier number. So that's what I wanted to do date. I thought, hey, it'll be like we like the old days of Musa was by all the time. What ten twelve years ago before her all he was cool. We go for beer is basically, kind of conversation. So I thought, what we do is we would break it down into the two two different types designed Dr Mike, always talks about the, the male brain in the female brainer different rate, so less. Let's just for start off. No start with Michael. Let's talk about a female chiropractor, and again, I've, I've interviewed like tons of on my podcast, and they go from, you know, going through school being stressed out in school getting married. Having kids, some have kids in school, and then a lot of them. Are they take a maternity break for lights three weeks and they're still adjusting carrying the baby's on the swab and stuff and then also like ten or fifteen years later, and they're just slowly destroyed? So what are, what are some of the things trackers can do to kind of get back as a female carp actor to kind of get things going again, would not, if you don't mind, I'd like to kind of dovetail off. What Ranya was just talking about one thing. I think it's great for all the listeners atomic catch onto when we started this journey a decade ago. What really made it work is one, the two of you see a doctor, if you will office manager were on board with learning something that was new not only to learn it to put it into place in practice. And then when you put it into practice you saw changes and you were able to see a whole different shift in your practice. And so when time to plant the seed, I is that for all the people listening to this is that what you in brandy put together is dynamic is vital. It's, it's what typewriting needs. I'm I'm very proud on the part of it. That's what makes me excited is to have seen what you two did with contemporary, neurology in how every tire pressure can go to a whole new level. If they're willing to receive the information in what kind of comes to mind is that we live in age of when I say, anxiety an era of anxiety, and people are uncertain. They're uncertain about tomorrow. There. What about practices on sort of other Bill Reiter bills, and uncertainty plays a role in both male and female brain with how we crooned synapses was how we refund him in how we you know, dominate our physiology. So I kind of plant seed of those missions, what trust is so people taking this program that you have, or listen to these things one thing that they've got to do. They've got to trust the system. They've got to trust the procedures. Otherwise. They're uncertainty ensue will sabotage what they're trying to accomplish in. So they'll struggle to get where they need to get. That's the difficult is at Icees so many tire prejudice frog lame because they're just not really trusting the system like we talked about doing it turn tests. You guys have done this for years now, someone marches in place, a turn to the rider left that has its -nificant impact on now. How you discussed with the patient how their nervous systems function. But also now plays role in what you might do with your judgment. Why? What you might do some rehabilitations now your staff going do that. And now, your staff entrust that the whole process is working as well. And then the whole office is in sync in tandem with what's going on? And that's the beauty what I like let this whole thing if we look at the male and female brain, and which we look at the female for moment, what we're learning now is now in well, from two thousand fifteen neurobiologist stress, if you will the ideas at the temporal, low, we were born with, but we developed a frontal lobe in. So we know from temporal physiology, like, sometimes I'll use the term temporal tantrum. Is that women get in our own head? It's he will return to get more more criminal more survival Listrik, if you will end you may use a term called sympathetic dominance, or now we see the term dish oughta know Mia in. So we see a variety of clinical conditions that come out of simply not trusting or not believing in what could take. Place. No time at cedar have anxieties in so that part of the brain begins to light up like a Christmas tree, and that will sabotage our health. And then if we just cut me off anytime you want to. But if we look at ourselves in a top down fashion than the first marker of this anxiety is in the people's. So now what happens is, we, we lose some ability to constrict, our people. So to read things which are near to us to drive at night. With bright lights in other cars coming to make people more anxious in Tim violence and upset them as you come on down to heart rate and respiratory rates receipt, increases there. So now they're comes Connex t comes by congress mile fifty will there comes a variety of musculoskeletal aches and pains that are downstream from where the really the problem is. And so, and then after that comes the whole low stomach acid decreased twelve absorption decays calcium absorption in. I got. Tonight at the leaky gut, it'll bell in all the way down to sexual dysfunction. So there's a mess going on. And what happens is what I would like to make sure we, we put out there's at orthopedic conditions and even neural indicate neural metabolic conditions. Follow the perception of interference slower. There's something wrong here was Howard, putting things together that sabotaging our health and then basically interfering with our day to day life. So sometimes typewriter doesn't want to go to work. Right. And especially in the Seamount, who is an entrepreneur, maybe a wife a mother of righty of hacks, also out the day because GB middle C impatience, but she still got her kids undermined as well or some run non so she's gonna be in a good, good place for the good support structure at a good set of office. When I call office assistances source systems have to be there because as we all know, the more your systems are in place, the easier, it is to go and do what you do best. But if your systems are flawed been you're kind of all over the place and I see Dr struggling with what their exam looks five is not any clicker orders kind of all over the place when they're done. And not really sure what the diagnosis is sleep like example, they haven't, they kind of make something up over here, and then they've got the care plan. It goes with whatever it is, like just stop. Slate and going top down order never fails, you know. And so, I think that's the key to a lot of this, because when a female for example, we know between males and females. Females ten have a little bit less muscle mass, and with regard to the strength of neck emails tend to be a little now they don't have to be, there's some very strong six emails out there. So we have to be real careful today in please. Anyone listen to this. I'm not being sexist not being soberness. You're buying this is just some things that we know but for the most part, he most tend to have a bit lower muscle mass if you will. And so that denote chance to internalize her stress, while the male externalize. So what that means is that between the two of us you, and I is we're not likely have attack a cardio, but brandy would be more likely to. So she may be more like suffer hyperventilation syndrome. It's you will attack cardia just of Ryan those things and. Against emails oftentimes even more wear. That's they're starting to just hype lateness like we'll tell you having a panic attack, and it just kind of gets worse and so forth in what that does it straits net right out in now. That's a mess as when the F C N the scaling start to be recruited for the increase in respiration increasing cardiac rate, it basically, reverses the circle or doses wing basic CPR in those imports drone are all g two thousand thirteen was all about it. We had a great article came out last month on pre imposed changes in the brain following restoration circle curve. So a lot of good stuff is going on with the idea that when you got a straight neck, your brain's not on simple enough, and the part of the brain is most affected is the Partha rely to trust and believe in others, the most. So go the door allow prefrontal cortex new orbital. Prefrontal cortex, does it all the brain allows look at each other and go off? You are safe. You are comforting to me. I can put my guard down can listen to you. I can receive. Of what you're trying to share with me as opposed to being in a whole less brain. Calculation business oriented were now you don't really see unless it makes sense. You already in what we know after about thirty years studies from dash Nagin so forth. Is that your left brain's Aligarh unless you left range, trying did you all excuses for why your world doesn't work sometimes not? He's not a break down and go, hey, you know what, what I'm doing sucks. So I need to get a coach I need to get in mid twentieth. Someone else who says, hey, their model works. It's a fishing, I can reproduce it in. I get back where need to be a lot of people. Their pride in pride is very much less. Cited just creates messing things. So I think what people are missing are needing. And of course, you know, such a tender topic nowadays. Will help look for that jury in their social network and social supporter, and not having that -ccomplish out on island by yourself that doesn't help. So I just in my own the people need that network that social grouping, and you guys do such a wonderful job with your personalities that getting people in, in, like circles of can be safe. And then they're more open to learning. When you did the station is all in the doctor, if you will it's anxious at struggling, then you gotta come back angle. Hey, you know what? Let's work on your breeding. Let's push into study glasses to see things in a little bit different lenses if you will. Let's get you adjusted. Let's get those ribs adjusted. Let's ahead and at digestive enzymes issued back on track, where you need to be switched on some liquid high-powered smoothies, once or twice a day to kind of get things going again, where you need to be because you've got to kind of triage, a situation normally likes to, hey, let's put you on a long life care program, but sometimes they're such temporal mode. So wound up, sympathetically, you gotta do some acute, restorative processes to get them where they can actually hear you. Yeah. To when I think for the Email a lot, a lot of the females that we worked with AP have, they have a level of, of disconnection. It's I was just having this conversation actually with. Mill contractor who's Freeman. She's do here in the next couple of months, and I gotta shout it to genome for teaching me this, I remember genome, saying at a seminar that the more disconnected the female is from her pregnancy. The more disconnected she is from people and his female chiropractor was talking about just her inability in practice to connect anymore. And at although although male cartridge want that we share those words will often from female power factor. There's a level of there's a level of connection that is often actually sometimes the barrier as to why they don't have the systems. So in their mind, they will have all of these really dedicated systems that are like one two, three four eight takes away from my connection versus the opposite. Because if you'll have to think about it, you, then do the things that male or female chiropractors, I think, is where the brilliance lies. You can't observe healing, when you are in your temporal lobe. Oh, so you can't observe for somebody else, the results of chiropractor, because you're too busy trying to think about something that's not real or something that's not happening. So you're never really outside of yourself. And I think that, that's a huge like what you're talking about addiction, the house or decline. Somebody starts to become so internally motivated, so ego Centric is the brain was Mexican dot childlike behavior of it's all about me. I don't actually see anybody else because they're just trying to survive. And I think that we see that so much long before people are ill have subjective of illness, or disease, like it's in that really stage where you're tired, you're not motivate it, they're getting sketchy with their kids. They're getting kinda low tolerance with their spouses. Their staff through kinda, you know, I always say like they're, they're kind of the bitch on wheels were there or the opposite. They're actually like shutdown frozen like knock nauseous blank. This aren't highs. And so, I think beyond beyond Carolina, people, I think are under care, but I will last time that they actually had a full evaluation with somebody that said, I don't think that's enough care. Can you to do other things like advice was to check weekly? They've been checked weekly for like the life of their chiropractic experience and their health and their spine is basically on a school believed. Downhill until now. It's severe agree in, you know what you're saying. There is perfect, because I don't think many doctors subject themselves examination that there would give their patients. And there's a lot of doctors have wreck next if there's a lot of doctors who have no best expansion, and, and just kind of us on down a lot of doctors chiropractors that are taking antidepressants in taking. Acid reflux medications in having sleep avenue. And so. No every five or so we gotta make sure that we don't get caught up in, and I use the term treatment versus chair. A lot of people on treatment plans, when they need care plans, but the doctrines staff, also need to be on care plan. And we need those markers in so on tests, it would might teach doctors to do for their patients. We need to also have walkers, will, I, I just remember the one time that we had it was just one of these times. You're at us. We had you up there when we did your series in Edmonton. And I think it was either it was like. Zeidler middle Myers or else, it was Martinez Luxembourg around for everybody. Keep ARC's every single podcast episode. So I'm I'm totally desensitized to enough. But I think it was marching it was we were just having everybody marching, you had everybody stand up in March, and I was standing up at the front of the last few, and it was like it was like insane light probably half of the chiropractor. Could not off all, yeah. It's bizarre. It was like so crazy. But I think what happens one thing, not today and his team out in a narrow science news may twenty third two thousand nineteen. Last week. When I think happens is ranked out that we get in our own head with most early will documents that what we. Brain, we tend to give up, our friends and family. Yes, we are exercise, and we give up our diet, very me. Why right? Brain allows to be creative. And to be calm within the storm and be composed. In actually be able to receive create us Jeff Sessions that can indicate on linear in Africa nation and so note, what this was showing that, that basically exercise Trump's medication for depression. We're not a big surprise for most of us that are in the know. But it just shows you that the chiropractor specially needs to have, you know, their exercise program, but what we need to think about today is, we need to bring in the measuring of Arabic sickness. His luckily plan exercising. But I don't know if they're exercising is having a therapeutic benefit, and so a world, you'll hear things about bagel tone, you'll hear heart rate, very Billiere variety of things, and they flush talk about this all the time. Okay now. What? Right. Best ways of activating your bagel tone. I write brains is your social network, injure Arabic exercise. That's the thing that we tend to give up the most when we are stressed or at least under perceived stress. And so, you know, we take the whole March in place tests, and add to minister that you can make it to Cambridge walking tests. And so the idea is you can March in place for two minutes. Men, take your heart rate in the measure again. One minute in two minutes later and get a good idea what someone's bagel tone is because you're aerobic fitness, is your beta tone so instead of having people gargling and scrape your time with toothbrush and so forth. There's a whole lot better ways that we need to be leading. I'm going to be doing a seminar up in your way on Friday and before the seminar, ever and goes out for forty minute run. So the twin Clement's back, just don't start the whole process of install. The doctors that are doing so by to lay the groundwork for if you get out and exercise. It's like an uptick in brain activation, particularly on the right side, because we know what the right side, brains involved with posture sort of Lor doses. Respiration cardiac function, so forth. So gay into our lives. Again, is a good deal and just even bring in, like the, the wall sit test for quite endurance. A lot of doctors bombed that test, yet business owes it were not any any don't train to do the wall set tests by doing the wall set exercise. Better wall set by increasing your aerobic activity, going for Ron doing some box jumps doing, you know a or whatever to increase your health in doing that you increase the nerve signals if you will from your lower extremities from your spine, that drive, very powerfully, the right frontal lobe, which gives us left frontal temporal in habituation in, in allows for to get out at wind up mode, in the temporal lobe now start winding up the frontal lobe, and that's the long term health and prosperity, right? It's interesting because if you if we take some of the car factory work within by the time we've got them, they are in that degree of. I would say adrenal fatigue Wiggins. Even they're not already there sooner. So tired, they can barely drag their bodies to work, and then went to go your families or caring for and if I'm talking about the moms right now. And they've got to organize all of their time. They just they won't they don't feel and they won't get out and do a twenty minute ride. So from that perspective, if you take a look at that level of on enormou- dysfunction where now we've actually bought some severe decline in their, their ability to get up and go, what would you recommend for those, those emails, I those females. Here's, here's one had a whole fun with. Right. Because you're right. When someone's tired and down. They're not motivated that the actor right? So what I've been doing now with past couple of years, it was held Virk test. And one, a lot of people realize that one I go is low stomach acid and southeastern how to take a court. Teaspoon of baking soda. And what about six ounces of water and before when they first more before they brush their teeth to anything else is slowly drinking, and what should happen. They should earth on these eighty percent of my emails, never have stomachache, which means it can absorb b twelve so there's unsually anemic make my Andrea, so until we bring up their stomach acid. It's a no go. Sonic acid. We now we can bring in Bucci if we want to bring an apple cider vinegar twice a day. Now we have Ryan ways to start increasing somac- acids improve their schwarzen-. His it's east patient start taking a lot of supplements. Unswerving. Announcement, a whole on money goal in nothing's happening. All do that test at the very beginning also have low thyroid as under dribbles stress. You basically turn off the lot of places in sewing. Silence function. What I'll do is. I'll do an item. Patch test is very simple L go into space bed. She let them take home with a lot of times at iodine patches. Don within two hours, should still be there. Twenty four hours later, I can bring in marriage time rating, your digestive enzymes. Now's the time to rain in your apple cider vinegar on the way we might for many foods wants to improve your stomach acid. Now also taking the scent gyn, nice started kind of taking care of the gut taking care of the stomach midnight go through prefer to do the adrenal stress test, not sexy, whether deals are is in some Haitians, if that have drilled soften got Bill them back now, so empathetic some chanels are, are urban, if you will, and they're taking things you're calm there drills. When already exhausted, L afflicted autoimmune profile, and nature are. Of headed towards auto or files. Or in the background. So Brian, what you're saying? It's good. So with love are females. Start with that's we wanna come into our super green like with drink though, we call our brain based movie so sorry that morning start went night as well. It can still e- throughout the day. But at least they're super nutrients, again, warning evening ringing their no. Add raised a lot of people in a variety of things, and they have salad dressing use Vinograd versus the ranch or whichever just start eating better. But that'll improve their absorption use it within about ten days to reach dramatic change in their energy in their wakefulness. New state of arousal Lynn start with a very simple March in place. One minutes three times a day and start building. Then you may be your other things as it's clear improvement. But in their energy back is a big deal rival. We can't make my time. You're for energy when we're dominance. Right. I tend to say there's, there's three approach fighters adjustments what restore the curve, it was a graduated nutrition program in this case aware, quit nutrition ahead of exercise, but only so far downstream. He can't tolerate the exercise without going further into anaerobic, though will come back start working on the adjustments. She restore the curve. Address you impulsive nutrients that got back where it needs to be done. Very graduated, like hall, daily active progressive resistance exercise program bring them back around. And of course Howard is in adrenal exhaust got bland was to build them back out. It's there, you know, adrenals high. We've got a time calm down. We, we can't really dress the dreams without addressing fires. Well. So there's just a little loop, there helps bring of conflicts. Kyw priced out of the fog, as you will. And of course, what they end up lanes to restore their health do for their patients now one beats the other in conference improves when they see Keynes's into whole pass it on someone else, here's what I did. Right. But a lot of doctors haven't done their own drills while doctors haven't done some of their own tests. Great ways. Twenty because like you always talk about how important it is for exercise. We'll get to the man here in a second by was telling everybody will the story of how you said, if he has a guy we don't work out week. We turn to a woman like we basically default women and that was the motivation. I needed to work out item workout with weights ever since. It's been good. Good. But I have some of our male patients. So that's what you say, totally intrude into, where's your man boobs in all this? So you're going to devote. Memberships? Yeah, that's it. I'm gonna work out. So I'm like, whatever actually works for them, but it was funny because I have a hard time running just because I tore up the cartilage. His recently started doing spin class to do spin class to get that get that good shot at getting moving in your up and down and move around, and they do upper body stuff too, and it's funny because since I did I loved it. And then what we did is we rented out the spin class, and then we had our whole office come. We did office been placid end. We had forty people there at the spin class, only five people had spun before and is really cool. Because when you do suffer yourself, you start to do suffered practice members and then since that time, they about six or seven people continue spinning and one guy has lost thirty pounds. We just do that in arch, and he's like turning around, and we're doing another spins last coming up. You're right away. So yeah, they'll just example of doing something for yourself what you wanna do for your for your practice. I think that's why I asked that because the biggest thing especially before we move onto the mail chiropractor with timing. I think of all of these Yawovi Nells we. Work with young children. And the biggest barrier in their mind is they don't have the time. So like, often what we'll do is, we'll have these female chiropractors do a time study. She'll I just wonder like, where's your time, going part of it is like because everything's so internalized? They don't actually have an extra byu of the reality of what is actually going on. And plus, when you're fatigued, it seems like kind of walk from wires and almost feels like you. It's even worse than it is. You don't have that energy. Anyway in so you don't they'll do a time study at almost one hundred percent of the time in all of these tire rashes we've worked with if done their week time study, and there's just massive gaps of time, what she did her solving young kids, so is buried their practice their dislike their responses always been one hundred percent of the time. Now, I've said this to I don't do anything. So that is suggestions. Would you feel that only got don't have time to do? All this is actually bought a lot of stock to start to rebuild is actually berry. It's actually time orientated it doesn't take a lot of time. It just takes you to look at your time differently. And the only way you differently is not real awareness of how you're currently using your time, and it just find that there's actually quite a bit of time and is just goes into the abyss of nothingness. And until you actually all out and actually look at it, most people can't bit tables, if a baby steps to reward as because it doesn't take much. Really? Yes, that's does what basis perspective and I think, for a lot of the a lot of the young families one of the challenges that they, they, they want the practice to grow, but they don't have the energy to do it. So we've found that most of our time, working with people. We're not even talking to practice anymore. You don't have the. The energy in the engine to get the vehicle moving. It's impossible to make sustainable changing factors is your, the level of, of care that we practicing is not a piecemeal. Everybody gets the same deal. It requires you to have such a level of consciousness, in wariness of each individual person that comes to see you. You need a lot of energy in the engine to do that in full-time practice, and sorta to even have that you've it, you gotta have outside the practice. Like you're not gonna find it within the process. So I think that those ideas are just still simple. And like, I mean knowing what we know didn't so adrenal work as you lever went on destroyed money. A lot is it's, it's a long term is a marathon, but it's not a ton of time, so meeting every day, all the time I time, but it's going to be patient, because you brought them out for fifteen or twenty years. You can't expect that rebound to happen is like a month. It's gonna probably be a here three years, depending on. Very Lauren that, and that degree of, of Adrain over out. So, so the voice cycle Ben. On say to, to get to man is all what Dom, which are saying is that because there's as were busted out that he had spin. But that's what's important right there from perspective, is that. Summa early about trust is actually had, you know that you need to be after. So just because you can't run doesn't need tambi active railway over about the, the male brain is onto our systems theory is you say okay, what else can I do is swimming could chosen not offer tragedy? You wanted to third chosen spending. But now you listen he will I can't say, I can't be active. I'd see define a different thing. You that works for me and that's what a skies do so well on wants to get the right perspectives ranks talking about his. No just falling Olympics in you. Fall in the eight hundred meter runner the other day, that as a girl, he trained so hard and so strong that her testosterone levels rachi through the roof nowadays. He put rules in that your testosterone as female is a certain level, and you need to have to take drugs to lower your testosterone. When you can't compete. Wow. And so that's one of the things we're really dealing with. And I've been teaching know for years, I have never. Gets prophecy with you. It's like one. Rain hard. You're gonna raise just auction, whether you're male female, and if you're gonna lower testosterone, it's simple enough until nearly one is a lady affects no breath in don't wanna male with no pets and breasts. But that's no irrespective of male female knots about what your lifestyle is like, what your activists life in some people, a lot accused of decision about theme as a lot of emails at our training, but not really getting health benefits because they're so stressed on the other side of the coin icy males that also aren't training. Well, in remains the male needs those air robotic, and anaerobic. Donates, particularly Arab whole scenario is the female anaerobic sleet is an elected, if he will. But she requires Arabic, especially in a group typesetting, because then she flourishes, socially, the male often split, Rick, would the male can go off gopher run the mail doesn't exactly require a social in the workout, but male requires both Arabic and anaerobic exercise, which is what's kinda cool about the trend right now. Tell time spending so forth that eating really kind of wrap it up in so good things. But what has happened is the male chiropractor needs to subject themselves to a sickness test in. Here's what kind of experience have been talking about this for past couple of years. Is that I think chiropractors should do fiscal Zams? So in here's what they had been been kind of speaking about, is that most of our patients approximately go to medical entre once a year. For a physical which agree. And they get a chemical evaluation. Chemical value, some physical exam is that he doesn't get the lab work on than here's the medications. But what if the chiropractor became the model, what that physical exam should look like beyond benchmarked for all types of, you know, the wall sit or the box John for the one mile Walker playing or push ups. We have benchmarks for those with the chiropractor should lead the way in what the fiscal Zand should be like, because it'd be nice. I mean we can ask ourselves. I've never been to a chiropractor who put me through physical regimen at all. How do I know what my workouts are working mail, you and I both know as a male, we know our numbers at the office. We know our patients were very linear in everything in our life. But no one has said, hey Don, you should do forty five push ups straight. You might go okay, but if no one ever asked you to do it or you don't know, don't know. Right. And so this is what a sky. Guys need to do, especially the chiropractors need to be more aware, what physical fitness actually is if we surveyed EV all the chiropractor, and said, hey, as physical, fitness important, it by say. Yeah. The krill if it's important, it would be in your practice. Wouldn't it? And also, you get real quiet. So the chiropractor needs a physical, fitness and strength measure. Because otherwise if you and I are designed to exercise for strength and endurance in who's holding us accountable. And so you got a lot of out there now having testosterone pellets putting their gluts in a variety of things, but they still got tone of a Donut. Totally. It's true. At also, you know, we see a lot of so, you know, don't send hate mail. We are generally speaking about men and women. We are not talking twenty rule. You're not talking individually about men or women because many going gonna send a hate mail that saw my experience. We're well aware. We are talking generalities because cast, and that's always can do on a punt chest, but a lot of the bills we worked with love, milk approaches, we worked with not only have that low that low tone 'cause they don't exercise anyone. They don't have any lean muscle mass. They actually like dramatically hurt themselves. So when L A doubt they have torn shoulders torn rotator costs like blow their little back blown a rudder bull calves Zo liquid gets it tends to be not that again, not the female archers haven't physically hurt themselves south, but we find they tend to be more in that like you said that we're auto immune. Road. And we actually found the milk are actors on a lot of our friends of how life physical injuries when adjusting his cortisol breaks down your tendons, ligaments, and so the male who doesn't exercise but is under stress. Whereas all is damaging to your joints, your legaments two capsules to your tenants, so geyser profoundly more likely to have orthopedic conditions in the nothing about that. Do we Dr dawn? What, what you talking about is talk. Oh I hurt myself adjusting, like no, you didn't hurt yourself. A judging you hurt yourself when you're stressed out and not working out. Good reframe for everyone. Like the big accident comes as they hurt their neck. Because he's talked on the pillow raw. No, no. He didn't it wasn't the Bill. So it's actually the exact same refrigerant good us next time by Dr air pressure is not working out and really not taking care of themselves at all. And then their strikes in there. They end again, male or female, the stories today. High rate fatigue time internalizing though, perspective. It's, it's the same story just manifests itself somewhat differently in the war guy gets out of exercising more temple, he becomes the more exclusive he has not give back into it in the mail version of drill, fatigue, or exhaustion is low testosterone. Right. It'll out our primary way for Don. I out of it is to basically sort exercise in promotes the males. Whereas the females, we might put on super nutrition, most, the males actually needed to start exercising. Are exercising again, aerobically on graduate scale will tend to start eating better as resulted the pride in their workouts. Let also I think your results, right. Because I stopped that results orientated. They see that we'd have a bit of a difficult conversation with a really good friend of ours, who that has happened to a couple of friends of ours who ended up getting like quit severe like hernia. And like did not, we'll be get randomly nobody's random hurting, but he gets an idiopathic hernia Mike, that you can't even you can't even subscribe to our philosophy and then say that came out of nowhere like it doesn't work that way on TV. Splitting the bible speaks, like it's just it's missing. Ms was that after dinner. So I wanted to do this, the chiropractors because you'd never say that to practice even oath at. So we're not why that happened. But if it's up to us, when it's so weird. I don't know why that happened. But from the extra you can see exactly why it happens to somebody who doesn't take your it's a male Ebola males. We know Joe take care of themselves. They work L, but like you said, are, there were sufficient and actually doing what they're supposed to date? My guess would be no with no one's measured them. Right now in fairness, MRs is difficult, especially with the higher volume practices. Right. Is your notions? Especially doing some side offered. You gotta have some, some good owed leaks. You gotta have some bit adds. He should have a good core. And not in somewhere down line. You're going to have a problem. I choose us analogy tons of time to when you when you work in a high volume practice for awhile, you're basically professional athlete, because not only do you have to be physically on and physically there. But you have to be mentally sharp and you have to connect to people all at the same time. And it's not like you can take a break when they're in front of you. You're on lake twenty four seven so it's like it's like a it's almost like a double intense amount of energy that yet, used not only physically, but also with your mind. Here's, here's something I've been working on for the law. Now, you guys see how you think it is to our listeners is at eighteen zero hockey player, you would train to be what lucky hockey, if you want to run a marathon, he would train runnin marathon play basketball you train in. So when we take care of the hockey player our goal usually is to get them back to playing hockey. Right. I asked you, if you're going to be a chiropractor. How do you train to be a chiropractor special chiropractic training program? Insane tape won't be a staff in the office. You need to have an exercise program that prepares you not have the possible false afford head off show, shoulders, and so forth. So as chiropractors renewed put together a program. Ourselves. Oh, as otherwise, especially the male chiropractor doesn't know where he's going it works. Okay. I go to gym I show up now art. Yeah. If I'm sixty years old should I have a two hundred fifty pound bench or not should I be able to run a seven thirty mile or not nowhere to I'm gonna go work out. Otherwise, I'm just gonna show up the treadmill and ramp it up and watch sports center. We're going to tell you that they worked out or one guy wants you were. He were killed for forty five minutes. You just stretched and then left. Yeah. You're out man, especially as at man who don't work out or don't have an athletic background. And to just kind of show up and do what they see doing or they'll go join class and kind of folly, but they don't really know where they want to go going by brand new kind of started off is that if we don't know where we're going been were anxious yet is now I, I work out, but I still have high blood pressure workout that my prostate the size of cantaloupe. I work out at my testosterone levels are low. I don't understand now. I'm frustrated now you know sleep apnea. I've got a variety of issues. And that's when we, we, we need a guide them in so chiropractors need to have carpet need to have a training program that prepares them to be a great chiropractor. So you can't see five hundred week in have a post your dealt. I know don't know you're gonna blow out into your couch. We see it, right? Those, but I don't think we've been asking ourselves these questions as chiropractors because now when people, you know, we'll ask what you do. How do you train to like trained to be a chiropractor? Oh, what does that look like say, we'll hear the ten things I do. Here's the ten metrics that I go through. And so, in just like if you have, you know, a staff person desists the front desk. All right. She doesn't need to do a lot of Adwork's, Newsday more oblique work. She also needs to do more post your shoulder and extender in works. She needs an exercise program to address in target bows, areas as long as our head, or doesn't really matter if we put on traction device, get just if she goes right back to the desk consists. Down for ten on her chest. Not make progress what we know from a brain perspective, is that the term neuro plasticity means that if we're going to remove a subway station, so a joint can move, and they're gonna have to have a program in which they are moving in what, what we've noticed in today's world as chiropractors in this, everything's begun more paperwork, orange and so forth were not getting the activity that we need. We gain more stress. Well the window to stress is activities. And so it's like having your spin class activity in social group is a home run. But again, people are looking for, you know, you see people on a lot of coverage. Now trying out, you know, weight loss in their office like. Okay, so now you dropped thirty pounds and what happened. Did you push go up? Is your bench better digitize, Josh horrible outrages loosen white? Because this your drills or thyroid or any healthier, you know, what's amazing to me with some of those before, and after pictures that I see adults than hate mail of this is you. But I just want you to look at some of the pictures, I notice that the before, and after pictures what, what actually what I notice is how much more significant I can see their flex. Dull moment, posher when they have lost thirty pounds about on was like obviously, it was like that before, but now they have no not an end. You can see how like their postures are toward shifts in those attributes that might be slimmer. But you could tell their brains are dying from the inside out like it just it that is the one thing I really actually noticed those weather being done in a car by Dukakis because they're just looking for something in it again like you said, because who's leading them in their mind that seems like the right thing to do people can drop pretty quickly, it will be healthier for them. But that that is a little bit like. Let's get some symptom real quick. But is that really what the issue is? Here's what it also does in any given. I'll reiterate, nice don't seem hate mail. We're, we're saying that loss of this. The same. Is that if someone distracts thirty pounds that doesn't mean healthier, right? But now they're motivated to be lose more weight. Now you're just driving temporal vanity. I mean there's there's, there's reason why the phrases that happy. Not thin grim. Right. Yeah. Way. But they only look at sells more in the mirror, and which they're still serving others, not driving. Prefrontal cortex. And they haven't removed the barrier that got him there in the first place. And so this is where we get into the yoyos and so forth. Misses a difficult because it does bring out the Ford had Pasha the tethered cord that you're going continents in what happens is something breaks down in also they put fifty pounds back on. Yeah. Can't active. Well, a lot of these diet. Things are out there right now are just take these pills, extras at all. Like. Like. So you need to be I you would be where you're at. Because if you just take the pills lose the weight, you haven't changed your perspective of how you view life. This is particularly a bigger deal with male chiropractors. And again, you're the hate mail, because the weight loss program a revenue stream. So now we can make more money. But we haven't changed their lives. Right. Made money off of their weight loss gonna put back on him. Three to five years, and read the studies journal nutrition, mostly people put on the exact amount of weight or more within two to three years. So you know overall it's, you know it's, it's the diet approach isn't winning. It's about lifestyle change. It's about perspectives about, you know, a lot of people are putting on the way or not exercising, or stressed out because there's something in the world that they're not trusting. They're not trusting their relationships, not trust in their practice procedures, and it creates fear in that drives him back into temporal over the anxiety pathetic. You can't you can't maintain your metabolism matter. There's where the mess comes from in. So as we as we begin to change their lives in bring them back in his brand new sets allow giving them things that can get them confidence, and things that they can understand in process, and then do, and then typewriters need to hold themselves accountable for the same things. And then then you gotta home run because just like in your practice you did stand, and you got excited about it. And now your office is that went to the staff to the patients and I it's. Near the things that I do the same things I show, my patients has no, what you do for exercise. Wanna know what you eat. They wanna know what you know what you do. And that's. Exactly. All right. Well. No, no, no. I, I see that time, by the way make yourself what you just said. Michael Lebel bull Sex's. He's, I think that like, because a lot of our work is, is done with the way that people think it's always, I I'm always thinking I'm always thinking chicken rage, h Greg, and so I don't really know what you was Wednesday. But I do know that the way that people perceive, their world changes the biochemistry of the brain and the body interferes Yala Judy. And then vice versa. So then they ended up getting into this awful maladaptive sort of cycle of sinking behaving and thinking of behaving, and unless there is a control delete in that are why we spent so much time on the adjustment because I control all delete in that moment, if he's sort of is bright missed to the brain for a second. But then we always talk about sustained dis in our office, which is more than that immediate es in that sustained these really is a matter, what people do when they leave you and it goes moves you away from. For both sexes in per project. We're not gonna fix. That's why. I'll make you lose weight. And I'll fix this, then I'll cure this, and I'll just doesn't work because from people's perspectives, they have to be able to tap into their own potential and their own ability to do the work. And there is steamed then comes from not like you said temporal Batty, but it comes from actually doing the work and doing it often knocking repeating at wall enough, where they start to become proud of themselves or actually, I count holes through on things than I do find that is really for chiropractor, male or female, both in their health journey, but also new practice success, the only way it sustainable that nobody's gonna give you that. And so, I think that, that is that's a really important point that I just wanted to drive home for his up on March, just to follow on that is that just recently in brain research. There was a paper done that people who actually claim their own house, were happier. Yeah. Yeah. Or were happy enough, their own as they could take your self esteem. That's exactly what you're on was improved. Wednesday Jinping sells the fried fish. This last or changing fishing when you see it, you do it yourself. It makes a difference totally. All right. Well own. Thank you guys for being on the HUD, girth podcast for breaking the underdog. Cursor chiropractors. Thank you very much. I just last couple of minutes last couple minutes here. Brian got new Harding words of wisdom. Impressive press did it in the time. Because I that's impressive that we could we. You off. That's true. Well, I mean, this could be like a fifty an hour program, right? I mean it's to try and get it all into two hours. It's talk. What I, I think, for me just key is sort of what, what we've been doing. And I think what we learn from you like, is that, you know, somebody's life is a result of their habits their behaviors of end. Those all come from the way they think, and until somebody really has the ability to change the way. They think those habits some behavioral changes favorably. I think for us, if we can start to do some of the work ourselves, we then have an expectation for people that is realistic right now. I think we expect our people do stuff that we don't do, and that's unfair as grew it, and it list frustrating practice, and we start to judge people yet were doing what we need to do. So I think it's really the health of a practice really helps from the health of a character, and I don't not just physically. I mean emotionally spiritually relationship in parenting and not just can't. Translated the practice. So I think that is like you said, a training program for chiropractors to me is not just physically by just hallway are as people showing up every day and caring for other people is so like we do podcast, point castle. Not. So I, I'm glad that we had chance to talk much. They like little words of wisdom for all the underdog nation out there. What next say Don is that, you know, you in Brian, these podcasts, obviously showing the downloads, but you want, if you're listening to this podcast, there needs to be twenty thousand downloads in a word share with all your colleagues, because what's being taught here is is truth. And this is a great time to be a typewriter in what we're coming into the neurology support that we need is, is how we think, is how we learn is how we live and that translates into your practice in so this is this is a good conversational topic for so many people. So if anyone's listen, just no shoot. There sounds of ten fifteen other people in, we need to put this professional on fire. Though, humbled against always to be involved with both you guys like you guys in quite a journey quite ride. So. Mike also just give your your content for your website so that people can find out where you're speaking around the world, because we have people listening all over the place. So if you give your contact info absolutely website is rain, DC dot org, and you can reach me acohol at Randy's dot org reteach program called unction Raji for practicing tire factor. And in timing tag team. So go, there check it out where all of the US in Europe and Australia. So empty and police said, all hate mail to doctor, Michael hall. Just let us put an envelope and set. Ross is he was mentor at the beginning. So that's his fault. Right. So. Okay. Well, thank you so much for being on gas. A everybody'll dare I won't be shuttled tell you guys because you've been listening to this podcast. I think we're up to like two hundred sixty thousand dollars as since we started overall, and we've been reaching a lot of people and our whole goal is to help you rush the purse, thank you for listening to the podcast. If you're see value from this episode, please take some time to rate and review us on, I tunes, or your favorite place to listen to podcasts, if you know, a fellow chiropractor that could benefit from this message, please shirt with them because it's my goal to provide you with great content. Please contact me if you have any questions at after dawn, McDonald dot com, or find me on Facebook. I look forward to hearing from you so until next time, Dr Donald.

testosterone anxiety Brian brandy Hata Don temporal lobe Dr Mike byu Ryan Howard Michael hockey Michael hall office manager Dr dawn McDonald Michael hall Bill Reiter
108. Jameela Jamil | Part 1

Homo Sapiens

33:59 min | Last week

108. Jameela Jamil | Part 1

"Alan please take a seat on my mississippians couch. I'm here and fluffing the cushion right next to you in the virtual cushion very excited devote. Today's interview christopher. I love jamila mill british actress but also activist so many things activists reiter and she was a t. four host in the uk which is a kind of it was like a music show in the uk music. Tv show on channel four. But you and she has sort of. Reinvented herself in. La as this kind of amazing activist who has set up within. Could i way which is a brilliant instagram account. But is kind of. I'm going to say movement About trying to reclaim some of the kind of rubbish ideas. The ramdan women's throats by mainstream media especially for young girls and also she you know in terms of she went to america to have a change. wanted to do some writing and immediately offered a part in this sub sitcom that ran for years called the good place. Good place good place and so that many people. I'm sure we'll know her from that. Mostly she's that wasn't total accident. I love people whose lives were completely the opposite direction and she fascinating i think and also i think what was great about this interview that she talked openly and candidly about some of the kind of altercations that she had with the press recently and perhaps one a very fear but the fact that she's proud she had mishandled the whole situation when she talked being queer and the timing of that. So it's really interesting. I i love when we get into it with someone on the feel confident and open enough to just really not be guarded by sense of things and this is what what made this such a great show for me. I agree and i'm one of the things that she says which is a breath of fresh air is the she started her own. Iway podcast for example is so that she could learn with her listeners. Because there's a lot of unchartered waters at the moment of people learning about huge things like systemic racism or learning about huge things like beyond the gender binary and we're learning and we're trying to get it right and we're going to get it wrong and that's a and she says you know i'm gonna make mistakes and i think people without hea level of humility taly just my favorites tires. And she knows she. She's such a nice. I mean just a charmer and always and also headiest as well. Health is so. Let's hear it for jamila. Jameel how come you have a microphone. Futuristic says stuck inside my look at the technology you'll like star trek. Yeah exactly like star trek. Who i actually met the lady who was a huda in one of those comic things was a hobart next to me. Chewbacca was there a huda was there is this crazy and it was. it was literally shopping mall in milton. Keynes had some great. dj and milton. Keynes keynes on it. Yeah they have like custody. Young farmers bull that dj beyond films. I think i'm not sure if that was the i'm chrissie. Show at least one of his gigs. Six thousand people would dress as wally. Wells will lovers waldo. As i could see was teenagers. Who couldn't find each other. Everyone was lost zayat going back to the foam is bull. What was that. The young farmers beyond is bull. So they don't get empathize a thanks huge and it was somewhat was between six and ten thousand people and it was this massive event on its because get the saturdays and sundays because that out fine unsettling so that we can eat breakfast and so that they do these young fossils every couple of months which is kind of like that new year's eve which they finally get to go out and feel what it's lines right and so i used to. She does of accused the farmers bowls that there's a whole gay agriculture movement in the uk. Actually is there A whole subculture. I didn't think i was going to be. This is what we talk about this. Yeah i know for the mole. Where are you and what are you talking to us from heli. I'm in had. I not los angeles i. It makes me about breath. I know that no no. It doesn't actually. I was listening to something. You'd said i really sort of understood what you meant when you said about how the madness or the kind of chaos of london when you go to la the there's this this sort of i mean it's crazy and chaotic. But it's calm now. You can have a calm life. There is impossible to have. I think in cities in los angeles Spread out and everyone's to to seek out madness whereas or new york is thrust on your off and so says he's got someone's in Face and then you live in an apartment way. you don't get much. Oh what pain for or it's just like. It's a stressful very fun and exhilarating but restrepo culture. And i think that because of that you can mesa things that are making you feel like shit because you are able to blame your external roundup whereas los angeles because everything's like saami the foods amazing your space. Money goes much further hand when it comes to property or whatever the. I didn't have anything to blame my sadness. Some to confronts all of my initiatives. Which i thought was gray. Well you said to. You went there. Honest side hanover. A sadness steph much better. But i don therapy for got here. I was definitely still a bit sad and also united. Sloan is not pedestrian. You don't walk around and and seeping into friends. You'd have to really make a definitive laugh. You don't know when you yes. Why were you said when you said you hang up of side. And what was the sadness from. I've suffered with mental health issues my whole life and i think i kind of hit the epicenter of a When i was about twenty six i had a novice breakdown and still therapy for two years just to try to fix my knife out myself practically fast classic stupid british shang around getting will medication etc statements. And so i was like no. I'm going to do this practically not as hugely effective. I made loads of massive changes in my life. I kind of went describes the function detox. Where i just got rid of the fuck shit from people things and stick through that move making us instead of confronting electoral. But i did it without help on. I didn't really stop to get help in about two months before So i was still kind of you know when you have therapy. It's hugely helpful. But it was brings up to the surface. And so i so i think i brought some of that debris with me in my luggage to los angeles but it was great. Because i've known it was when you have a plane lines to look across in like when everything is smooth sailing it really makes it easy to identify will source of pain. I'm trauma and so. Therefore i was able to recover so much with ahead than i would have somewhere else where i might feel distracted right. Yeah and i could see that and what you're doing in your life at the time when this all happened you to work and be presented to the world whilst own crumbling inside. Yeah i was so typically at the height of my career in the uk Hosted will be shows bbc broadcaster italy's clothing lines out and i was just i had become a full public property in the uk. In a way that it was becoming quite a fee and razzi which is practically sleeping outside my house so all day all night for about six months straight being incredibly violent weather. I know Sexual comments we just harassing me. And so i think you already going through your mental health issues. Famous probably one of the west. It's just fuel on the fire. Brazzi adjusts life. The the harassment. That comes with it. Just means you conquer out you cop see friends chicago wolf. He talk about exercise. Just end up saying your house. So i kind of became quite akra phobic suicide price and it was funny because on the outside it was projected that i was tina. I i did. I had some privilege but on the outside. Look i was this happy policy goal whereas insiders. i was truly dying on so i just made a big change and one of those changes included getting out of london and moving to a place where would be anonymous. Why even with my career taking off is. I'm still fatty annonymous has i. Everyone makes resolve it. No one knows if i am resolved. Jack nicholson is standing. I'll people six. He takes the heat of. Do you remember the moment when i watched your career from the very beginning in. And you know you've had many to rations and do you one thing i want to ask is. Do you remember the moment that you chose to start speaking out publicly against stuff and what galvanize you do that or d- hudson. You'd had some horrible experiences but of people don't speak out kind of to the two stages. The first stage is that he had one of my career. I was given a column in a magazine and they wanted to be a fashion column. And within one week i changed it to social commentary comment so i i'd i know anything about faction only justice gotta talk show. I come from a background. Identical nuclear is totally. Please don't try to force into alexa job. She is doing what she's doing and she does it very well. And i have a completely different person until on. So i pushed pushed pushed to be able to make this social commentary and i started opening up that so that was the first time i saw suggests thought tending all of my trees and it was received well and so i kind of built my confidence start using one of my entities. Talk about social justice The moment where became where i became diehard. That's only going to talk about was when i was twenty six in that breakdown year. I'd also i'd had pneumonia for original times. Give me loads of steroids. I gained huge amount way. But i'm sort of radio. Dj at the time so it didn't make sense to me as to. Why would be harassed. This much gaining webs. When you can't see me at my joan you know do you is is patriarchy around all society so obsessed with female thinness smallness that they just need to know on thin over the airwaves to sit safely in the knowledge. That fixed telling you thin. The problem was i remember saying to the point where on compost in my mouth any impacts. My friend meeting i told off for eating allen's experience a lot of shaming for eating on this that's have i so maybe not what it was a million to. But you're talking about this. Never speak to him because my understanding my narrative of you is that you had the find a lump in your breast someone. You're waiting for that use. Decided i'm going to move to california and that was what did it but was it is that not true. Is the nervous big. That was sort of yet cutlass. The i'd already had so. I created the list of things i want to fuck it list and i created twenty six and off. The top of that list was move to america. But i still didn't have enough to do it because i kept talking especially as women women come. You'll total the time that you have sprint. Marathon almost gonna take place catch from being definitive By my peers by everyone on you entrusted that. If i moved back were disappear. I would never find ever again. Negative visa become this a way. So being so consistently among people projecting insecurities about fantasize onto me that i just i was waiting down on it and i think there was something about finding. Were these people everyone around me. I think they came from a place of what they thought was loving. And i understand as well like if you're mentally ill. Friends are moving to american stock in a street in an industry. That is not thin as well. Yeah skinny young. In hollywood serves for you know pushing twenty pushing that and move in completely unknown. Their idea will so upset in will say easiest vice resolve agents break out. We don't have many silly countless. What has it. I do understand it but it was also just such intense fear mongering Such do around it. And so i believed that for a while but there was something about finding out that i didn't have council. I wasn't going to lose my breasts as so many women in my family have died right but you know what this is now a napa and this might come back one day. I don't want to stay here just worrying about career out of it. And so i booked my ticket six weeks to the day from the operation and Tap the removed and then that was it. I was off in a way. That was the thing that tip me over the edge. It was listening that was in the back of my not going back to never speak to speak survivor to yes nervy bi code mine. And i just brilliant cheated but was it something was about stuff that was just kind of you know societal pressure of stuff that you are finding. I wasn't from key for me. It was very much but stuff from the past. I hadn't realized hadn't processed. What was the what the ingredients of your nervous breakdown. If we can make cooking ambitions. So i had an incredibly tricky childhood Came up with nine hundred and a really. My parents are really really difficult for matic. Marriage antidote wanted further. Stack this channel on undescribed with lots of very mentally ill people lots of mexcio I would say every single member of my family was severely mentally. She's the flashy each Will bipolar schizophrenia. Will not Sedan depression anxiety. I was i was becoming kyra by the time. I was about nine years old for the battle so i just likes Drama and then bullied at school in development needs him. Soldier is my method of control and finding wealth in this world because it was the use of heroin chic. So i was just a that was just every type of abuse that i had experienced. So whether those physical emotional or sexual. It'll happen to me. And i think that you are able to buffalo it only for so long as a human being at the tradition of around in your approach to your therapies. That you stop to combine it's sunny so snowfall you can push it down and i think are phony. Pushing down with food might twenty six. The or i was just trying to keep everything down. So i could maintain this happy funny persona that i have on television on. It just imploded. As with guide to happen. It's a bit like water isn't always finds. Its way out somehow. Yeah and so. I just sort of bus with trauma and you know. I wasn't sleep properly on massively massive attribute ridiculous decisions to try and take my life to the death of so sleep deprived. I wasn't thinking straight. And and that's why i'm open about it now just to explain to people that there is a there is a beyond terrible day that terrible moment where you make this this decision that you can take back and so i beg people just a high on because things get better and they did get me. That's why used evoke lapasset. But i was just miserable. Ask nightmares. I was sleep deprived. I was famous. Unable to express myself is being so scrutinized punished for just existing as a woman in media because the media radius some crew women in a way in england in particular wave as it's remarkable. It's not even just insidious cities unplanted at the same time. I also have the stick around talking about mental health reaching out to anyone. Getting therapy going medication. So it was. It was remarkable. I survived that yet. But i'm glad i did. We're you on your own then. Yeah yeah darting says absolutely all forms of saudi. Yeah it was. It was a it was a tricky time and i'd caught my entire family off at that time outside. Truly have zero support network wasn't looking to my friends. nothing alone. Eaten roast chickens unlike full roster in my back with the world outside thinking that i was making my best life. This swanky fun loving girl about town and you didn't roast chicken with your hands and beds. That's show biz. I think if we fast forward to now and you've created this incredible community with iway and with your own like personal instagram. Whole community as well. You know the two separate things but what would you say to that person. Who's sitting in bed eating the chicken therapy guard. Don't listen to english people. I've the tariff. 'cause i would have saved myself a lot of money and a lot of trouble if i just saw it myself out way before that i mean we should be introducing the conversation around mental health and school around each electrode around consent around me. We should be. I didn't need to learn about ignace rock. I've never once had fucking ignorance. Rock can school by the tundra. I just say say so much of the fucking tonnage. I got tectonic plates. surely cabana. like why. Do i know all about that. But i don't know anything about the most important things. Mikey monitor's going to but on so just seal that at twenty six. When i was getting fat change fast Be i'm not going to lose weight. I'm not going to a trade. I'm going to stay for as long fucking light on hand to fight back and is often speaking parliament and is became incredibly dialogue. Which is what i. What's frustrating. Because i think whereabouts Jumper where i'm at now. It's so funny to me. That people think that i've only been talking about this since two years into my pau tommy. Indigo flint sticking high discovered activism. Two years ago. Whereas i've been at this was nineteen. I say now. Because i live in a fridge feels awkward. Who was accidents. May be more of an advocate activists across rates not been saying the same stuff publicly for ten years. Just people are listening. Yeah people are acting like. I've never said this before. But the acting like no one's of this before whereas in forty years but lazing advocates and activists who've been saying ownership law but we only listened to the privileged uneven Set time we don't listen to. The module is blame them for the mossurize action and then we listen to the privileged briefly Very quickly to that. While you'll privilege the universe we on this so therefore whoever gets to have this difficult conversation so true. I wanted to ask you more by your background and in terms of all these things. You talking about by stigma in various kinds how much that was compounded by going up in southern asian community massively mass of the i call men the breads like also we have so much shame around mental health and really truly the end goal of my lineage. Anyway i was just you have to go to cambridge. You have to go to cambridge auks that you have to be a reading successful doctor or wear. And that's it. And so it was every stereotype. Malvo look at least within my own experience. My people around me. So that's that was a big part of it as well. And i think you know and also i always saw the mental health issues in my family result in them. Being sectioned. members of my family being sectioned lay or having that stomachs pumped in front of abuse. So the budget. That i so so dramatic. It wasn't oh mama's side will die. Decide will many people will see a family member. Go through struggle and just go to get help fatty and they'll be cyclops in the right. I will i just saw was like a nicholas cage movie. It just full found like the inside. Good it was. It was chaos girlfriend castaways associated mental health issues with octa cancers. Actually it's quite mundane time. Yes i'd everywhere on what to buy it. What about the queer eye. So recently you said that you defined as queer not must be difficult within that the community to yes. Why didn't say anything for certain on. I was going to say anything shows truly the most inappropriate moment possible to do it Bus i am a human because of this the show that it was i could cost on his show that senses the ballroom community which is predominantly algebra to keep people off Specially back not next people answer. I was wrong to judge. Because i think the entire cost of posed was busy. Genuinely that happened the entire Pretty cool so. I i wrote originally. They needed someone who had a big enough to guarantee appetizing impresses. And so they. I think that was their inclusion decision to include to women which is myself and the rafa negative stallion because we were allies advocates. And we want to make sure. Our communities paid our margin experience. This incredible community. That paul coaches steel. So much from but never discusses you know so. No one knows about lower community. Vote the fact that everything we see in fashion aw music akyayla olivet darts calms originally from ballroom but they never get the money or recognition boss steal from them credit them doing so we have. Yeah but we have the best of intentions signing on. But i think i understand that people who are upset. The dog is offsets holding a partition. But did you feel. Did you feel you had to a reaction to people being upset that you felt. You had to be more vocal about your you find yourself sexually. I think people would just like. Why would you even care. You would just You aunt you don't care about community until you're just doing this for fame such as a wants to explain that the reason i'm doing this because my lawf- a full room full representation and for just honoring. This community comes from the fact that i've been silent. Member of this community has decreased risk into our life and i looked to them look towards them and been inspired by them. I wanted to join them in a more open way outside of just my five at sokoll but felt too afraid to because of my background. Being south. asian will is funny. 'c- 'cause it's something that we hear a lot like alan. I've spoken about a lot. Because alan identifies as bisexual for example and a lot of. I've heard people say over time. That people who identify as bisexual or pan sexual many things sometimes have said to me that they chose the easy path because if they fancy men and women and it's the straight version is too fancy women than they'll just do that because then they don't have to address other difficult things within their life. Was there any element of that for you. Know no i just i was just telling the truth I just shouldn't have done it. Then because it looks like hires trying to deflect whereas i wasn't i was just trying to explain. I wasn't trying to make the conversation now about my sexuality otas explaining that are not the slick straight pleasant tried to steal from his guests. I actually have a deep lifelong loves and and designed to make sure that we are represented and this is where the love comes from and this is something that i'm going through personally right but i guess the people who gave you the job to to know that initially they didn't they didn't come to you without knowledge. No they didn't know they kinsley criticism based on their medicine re nature. Put making the leave. Is i think. I believe she straight out. I don't think that that was something. That was reliant on that because the boreham was had a history of including states or striped. When people say amy campbell coming to like john travolta consumers history of in particular snap. He's coming in by sponsoring a bull judge. Will i think they didn't think it would be as much an issue. It wasn't reliant upon Remind on whether or not to bring non. Title also yeah. They came to off to two years making shows. So i reckon they must've gone to other people i said none because maybe they won willing to take a chance of this fucking incredible show and community. So i'm thrilled related. And it was a huge success which is really exciting on. It's been coming back for a second season. And the contestants also happy and it's i think it might be genuinely wanted. The best dot competition competitions on the time issue so it was just messy. I i did it. I did affect you like. You're talking about your mental health. And how did the effect you having all that sort of having to talk openly about something and then being kind of facing a barrage of why don't if it was criticism but what was going on on a straight relationship carney's nine fundamentalist eight dupin. Yeah that was the biggest problem. I don't mean that. I mean just like you know just basically you come out and you're come in an arena where you're being either criticized or suspect something. I just just not not for the whatever maybe even if the timing of it. I just wonder what that was like for. It's a big sort of that moment when people are who have come from backgrounds where they have been able to be open about their sexuality completely when they do it. It's supposed to be a set of attorney moment and obviously wasn't really for you was it. I mean definitely it was. I wasn't planning instead of rights read life. i didn't really clown talking about a public. Also because of the fact that i was worried that people would think regardless the undoing it's trendy brussels hadn't come out until then because i want a is afraid of my reaction of worried about whether or not community in the south asian community was worried right that would be. I hadn't shame on that but it will say by the time i'd let go of that. Shame is also becoming very public. Figure on the i was trying to wear a hat to look extra to get extra points to you. Know what. I mean like trendy to be considered by trendy to be on the cover of out magazine etcetera. I didn't want to look posing as that. So i just kept my mouth shut on a bus out of me in february Planet celebrate your in just was a snap snap dutchman pool judgment on twitter where it was and it was exactly how i felt. It was tricky. It was it was wild to see the way that people spoke about it because it was a guy who's like big or numbers of black on beneath the. He's the neighbor adviser on lgbtq issues. But he anthony something. He tweeted in hollywood and he can involve my sexuality is actually strike. Like how dare he. I think eventually off the after he was then very. I don't remember what happened. But i think he lost trouble for that. Because that's a good thing today. I think he got told off by them by flat. But imagine for gas lighting someone around that sexuality with this false to my vagina. I'm in hollywood. And i can say fact ridiculous. I can confirm china. Yeah that was it was it was it was tricky is it definitely made me. Very reserved on filming. We were filming in the middle of this guy. I became like the dog from the artists on show which league's just signed a suicide noting. Am i think that's probably the perpetuates the idea the ice of see straight resolved on this. I think it'll be better next comfortable. And i've been treated so well i members of ballroom on the show who i asked if i should leave the season. They were not by ahead so they made me feel profiting off family and i'm just on it too. I feel nothing but divide now. Yeah well. i'm sorry that happen to you and you know it's it's amazing that you did it because visibility is you know it's like it's incredible and the kids can look up and see you go. I'm like that. You know because the such a lack of visibility of quiz south asians as you will this a just incredible to see. Thank you very much. I appreciate that. And i had an amazing response from young south. Asians who read from safer kyle to me in my it was. It was very beautiful as well as just a bit. Tricky and the whole situation better up my inability to recognize up until treaty. Maybe the movement. The i have to be more catholic. High speed huddles also added to the see i mean. Maybe that's that's maybe the maybe the case in this instance. But you always seemed to me. You always seem to be thoughtful about all the things you said about speaking up for young girls and their imagery and the you know the lollipops of the flat tummy things and just the whole just the way that and even your i love that thing he said but the double patriarchy double agent. And i just think you're a very thoughtful and and yeah and you're measured in what you see and you understand what value can have when you see and and then you also don't just blab at you make organizations up and follow through so i don't think i mean if you have one doe slip think whip yourself. I know well no. I don't let myself too much. But i do also recognize that like i should have worked out earlier. I am thirty four. Like i should have worked early at when i am saying. These things or things are hugely a nuanced his historic complicated issues. Don't do it when you were confined to two hundred ninety five characters. What was i doing when i speak in a podcast or like on stage in essay i can actually convey my anti thoughts on something whereas you skim everything when you're looking for millions of people in some that can go viral so fast way devoid of context tone where they caught. Hey yo intonation the content when you will tie jake when you're not and you are woman who seeks out. There was naturally a mistrust view that dates all the way. Back to buddy. Adam eve where we put the most sinister intention behind announcement women's words in actual them you go back history. Every single woman Talks evil manipulative. Leah overly promiscuous quote unquote just stereotyping. Bitten asti. I understand the system. And i spoke on twitter an awesome well. I didn't know about you listeners. But i'm having a ball lovely time listening to this. So this is the one go to your feet and find to play and enjoy more for like four to me the.

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Orange Marmalade Torte and Winter Wellness

The Maria Liberati Show

28:59 min | Last week

Orange Marmalade Torte and Winter Wellness

"Hey listeners if you haven't heard about anchored dot fm it's the easiest way to make a podcast. Let me explain angered dot. Fm is free. There's creation tools that allow you to record. And edit your podcast right from your phone. Or computer will distribute your podcast. We're you so it can be heard on spotify apple podcasts. And many more you can make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. It's everything you need to make a podcast in one place. Download the free app or go to anger dot. Fm to get started. That's a. n. c. h. r. dot. Fm come to the marie liberati show where food meets art travel and life. And we're we answer the question. What does food mean to you. This is maria liberati in today's episode. I share a recipe for a simple yet delicious orange marmalade tour and i get to interview recipe developer and wellness. Reiter beth lipton. Join me and don't forget to tell us in a recorded sound bite of sixty seconds or less or social media post of fifty words or less. What food means to you hashtag. The burri liberati show and post on social media or email it to me at maria. Maria liberati dot com. And if your sound bite or quotes are selected to be part of an upcoming segment. I'll send an autographed copy of a book from the book series the basic ord- of italian cooking to you as a special thanks. I love having my listeners. Be part of the show so come on and join in so if you have a jar of artisan or homemade. Orange marmalade in the pantry. Here's a quick desert you know everybody's home and seems to have a lot more time at home and and always looking for simple yet delicious but yet healthy desserts. Orange marmalade is one of my favorite ingredients Things to make in the winter. And i will be doing that on. Next week's episode sharing my recipe for the blood orange marmalade. I'll be doing. It might test kitchen this coming week. If you have a jar of it on hand if you have a jar of another type of preserved fruit preserve you can also use it. I love using oranges in this time of the year because our oranges are so good for you. And that's why. I'm calling this my winter wellness episode. This makes a great evening desert to accompany a glass of per seco- or even makes a great afternoon snack to put together a quick snack or dessert into to make this even simpler. You can buy ready. Made puff pastry and this recipe makes six servings and it only has five ingredients yes and you can even serve this with fresh laces of fruit if you choose to use the orange marmalade. Orange preserves us freshly sliced oranges or another type of fruit. That might coordinate with it. Any fresh fruit rarely will do. Fresh fruit is always a good thing. Here's the recipe again. It makes six servings two sheets of puff pastry one. Twelve ounce jar of orange marmalade or preserves or another type of fruit preserve. One a joke. One tablespoon of unsalted butter a tablespoon of flour. You're going to. Preheat the oven to three hundred and seventy five degrees. I butter and flour. A- pie pan now if you don't want to butter and flour the pie pan. One of my favorite things to do is to get parchment paper and cut it to fit the size of whatever pie pan. You're using if you do that. You're not going to need to butter and flour the pan so that eliminates those two ingredients removed the puff pastry from the package. Line the bottom of the pipe pan with one sheet of puff pastry cutting off the excess sto fit spread aligarh about one eighth of an inch thick of orange marmalade setting aside two tablespoons of the marmalade or the preserves for leader. Then you're going to top that with the remaining sheet of puff pastry and seal the layers by pressing down gently with your fingertips. You can also go around the sides of the pie pan pressing down with a fork and sealing the liars fake this at three hundred seventy five degrees for thirty minutes removed from the oven. Let it cool when cooled spread the two remaining tablespoons of orange marmalade on top served with fresh fruit. And you have a simple desert. This can be gluten free. There are many gluten free substitutes. Out there for the puff pastry. You can find that if you're if you can't find that to know what to use and you wanna make this gluten free email me at maria. Maria liberati dot com or message. Me on any of my social media and I'll let you know exactly what to us. I will be sharing that recipe for a blood orange marmalade on my blog. And my podcast next week. So if you'd like to wait 'til next week to get that recipe and make the orange marmalade yourself. You know this time of the year. You can find great oranges. This is the time of the year to get them in the blood. Orange is if you can find them. They are out. They are but you can do the recipe with regular oranges. Also i know everyone can not always find blood oranges and you can find more easy and artisan recipes in my world award winning book series the basic art of italian cooking there is. Let's see there's the basic art of italian cooking holidays and special occasions. There is the basic art of italian cooking which was the first book that started the whole series and the basic art of italian cooking davinci style which is also about leonardo davinci's life as a few d. and includes recipes from all the places that davinci lived in and then there's the basic art of pizza the basic art of pasta the basic art of coffee the basic guard of cocktails the basic art of tuscan wedding and the basic art of experiencing venice. You can find all of those books on my website at maria. Liberati dot com or the publisher's website art of living premium media dot com or anywhere books are sold online. So please check the books out and also stay tuned for my facebook live events that i do every week. Just go to buy. Facebook live rather my facebook account. And you can find out when. I'll be doing the next one. And we'll be interviewing beth lipton next recipe developer and wellness raider here by show also be a special guest on my facebook live event sometime this week as well so check it out and stay tuned because i will be doing some more live events that you can be a part of online and as always if you have any questions feel free to write to me directly at maria at maria. Liberati dot com. Hi this is maria liberati and you're listening to the maria liberati show and i have This week special guests. She's really interesting. Is freelance food writer and recipe developer. Beth lipton and Beth guests lot into a topic. That i love is clean eating and which is gonna really explain that to his as beth has said there are lots of different nuances. And but beth can you tell us the connection between food and self care like what are your thoughts on that short well first of all thank you so much for having me so i think that food food and self care are so linked and one thing that i see with people. Is this sort of fear of food or this idea of food is kind of the enemy. a lot of like while i was bad because i eight y xyz or you know this. This kind of food is bad or So i think if we kind of turn that around and refrain food as i mean obviously food is a pleasure and food is enjoyable and food is about sharing and and nourishment but also the food is is fuel to us is information to our systems and food is something that It really can make the difference in a lot of ways between you know feeling well and having good health versus not so. I think it's i think it's really important that we think about food you know. Take away some of the like good and bad language to think of it more as like audible optimal or less optimal their moments. That we all agree. Like i think no matter. What your dietary coaches we. All agree like sugar is not healthy but there are moments where it is socially acceptable thing to do to eat sugar. An example i always give is now. I have an eleven year old daughter so if she made me a birthday cake. I'm not gonna say. We'll know. Pumpkin i can't eat. That should look like obviously. You're not gonna do that so in that in a moment like that. I'm going to eat a slice of cake with my daughter and have this sharing moment with her and tell her how proud i am her and how much i love the cake. That's a form of self care. Even though the food itself is not the most optimal food. So i. I think it's sort of a roundabout way of saying that i think when we look at food and self care It has a lot. There's a lot there beyond just you know what are the collection of nutrients in the food. That's on my plate. Yes that's that's really really important. Exactly kiss stressing out about food and what. You're eating that in itself. I guess that's detrimental to you. Also that could be worse than eating. Really bad huge too. I think as well right. Or just as detrimental. Well yeah i mean. Stress stress is deadly on a number of levels. But one of the things that stress does in the body when you're under acute stress. Is that your digestion shuts down because your body is preparing for battles essentially so if you are feeling a lot of stress when you're about to eat yeah i mean not only. Are you going to enjoy the process. And are you probably not gonna feel great afterwards. But you're also not absorbing the nutrients from the food too so there's like a short term long term. Well you problem with stress. So i would say if you are feeling a lot of stress when you sit down to eat yourself a moment and take a few really deep breaths and just bring down the level of stress So that you can just enjoy your meal but also so that you don't feel terrible after you eat and i think now that we're bringing this topic up about stress but it also is you know a good topic. I guess to bring up now because when people are stressed out about everything but but you can also one of the things i talked about with one of my other guests how cooking and and eating a great meal or something that you like actually takes the stress off of you and You know you can use that. As kind of a de stressor. I guess correct. Yeah absolutely if cooking is something that you find enjoyable definitely and if it is iran or you find it stressful than i would say. Look for the ways to make it less stressful. You're right. I didn't even think that night it's not. It is not necessarily a notch stressful thing for for people. You're absolutely right. Yeah even even people who love to cook maybe failing fatigue around cooking. Guess you know the lack of ability to go out to eat and all of that so It's it's perfectly understandable. If people feel that way and i just think you know make it easy for yourself if you find that you have more energy in the morning and less at night than plan to make your big meal of the day earlier in the dan naff scrambled eggs for dinner. Like you know. Make it as easy on yourself as you possibly can exactly. That's i think that's the most important thing and take away as many stressors as you have to but So one of the things. I know people are always. I see this online and people talk about it a lot. So what are there. The best foods to eat before going to bed. Should people not eat anything before going to bed. It's probably not like a one you know it's probably different on. I'm sure for everybody but if you do if somebody asked you the best foods to eat before going to bed what would you recommend well. So it's a balance. I mean i would recommend not eating at least or three hours before bed Because you don't want your body to be working on digestion. When you're trying to rest having said that you also don't want to go to bed hungry like feeling that physical sensation of hunger because that can also wake you up in the middle of the night. Your brain will essentially sent out an alarm that you're starving. You'll wake up. So i would say if you are consistently hungary at bedtime then i would look at what you're eating for dinner and see if you can't make that last meal more satisfying To me just equals eating more high quality protein But if you are going to eat something before bed i wouldn't do it right before bed. But within an hour or two before bed i would look for things that are not too hard. Just that can bring you there certain nutrients that can help you. Sleep like magnesium is really good for sleep and there's nag museum and nuts and seeds so Having a little bit of complex carbs at night can help you drift off. So having something like an apple with a little bit of tahiti or not better on it That's something that can help you. Fall asleep Or if you if you if you eat grains something like a a really really small portion of oatmeal with some some nuts in it something like that will help you drift off. That's that's great. Yeah they're and they're all healthy snacks and debt definitely sue. You are a recipe developer and of that field everyone is always fascinated with. Wow i would love to be able to develop recipes. And how do you go out doing that in all that and dumb. So why don't you tell us about your process of developing recipes. Everybody i think is curious about how that works on shore so I worked for a lot of magazines and some brands as well. And everybody's process is a little different. But i'll give you sort of a rundown of like a typical magazine story so a magazine will come to me and say we wanna do story about xyz top ex. It's going to have six recipes in it and it's going to be in the may issue so that gives the idea that time of year for she's analogy And a general subject. Sometimes they'll say like hey. Don't put any cucumbers in it. Because we're focusing on cucumbers in another part of the issue. So then i will go away and all come up with. Its six recipes that they want to come up with ten or twelve ideas that fit the story and it back to the editor and the editor will usually either just straight up. Choose from the ideas that i presented or they might want to change it a little bit or tweet or combined or something like that and eventually we come up with a final list and then i go away and i developed the recipes and to do that Depends on the recipe. If it's if it's something sometimes it's something. I've made a version of before Sometimes it's something that requires research especially if it's like a cuisine unless familiar with all do some research and then. I like to write down the recipe. I know he does it that way. But i'll write down what's essentially a recipe for the dish man Just knowing that. I may change it as i go and then i shop for the ingredients and and then when i when i go to cook the food i'm on paying attention to everything including like how long is it taking me to prepare the ingredients. I'm cook because usually that gets put into a recipe As i as. I'm putting together the food i'm getting a sense of like is my seasoning right or doing you to tweak something or change something as simple as like. Spooning out a spoonful of spiced for you go you know. This looks like too much or too little Paying attention to i. I weigh all the ingredients. So as i'm as in developing. Let's say chopping an onion before. I do that away. The onion and then i'll measure. How many cups of chopped onion that yielded So i would say to anybody who wants to be arrested in all of our. I hope you are like very anal. When i cook the dish. If it's something like addressing where you know. Maybe adjusting as i go. It's like a baked item. Then i may have to bake it and then bake it again a few times and i'm just noting as i go. I'm just noting what i'm doing. And then the finished product happens one way or the other. And then i you know. I'll measure the yield phillips as like a super stew how many cups it is or whatever rahm and then i tested it out eat it. I served my family And we kind of talk it over. How is it does it need. This doesn't need that as it. you know. How's the temperature is it. If it's neat like how you know. Did i cook it to medium rare all of that And then you know. Sometimes recipes often require more than one round. We'll go back and do it again. So when people say oh it's my husband. Oh you're so lucky. Like yeah but he has mistakes. Nato realize how much time goes into you know. It's just like. I know you've written books right you know. There's so much time that goes into that people don't realize all the time and into doing you know a recipe. But i think you really have to be which it sounds like you are in. It's a compliment obsessive about what you're doing. Mary you really are because you have to keep trying it and making sure it comes out absolutely you know the best in all that so yeah and i you know the the worst like my worst nightmare is like no not my rhino. You know what i mean like. Yeah miss scenario. My worst nightmare is at someone out. There you know is flipping through. This magazine may find my recipe. They make it in for whatever reason it doesn't work for them like uh set. I mean that's the worst. The worst that's happened to me. And i it's a terrible feeling you've wasted your time and your money and so i am always thinking like who is the end user. Who is making this recipe. And that's always a question. I asked my husband when we're eating food like you made this. You know you brought this home from magazine in you made this. How would you feel. And if he's not like. I would be so psyched and like i would cut it out and make it again. I know it needs needs more. Yes So yeah definitely definitely obsessive and airy detail oriented. I think people do think that it's like what i do. Is like cook stuff all day. But there so i get that but there's so much more to know all the way measuring and and shopping and dishes and you know there's a lot but i love it. S you love and you you know. Obviously you have to love it and it shows in your work. But you know what i did. Forget to ask you. You have such an interesting background and you. You worked with some of my favorite magazines and things. So why don't you tell us. That's what i was going to start off with but talent share some of that with us like some of the magazine. Jim worked with and door injured stories. That you've worked on or traveled on. I understand that you do. Have you traveled for some stories that you've written also a little bit. Most of my work travel. I mean not right now. A co ed but general badge. Yup i mean in the past right yeah. Most of my work travel has been more to go to conferences. Shows but i have have traveled a little bit for other things. I used to be the director at health magazine on. I used to travel for events like my did we had these fit foodie events and have like a five k race and the dinner the night before and then like a festival after an ice travel for stuff like that That's been most of the travel so worked at health magazine I worked at a magazine called. All you is places folded What has tied you remember. That scene by now is a freelance. I it was. It really was a great magazine and then now as a freelancer. I worked for a lot of different publications online and print. I work for food network dot com clean. Eating magazine cleaned plates. Which is a website Lip strong Well and good so. Yeah all of brands to work with which you're box and i've done recipes for new theory which makes collagen powder and other supplements and I done primal kitchen So i really like working. With brown's his ziems. You know that's it's probably really yup interesting Working with a specific brand. And i guess getting into that recipes into that brand or that brand image. That must be really really interesting as well. So i understand you do. Virtual cooking classes also is correct. Yeah i do I give talks on food and wellness to companies. And i also do I do cooking classes. Sometimes it's just a demonstration and sometimes it a class where the people watching our cooking along and that's really fun. I love. I mean i used to do in people's homes but yes now it's all virtual but it's really it's either it's really. Yes so what. I wanted to do to let people know. So where can people find you or do you have a blog. I'd be surprised that you don't. I actually don't have don't have time to i. Don i do. You know i'm always making. I may content for everybody else. But i haven't instagram and i sort of. It's sort of a blog light. Do post a lot of recipe. You're gonna say you know what. I really think that blogs like when i started my blog over that was like fifteen years ago. That was like the big thing. But i think with instagram everything else. I really think that the blogs are kind of going the way of dinosaurs and instagram and all these other Take talk in all are going to be you know more out there than than the blog so but anyway so people can find you on instagram. Then yes instagram. Is cookie pie zero four zero two. Okay that's great in bed. Generally i asked my guests at the at the end of every interview. Whitest food mean to you. So what does it mean do you. It means a lot to me because it's my my living at my work But food to me is Amion sort of what we were talking about earlier food to me is it's nourishment and sharing and it's pleasure and it's fun food if fuel to the body but it's also be like corny but like fuel to our souls to there's such we such an emotional connection to food My mom passed away last year. And i still think about like so many things that so many memories i have of her connected to food and one way or another i. I don't think that's unique to me at all. So i think food is I hope that people are able to sort of in their quest for health. They're able to sort of seafood as an ally and a friend instead of like something to fight against Because to me it really it really is just you know one of the joys of life but that's great. Yup i and i love that heart about your mom. Sorry hearing only lost my dad to log too. But i know dude creates those memories and i still have memories. Some of my fondest. Memories are the foods that he loves to eat in. We would eat y you know we knew we would enjoy with him like different things in. All sophie does create lots of memories. Thank you so much for sharing that thank you. Beth lifted for being a guest and yes to people can find you on instagram teller. Instagram handle again. Yes it's cookie pie zero four to kore- thanking thanks to much and We look forward to airing this podcast and we're going to do something on facebook. Everybody can watch also so you'll be able to sleep beth. Talking about clean eating on my facebook live. thanks for joining us and listening to the maria. Liberati show if you have any recipes that you want to show off take a picture of your arms marmalade toured or your own version of my orange marmalade tour and share it posted on social media. Hashtag the berea liberati show. We'll be sharing it on my website in the next few weeks. So please share. We love to see those pictures. Thanks to my producer. Britain roselle and this week's guest recipe developer and wellness. Reiter beth lipton go to my website. Maria liberati dot com to keep up with my blog in the show in my book series the basic art of italian cooking. And don't forget you can find any of my books. From the gorman world award winning book series the basic art of italian cooking at murray liberati dot com at art of living premium media com which is the website and anywhere. Books are sold online. You can also follow me and keep up with i. Events live events. facebook live events any virtual events that opie doing coming up. You can follow me at instagram. At maria liberati. On twitter at maria liberati with a capital m. on facebook at chef berea liberati on linked in at and liberace. And don't forget to post your answer to the question. What does food being to you in a recorded. Sound by of sixty seconds or less or social media posts a fifty words or less hashtag at the berea liberati show post on social media share with everyone or email it to me directly at maria at maria. Liberati dot com. If your answers are selected for an upcoming podcast segment you'll receive an autographed copy of one of the books for my book series the basic art of italian cooking especial. Thanks and that's it for this week until next week. Peace love pasta.

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Spittin' Silver and Black Episode 8 Part 2 W/Raiders Longtime Raiders Fan Rocco

Silver & Black Pride

45:28 min | 1 year ago

Spittin' Silver and Black Episode 8 Part 2 W/Raiders Longtime Raiders Fan Rocco

"We're back on spitting Severin black with greater superfan and longtime season take older Rocco. Intact amid my. Now, I remember one of one. When the Los Angeles where it is up to Oakland may were going back. I remember Al Davis at one point fine fine too. There was a there was some reporting out there that they were going. They were trying to bring a preseason game a loss bagels because you have those I know race southern L that they were trademarking the name the ages off as raiders or something like that earlier on and right? You know, I I know how much he really, you know, looked out for the Las community and his son Brian how the finishing the puzzle. Right L Davis USA spent his birthdays down here of fi not if I remember correctly and at one point in time in the mid nineties he wanted to bring he wanted to bring a preseason game. And the NFL was so anti Las Vegas at that that time that absolutely not not even preseason game. Could now no way that we're bringing the NFL. We don't want to have anything to do with Vegas Ebeling sand, you know, everything and look where at the core at twenty years later. Yeah. And I know expand that I know Romo of couple years a couple years like us before we moved here. Like, nope. You can't have fast in football draft or your, you know, your event in Vegas because while the gambling. No, no, you can't and the cancel that like, you know, week before we're supposed to get. I'm like an to see them acting come to say that they aided and that the ages were adamantly refusing to go to in a couple years after they once this event. It's just amazing mazing see their about face an amazing see how fast they have come to accept most bega sinc- Las one really is real community a real city and were actual people real people live, not just surest. But after people live and then to see the growth in the pencil that has. To house themes there because I know in the future like Joe on touring for the New Orleans pelicans in NBA circles has been rumored as a theme or loss Vegas. I see that. I see foresee that happening. I see I foresee an NBA team coming out here, and we're going to be inundated with all pro sports team. We're going to be like a big city along with all the tourists come in here. And yeah, it's a. I'm. I'm very happy. I'm very happy with the way things are going very happy to see my team our favorite team. And you know, there I've been paying attention to just a just to get a gauge on the, you know, you're driving down drive down the street. See all the Vegas night, licensed place Vegas night, stick or the biggest old nights acres. I'm starting to see more and more waiter, stickers more and more Reiter place yet starting to see a bigger increase on, you know, striving around, and I notice Reiter nation, and I try to, you know, hey, you know, say hi as as I drive by eighty ninety miles per hour. But you're starting to see more and more of the raider sticker in the Reiter brand though. I'm happy about that. I'm happy to see that we're getting more and more fan home, you know, homegrown fans and at that goes back to them doing their their community work. You know, they show you're going to have a bunch is growing for the next generation of raider fans raider nation as long as we as long as we put a good product on the field. I think they're going to see more and more people birth and dislike or two gold nights gonna see more and more people dump fans of the game. And of the team the more and more. They do things in the more more win. Young into stand that I work with a Joe with a, you know, the football in those players evening safe for come here. Of course, they're excited for the new stadium and the chino utilize NFL stadium, but players themselves really excited for it after NFL team to come here because those players Aken look up to those players. They see. And those players stayed rack within it only inches the head coach the Novi football already brings local of the icons into fractures in such in order to lastly bar magician in or give a Z's scholarship, but is see, you know, say see them excited, and within to really, you know, have that partnership together is a really good thing or lost. As is. It's going connect to who entities and bring them closer together closer than a college. Anna protein has ever gotten an it's really cool see that occur because you know, it's magic because you know, publish back never or few years backing over thought this could happen. But here it is happening. For a, sir. You're definitely on the precipice of of the great things happening for our city for the city of the state, and I'm this. I'm glad I had the ability to the in. I have to give a shout out to one of Reiter nations favored sons add on Twitter. He's the one. He's the season ticket holder been a multi-year season ticket holder up in Oakland. And it doesn't live too far from me. And he was part of you know, we on a whim, we all we never ever met each other person, we all drove down to the owners meeting together. And since then we've we've had a great relationship. He doesn't live far from up here in north west, and he actually lives in Alaska and he comes down for gains. He is the one that brought me with him when he got. The opportunity when the PSL's first went on sale. He called me, let me know. And he asked him if I can go along with them just to see, you know, get a gauge, you know, when they when they opened it up while the raiders in their graciousness when I went down there. They offered me the opportunity by PSL's because I went with Ed, and I had the ability to buy before other of, you know, regular raider fan base that put their hundred dollar deposit down. So I have to give a shoutout Ed for bringing me down there when he when he was in town, and I am just oke. Who'd I am stoked for twice a day. This year this year cannot go by fast enough to get through this next them. So yeah, I'm so jazzed get get through the season. See them put a good product on the field. Get into next year get into next year's draft. In an ex years free agency. And then I game I sprees. I'll be there for the preseason. And I'm hoping they give the Reiter, you know, the elders. I hope they give us an opportunity to walk through the stadium before. So we get to see the dole innards and see the locker rooms and all that stuff. If we don't know big deal, but I am stoked for that. First game the Lagoda efforts. I bet they hear his I graduate may. Yeah. May twenty point next year. And you know, I'm like, I I look that. I'm like, wow. That next Mestre rate of football each year. It's like, boom like everything happens at once or on my side. The personally, I'm like, whoa. Some unlike it it can't go back. Of course. I can't wait to graduate. They can't get by vast of his efforts. While like you said regency. The draft. I'd like to see who the raiders are going get foos stick with team who is not think that going to come your who's going to be the longest tenured player Reiter player to travel with the team here. Thousand Vassar hausky who are you know, Josie tired, the for raider who really wanted to play in Vegas, or who said of cley that he wanted to play with Vegas, and you know it. I see who they pick up. What they do what the moves are before through going through the party is right now targeting foundational players. But yet sear I wonder if they've always like, you know, maybe another, you know, his Brian someone, you know, low on the I on me I interested to see what they do is. I know that I don't I know they don't want those guys because I know Joe Toma a couple like a month ago that they don't want those guys hissy who they what type of leaders are going to bring when they find loss as because you know, they have a wild things going on Oakland, but not as much as they have also and this past year, I know MAC, they talked to all the players and said, we're bega response, you they said no by intestacy was plays over here because you know, Vega. Of all our so called distractions. Now, I wonder what is going to of. And what type of players are going the hear what they going to do. What players what the going to databases what how they interacted foodie and other things like that. Because a lot of people will say, oh, they're just going far Yoder's going to. It's like no there. They get involved in buying religiously outta game. What they do. And how they banned the fan base even further here is like you said with bring all licensed lights of having everyone have licensed light year. I'm just interested. The I'll many people acting galvanize his move your have already seen. How many people are going to leases raiders once they win here with the wind now attitude only, you will FOX seem like they did. You know with releases black off from the paying and becoming going night. I wonder how many people are going to be raiders fans here. His you know is nothing like lack oldest nothing like, you know, a raiders game. On Sunday is nothing is nice spectacle. Not going to be a spectacle larger in town on Sunday. Then in August. I mean, I know thumbs verges got around here. Like when I go to they got rid of sixty answers on Saturday night. But would they bring those back with raiders games and games on Sundays? You know because more fuel probably wonder what is going to be tailgate charity for game on Sunday. This you know, I really into see what they do and how the city will react to them acting here. It's like, you know, it's it's a different vibe on Sunday because you know, bring people together. Who were normally be go. That's a football does. My church service will be at the tailgate. Aches at the tailgate. That'll be my turt- service for the day waiting for the next game. On I because I know in ridge, which I go to they, you know, I know they were closely with the nice, the, you know, I wonder how there were with the raiders and how they go. You know, what they wanna do welcoming town doing that involved? Because when we suppose pastors actually are passed this newcaster e pastor who was there to transition the goal night or the Archerd gifted him of his own jersey with his name on the back. And you know, I wonder what's going to happen with the raiders in town, and how might particular other peel searches how other you know, ended. He's in town going galvanize. Or israel. How the raiders are going to reach out to them is being the first organized in that they are going to amazing to see the outreach in town. And how the community really, you know, gathers around for all different angles because they are do that. But, you know, Rb mazing first-person overs, and we're going to see the first person that you're gonna see and and and worshiping and will be Derek Carr leader of the you see all all the events that he does in Telefonia with his with his organization with his with his belief system. You're going to see him front and center here in Vegas, different churches, different. You know, whatever. Whatever lease you have you're gonna have all different denomination. And he will be from center. He will be the face. Going forward of Las Vegas or the raiders and for this immunity. There's no getting around it. I know he's Fresno or Bakersfield guy. But while he's here, he will be the face, and he's the perfect base for this this immunity. So I know the anything but his using much. He doesn't really have an ego. He doesn't have ally for that calf e in more low-key, and it's only nice to see that as a physio range is because in the face healings ation because that is or is always says. Things are the giving bases. Eat more ropy in. He saw really way from where route in Fresno is. I mean got doesn't all the Oakland all those years or playing in office is going to be so much different. And it's going to be racing designer. We had many Destot on are still last week talking about how Rudin and motive people are looking in gang place in seven hills and the island and. Moving where the dust settle for our players is. I know we agree. I've us some want Summerlin and our. Going to the navy? See how you know will ever the host all is on, you know, the newbies or on suffered for say, you know, and we wanted to gather with the factors. They'll be in an EMMY that Priscilla that each facility that they're building down Anderson. That thing is is a monster. And I know everybody will come down there and watch their if they open up their factors. Traditionally there faxes of always been closed and they've been very secretive about their five asus. Maybe they'll figure out a way to make money and charge people to come in and watch them practice to who knows all their eggs in that one big Bassett down there. That thing. Have you, bro? Joe? Yeah. Joe gave me the opportunity to go to the the grand opening the groundbreaking or that facility. And I went. There and just a video representation of facility in three different fields on the outside. You a field on the inside. That thing is an amazing mazing headquarters for our amazing more than. Hughes lovely like I par five five or bills rendering? I've seen I wanted to go to ground baking. But the inheritance to other out Dacian that had, but I heard it Ray any agree and Fairfield every those the about three factors field or the scene. You know, that's great week three brianti outside and at one on the inside. I yeah, I believe I believe that's what I that's why. We read in awe. Yeah. And they wanna say say the way there. I think the practice fields are designed the same way field is I for our stadium. I think they're exactly the same. If I'm not mistaken in directional wise, though, you'll have the same same consistency with the sky, you know, the sun in sky even know where we're going to cut down to the light with a the openness on top of the stadium. But they're still going to have that same direct, you know, just flows for the practice blows the game. So, yeah, we're the locate because I was over near the Pasco over there, and you know, within the locates the perfect is almost like is not much around there right now. But when they were now, going fact only businesses only tiny round there is going to be still impactful because. Everything is going to roar around there, a mass because you know, just you don't just get constable, and that you don't just get buildings and new extensive housing drove unless with that will almost rejected make that big of enact in which you know, football and foreign journal almost always does the are the the leadership or Henderson has been given a lot of credit. You know, there's a lot of naysayers about selling that land over there for pennies on the dollars at a writer. They knew what they were doing against not GIC mixer thinking looking forward that future. What's gonna develop and you're going to see why the development quite a lot of money being made down Henderson from this. This this venture that that Henderson saw the the opportunity the growth in the business opportunity. There's a it's a no Lou situation. For them, especially we know they'll make their money back with the land that they sold them. They'll make the money back tenfold twentyfold hundredfold with all the people that are coming in and all the business that's going to happen down there. The housing that's gonna develop around there. The the there's some smart people out there that figured it out. So. Because when I went down when I go down there. I mean, there's almost nothing. I mean, there's a ton tunnels like malls down there. But is is not much. I'm excited for this. I'm up in thermal. And there is in most down in Henderson that I really wanna go to a win still. I'm I'm only flocked there. My boss there, and it's going the, you know, and with the city there is going to add more money into their wilbon more money into their city. So that you know, they can further maximize their potential maximize or growth in for the Bill rounded is right now is one of the and fastest growing cities in the United States. I wish I could have been smart enough to figure out how to how to get my hand in pot somehow. I'm just same. Same your thing here. Just a retire guy. Just having a in my life. Yeah. I mean, I mean someone not just a good time. This has to be like an excellent perfect time. Because you know, your team is moving into your city. This is like the perfect Neil Nereo for you. Yes, it is. There's no doubt my mind. And just I'm I'm so Keith about it. I got all I keep saying is all I gotta do live in other year. I'll be happy where we have to me wake up every day for the next. I mean, I'm pretty unfree. Sure. You know? I mean, you know, sound for young, you know, I mean, he's still sound around middle aged around. You know, they five fifty so found with his good young. You know, when he thirty years to see, you know, the raiders win the Super Bowl and win the Super Bowl and point only five win soup will is no openly as has been a rumored. The, you know, lost as top ocassions thinking of both the, and, you know, we'll be it was the, you know, if the raiders answers to will point five, you know, they could awfully become the first hometown team the win at their home. They. And that the amazing. Oh, yeah. And in you idea. Yep. Why can't we go on a run like New England Donna run since the? I mean, there's no doubt Jon Gruden. He won the Super Bowl with amp Abay and younger was winning with Oakland before he they they're Radim to inveigh. There's there's no doubt that with his tenure contact if you said, there's a reason or consistency. And is no better thing, in my opinion, or an organization the van consistency. I've seen the grounds being going consistent with all these you know, coaches offense coordinator, they can never get the plane, but with in have that Cassini had buying with a single make everyone around there believe in more that this is the guy was sticking with this guy. There's only get us to the promised land. And I hear in the whole invasion feels that way about him. And you're going to see out open on life. Yeah. Unlike you know, a lot of lot of and references on this. Whether GM's you're going to see vast improvement from the quarterback position, you're going to see vast improvement all across the board with consistency of coaching. Not a lot of changes, you know, the defensive line coach, he backhoe ch-. There's a reason why they left there's a in a what everybody's harp. On on payable is being terrible offense. Obviously Rudy didn't have a problem with them. So, you know, listen Gruden don't listen to Twitter GM's, and let's see where this goes as consistency. You'll be e factor for MS specially for car going forward having to Saint system and then expanding on that because he only had a small chunk of it. He only got a small chunk because it's so volume of you know, how much has the learn. This year, you'll see a little bit more more plays or audibles. Let him call the game as he sees it as he's learning. And you got the play makers now of. I don't want to stay healthy. You know? There's no reason why we can't switch this. Switch this up up an Oakland finish out a good year and open for the fan base of raider nation at been with him for so long up there, you know, and dealing with having you know, they lost team once losing the team not feel for them in that regard. But out of the product is here, and then bring that winning that commitments excellence just win baby Vegas when he twenty. Let's get this thing started. Let's go, and you know, what we're going to have a good team going fold know that my mom. Going back where you are. We Mike the raise e England wing Lund's, you know, how many years number have. I mean, probably has a few more is a, but in though, taking older, you know, the raiders in MD that next owns Asian because we're fair consistency with their, you know, top to bottom. It's like everyone is as a nice Joe because you know, Gruden has is only injures in might ma- and more Davis is leading no organization. You know, runs newbie. He's not, you know, necessarily. The end where they needed and in bond organization is in everything that they need to do in order to win, you know, just just win baby. And you know, when everything they need to or Woodley are they wouldn't they our navy if the raiders end up playing in the in the AFC championship game against New England. And that's or so and Tom Brady's on his last year. And he gets any fumbles the ball and the raiders recovered the ball and we win the game go to Super Bowl. Wouldn't that be the irony of ironies for? The way it was like handing off enforced. With the with the coaching football. Yes. No thinking of Leo MAC, no being gone and gang fumble arm three, you know, that would just be you know, that was just the fourth and everything because marriages Ned Brasi got that as well. They just the no just a great that next or on is another one of those players acting to help them when now, and you know, when they see because things any worth on in the face, and he has that emotion in that that urgency in that down his about him that will translate into rose from eastern Michigan. And you know, just the just be great for the reader and everyone around them. This is their New England in fastened is you know. England that would be going down. In in where or know where you're going to have a turnover Flint or that laying over the little. Albay Davis memory would be it would be retribution or what happened that travesty of a game tragedy of a night that I remember Oso vividly, despite the fact I was drunk. It would be it would be I would love that. And for me that would be awesome. I feel that are feel great, you know, with raider with everything, you know. And then if they did win the Super Bowl, you know, just the right in that in Najan that already on. I mean, I I've, of course, I'm willing to really in lean guy. I still in Boston was other teams are weighing people. Of course, the great is always use who's you'd wins to Kogyo won the World Series. But imagine they Vegas would be if they Lombardi trophy down this that would I imagine that, you know, we talk about the draft talk about Sukhpal in Najan of Bharti Brophy traveling down that that just on the other warmly is like no air force, the civil not everyone's gonna come out. But everyone everyone's going to come out is three eight down this. I mean, nothing said the city apart nothing that they rows. That was that are the than Browde room the local. Honest with the trophy. Yeah. And let's double that up. Let's let's let's pretend in in a perfect world that Golden Knights also Stanley Cup for the city. Oh, yeah. At some point on, you know, hopefully, relatively soon that would be great, but have to who franchises just like in, you know, New England in Massachusetts that Boston knowingly know winning championships almost nearly close together. This. I couldn't I couldn't imagine with the city would become that happen. There would be. It would be amazing will be this the fun on place to be everybody'll get along and everybody will be happy and the crime, we'll stop and everybody'll just love life being in Davis. Biggest being the city that it's Vegas grown up and become a real city and become a real metropolis. And people having said life in enjoying, you know, not just sitting, you know, going to red rock going amount Charleston on the lake me. Now, we got actual things family things more family things to do and enjoyable sports. And then bring championships to the city. One can hope one can dream hopefully that yeah. The you know, the goal in night and vision win the Stanley within five years and were going here. Four those five years. So that actually happened in the goal. Nice voice. Ears in row the first years and ding players to help them win. Now and players say no are consistent marked down, the nice and everything and then with raiders getting foundational players like clone. We went through John Jada FaceTime on and all these other players that they grafted into you know, win in one year win the big one that will just be. Are they mazing in for the family environment? You know, there'd be that would be great his, you know, I know this past year the the first time so play baseball have those or size in the USA. Soon. Half years now earth time of Atholl made those with aviators having top record in most difficulty or earlier this season incident to actually he winning you know that. Oh, no excitement. Sue the whole around. I felt of here in someone. But that's only play they fall within folate. As I said, everything whole magnified in. If they wanted if the all night in Roseling things even. Oh my God. I. I. I game. Grazing. How how everyone would just, you know, everyone just be granted one another. And you know, it would just be like, you know, why work. Let's go. Let's go down in enjoy everything because you know, when Evelyn's Evans family of part of the raiders family, lean voice that reclose, but but raiders are one big family and. Resonate on top. Would owners with ownership. The family were without Davis. When he passe was Mark Davis. And you know it. And then if. Essentially city a loss. Data -ssary to see. That us. Concur. Yeah. And mean. And I mean as a final thought here. I mean, we have a look ahead to raiders get here and twenty twenty the NFL draft these or ulcer in the new era raider football, and when he twenty next year, and then you have to look ahead. When they honesty host the Super Bowl in twenty twenty five. And then, you know, you have these big events with raiders of, you know, one thing after the other after the other own almost like a miniature version would Vegas is you know, with event event events event mentioned vengeance events. And right. You know, formative every night. It's just a many cats cats license of what they already. We're going to have this one big party all the time. So. Yet. I can't either brother fan either. I mean, I I didn't I work over at on Sundays easy. AJ's? And like, I I can't imagine. How dead it was the a Sunday morning is this, you know, everyone's going to be being marriage. The raiders are now you will be when you're and for into they're going the fan when they gave because there's nothing like is nothing like the raiders organization. Do you have in you know in? In the win. Now mentality is only was you know, or where were one win. And they know they have. Argon the back win point twenty twenty. Bring bring everything together. We'll see what the future holds. I I hope I my personal beliefs. They are going to be good this year, and they're gonna be great next year and going forward. They're going to be relevant again. I'll just say that as they're gonna relevant again leave that they're going to give a lot of teams in ARIN ARIN injuries and all the on forcing nonsense that goes on. I see a very very capable team developing or further city going forward. I see players coming here wanting some here not only because we're winning again. But because of the money, you know, not having to pay a state tax that goes back to player in the long run is just a ton of re. And then think about this to the money that Mark Davis is going to be making the organizations, and we make in they'll be able to pay bigger salary the calf that's a whole nother. That's a whole 'nother show to discuss just the fact that they'll be able to pay more in bonus money to get better players. Here. And it's been a continuous cycle. Moving forward who's not gonna want some debates to play got a good host the coaching staff ownership make money, make more money winning culture. Hopefully, we get our winning of that. There's no reason you know, like before going to the MAs Liam or onside. He'll Alameda County stadium. You know that on baseball there. Having to pay the outrageous is that they in fella -fornia losing all that money out of their other pockets. There's nothing bad about this situation going forward that I can see. Everything is this son signing roses coming up. I can't wait those Dantley for this like them so stoke so about it that. My world. My it's gonna be fun. Everything's gonna be fun about this. Yeah. And I know that owed me earlier this office, and that aren't they this is one of the their owns and we used to be. I know publicly. Was Nestle used as but. What people don't realize that all whose money into the? Noar? There's almost nothing else. My nothing in all those raiders thinking races organization is great the franchise, which is a great thing. Because all those me he still focus is on the raiders. I inform affects is only. It was only thing. With his great. We see like is talk about the second. They'll be though almost known within because he's going to, you know, with the players as and with everything he does he's going to make reason the what people think of won't Vegas for now. And in is every where? It was that's my. High-growth? We're no fours. This everybody to stay healthy and the growth of the team, you know, that's all we can hope for. I hope everything plays out the way, I vision it, and I think I don't think there's a reason why shouldn't so. Everything ever ring healthy. You know, I mean foiled going down this year. Signing is still have that death that you'd run in in this this world. And you know, you run into Martin. So they they have a plan in the sticking, which is good has your manager. Sometimes it's our to lock all that outside noise. But then still owes his in on can't get in on Ilginc raiders. Breaking his, you know. There's nothing like that. That's. So I think yeah. I I ain't Rocco. Or joining the in silver in blasts are by ESI nation black Friday podcast or a on. This of lovely Thursday night may second I really feel that if you want. My pleasure. Thank you for having me and you ever want to do this again. I'm more than willing to help out. I I love to do again with you. Enjoyed talking. All right. Thank you, sir. Thank you. For listening to this week's edition of spitting silverback with longtime raiders season two good older. Rocco? Ignore me Kaelin. So Cal on Twitter at many underscore. Kyle too. Thanks for listening. My name is Spencer home. I name is Jason Kirk. My name is Ryan nanny. We combine we form the shutdown full trying keep telling you, we're not from this forecast is technically college football podcast. But it's also a show about care disaster regional grocery stores. We Tennessee Batman homeowners associations bears in video games. Pittsburgh Batman the hell of being treated a group. Text unreliable legal advice. I mean, there's also some actual football discussion about coaches, having utes contracts coaches making terrible decisions coaches, saying really stupid things or the NC double A's saying released. Yeah, there's lots of stupid things in this big dome. Beautiful sport time Arkansas decided to use a captured feral hog as a mascot and it escaped and it wind up killing seven rattlesnakes a pig and a Coyote, sometimes we talk about okay alleged with if you wanna take call. Football exactly as seriously as it deserves taken come find us on apple podcasts Spotify or wherever else you listen to podcasts. Like this one this full cast. It's not voltron unless it is Tim.

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Silver & Black Turf Ep. 7

Silver & Black Pride

44:09 min | 1 year ago

Silver & Black Turf Ep. 7

"Low. Body was going on. I'm your host Nick Hamilton alongside my partner scout winter, and we have a jam packed show on this episode of the silver black turf here on the silver, and black pry podcast network on SP nation how crucial with the raiders decent beheading into many camp, enshrining camp will definitely be hearing from defensive coordinator, Paul, gutter. How important is the pass rush for the sovereign black and could the MLS be muscling in on a writer's turf? We'll get into that in more coming up here, now it's time to hit the Turks Scott winter, what's going on. It's another day, another fine day talking about raider. Football's what I'm talking about a may. Well, let's hit the terse first or foremost, we talked about the Reiter defense, and we all we've been we've been circling on that topic for a long time. We've been wondering how the raiders defense is gonna shape up under this new regime, and I'm when I mean by new regime. Yes, it's year two for Jon Gruden but year one for. Mike, Mike may as so would what will the rate is going to do. We went back into the draft period. Name went they drafted young. They drafted very well. I was very impressed. So were you in where the raiders draft with, especially on defense, because they were of gaping holes for them on diesel one person, in particular, that really stood out for move was Jonathan Abram, who was a young man, who's definitely turning a lot of hands when it came to the, the raiders in when he came to is coaching staff, opposite defensive coordinator was thoroughly impressed by John angel out his gentlemen, have a high football IQ. He's learning plays as a safety. Very quick, very impressive. Full young man of his stature, the would you think about John Abram so far? But the, you know, he's, he's a true box safety, and could even play a hybrid linebacker situation. I see a scenario where, you know, they can bring in a big nickel that ease going to be a part of that package. You got a mobile quarterback in Jonathan Mahomes screaming. Patrick mahomes. And if you took a look at what San Diego did against Baltimore in the playoff run running that big nickel, you know, bringing in three safeties and playing fast. This is this is that kind of guy, he's a ballistic missile back there. He's, he's very good at picking up zones. Swing. Swing routes screens. He's extremely aggressive. Sometimes it works against it. Sometimes she'll over pursue. He needs to rein in as discipline. But I mean he's easy. He loves football. He loves hitting in, in the very true sense of the word. He loves the hip people. He wants to be an on every tackle and he he just he's an exciting player to be around to me. I think he's hardest sitting guy coming out of the SEC actually excited to have because listen. I, I never am too concerned about a guy who's motor continues to run if he's too aggressive. I rather have him too aggressive then it'd be too passive. This is a guy who can who's picking up safety. The safety position as I said, very quickly. You got a great teacher lamarcus Joyner and you talk about that nickel package where lamarcus Joyner is continue to learn nickle package. When he was with the Rams, and now he's extending into the Oakland slash laws Vegas writers. And so when you have those kind of guys in at the safety position, they could call some problems, not only for Patrick Mahomes. So you look at you look at Philip rivers, you look you look at other guys in the AFC they can go up against it 'cause some, some natural problems, especially in that secondary. And that's something that we talked about on this show in a couple of shows earlier about what other rate is gonna do specically comes to the secondary in the safety issue because it was a lot of question marks, and I think they've answered those questions when it comes to a guy like eight who could fill at jets, now it's going to be a learning curve at some point guests. Absolutely. But at the same time, again, I rather have a guide that is too aggressive. A guy that gets after a guy that lows football than to be too passive in worry about man is this guy going putting the workers as guy going to be effective with when towns? Against especially the AFC west opponents. We mentioned the chargers mentioned, MCI mentioned, the different Bronco though, is going to be crucial for this defense to really step it up. The one thing I learned about this defense is not only are they active not only are they aggressive, but they've gotten young. And that's something that we also questioned is how well they will they younger in order to be competitive in the AFC the me they made all the checkmark. Nah, I know it's early. I know they just wrapped of OT gays heading into minicamp next week. We'll find out more about guys like Jonathan Abrams about lamarcus Joyner to see how well they flow in our weather mesh, but as right now but I'm looking right now. I'm very, very happy. I'm very positive. I have a sense of optimism when I'm going to many can't with these guys because they are thoroughly impressed. Another guy is max cross worth round, pick aggressive loves the. Get after. And it's interesting because not look at max Crosby. He is the guy that I'm saying man, this is gonna be suspected will he definitely has that, that within him another another guy that flies around defensive van, you know, little light. In the hips, and in weight, but working on adding weight without taking away from his speed very aggressive, twenty excuse me, forty one tackles for loss. Twenty sacks of both of those are were second in, in the eastern, because he from eastern Michigan small school. Absolute one of the biggest reason that program from small school aspect turned around. He was part of bringing a loser and turning it into a winner. It's that attitude is exactly what the raiders need because that's what they're doing. They're earning a loser and they're wanting to turn added a winner. Take that loser turning into winter, and they brought a guy in who has he's very good in locker room. He's very social, you know, part time rapper, and they've already put out some videos, ease a he's a guy that's going to electrify people around him. He's going to raise. As the passion of those around him. And he can get after the quarterback. There's no doubt about it. Now. Get a little weight on him. Let him establish, you know, an edge so that, you know, you can you can contain the run and this guy absolutely could be very special right now. I see him as a third down or passing situation. Kind of guy. He has a good shot to supplant, Arden key. As the first guy in there, you know, but arkie as making strides. But I think that job right now it could change. I think that guy is going to be the run-defender right now is going to be Benson. Mayo enclo- federal courts is going to be, you know, starting he's a three down guy. Guys have been raised about cling Phero this far just his work ethic the way he goes after I've thoroughly impressed by. He's got good reviews for with the one thing I wanna talk a little bit more about his is, is max Crosby. Because I feel like max Crosby is one of those diamonds in a rough I feel like max Crosby is a guy that the definitely be a huge but of huge feast that graders passed Comey season less with defensive coordinator, Paul, gutter had to say about max in, where he feels maxes currently max, he's he looks like a Cadillac coming off the edge, she's long. He's loose. He's quick off the ball, and I think he's gonna make big jumps here in his first year. I made it sounds like to me he's checking off all the boxes. I mean when I look at max Crosby, I I'm really rooting for this kid. I think this kid is going to be special. I think he's gonna be a constantly improved week by week. I'm looking forward to what is going to provide? Only just a mini camp. But in training camp as well as they prepare for the preseason. Let me tell you something. I'm being I'm starting to getting press about his patients who will there's a lot to be impressed about understand. They're running around in helmets and shorts right now. And. Gunther even made mention that he wants to see what these kids, look like, especially Crosby when he's got the pads on. And, you know, that's going to be a maker break situation. But from everything we've heard from his coaching staff, his prior, coaching staff, and his teammates, their eastern Michigan. He he checks all the boxes. He loves football. He wants me eat play. He wants play it all the time. Talk it high football IQ and just one of those guys that you want your for. But they got a lot of guys like that. Now we mentioned Jonathan Abrams before he's one of those guys you wanna root for him. I mean he's old school. Trash chalk, and, you know gonna jaw at you gonna hit you gonna blow you up if you're tied in, you know, I mean that's or running back, he's going to he's going to nail you. And these are the kind of guys that Mike may are wanted to see these are the kind of guys Jon Gruden wanted to they. Wanted to interview these guys and four hours later. They wanted them to be still passionate about talking football in innovate and Jonathan Abrams. Showed up in a suit and, you know, hey man, you know, I'm going for a job interview, I'm going to look, the part, the one thing I love about this defense is something in at I have to agree with MAURICE Hurson when he talked about, you know, they have the scene, especially defense has some toughness to, to Fisher some towns that we didn't have last year, which is absolutely could could be more truthful. When he said that I think that was honest. I mean especially when you look at the technique because second is obviously very important. But when you look at how the younger players are learning from the older players. And when you look how, you know, the other players are developing a younger players, giving them certain skills, giving them, you know, bits and pieces of information that's gonna make them better. This is the kind of. Mhm rotary that we've been waiting for when it comes to the redder default. We will wondering what happened here we spoke about this last week about even perfect of, and how he will be sitting in with raider defense of in all his pass aggressions, but it looks to me burpee, you know is is a kid is a guy rather, you know is is, is definitely settling in. He's believing in, in a writer ways, he's not trying to be on a quote with star guy, but he's getting in where he fits in and that's important. You have a guy like that. Whereas tremendous of very talented, do people say, you know, he plays thirty knob believe he does is adults thirty. But if he can play thirty within the color within the lines in in not able to give up a whole bunch of penalties in a game. I say why not that's the right away right away as always been, you know, our smashed mile hard knows football. And I think that's something brings to the table. You know, being a lot of guys are happy back on defense with a play to get those reps in gonna be crucial as make their way into minicam in into training camp. And will you have guys that are on the same page, you know, in, in just really amazed just the energy that these guys are displaying, the younger guys older guys in being in unison. And that's what's gonna be another another thing that writers miss last year that I did not see the union. I did not see the cohesiveness that they needed to be successful. Something on seeing even in Alta games in, I'm sure it's gonna continue on into mini camp in the training camp. Well, not the beat a dead horse, but they don't have the MAC situation this year. You know, an end taking a leader like that, and he wasn't I wasn't there. He wasn't there on all year. But everybody thought he was gonna come in last minute, and then hated show up and there went your continuity. A lot of people who believed quit believing. You know, you Bruce, Irvin moved on just the team, the five guys on that team aren't even started last year on defense aren't even playing football as you're right now they aren't sign with the team. What does that tell you? I mean. That was a stopgap put a band aid on. They ran out of steam in the second half. The I mean, they play good football in the first half of most early games, especially they limited. The Rams limited Miami. They limited Broncos. They limited a lot of people in the first and just, just ran out of steam got run over gave up almost you know what one hundred and fifty yards a game rushing couldn't turn couldn't get the ball back couldn't get turnovers couldn't get stops when they needed him, and it was it was it was it was dysfunction at its finest. This year. It's totally different. Totally different. Yeah. Leadership. It wasn't, you know, wasn't my just jelly Ellie went down. I game McDonald's. I mean you know. I mean, you know, the guys that were on that defend Bernie linked time, they, they were worried about keeping their jobs, but, you know, or they were veterans come in from somewhere else. There was a mishmash this year. You've got now you've got your two guys in the system. You've got guys that were, you know, MAURICE earth coming in PJ hall coming back, Gary and Conley. Having a standout year last year coming back for his third year, you know, knowing his place, knowing his role, a lot better because he's going to be an island over there. And he's if he continues on his progression. He's going to be he's going to be one of the one of the good ones that people are gonna look back, ten years, a we had a good when they're you know, he's at kind of player and then you've added a lot of young feisty aggressive passionate players. You know that Jonathan Abrahams and max Crosby and clone Ferrell. These guys are vocal. Their vocal leaders are on the field. Leaders off the field leaders and they get after the ball. Well how, how long will this happen? I know it seems like we're in heaven. It seems like we're in paradise. But how long will this last Ken, this Candice type of cohesiveness candidates type of Roddenberry laugh into the regular season where we start were really counts in the wind start to pile up all the loss of start the pile up Ken, this content candidates via successful venture for this redder defense in order for them to get to the next left is I'm still questioning. I'm just happy. That is happening right now. But I still have some questions. Absolutely. Who are these raiders who is this defense their their their plan? They're playing teamwork and getting to know each other right now and that's exactly what OT as before that's exactly what many campus for. But when they get into camp camp, then it's all about. Getting the pads on and getting the reps in and learning the system, downplaying physical and showing what you got with those pads on. We're going to see it's basically where the rubber meets the road, you're going to see what this team starts to get made of right during that during that stretch and then. You go into the season. Now they're gonna have a brutal season. Lot of road games a lot of time away from home that's going to test this team. Now, if they get some wins under the belt confidence is a big thing. You take a look at the twenty sixteen Reiter defense which played is a twentieth ranked defense. You know, twenty points, twenty six yards and all that stuff. But that plus fifteen takeaway margin and they didn't give up a point in the last two minutes again. They gave then they got stopped when they needed to get stops gave up a lot of yards, but they got stops and gave the raiders at offense and Derek Carr. An opportunity come back yet. Seven come from behind wins at your may got the Castrol clutch performer award. Any went to the playoffs with you know twelve four and they lost after all, but they had a team that was playing above itself because it believe believe okay? Yeah. So are you comparing this, this qua- this up and coming squad to the squad happened three years ago? The squad happened three years ago was a perfect storm of personalities and, and they believed but if I believe that this team can play above its its ability, if it can believe now something's cannot win. I mean, come on. They gotta go out here that relief is one thing. But they gotta go out here next acute, Mark Hallett. Is there the talent is there? That's what I'm saying. The talent is there. They have to believe that have to buy into this system and being a young, you know how it is with young teams young teams. They are roller coaster of momentum momentum can go one way could go the other way they can get confident or they can lose confidence and their players affected by more than say veterans. You know you got a guy that's been playing back there. You know, eight ten years, they don't get they're not affected by the highs and lows so much. They, they understand how it goes, but younger players, they tend to play better when things are going, great, and they tend to kinda not play as well, when things aren't going as good, you know, things can can contract on a dime. You just never know. But I feel. Like the talent is there. And they can keep the raiders in ballgames if they can do that. Then the offense which is loaded should absolutely be able to score points and win games for them. You know, I it's a it's a balance you gotta have both. Now you do you have to have three sides of the ball. The office defense special teams. The one thing that I looked at this writer team from last season. And I'm looking at this team, obviously they were disaster last season. They underachieve last year, a lot of different moving parts. We, you know, we saw the departure of Khalil Mack on the defense. We saw the departure of Amari Cooper on the offense those allowed it was a lot of confusion. But a lot of players that remain on this squad that are that have been in Trenton in OTA's in heading into minicamp. Learn a valuable lesson learned a lot of different lessons that prepared them and made them better. You know, when I look at to hear why hit or example. I mean this is a guy that learn from the experiences of last season. I mean he played all of the stat. Right. So allowed him to really understand in comprehend the system. So as he's moving forward this season. Season is gonna make more of an effective weapon on as a linebacker in him being able to go back and forth. Talk with guys like volunteers birthday on that decent only Nabil's them to get better. And that's what I look. I mean, you know, vodkas Burke is, is a guy that can console these guys federal a look going this correctly or you Bill in this wall or you flat out suck, or you're absolute house. Staying wanted to is gonna come out of five vodkas burgers, the honest enough, let guys know where they where they fall short where they see. That's the kind of guy you need on this type of, again, hold it together. Enough way doesn't cost for waiters yardage with penalties incarcerator get cost raiders game. That's, that's the question Mark over my head as of right now. And I listen to guys like to hear why did be very highly about it does make me rule in his favor as pertains not being. In so concerned about the behavior of. The thing about the, you know, again about von birthed is he knows his defense, backwards, forwards and sideways. He comes in here, knowing, exactly what Paul Guenther once on that field. He knows how it worked. You knows how it audibles where guys are supposed to be. He's absolutely going to be the quarterback of that, even it is his job. It is his job until somebody and do it better. And basically got they're basically said that it's his job to lose. And I don't see him losing. I think he's going to come in here. He's gonna play it lights up football now as far as is he gonna cost raiders some penalties? This is the raiders the raiders get penalized for hugging a quarterback. I mean Arden key got penalized for coming up holding up and chest bumping a quarterback didn't even knock him down. And they got a penalty fifteen yard rubbed a passing that he's gonna get penalties on the raiders. I mean I could be out there could be golden to shoes. Not even touch somebody, and they're gonna throw three flags so it's going to happen. But that defense is going to run so much better. And then you got guys behind him like Benda, who is a student of the game. Who's going to sit around him like a sponge? You got guys Marquel Lee, same thing, young players young, then they picked up, you know, you know, young little linebacker under free agents you know that, that, that should have been drafted. Probably foreground. He just never know with these guys. There was it was such a T plows, so many people fell out of the fell out of the drafts. So they got a lot of guys. You know, they got better Marshall inner this defense is going to play a lot better now. Is it going to be better than twenty that had minute lower than twenty years? You know, is it going to be? A plum. It is. But what what the key things that I wanna see defensive? I mean it's great to talk about. It's great to see them communicate. And it's great to hear them. You know, vibe ING because they are. There's a certain vibe on this team that wasn't there last year on his defense. But I wanna see them pressure. The quarterback I wanna see them the sack. But pressure brusher those turnover because I wanna see turnovers. I wanna be I wanna see a plus at least a plus one plus two every game of Turner ratio. I wanna see run stop and it doesn't. They don't have to be the best run. They need to be able to do it when account when bring out that monster. And they got a little bit of a lead in front of all they could do it all day long. We need the raiders Nita, stop that run, especially in those crucial moments they need to get those stops they need to play more gresson, and then they need to have that stamina because they fizzled out in the second half of a lot of game. I wanna see them play sixty minutes football not thirty minutes as we all do are gonna keep the chains rolling. We'll be going to take a quick time out as we move down the field MLS China muscle in on the raiders territory. We'll come up with that information in that answer on the other side of the brakes. Hi, I'm every woman, and I'm hosting curbs new podcast. Nice, try it stories about how people have tried to design a better world. And what happens when those designs don't go according to plan season. One is called utopian. And it's about the perpetual search for the perfect place. It includes cannibalism fascist architecture. Poly-amorous hermetically, sealed domes and Courtney Kardashians dining room chairs, but not necessarily in that order, new episodes of nice, try come out every Thursday. Subscribe for free on apple podcasts or in your favorite podcast app. Hey, I'm Spencer hall. I'm Holly Anderson. I'm Ryan nanny. I'm Jason Kirk, and we're the hosts of the shutdown full cast your avengers of college football podcast. It says in the script onto riff on what that means and basically, what I mean is a soul, spoiled every Tuesday, we talk about everything from cooking disasters to pro wrestling, too unfashionable pants worn middle school. We also do talk about college football every now and then, like mascot fights announcers, fleeing the booth early and unfashionable pants that coaches where now if you want to take college football, exactly as seriously as it should be taken subscribe for free on apple podcasts or in your favorite podcast app. Back the silver, and black turf. He'll to civil black, pride podcast network SP nation. I'm your host can within alongside Scott winter and before the break got a little interesting information when it comes to the future of the loss, Vegas raiders now we all know that. The biggest is growing metropolis. We all heard about Las Vegas aces. Being there. We know about the Stanley Cup of. Golden Knights years back. They weren't expansion franchise in the NHL in now we all know the raiders fish leave moving to loss fake as stadium is about fifty percent or so complete. But here's an interesting. We all know that UNLV is gonna be also housing their, their football team is are the raiders stadium would awesome, too. There's talk of MLS franchise. Being another teeny is reading. Martin is Bill Foley obvious. Owns the Vegas voted nights. In the sports world in. Decided he wants to bring MLS franchise laws. Now is ironic because correct me if I'm wrong wasn't fully fully on board with the raiders in their stadium being in Las Vegas. That will be correct. That would that would be correct. You know. Just one of those things he had to pay an MGM had to pay full price for their for their Rena. Course we're only talking like five hundred million as opposed to billion, but there was a little bit of, you know, we didn't get money. That's kinda I think that was more of that. Plus, you know, they wanted to be the only show in town. You know, being the only pro team in town, and now the raiders are coming in the raiders bring the NFL. And you know how the NFL roles I mean, the middle, it's number one is flat out and writer nation is deep as we as we said numerous times on this podcast. Writer nation is deep in three different markets LA. The bay in solar be lost fakes. The single bottle is this when I look at what Vegas turning into. And I look at what they're coming in for listen, the writers can play anywhere. Their fan base is decades in. I wanna know you know, why Bill Foley, had a sudden change of heart because to me, I was looking for other venues, but he said he's not opposed to playing in the raiders dating not as interesting because he also said that he wants to make soccer successful. He may hockey which absolutely MLS is growing in he net. He declined comment had any conversations with the raiders of Mark Davis. Mark Davis climb that he had any conversations with Bill Foley, which tells me those to have taught the what extent we don't really know. But they have talking, it would not surprise me in the least if. They did not go ahead and just make a deal for the MLS, France, the play in soccer writers, thirty because even more after Davis. We have three hundred sixty five days. The field stayed. Okay. You got eight home games when the raiders you have X amount of home games for the UNLV's football team. You probably going to host the patch world championships. One of these year you definitely gonna host the Super Bowl. So what other what other time, do you have besides filling it with concerts? Okay. You might as well have MLS franchise. Just had just we just got news today that, you know, the Las Vegas bowl is going to be held there now to not that it was expected. But it's a Fisher down, they're going to host the Las Vegas bowl, and they're going to be able to offer up better matchups. You know, for for that bowl, you know. Yeah, I need to know for writer nation. Are you guys cool will soccer team being inside the brand new raider study? Because I don't know how writer nation feels about this. I'm digging. They may be cool with it. They may be like hell. No. Get your own spot in our couldn't blame him either. What because the raiders have spent two billion dollars. Getting their own Sadia at UNLV is, is a little brother that's gonna be coming aboard which is fine. But do you really want a soccer team is Joe brand new facility? That's the question. I and I don't know of Reiter nations cool with that. I know of I was part of writer nation. I don't know how cool I will be with, that would when I had a guy tell me he was opposed of my team come into a brand new sitting like that. And he wasn't. He was opposed to the stadium because the stadium was also using public money. But I mean, hey. Chance to meet Bill Foley. He was a really nice guy when I went to the NHL awards a couple of years ago in Vegas really nice guy, very open to the media. He's had success with the Vegas Golden Knights. And so, I think only helps the city of Vegas at the only helps the sport think even helps the raiders because now they get that extra money that they need, but having another another tenant house in deficit. So I think it's a win win, if they decide to do it. But again, do I really want them messing up my field playing soccer? Well, you know what they do? You know they're going to the right now. Currently how it works out as a raiders the only ones gonna play on, on the actual THAAD, roll out grass because UNLV is gonna play on turf that artificial turf that's going to be there while the grass is outside. They're not gonna play on each other's field from what I've heard now you know, that can change. But for now, you know, you're the way they can have their turf hazard colors, and all of that, and understand, I'm, you know, I'm very happy that, you know, these part of this because I feel like that goes to justify more of avenue stadium, built, let me. Without the raiders, they were gonna they were gonna build a five hundred million dollar stadium, and it was going to be public by to make if they were going to get one. So, you know, I mean to me I feel like you know, that you need to have that partnership with a college team, I feel like it's a better use of put the public funds, you know, and those kids are getting opportunities to go to school. And I it's a big deal. Big kind of thing. Now, if I'm a raider fan anima ticket holder. Anything if that stadiums, Megan lots and lots of money then. It's possible that the ticket prices will be will stay within reason, you know, if they need more money goes, I gonna hike ticket prices or you know, I'm not saying that there's any gear up there. But, you know that's. You know, are you are you oppose the mail being is are the writer, citing are you for if they if they decide to go that route? I'm neutral for it. I feel like for the team from of success point of view financial stability. That's more money is better anytime. A team can make more money is better. I mean if you take a look at what they do in Texas. I mean, they have rodeos. I mean MLS team is bad, wait till you have, you know, a hundred bulls and steers, you know crap it on your field. You know, so. Roundup it can't be any worse than you know, you picking up ill. So I mean only makes the field grow. But let me be clear when I say that it's not a done deal. It's not guaranteed that they're going to use rhetoric facility, but that was that was spoken about when it came to location. Now, also, two of, you know, Foley, this into the city council who voted to approve a hundred eighty days, exclusive negotiating agreement between the renaissance company Ford deal to build with on the new MLS stadium on the side of Kashmir field, according to Las Vegas journal review journal should say, so we'll see. I mean, we'll see what happens in the coming months. I'm sure they'll strike deal. If the writer if the raiders happen to be avenue. Other tending Rams be MLS expansion team. The Soviet Bill Foley is, is a good owner of, to bring that team in not thinking, only helps the laws, Vegas sports landscape. When you have two of the most powerful entities in sports where. When I say the NFL in the MLS, because MLS concert, growing just like you know, the NFL being the number one powerful sport right now, though. Who knows? I mean I in about ten years met. Well, let me say this much in about maybe seven to ten years. I can see laws Vegas having the raiders having the Golden Knights. Having Las Vegas aces of the WNBA in also having MLS team as well as an NBA franchising. I can definitely see that. But. Depends on the success of teams like the raiders like the Golden Knights like the aces. You have to look at the demographics, and I don't mean to stereotype here, but the fastest growing segment of population in Las Vegas is Hispanic and again, not trying to stereotype, but typically speaking Hispanics, their favorite sport, is soccer, you know, food the ball. And when I went to the lights games, I went to the first lights game that they ever had out there, and they had there were so many Hispanics, outnumbered everybody, and they were you could hear them and they were cheering and they were loud. Never have great time. And again, it's it is their sport their chosen sport. I mean, you know, we're talking in general. I'm not talking you know specifics, but if that demographic continues to grow and get them to, you know necessarily come to hockey games. They do they come to football games. They go see baseball games too. But I. I believe that it's going to be ground for, for, for 'em LSD there. And I'm you know it's unfortunate that the World Cup is, you know, little bit on the shady side, and decided they want to make sure everybody's up to snuff and, you know, they want their damn pockets, Greece. In it'd get that didn't get the host World Cup because I would have don't even been better, you know, to jump start the stuff. But, you know, it's my own thing, I, you know, they'll go to other countries will make them comply. But, you know. This wait a minute. I think the MLS is a growing sport. Not just amongst. Let's you know population, but it's growing sport among Americans across the board. Whether it happened to be white, whether will be black, whether it happened to be Asian or what have you. I think it's just a growing sport period. And I just like the NFL had to grow in continues to grow its market in its sport. Even even even within being the number one sport. It only helps everybody else involved in those markets. You look at would in a field in Los Angeles having not one but two teams in how it's starting to build up the markets here in LA. So it can only help that, but like I said, we'll see what happens. We got many camp coming up next week, which would be very interesting. We'll see what happens, and we'll talk a little bit more about that with many camp will get into where Derek Carr is and how he's feeling. What his witness? We'll see what happens with that. So we'll figure it out. What? What we'll see have is thank you so much tuning in to the turkeys step off. Silver. Podcast network. Slick. Products. The foothill. Feel Plymouth from the Bill. Forget big. Crack. The home of show. Still remedy. By crack crystals. But I was think without the open face. And in. And in. Was the first Oakland radios? Was when he was aborted a stain dangerous famous when he was calling holes name from the base to the east. Mutt famous. To go back to swinging. If you. Thirty nine. Ninety three to Finnity someone the ground shit that just took the fucking industry. Humpty rada. Can't forget you now the only way to sit baby girl. I'm just letting you know and last, but not least. According to rest in peace. The town from. He told speech appropriate. Three kids. Keno. Oakland bitch. I'm a right. Christa. Mad imports. Banks Seagram recipes. The league with Richie rich. That's right. Representing the town, he signed up when you know how we do it. He signed. Oh, make a straight up. Take Yoho house all day long. You know how we do it in the town Christo, big dank. That's the way we row O school said, no twenties. It don't make no difference floating billing get 'em Negga from the mouth.

raiders writer football Football Bill Foley Las Vegas max Crosby soccer NFL Paul Guenther Rams lamarcus Joyner AFC Jon Gruden Oakland Reiter defensive coordinator Derek Carr Mike Jonathan Abrams
A Blogger's Food Story - Daisi Owens

Not A Single Fork

22:12 min | 5 months ago

A Blogger's Food Story - Daisi Owens

"So we've talked about cooking and we've talked about Shopping Kinda and the holidays days a lot about the holidays and food. But. What does food really mean to you? Well, what does it mean to anybody? Do you have memories or threes about food? Yeah that you think of when you eat certain foods. L.. Certain things. Yeah. So so they bring up really. Even good or bad. Yeah. Okay. Well, that's what we're talking about in season four where telling food stories I'm Candice Conley. On Italian and this is not a single fork another podcast about food and cooking. Yeah we're going to keep it real. Now, this interviews little bit different because this is someone we have interviewed before we did was it. SEASON, two. It was it was days Thanksgiving's giving basically like her and the kids and like her and her and her kids and her family and her kids are kids. So. We're this is an interview with Daisy Owens. Yeah. She is a food blogger. Her blog is my stir crazy kitchen. We talk a little bit about that but more. So we get into the whole. Let's talk about food and what it means to you kinda thing. Anything that. You want to tell people beforehand. Well, there were I mean there were a number of really nice food related stories especially with regard to her. She calls her her grandmother, but she was really her great grandmother and that. And she probably created the love of food. That daisy has because she was one of those grandmothers that you'd go to her house and she let you do anything and she's loved you. Yeah era the precious little sweet thing exactly 'cause at that sounded like an evil which like. You little thing getting oven. She was like the epitome of what we think of or want my grandma's to be, and it was great grandma but still like. He's or baked bread and. Whatever a mess? and. So there were a lot of great stories like that. Yeah that she told, but we'RE NOT GONNA we're not going to ruin it for you. So without further ADO, here's daisy owens tell our listeners a little bit about who you are. Okay. I am a former accountant CPA. Self proclaimed nerd who later turned into a stay at home mom and blogger have two boys aged three and five and a very, wonderfully supportive husband. So. Tell us about your blog. It's called my stir crazy kitchen. It started as a way for me to keep busy after I. had my second quit my crazy demanding sixty hour a week job. So to go from that to being at home I, needed something to fill time I love to cook. So I kinda continued an old blog that I had started and re. Revamped it to what it is today. So, you reinvented yourself I did. As your blog, all about you cooking in the kitchen. Or like what is it about? That's what started as and that was my goal but I realize does mom that doesn't happen as much as I wanted to. So it's a little bit of everything kid activities. Cooking anything like activities in Tulsa globally everything. So it's just kind of my brain on paper. Okay. Well, we've got some questions. We're GONNA kind of go through with you want to ask the first one. Sure. What's your favorite thing to eat and why? I'm sure you guys know this because I've signed up for so many classes of different origins. But my favorite thing to eat are things that I can't make myself. So when I say that it's like Vietnamese food Mexican Food Korean Food Ethiopian. Italian food. There are so many and I'm like always. Wanting to try more and it seems like everything. Try I. Love. But there's no way I could go back to my kitchen and do it. So there's not something specific. That's like your favorite Goto thing that you love now. Like everything. Okay. Hard about problem. So, then what about like guilty food pleasure like something you would hide in the closet the maybe you don't want people to really know that you're snacking on this item. Let's tell everybody what it is. For me that would have to be like I think ice cream or custard. CUSTARD yeah. Do you make your own custard? Like Andy custard. Pastor. Okay. There you go. Yeah. So sometimes that's like I think Sunday we went and got custard and it was a meal replacement for me. I can just eat ice cream or custard as a all and obviously I can't do that front my kids but it happens for me often I would care to admit. What's your favorite flavor? I either go with Oreo or he or Kumbum. He stuff in the ice cream I see. So. Do you have a favorite like this is this isn't on here I was just thinking. Do you have a favorite fast food like Shitty junk food? You know like only asked me feel greasy and gross but I love it. What is this Burger Street is my Favorite for some I think their burgers are some of the best. If I'm not making them at home, that's where I go and they have everything like that shakes up tater tots, curly fries, and it's like made. When you order it so I mean it's junk fast food, but it's still really good and it's Okay. Yeah. I. Love that. And and we actually this next question. We've kind of talked about this when we did our first interview with you about how Family has an effect on you know. Your approach to food and your food world and all that sort of thing. So what was getting give us a sense of what the food world was like when you were growing up. So when I saw this question I had to go back in time and relive my youth and I was thinking when I was growing up my food world was quick and easy. My mom worked two jobs. She went eight to five, five, thirty to nine thirty. So meals were either fast food or something that you could grab like a breakfast bar something like that. So later when I was a little bit older and could stay home by myself, I got to make dinner which for me as a twelve year old, it was just like mixing pasta. Jarred sauce or whatever. But I felt really grown up and I love that I could create it, and then in our house, it was just my mom and I we didn't have a dishwasher and so if I cooked, I didn't have to do the dishes and so I volunteered to cook. Every night. Did your mom likes to cook when she had time or was it just not? Yeah I didn't know she liked to cook until Oh okay later because she never had time but now that I'm an adult she cooks all the time it's amazing. She didn't have the time when I was little. So so everything that you do and like your blog obviously, you like to cook and you like to eat and Did that? Did you just kind of create that on your own then if you didn't grow up with that as a kidney so yeah, I mean I think it started with getting me out of the dishes and then when I got to college I, really enjoyed I like and I think you guys can relate is feeding people on so like creating good food and sharing it and so when I got to college. Everybody's Broken College but my dad is a rancher and I would always have like steak hamburger. Yeah. Fun. and. So I would would get all this from him and then make a big meal and share it with my friends and I loved it. They. Loved it too began Roman. McNamee's or Shit You know that you can afford. I'd Saltine crackers with. Seven. Seas Italian dressing. You just did Lau yeah. Special, dip wow. WILL EAT Rahman probably once a month. Good Rahman. Your bad. She's versatile. She goes around on what I'm. Craving. Well you know one of our. Principles I guess behind this season is that food memories are really powerful and they can bring up more and comforting memories or or on the other hand things that are kind of trouble. So keeping that in mind tell me food story well, like I said since my mom she was a single mom worked two jobs. So I know looking back that money was tight and I know now that. That also included grocery money I didn't know that I was a kid. So she was really good at being creative and using her money wisely she's link Saba why I'm and Accountant. She's really good at budgeting and making everything happened but I can't imagine having that stress as a mother. Thinking about your kids next meal. So now that I have the two little ones like that is I couldn't wait for them to turn six months old so that I could feed them food and like get them interested and they love like them while I've had them home with me for four months and Like they always want to if I'm cutting watermelon they WANNA cut it if. They, see cookies in the cookbook they WANNA make it. So I love creating those memories at home that like maybe I didn't have from my mom had with my grandma, not as often as you would with a Mambi home but I love having that connection to food with them, and now like I said, since she does have time she's a really good cook and she kind of brings that full circle at our kitchen. So. You said you mentioned your grandma. So you did you cook with her as a kid. Yeah. I was actually migrate grandma, but she was the epitome of grandma like we would go to her house and whatever we wanted to do. She'd let us do it and then she'd clean up the mess and so we can make cookies we can make bread we could actually like so addresses and she would just keep all these scraps. Beautiful Yeah Oh my gosh. See the disaster. Probably included food because it can't be that good but I have like pictures of me just sitting she had like an old drawer that pulled out it was like where she would roll out the cookies and I would just sit there and like I'd wear her apron and I could use whatever cookie cutters whatever sprinkles but she just let me go to town Mike that's. Probably a little bit where my love cooking came about is just because she let me go crazy. You know like didn't have to think about the mess didn't have to follow like specifically the rules I mean, she would probably do the recipe, but she let me do it all myself, and so I really tried hard to do that with my boys, but it's not always easy. So. Is there anything she ever made the like you still think about now or you think or you've learned how to cook or you're like my favorite thing that she made Yet chicken noodles. Her chicken and noodles were my all time. Favorite. That's one of my favorite meals and. For whatever reason she put yellow food coloring in her noodle like in her sauce and so they were always like this yellow deep yellow color, and then later when my step mom started making them unlike Meyer th-this yellow. She's Not, yellow. And, my head chicken noodle should've been she made chicken noodle soup and Yellow coloring in the broth. Yeah. But it was like a sticker. It wasn't really Like chicken noodles. Dumplings. Acre big fat noodle. Yellow. I don't know why in late. Day, I've like asked my dad I'm like, does anybody have her cookbook? Where can to get my hands on some of these recipes and he thinks it's like, oh so and so has it or maybe so and so but. I haven't actually physically got to see or touch it. I would love to have like a copy just for what does she used like red wouldn't that fuck with you like that would really fuck with. Our I want that red suit. Read. Chicken. Noodles. Beats yes. Yeah. That was going to be actually one of my questions follow up was that. So do you ever make chicken noodles? You know what's funny is I. Don't feel like I should because I love it so much but I think I have. I. Made the imagine a little lazy. I think you have two kids. That's. That's true. Just so I think I need to add it to my comfort food repertoire, but I usually let my step mom like any time I go home, and that's where she makes no sense. My favorite food means things to you back then to you now do you think that's changed for you? Yes. I think when I was growing up it. It really was just fast and furious. I'd have the occasional weekend with my grandma. And but I didn't I don't think I really appreciated the delicious good food that grandma's make. Now I would kill the have her in the kitchen teaching me what she does. I still have a few grandparents alive and there's certain things I do make with my mom's mom and that I'm gonNA write down the recipe so that I remember it forever but other than that lake. Food to me now kind of feels or cooking I dunno food but cooking feels like my therapy like I said, it brings me joy to feed people and so if I can get in the kitchen and create a meal, it makes me really happy and so like. was starting my blog. My goal was to like feel that every day now two kids I don't get to cook every day or like create for my blog 'cause they don't really care if it's fancier just chicken nuggets but. Trying hard to like get to that point where I can feel like that every. So what's What does the future hold for by stir crazy kitchen I wish. I knew. I am trying to be that outright now. But with the boys going back to daycare, I am having more time. I, think I'M GONNA try to do more videos for the blog but my philosophy of life lately probably because of Corona virus and it translates into cooking is like more of keep it simple stupid basing Neyla. Why do we have to like have these extravagant recipes? When like the best food is really just this cooked properly so I'm trying to steer clear of. You need all these crazy ingredients and this and that when really keep it basic and keep it really really good. So that's been Kinda. My second half of twenty twenty goal when I'm thinking of what I'm going to share. She's so cute right I know she's so sweet gotTa lover and you can get you guys can tell that just by the way she talks and the things that she's telling you. But at the very end, she says, keep it simple stupid and she so right new you've always had that what's your parachute? Oh, cooking without Harris parachute and like judy kind of. That too and like keeping it basic and keeping it simple and that's just point. Just, fucking cook something. Yeah. Don't take it out of a bag. Don't get fast food just it doesn't matter if it's three cans of beans and you call it fucking chilly like don't be afraid don't be afraid. I did think it was really funny about the food coloring though. And that was unexpected. That was unexpected. There was really cute and I agree with her about. When you asked her or whatever about her favorite food and she said, you know things I don't like to make like it's a really good point because. She doesn't know how to make right and it's just not in your wheelhouse. Yeah. Like we were just discussing with you when I go out to eat or when I crave something it's like Asian or Thai or Indian Sushi and I'M NOT GONNA make that Shit at how those are things that we. Don't typically make I will say that I have a love for Asian you do and I will make Asian food but not all of you Shia. Off Throw in some tight gradients but. Overall, you know when I get ready to just open throw open the pantry and the reiter reiter it's going to be a talent, right? It's not full of Asian Shit or not really weird anyway. Okay. I have a question and I do have a question for you though you mentioned that you a Saltine crackers and seven seas dressing yes I don't know what seven seas dressing is I. Don't I don't know if they make it anymore or not. Maybe. There's someone out maybe they chance Nanon's they might have changed the name somebody bought the company, but it was a creamy Italian seven seas in I. Don't know why remember the specific brand I just remember having in my dorm room which they don't even have any more than have big fucking apartments that are fancy with. They. Still have. Should he dorm just depending? Well, yeah. They they kind of are in. Competition in attracting students not sure. How many should he dorm rooms cheaper? The. Cheaper colleges well, whatever. So it's just a it was my old my old dorm room back in the day in the early Seventies. And so salting you, you know box assaulting graders which back then price cuts cost fifty cents maybe and a bottle of this creamy Italian dressing, and you just pour a little dressing on the south. Lake ranch is say. Okay. Dick Dress so it's like dip. Okay. Almost. So if I'd had a bowl which I didn't have. I would have dipped crackers in it but instead. I had a little dollop from the bottle and ended the bottle needs to go in the fridge or did you just finish it off? Oh No, it has to go in the fridge and but we did have little tiny dog rim refrigerator. Yeah that's normal. Yes you. were. Did, they do to defrost them now because you handed defrost by. Ever, defrosted it. So it had a big hunk is oh, my God it was. So it was like in that queer eye episode. Yes where he's like the. Late, around the things that are in there like the food that's in there is like, okay freezer bryce away to Jank, the can out or whatever. So. Anyway Super Q I. Liked that one. Well so we hope you enjoyed this interview. We hope that you been enjoying all of we have. We love these. This is great like best ever best ever. So be sure to subscribe right. Review Review Download where everywhere yet downloads are really important. We get lots of credit for download. And you don't have to pay doesn't cost you anything like it doesn't do anything weird. Your phone it's not gonNA fuck up your internet or anything. No. But if you want to pay us, you can get on Patriots for sure and throws bone throw. Money. We are starving artists ear. And it's not getting any better so. Yeah. So check out our patriotic page. I've been adding some things to as you have a little knife skill action here and there, but you only get to see it if you pay for it if you're a patron if you pay patriotic draw. Yes. So our next interview. Is Someone who works with us it is yeah and I liked that one too. Yeah that was. A Lot. Yeah. That was the surprising one as well yet it's Shayla more Morgan Morgan said, Morris but Morgan and because we had some issues with her last name and you'll see we fixed it. So Shea Leah does our kids classes and she's been to culinary school and she's just a delight and I think you're really three of us really just like giggled the whole time through that one. It was really silly interview filling. Yeah. So so look forward to that one coming up. And I. Think we're done for this episode. What do you think? Okay so stay fresh custard bags covid nineteen better known as corona virus has spread throughout the world symptoms of this respiratory disease may in a fever cough and shortness of breath these symptoms may show up to to fourteen days after exposure if you are experiencing these symptoms and have come in contact with are in an area with an ongoing outbreak, please call hotline and or consult a physician clean and disinfect high touch services for more information. Please visit CDC DOT Gov Slash. covid nineteen. Thank you.

Accountant Good Rahman Daisy Owens Candice Conley Andy custard Tulsa CDC Self Oreo Morgan Morgan McNamee Lau Shea Leah Mambi reiter reiter Mike Meyer
Eagles Injuries, Lions RBs and Downgrading Le'Veon Bell (08/31 Fantasy Football Podcast)

Fantasy Football Today Podcast

05:47 min | 5 months ago

Eagles Injuries, Lions RBs and Downgrading Le'Veon Bell (08/31 Fantasy Football Podcast)

"What's up fantasy football today fans this is the debut episode of fantasy football today and five and yeah I'm dropping this in the feed for the main feed. But that will not be a regular occurrence just letting you know you're just going to hear the first episode here. What I want you to do is go over to fantasy football today and five anywhere you listen to podcasts spotify apple podcasts, stitcher wherever download and subscribe, and let's get this show started. Another injury for the Philadelphia Eagles this time it's jalen Reagan and other bad report for Levy on bell and much more from around the NFL landscape fantasy football today in five starts right now. Welcome everybody today is August, thirty first. It is Monday morning you're listening to fantasy football today in five a podcast to get you caught up fast on the fantasy news and advice that you need to know follow stream on spotify and anywhere else podcasts for found. Colluding Apple podcasts and Stitcher, and so many places I'm Outta Mazer I'm joined by Jamie Eisenberg. Let's start with the big news Jalen Reiter Attaran his shoulder he's out three to four weeks for now what does this mean for the Eagles offense? Let's talk about Carson Wentz his fantasy value. I mean, clearly it's a, it's a downgrade for Raider who being drafted in the latter half of drafts. Now, basically undrafted unless you know you're going, sit on him for. A few weeks while he's out and who knows if it's only three to four weeks, you know based on the season being so close. So it's it's Glatt downgrade for him as an upgrade for guys like Sean Jackson Greg Ward. J Dare, Sega Whiteside, and hopefully Sean. Jeffrey. You know we don't know if he's going to be back anytime soon but the tight ends booth Zakar Scottish not miles sanders and Boston. But for Carson Wentz, it's just another hit. You know a guy who's dealing with a back injury himself losing his left tackle and Andre. DILLARD. So the offensive line is banged up the receiving core is banged up he's up he still a low end starter. But now he's behind the elder statesman of Matt Ryan Tom Brady, and drew brees and to Sean Jackson I look week one is against Washington. He had a huge game in week one against Washington in two thousand nineteen he figures to be the primary wide receiver in week one where are you drafting Sean? Jackson? Still in the same spot again, we don't know how long rigor is going to be. Also the other side of that Israel comes back Jeffrey comes back. Jackson doesn't necessarily lead this team and targets I don't think he's GonNa lead the team in targets even if those guys are out first -nificant stretch of the season. So I think Jacksonville a guy you're looking at and around eight at the highest round ten probably the sweet. Spot for him better in non PR THAN PR. But again, if you do like that week one matchup which you should, then he could be in the number three wide receiver conversation flex conversation and hopefully he's done this before it's not as Washington he has a big week one time and time again. I Cooper Cup has an ankle injury but not expected to be serious he's expected to be fine so we'll skip that for now. Jamie. Eisenberg. Are you ready for the offer of a lifetime? Okay. Do you WANNA be a New York jets running back? I asked the jets fan on Sunday? If you could have if you love EON bell and you're getting fifteen million dollars a year to go through hell or would you take ten million dollars a year to be in the happiest place on earth? What would you do and the jets fan said while you probably take the money because the money and started overlook that type scenario and you hope you make the best of the best of a bad situation but this is awful. And I don't put this on Levy on bell per se as much as I do Adam gays situation if you are going to try and win game you're GonNa try and lean on Levy on bells much. You can not thirty seven year old frank war so bell is going to fall to a spot where he ended up probably being a good value pick for fantasy players but ADP right now around three around four if you're still taking him in that range, you are drafting him as a steeler not as a jet and certainly not as a jet and twenty twenty but the reports were that he's not running while he's not looking good. So where are you willing to take Levy on Bell? Before you pull trigger. Round five and PR would be the earliest round six in non I'm taking. Ronald Jones ahead of him in non I'm taking my ingram ahead of him might at this point take Brahim moster ahead of Levy on belt in non. But Jonathan Taylor David Johnson Todd Gurley Melvin Gordon all those guys should be going ahead of Levy on bell regardless of format is not a good situation for him because if the receptions come down, we saw the rushing as bad as it could be last year. I don't know what's going to be that much better and again. Adam. Gates. Frank War he's probably gonNA use springboard more so than we like to see for again, a guy who's thirty-seven-year-old and one final quick news item here Jamie de'andre swift the rookie running running back for the Detroit lions he's been out. For about a week now. So Kerryon Johnson, should he be moving up draft boards and when would you take Kerryon? Johnson one hundred percent Gary Now put himself in that round seven conversation. You know again, regardless of format swift was going around five range, and so the gap should close swift earliest is probably six and carry on the earliest it's probably run seven. But if you're looking for a guy to get off to a good start, swift is probably going to have to earn your stripes. I think it's GONNA come in. The passing game because that's what they've been talking about using him in that regard and carry on, they probably want to limit his touches because he has a hard time staying healthy but similar MARLA MAC. You're concerned about John and Taylor maybe having his workload increase as the season goes on and Marlin Matt getting a good start. I think those guys are very similar. I've always said they're very similar but now I would take of on ahead of Marlon because of the opportunity that he has as bad as Detroit, run game has been Still. Been Lead them in touch while he's healthy and this could be a good opportunity for also made up. For more extensive fantasy football coverage, listen to the fantasy football today podcast on spotify apple podcasts stitcher you're smart speakers or anywhere else podcasts are found and thanks for listening to fantasy football today in five our debut episode. Great to have you along. This is your audio Al for fantasy news and advice in five minutes or fewer. If you enjoy the POD, please leave a five star review in apple and we'll be back tomorrow.

football Sean Jackson Levy bell spotify Jamie Eisenberg Carson Wentz jets apple Jonathan Taylor David Johnson Washington Jeffrey Detroit Philadelphia Eagles Jalen Reiter Attaran back injury Frank War EON bell jalen Reagan NFL
Fred Seibert: When in doubt, count!

Math & Magic: Stories from the Frontiers of Marketing

46:06 min | 1 year ago

Fred Seibert: When in doubt, count!

"The Community of six hundred thirty million professionals Lincoln's powerful targeting tools help you zero in on reaching the right audience down to their job title company name industry and more better targeting eagles message your your customers care about to redeem a three one hundred dollar linked and add credit and launch your first campaign go to link Dan Dot com slash magic or your free one hundred dollar added credit terms and conditions apply <music>. You're listening to math and magic production iheartradio when we I got to M._t._v. you actually where the Guy <music> who inspired us to do animated logos I said well. What are we going to do in between the videos and the V._J.'s are we gonNA do jingles? Oh No we can't do jingles and I said well. What what do we do? You said how about this imagine. It's like a picture of a cow drawn cow said Yeah said and all of a sudden an X. comes down and cuts the cow's head off and it falls to the ground and you see the veins coming out in the blood spurting out and the cow vomits and in the vomit vomit is the logo and went. Oh my God I can do anything I want. I am Bob Pittman and this is mathematics stories from the frontiers of marketing where we explore the insights side of marketing the creative side and how they come together to create the truly remarkable ideas and successes today on this episode. We have someone who is a true iconoclast somebody somebody Alamo Frankie Genius Fred Seibert welcome Fred thanks Brad and I were art of the birth of M._t._v. where at the First Twenty Four Hour Day Movie Pay Service the movie channel before that playing around with the concept of making channel the thing instead of just letting the shows at the image of the network Bredon. I also shared roots and radio as our start Brad gets most of the credit for the original groundbreaking look unveiled m._t._v.. He also helped your labor and when she created the first tween a network which Nickelodeon I can still remember when he pitched the brand image for nickelodeon and it was like Orange Orange and of course all these years later was impactful as the look of M._t._v. bread went on to do so much more and branding network creative and a major career in a major influence an animation from his time is the head of hanna-barbera to his own fred reiter he also discovered and develop some great talent one of his superpowers. We're here to get into all that and more but I fred we're going to do you in sixty seconds. Just give us quick reactions just to wellness up so fred do prefer cats or dogs dogs dogs hoodies or button downs downs power puff. Girls are Johnny Bravo. Oh definitely power puff girls mets or Yankees Yankees Martha Quinn Nina Blackwood Martha Cup or Cohn Cohn Disney or Hanna Barbera Barra for sure. It's about the get harder. What's your favorite city New York? City favorite cartoon bugs bunny. What would you eat for your last meal? Probably the same thing I eat for my first meal some yogurt and some chicken and you've always eaten at known you smartest person you know Bob Pittman Oh right that he wrote that's tough to I don't know my parents. I guess I got working in my parents pharmacy. Favorite Book Dashiell Hammett Emmett anything that he wrote quote to live by something by Winston Churchill about success is after a lot of failures worth fat or fashion trend You participated in probably my Khakis and white button-down shirt. He's never changed. God bless you who would play you in a movie. Everyone says that I look like the late Herald Ramos. What would be the title of your memoir? He tried really hard proudest professional achievement. There's nothing I've ever done that. I didn't have a great time doing it so oh. How about this creating the catalog for a jazz label called Mosaic Records God bless you? What's your favorite ice cream flavored a mixture of chocolate yogurt flavor plane Beth live concert B._B.? King at the Phil Maurice Done John Excellent that was a good set of questions before we go back to your beginnings. Let's talk about people because I do think this morning your superpower. Let's talk about people who you hired Mentor D- or help develop Seth Macfarlane from family guy famed Judy McGrath who went on to be C._E._O.. Of MTV networks who by the way has been here she said the interview when is what music do you like. She said somebody new said wrong and the rest of the time you talked and she got the jobs. Exactly she said Bruce Springsteen am I said Ron and fully who helped bill showtime programming and headed that developed her way. We all did bell but you know you've had a really great track record. How do you spot talent? You know it's a really mystical process when you asked me to come and talk to you about working with you. I said you know I I only watch TV. I don't make come talk to me anyway and we had a quick cup of coffee like at the four seasons or something like that and I didn't think another thing about it until till you called and said you're hired and it was like I wonder why and I think that almost everybody that I've met with its that seem kind of process. Basically it's having a conversation with somebody and go you know I just want to spend more time with them and it really comes down to did they say something or did. We have a dialogue that made me go boy. I would really like to help this person. So how do you empower them to develop breakthrough not ordinary ideas. What I feel like? I've done is one. Let people know that my major goal at work is to have fun because I think you can make money from having fun. The second thing is to provide structure in a way that doesn't seem overly structured you know in my t._v.. Days it was making sure that spots were thirty seconds not a second longer or shorter when you and some of our other colleges save it doesn't matter how long they are like. I don't know discipline seems like a good idea or when we made <hes> cartoons to begin with and I was in love with looney tunes. I said well. Let's make them the same length as looney tunes. They said why because looney tunes are the greatest cartoons ever made what I found over the years is that by giving some people structure and almost nothing else other than sort of a philosophy of where you'd like them to go if they don't WanNa be there they leave they quit that Oh vibe with you one way or the other and if they do they've sort of accepted the structures the strictures and as long as I don't over note them in our business. It's all about the notes that you give and all that type of stuff in the cartoon business. I just would say to people or what cartoon do you really WanNa make if you you have one you really WanNa make we'll do it and if you tell me you have fifty you wanna make I don't WanNa do it. It means you don't care about anything so I'm just looking for people who care about something when you were talking about Judy and I asked her who she liked and she said Bruce and I set wrong because I don't have a good thing about bruce the fact that she cared you know the Bruce haters coming after you right believe they've been coming after my whole life the fact that she cared men all the difference to me in the world not that I agreed right. You've you've got these people. How would you describe your coaching technique getting the best out of people I ask them to tell me what they wanNA? Do the way that I sort of think about it is there's a big circle of ball and everything in it in that ball is what I love and then they have their own circle in their own ball and it's everything that they love and I said why don't we just like find the places where we touch just where we kiss and then we're both going to be really really happy and the only thing I want is like I ought to be happy while we've been able to do you for living over our lifetime is kind of magical in that. I think that what I've done my whole life is make people happy the people that I work with want people to be in love with the work that they do is people are really passionate about their work. I never hired anybody who actually knew what they were doing. That had done it before. That was one of our hallmark T._v.. We had these creative promo departments. Once people came in and started saying well. I worked on Promos over here like I didn't WanNa hire them. If they were wonderful writer that was great if they were wonderful director that was great. One of the earliest people I hired had just come out of film school in his first job was cutting negatives film negatives at a porno place. I'm like okay fine. You know like what if so let's jump back a little <hes> want to get some some insights from your youth about you. Your parents were both pharmacists owned the pharmacy and Long Island drew you work there and you were going to Columbia to become a pharmacist yeah anything in that. What does that tell us about you? I I have no idea other than that. I was very influenced by my apparent. Everyone in my family are pretty much scientists. There's biochemists. There's neurosurgeons. There's other pharmacists chemists and I decided at six. I was going to be a chemist in you know I would blow up the basement with you know experiments and all that type of stuff but when I was twelve a lightning bolt struck that had changed my life. It's like this you know the Beatles movie this just come out yesterday. It was like that and in fact it was the Beatles it was the day they went on Ed Sullivan in my life changed I went and bought a guitar taught myself. Guitars already a musician. I started bands. I did all the things that everybody did but I was a chemist and I was a science math kid and I went to college for that and I'm in Zoology class one day where you we have been dissecting frogs great and the next week we're going to dissect rats so I get there and all the rats are alive and the first thing zoology teacher said is now. I'll show you how to kill the rat before you dissect. It and I looked at my lab partner. I said you know I like the Beatles more than this and I walked out. I walked right to the college radio station. My path changed instantly so your parents who are the pharmacist. What do they say oh great Fred? You're leaving this wonderful career to go. Be a radio something we did not have a decent conversation for the next ten years actually really yeah. They were very very upset when they became less. Upset is when I went to work in radio and I was forced to wear a suit to work and they thought oh it'll all be okay. Well actually just make feel better from my parents told me for the first ten years I was working out of radio crazy business. Go back to College College. Be a normal kid and then about it might thirty sometime. They said Kasha sure I'm glad you listen to US exactly finally said to my folks. I'm doing everything the thing you taught me. All the ways taught me to do it. I took my own path in doing it and they finally sort of come down and even though pretty much for my entire career and toy started making cartoons. They had no idea what I did for living after you're leaving this possible careers. Careers pharmacist you eventually wound up as the promotion strict with a country music station W. H.. N. In New York one of your great supporters who I'd worked with and who I loved dearly Dale Pond recommended you to me pre M._T._v.. It was in the early taste pay-tv. You came over to join us and the Cable Revolution Yeah at the beginning of the cable networks phase. Why don't you make that jump well? You know this is going to sound flattering. I did it completely because of you. Dale had left the country music radio station and left me alone and the guy was working for at that time in radio. I had no respect for whatsoever pretty much anything I did. He told me it wasn't any good so you call me one day. You said you want to be in television. Oh you said okay come have coffee not with me. I went to Dale's files and had files on everyone in the business and there was one article about you about your promotion that W N._B._C.. We're W N._B._C. and we're gonNA make you rich. I thought to myself you know. This guy is younger younger than me and I've heard of him so that's one check so we go. We have the coffee and I walk out and I called my best friend and I said this guy that I just talked to is so much smarter than my Boston radio he does. What do you think about that? I said well here's what they'll taught. Me Doesn't matter what the job is worked for the smartest person you can find and at the time you're the smartest person I could find. That's what television that's flattering so any career lessons and that for the folks listening go work for the person not the job. I tell people that all the time working for smart people has always worked working for Ted Turner working for Scott Sasso working for you I would go in at ground level at a job and I always came out at the top floor her and then I go off on my own for awhile then when I screwed that up I'd go back to a job. We started experimenting with Network Branding with movie channel. Although the movie channel has been lost in history yeah so it's really some pioneering work done there <hes>. How would you describe that I mean that was very early and we were about the only people that were doing that? Approach to let's make the network the star not the program the stuff in nineteen eighty when we started together may eighth nineteen eighty. Wow what a memory yeah yeah. The average home in America had two channels of television. I lived in New York City so we had seven but you know the average home had to however in the same town that had seven T._v.. Stations are about seventy seventy five radio stations and over the twenty five thirty years before radio had learned to compete because they only each had a sliver of the thing and what that effectively came out to his each had personalities you and I had either the benefit or the curse of having come out of that business where we had to compete like crazy at a television station they just turn on one light switch and the other switch opens a hole in the ceiling and money drops on their head because it was just easy to make money and television. Oh vision so we started from the premise that you have to have a personality it turned out that in television that was called an innovation and by the way we would probably about thirty years too soon but indeed that was the demise of of T._v.. As we know it when the loyalty was to the program not the network when you asked me to come back and work on Nickelodeon there were only thirty cable networks which we thought were it's amazing and that Nickelodeon was number thirty and people like what do you mean only three thirty you know and then if that end their thirty I have to tell you at M._T._v. time. I was so freaked out that there were thirty that the resultant were came out because I was like Oh my got Oh my God what are we can do to stand out. What are we going to stand out and a lot of it just came out of the panic of getting lost in the Mush Tillis move onto starting M._t._v.? The board would not approve the idea but I did get us a budget to develop up in that period. Did you ever think we weren't going to get approval the launch M._T._v.. How did you believe in truth? Be told when you first told me about it. I thought it was the dumbest idea in the world because I was a music guy and I had seen you know if view crummy music videos I hadn't thought about it too much and then luckily somebody played me a music video that made you know the little white go off. I don't know whether it was blind faith or I was too naive to know that you had to have faith like you told me it was going to happen. I believe you with a youth totally. Totally I was just talking with Alan Goodman my soon to be partner at that point and he said you know we didn't really know it was going to happen but you look at all the other people that were around you and it just had to happen. I think that's really true well. You know we went to the head of Warner Communications and American Express that on the Joint Venture Warner Amex where we got started and we got a meeting with Steve Ross. Who is the C._E._O.? Of Warner along with his deputies he's David Horowitz etc and we got Jim Robinson and his deputy Lou Gerstner for American Express. I don't know if you remember but we were worried that when we showed these videos to American Express what you said let's find the Tamest I think we found the Livia Newton John Video the talk about the launch of of M._t._v. we of your member but in the meeting they do have to play that kind of stuff implying a living John was to to their credit. Jim Robinson's the first one to say okay. I'm in for my half Steve so awesome we locked out. Let's go to the launch of M._t._v. and talk about some of the things that really I think still stand out today the logo yeah we had no money for a logo. I was probably the cheapest man the world and had expectations. You could create a lot out of nothing well we. We were really started. Venture capital guys well again. Here's the metric I use. A guy comes to see me for a job in the Promo Department from C._B._S.. Channel Two in New York and I said how much you get paid leaves getting paid twice. As much as I was that was the metric we all earned intern wages if somebody had a dollar and we were asked him to spend ten cents we knew that be bad complete found people that had a penny and we gave him the dime they thought they had all the might. Tell people all the time absolutely just hold on a second. You've got so much more to talk about. We'll be back after a quick break. When it comes to marketing marketing your business it's about reaching the right audience at the right time and connecting them with the message that will resonate the most you know for us question as okay? That's great idea. What are the tools well? What we have today that we never have is linked in? I'd I've had this twenty years ago even ten years ago at this level I can only imagine what kind of impacted could have had that with a community of six hundred and thirty million professionals Lincoln you have access to the world's business leaders decision-makers plus the the people who influence those decision-makers practitioners doing the hands on work today and tomorrow future leaders everyone who matters to your brain plus Lincoln's powerful targeting tools help you zero in on reaching the right audience down to their job title oil company named Industry More better targeting equals a message your customers care about which in turn leads the more trust built with your customers and according to a recent survey seventy one percent of people use information from linked then to make him formed warned business decisions now. This is what I love about lengthy at this is a company that's willing to stand behind the claims they make so to redeem a free one hundred dollar linked and credit and launch your first campaign go to link Dan dot com slash slash matching. That's linked in dot com slash magic for your free one hundred dollars added credit terms and conditions apply welcome back to math and magic. We're here with Fred Cyber so talk about the logo you set out. You got the mission. You and I had these discussions. I naively say we'll do our own star wars. Why has the story was slowing? You go to Bob Ours will look cheap. Yeah you said look if we do something no one's ever seen before they won't know it's cheap exactly so tell me about the logo well the low though itself actually came about because I was too scared to go to someone famous I wanted to go to Milton glaser. WHO's one of the most famous graphic designers of the last fifty years and I was like oh he's can be really expensive and Opal get all the credit and I wanted to little credit at least so Mike Childhood friend who I've known since four years old a guy named Frank Lewinsky had just started a little design firm behind Taichi studio above Piccolo chemists on six avenue and frank had been the guy because he's a year older than me who had always introduced? Let's meet every new rock band. He introduced the monkeys he introduced me to the mothers of invention to the WHO to Jeff Beck and I knew the frank love music so I go down to his little Tai Chi studio place and I go well you guys design logo for this rock channel. We're starting and they're like yes and they didn't ask me anything. They didn't ask me how much they were going to get paid or anything like that and this was right after you sent out the first memo in June of nine thousand nine hundred and boy do I wish I had that memo so for a year are they design logos and I just rejected everything probably five hundred designs so finally they come in the office one day. We're actually going to go on the air soon right and we still don't have anything and and they bring a pile and I'm like no no going through the whole pile and at the bottom of the pile is a piece of tracing paper remember that you could see through and it was all wrinkled and they had flattened it out. It was just like a <unk> sketched TV. I want okay. That's the one I can see frank like rowling kind of. He and I now disagree but what I had heard is that the woman there's three partners and one of them wasn't really a designer. She was Jose <hes> production manager and she had done it and frank sodden hated in through in the garbage. She fished it out and put it at the bottom of the pile. He says that's not true but you know may or or as a good story. The only as I said yes is that Dale had taught me one lesson about design. You need to dominate the space and that big blocking A._M.. Was the only thing they showed that when you put it on T._V.. Screen fill the whole scream okay we dominate the space send in a world of thirty channels in day when the screen was square exactly right so then I go oh you know we need official colors. You know a logo supposed to be a thing that you make and it never changes so they come to my office without ten different boards everything was on boards in those days and then a little board where frank had illustrated ten or twelve of them on acrylic overlays so I put all the boards up on my peg board and couldn't decide and this one on literally for like weeks and weeks and weeks and finally we had to do something and I looked at them. I'm just staring at all of them. They were all. Oh like really kind of cool and I said why don't we just use them all at once all the time the I don't know who I was talking to and there's like what I said well. We're television. We move shouldn't the logo move and to be honest with you. That was my first. I real- revelation that I was in television that we had come up with an idea that only worked in television the other thing you did when you did those promos great stuff you laid the music bed down I yeah and cut cut music and everybody else in that era people forget this. They don't realize that was an innovation that everybody else did the video. I enrolled some music under so I got that all from Dale I was an audio guy and I was a really good audio guy of mixer and all that engineer her and when we started making our first radio spots we would film country music stars and then he said we'll go to the audio studio and cut the audio track. I went well. The video guy tells me no you have to. I I do the picture and then he goes Fred. We own the audio studio. It's free if you get it right in the audio studio them the three hundred dollar an hour video studio. We'll go much faster by the time we got to MTV V._p.. I realized that he was absolutely right. I was hiring basically kids. You know twenty one just out of school and we didn't have any money now fast for twenty years I go to M._t._v. one day. I'm running their online business for a little while and and go who's the Promo Department now and they tell me and I go down and I introduced myself to a couple of people in the went you wh- what you're the one well what are you talking about. They said they make us do the audio oh I we're filming. People like why so twenty years later they were still doing it but boy what it did is it brought and rhythm and energy it brought the backbeat of rock and roll into those spots everything was beat. You know I'm in radio. I love audio. People don't realize how much of your emotion is not driven by what you're looking at hearing I used to joke all the time that we could make the spots black and they would have the same effect right those horror film you on the next to scares you. Turn off the sound very scary so let me I'm not gonNA spend all of our time on M._t._v. but I wanna hit one other thing here. The cable operators wanted us to pay them as you say we had intern wages and no money so so our good friend male stunts who actually had Harvard N._B._A.. Said we should use consumer. Pull what else consumer pull and he goes will get the consumer to demand it. <hes> great so you and Tom Preston came over to my apartment one night to show me a cable Brat spot <hes> embedded in the cable brats. Was this memorable line. I Want My M._t._v.. The actual spot said they grow up with rock and roll. They grew up with television now. They want their MTV. George Lois who never saw something that he couldn't copy had already copied a famous T._v.. Commercial from the fifties called I want my maple for a really horrendous tasting an oatmeal he had sports stars like Mickey Mantle and Joe Nemeth crying like a work by Babe Oh and he redid it with Mick Jagger and you know whoever David Bowie p towns and all that type of stuff and they showed us the spot so we went and we pitched to you. I think you saw the feeling of it right away. I remember going into our bosses office in saying but H._B._O.. Spending ten million dollars a year in advertising goes you're lucky you have have to somehow or other people in the media business didn't actually believe in advertising as the weirdest thing and so I went to jail I said look we only have two million dollars. Dale was this brilliant hybrid of a strategist and creative guy and as a strategist what he understood is that we had no money to spend on this ad and he did an incredible data dump of where could M._T._v. be put on against how much media cost in that particular market and he did three or four or five cross tabs to figure out the most likely places that if we put on these spots we'd have an that we would get people calling and making the cable operators insane and that's exactly what happened. He literally took what Mayo said and put on the beginning of the spot. He had Pete Townsend doing it. America Demand Your M._T._v. right then people go. I Want My M._t._v.. I Want My M._t._v. and then Pete Townsend again with a telephone going. Call Your cable operator and say I want and God knows i. I think we made customer representatives from all over America crazy within four weeks I had a guy stopped me at a cable show cable operator and said I hate you and I go why. Why do you hate me and he goes because my phone rings all all day with those people saying I want can't get any work done? Demand is bad we reverse that demand curve and by the way I just sort of flip at a couple years one of the major cable operators decided they were GonNa Take M._t._v. off the air and you called up up and you said we need new spots and what's that you said we have to get people to keep them from turning off M._T._v. and we went and filmed a lot of rockstars half in shadow and all in black and white going. They're trying to take away your MTV T._v.. And we put those on the air and Lo and behold they did not cancel our channels. God bless them so let's jump to Jerry labeling. Let's jump to Nickelodeon you. Mentioned Nickelodeon was number thirty Yup. It was a toddlers channel invented to help Time Warner cable. Get some cable franchises. It's exactly the way that net flicks uses kids on their service. Now it is a come on that no family can resist and barrage had basically no value. He's asked Oh we have this idea. We're GONNA turn between channels. Actually Jerry said this is great schoolteacher. I got a great idea. We relaunched it to that point. Only MTV had an image as a network and your mission. You need to do with Nickelodeon what we did with M._T._v.. How on Earth did you ended up with orange after the M._t._v. logo thing which was really the most visible manifestation of the creative work designers came out of the woodwork wanting to work with us? We found somebody up in Boston. Guy Called Tom. I'm cory in his partners Scott. Nash we ask them to come up with some ideas for logos so they came up with a bunch of things and all of them were pretty standard logos truth be told I picked a really standard one. We were about to go in and pitch it. When Allen said you know our thing is is this moving logo and they have one here? Why didn't we pick that? I said well it's orange. It's only one color and so we call Tom. How come like orange like you said he goes? Well you know this is the color it's a pan tone to one and it is not found in nature anything we put it on. We'll stand out from that so we go into pitch it to Jerry and her team and she's like but you're the M._T._v. t._v.. Guys how come we don't get lots of colors. I think you said probably something similar and we just think I said Orange and I think we just have dance really hard and at that point you were willing to give us our pets and the thing that was really brilliant about their solution is that it wasn't an orange logo. It was white type that was always exactly the same one of the key elements of a Lagos. You have to have something something that is fixed but the orange thing ended up being thousands of different shapes around it and sometimes they were real shapes like a boy riding a bicycle or girls Ed and sometimes it was just an abstract design China blob a splat color burst or something like that and we realize that we could have fun using it. The thing about designers is they hate the work that anyone else has done so you you give them a logo that somebody else designed. The first thing they're gonNA WANNA do is change it and what we did with M._T._v. is basically the m became a canvas for artists so that any artist could put their own imprint on it and not feel like it wasn't there's and the shape thing at Nickelodeon gave every artist a chance to be themselves and it worked we wanted these networks feel like a human. We once had a personality. Yes so let's jump. We've talked about Fred Seibert. Maybe two point Oh let's go to bed cyber three point zero animation yeah you went on to be president of hanna-barbera. You had your own animation studio. You Begin this living expert on animation. Hannah held you interested in animation word that come from well. I always love cartoons and as a kid the exact same way that several years later I fell in love with rock and roll. I remember buying a bugs bunny t shirt when I was in college. Thinking was the coolest thing you know in the world when we I got to M._t._v. you actually where the guy who who inspired us to do animated logos I said well what are we going to do in between the videos and the V._J.'s I said are we gonNA do jingles. Oh No we can't do jingles and I said what what do we do. You said how about this imagine. It's like a picture of a cow drawn cow said yeah he said and all of a sudden an X. comes down and cuts the cow's head off and it falls to the ground and you see the veins coming out in the blood spurting out and the cow vomits and in the farm it is the logo and went. Oh my God I can do anything I want. This is the most exciting moment of my life and we started hiring animators to do all that stuff so in that process I started talking to lots of people we did animation. I'm curious guy and I just ask them a million questions and a few of them started telling me how the cartoon business work so I started reading books about the history of the cartoon business so one day nickelodeon comes to me takes me breakfast and said you know we've been licensing all of our programming. I said Yeah they said you know it's getting really expensive. Because the more viewers we get the more they want to charge us and in our most popular cartoon is this thing from England called danger mouse. We think we are going to pay enough that. We ought to start thinking about making our own. I said Oh great and they said what should we do silence. I go what they said well. What do you think we should do for cartoons I said why are you asking me this? Will you do our animation. I said well one. I don't animated anything and two I essentially take your logo and wiggle it for ten seconds. Please so we'll you're the only person I know I said okay well. I think you should make cartoons. The Way Looney tunes did and just start improvising and they didn't want to do it the way that I wanted to do and you know me like if they don't take my I get really upset and as a consultant they never quite take your idea so long story short i. A help them make a deal on a library of cartoons and I wanted a bonus and they wouldn't give me the bonus and I got so mad that I just started complaining to everybody and one of those people I complained to Scott Sassa the president of Turner entertainment he said. How did you do that deal? You make logos. I said Yeah but it was logical. I did X.. Y. Z. You know types fine and they were hanna-barbera cartoons eighteen months later. He calls me up and he said hey you know we just bought hanna-barbera. I said Yeah I heard I read in the paper us. Why don't you come run hanna-barbera? I'm like what I said look. I don't know anything about cartoons his story about it. It's a disaster there. You can't go wrong. If you don't make a hit. They haven't had a hit since the smurfs. Nobody will blame you and if you do have a hit everyone will think your genius so here's the kicker I literally look at my watch and on my watch our four hanna-barbera characters completely by coincidence. It's ten thirty five in the morning. I said I have ninety days. I have wind down the agencies will wait the first time I walk in the Hanna Barbera building. I'm president of the company I made to cartoons full series ten million dollars disasters. They fail like immediately named the what too stupid dogs and Swat what cats the radical squadron okay so I go back to Ted Turner. I go Ted. I know I'm out of budget but I need another ten million dollars us what I said. Well you know I I gotta get you some hits another ten million dollars. What are you going to do with ten million dollars? I said I'm GonNa make forty eight short cartoons because what you just had to failures like what makes you think you're going to say Ted if I do something forty-eight time so you think I'll do something right and you know the Natural Entrepreneur Ted was like you're right go for it and that was that and hits were power puff girls Dexter Laboratory Johnny Bravo courage the cowardly dog tau in chicken and I am weasel so you're at Hanna-barbera. You now have a hit Yep. Now you being think you're a animator actually to be honest with you. I figured that animation was sort of sideline that I was going to do for those years and that was gonna be it Ted Announces One day that he's selling company and selling at the Time Warner. I'm one of those guys that runs around the edge of the field to get goal like I can't run through the scrum and Warner Brothers scrum and it just wasn't the right fit for me and I figured I'd come back to New York and go back to doing the things that I had done in T._v.. Somehow I didn't know how somewhere between Judy McGrath herb scandal was running nickelodeon and Tom Preston who's running MTV networks they I said Hey why don't you come back and be a consultant. I never going to be a consultant again. Make things like I'm a maker. They said okay well. You may cartoons for Nickelodeon as long as you come in consult with us once a month. I'm like okay I could do that now. I don't care if you listen to my ideas and I started Fred Reiter you know in one thousand nine hundred eight and his history yeah so this is a podcast about math magic yep. How do you use both? I didn't know what to do for M._T._v. because I was the head of Promo but we had no shows and in television promos are watch bill cosby in a very special episode Thursday. We didn't have that I remember actually going out with Dale and we go out to the beach an against it and I just said walk with me and we walked back and four on the beach for five or six hours while I tried to figure out what the Promo should be and I realized that the problem that M._t._v. had was twofold. One is nobody knew what the hell it was and so telling them to watch watch this or watch. That wasn't gonNA be very useful so I realized I had to tell them story but I also realized something else that we had learned in radio which is at the end of every song people have a reason to tune away so that meant in MTV every three minutes people could leave. The ratings lesson I had learned was time spent listening was more important than how many people listen because we get somebody to listen for fifteen minutes for a few songs and through the commercial you made more money and if they listen that long more people were going to listen so I realized that an M._t._v. our job was actually not be cool. We knew how to be cool not be crazy and creative that we were going to you that anyway not tell people time the shows it was to get them to listen longer time spent viewing so fast forward nickelodeon one of the great things about Jerry as she was very research crazy and she said we don't understand why no one watches as you remember one show had a rating and everything else had hash marks basically zero and I said well. What do you know should well? Here's what we know. We can't figure it out forty four percent of everyone who has cable tunes into Nickelodeon once a week and stays for less than six minutes. I said Oh okay so that's the problem. The South to what do you mean is it. We just have to get them watching longer. We go back and we work out a promotional clock because the way nickelodeon did it was like nuts. It was well. If you have a minute here. We'll put a promo and if there's not another minute for two hours then we'll do up there was no organization and as you well know with media at dependable organized wheel makes all the difference so I go back to Jerry to the next meaning I said Jerry Gary I found twenty five million dollars for you to market to what what are you talking about. I said well the whole deal. Is this time spent viewing thing we worked out o'clock and there's GonNa be two minutes of promos and our and they're going to be distributed this way. We'll I'll have to re cut some of the shows but we have no new shows. We have to do that too. Will where's the twenty five million dollars coming. I said well your rate for your spots are five hundred dollars apiece and if you add up how many there are over the course of you it's twenty five million dollars and we're GONNA use them like ad campaign not like a television channel. We have a story to tell. I don't care about your show. The only thing I care about is your kids that watch them and the story that we were telling them. I remember having a fight with my accountant at MTV at the time and screaming about how much money were giving us and I said. Would it surprise you to know that I not only know how much every second video costs but I can tell you how many any time that second will run in a year fast forward. He's my C._F._O.. Now we've been friends ever since because counting delpont taught me another lesson when in doubt count and counting together with a creative creative approach makes for as you say here math and magic almost WANNA in the show on that such a great way to do I don't WanNa if you just a couple more things. Though we're talking about creativity talk to me about the rule of the old dogs like us and creativity we sort of know the power of young fresh thinking. We were that once upon a time. Do you think there is a role or is this a young person's game. I think there's always a role for anybody who gives a crap one way or the other. I decided a long time ago that I have three rules for myself. That you know have not always made me wealthy but they worked out really nicely. which is my first rules? I want to have a good time. My second rule is I wanNA make some money and my third rule. Is I WANNA stand the people that I work with figure figure at any point. If I get two of those things like I'm onto something there was a period of time where I was still fresh enough to that work that we had done in the early eighties that when I would meet with a new team of people go well you know what we did. M._T._v. was this so well we did it. Nickelodeon was that and I realized I was starting to be the get off your lawn guy you know and I decided instead that what I needed to be was what people had been with me. which is the favorite uncle I would go through the point of view that I had and why I had that point of view because it's still as fresh in my mind today as it was thirty years ago forty years ago? I realized that people need room to be themselves. The way I recall what I do now is I'm the burs in the bowling alley. You might not get a strike. You'll never get a gutter ball and by never getting a gutter ball. You have the confidence to be able to do something wonderful. The first person that I brought in to nickelodeon Colombian was a guy that you know called Scott Webb who had been movie channel producer and he made a bunch of promos and he comes in shows them to me and I go. What the hell are you doing because this is what they wanted? I said I didn't hire sure you do what they wanted. If they knew what they wanted they wouldn't have hired me and I wouldn't have hired you now. You better start doing the things that you believe in not the things that they believe in and from that day on not only was brilliant but the thing that very very few people know about Scott is he was legally blind but became the worldwide creative director of Nickelodeon while being legally blind why because what we gave him the opportunity to do is what he had always imagined rather than what he was told to do to me. That's our role. Our role is to give people the room to screw up because if you let them screw up and they're good the next time it won't be a screw up. It'll be a home run with move to the way we always in this podcast. This is about math magic the two keys that come together to make great marketing products and their experts and icons in both your favorite math person Dell p- on your favorite magician the Beatles bread cyber genius and friend. Thanks Bill. Thank you Bob. Thanks for having me I really appreciate there's a couple of things I take away from Fred Cyber one one when it comes to logos Fred's philosophies dominate the space to fred secret to great hiring is to determine in the interview whether wants to spend more time with the candidate such a simple metric but if he hears them say something intriguing intriguing wants to help them grow. It's an easy decision. The re on the flip side one of Fred's keys to success has been figuring out who to work for in his words doesn't matter what the job is worked for the smartest person you can find it's what made him take the leap from Radio Television and then working cartoons for Ted Turner. I'm Bob Pittman. Thanks for listening. That's it for today's episode. Thanks so much for listening to math and magic production of iheartradio. The show is hosted by Bob Pippen special. Thanks to sue Schillinger for booking and wrangling are wonderful town which is no small feet Nikki tour for pulling research bill plaques plaques and Michael as our for their recording our editor Ryan Murdoch and of Course Gail Raoul Eric Angel Noel Mango and everyone who helped bring this show to your ears until next time with a community of six hundred and thirty million professionals Lincoln's powerful targeting tools help you zero in on reaching the right audience down.

Nickelodeon MTV Frankie Genius Fred Seibert Ted Turner Dale M._T._v. Judy McGrath Hanna-barbera Lincoln Tom Preston New York City Bob Pittman partner president Jerry Gary I Bruce Springsteen America Boston fred reiter
#685 - Comic Book Curator Creates Custom Crate Subscription

Side Hustle School

09:48 min | 3 years ago

#685 - Comic Book Curator Creates Custom Crate Subscription

"Video games, tabletop games and other nostalgic or whimsical hobbies old that returned to life as someone gets older. This has been a theme lately. And it continues today with comics now in today's story, a Sacramento based comic and collectibles owner. Sparks an interest in reading with a monthly comic book subscription box service. We're gonna talk about why subscription boxes, particularly a good fit for this particular business. Also, it turns out that we previously featured this guys wife more than two hundred and fifty episodes ago, you know, what they say the family that side us together stays together. That was episode four hundred and eighteen by the way. Gardening, mama monetize frugal living block. So it seems as couple is all about gardening and frugal living and comic books, but they're also interested in making money. So that's what I'm going to tell you about today. Now, as it turns out, I learned this as I went along and the research this episode also features true confessions of my childhood love for my little pony. Do you know my little pony? If you don't after this episode, you're gonna have to go and Google search. My little pony. It is true. When. I was a boy I really liked my little pony at least for a year or two. I just cut forgot all about that. Until you know, I don't know hundred years went by and I recorded this episode and remembered so yeah, obviously after I finish this episode myself. I'm gonna have to go out and get something new for my desk. Maybe I can find that on EBay or my little pony dot com. Who knows but anyway, more to the point more to your relevant interests? I'm gonna tell you all about this comic book Reiter, who creates a custom crate subscription fun times. It's all coming right up. After this quick shout out to our sponsor, sinus school is brought to you by light stream, offering credit card consolidation loans from six point one four percent APR with auto-pay might stream believes that people with good credit deserve a great interest rate, and no fees and listeners can save even more than additional interest rate discount on top of light streams already low rates. The only way to get this discount is to go to light stream dot com slash hustle. That's L H T S T R E A, M dot com slash Essel. Subject to credit approval rate includes point five zero percent pay discount. Terms and conditions apply. Offers are subject to change without notice. Visit light stream. Dot com slash hustle. For more information. Jean Farley has been reading Connex since he was a little kid. If always been a source of joy for him even thought how cool it would be to one day own comic bookstore. Gene grew up in two years after we got married opportunity came knocking the owners the comic shop he'd been going to longer than iron man's feud with LOKI decided to sell at the time. Gene was a graphic designer his wife. Pam featured inside us will school episode for eighteen wasn't administrative assistant when he asked her about buying the story, gene, imagined her slamming the hammer of thord down on him with an emphatic. No. Instead, she said, okay, cool. Let's do that. So one day in early April nineteen ninety eight they matched out there. Credit cards and bought the comic bookstore. And by the way, don't try this at home. This is not about maxing out your credit card because we're going to fast forward to two thousand eighteen where Jeanne is still running the comic store alongside his wife businesses. Good. They survive the recession survived countless comic and pop culture fads and one day, gene. Pam reminiscing about the good old days when you used to bike down the streets. Your neighborhood seven eleven blow your weeks allowance on a larger than life cherry flavored slurpy and spend the rest of your day in trickery bliss reading avengers comic books. This thought causing to wonder what if there was a way to get kids off their electron IX? And I don't know maybe open a book or something he knew how important reading had been to his success. He also believe that comics are a great way to spark interest in reading further. He knew that comic book people already know where to get their comics over that market is already covered busy. Parents may not have the time to make a special trip to the comic bookstore and figure out which comics or pre it for their kids. In other words, his whole goal is to reach new. Ears jeans utility belt tasers struck him with an idea. What if he started a subscription box service where customers could get comics delivered to their homes once a month, his Spidey sense, then kicked in and he devised a plan all the customer would have to do is choose a G rated or PD rated comic book crate, he used his knowledge of comics. What was popular that comic season and special information about the recipient to create a crate or a box basically package that comes in the mail that will match either rating he didn't believe in a signing age or gender to the crates. He didn't want kids to feel weird if they're older, but they wanna redes- ni or if they're boys who went to read my little pony. This brings us to that side. No. When I read that I was like my little pony. I forgot about that. Because when I was a kid like I said, I had a brief little phase of infatuation with my little pony. It just lasted a year or two, and I forgot all about it. But then like also I mentioned my little pony dot com. And after I mentioned that I was like, oh, man. Like, I'm worried that that site is like something really bad. Now, you know, I won't say anymore because we do actually have some kids listening the program. But you know, what I mean and actually. Went to look at that site. No, everything's good. It's actually owned by Hasbro, which is the manufacturer that makes my little pony. And they're not a sponsored a show, by the way, just kind of like going down memory lane. And I saw they have a whole my little pony history. Time line beginning nineteen Eighty-three which is probably about when I discovered them. And apparently, they're still going strong today you can shop on this website. You can explore some online videos, which they didn't have in nineteen Ninety-three because they didn't have online in check out some activities for every pony. But anyway, I should probably get back to the story because that's why you actually listen to the show. Our sponsors are going to be like, what are you doing Chris next week twelve part special series? Brought to you by my little pony. All right. So did this obstruction box service idea, actually work? Well, indeed, it did gene was excited because based off the customers you already had from his comic shop he got some annual subscribers right away comic crate as he called. It was a hit. His startup costs were very low since he already had the comics comic book shop, you know, he just needed to buy things like padded envelopes customer survey, postcards, and business cards. These materials ran him seventy five dollars. He then signed up with show which cost thirty nine dollars a month and geniuses the tools provided by crates ROY slugged all those into his existing brick and mortar website, brick and mortar website, right and says AM success. He personally picks and packs the boxes while working at the shops. There's no need to hire. Additional labor after shipping, packaging and crater. I Gina seeing about a ten dollar profit per box. He slowly adding more subscribers and sees this as offsetting that monthly crates ROY fee entirely. The price varies by subscription term each crate holds six comics along as an extra free good. He like book marker, art, Brent and all the pricing tiers are paid in advance. So you can pay month by month, which is twenty five dollars six months paraded amount of twenty to fifty or a one year prepaid subscription which works out to twenty dollars a month. He doesn't just ship once a month. He ships every two three days because he doesn't want kids to have to wait long to their orders. So he plays an order. You're gonna get it really soon. This makes things a bit crazy prim at times. But he insists that the kids get their comics faster than a speeding locomotive come at crate now since comic books to kids parents and teachers all over the US gene believes everyone can benefit from reading comics. He's using them as literacy, tools reluctant, readers English language learners. And of course, comic book fans can all benefit since launching in July of this year. Come at crate has been averaging a few thousand dollars a month in sales genus focusing on organic traffic only for now he's not doing any paid advertising since his brick and mortar store like the actual story is still there bread and butter his advice to someone following the subscription box model is do not try to build everything from scratch. There's a lot of work required up front and gene originally wanted to bring on the incredible hulk to help with all that heavy lifting apparently the hawk doesn't know much about web development. So what's on the horizon for gene comic crate? Well, he's been thinking of adding another reading level to his service eighteen level. And he says this could expand his audience significantly. Okay. So we have talked about subscription boxes and number of times, if you're interested you can just come to the website, saddest dot com at search subscription box on that main podcast episodes page. You can see a whole different stories case studies examples now one of the things I mentioned sometimes as a challenge of this kind of business there's lots of benefits benefits, you're getting paid every month. You know, how many customers you have at cetera. One of the challenges is building critical mass. So I think in this case, this example, it works really really well because he already has a comic book shop. And so this is an extension of that. This is allowing him to reach other customers new customers, perhaps with the inventory already has directly related to his main business as opposed to someone coming into this business completely fresh new. I think this is super smart. It reminds me of a wine shop cafe had been to a couple of times that does something similar. They have this monthly customer program monthly member program. And they are just really good at converting people even just casual visitors to this program because the benefits are really solid. Get this free bottle of wine each month to these big discounts. When you go and they do special. Above and beyond things for their customers. And I haven't joined yet myself. I'm not a big wine drinker, but the point is like not a big wandering already thinking about joining it because they've done such a good job of marketing. And that's another example of something that's an extension like they have a wine shop they have a cafe it's they're trying to build on that loyalty, perhaps reach new people. But also just kind of bring in their people or frequently or just increase the customer loyalty to their particular business. So good for him -gratulations, gene. And thank you for the throwback about. My little pony as well. That was cool. Not sure our listeners loved as much as I did. But I for one in grateful and listeners I'm grateful to you as well every single day. Thank you for allowing the show to continue. We make it for you as always inspiration is good. But inspiration with action is better today's show notes, including links to everything I mentioned, the crate service, the crate joy service. My little pony, perhaps all those things are at school dot com slash six. Eight five this has been episode six hundred eighty five of the show, and so much more is on the way because of you again, thank you again. My name is Chris gal back with you tomorrow. He sure you're subscribed to side us. School.

Gene Pam Chris gal Google Sacramento Sparks ROY EBay Jean Farley US Hasbro L H T S T R E Reiter Jeanne Connex Gina Brent one day seventy five dollars
Remembering Nature Writer Barry Lopez

Fresh Air

48:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Remembering Nature Writer Barry Lopez

"From whyy in philadelphia. This is fresh air. I'm david being cooley in fraternity gross. Today we remember the award winning writer berry lopez who wrote a vodka the about nature and in turn shed light on truths about the human experience. He died christmas day. At the age of seventy five. He wrote nonfiction fiction essays and short stories. He lived among the arctic. Inuit people for five years and raised a wolf pup for his book about the relationship between wolves and men also kevin whitehead reviews the new album by chicago. Basis joshua abrams and i'll review the tv coverage of trump's supporters storing the capital. Today we're remembering nature reiter berry lopez. Who died of prostate cancer. Christmas day age seventy-five. He won the national book award for nonfiction for his nineteen eighty six book arctic dreams and wrote other nonfiction books about nature and travel including nineteen seventy eight of wolves in men a study of wolves and their powerful influence on the human imagination. That book was based on his travels through alaska but he actually raise to hybrid red wolves at his home in the oregon woods. Although it was an extraordinary experience he concluded that wolves don't belong living with people berry lopez also wrote fiction taught at columbia university and was a contributing editor for harper's magazine. The new york times said of his nature writing quote lopez takes readers not only out of themselves to another place but into themselves as well unquote. He was born in port chester new york in one thousand nine forty five and spent his early childhood in reseda california where his mother took him on trips to the mojave desert. And the grand canyon at age eleven. His family moved to manhattan but he always loved the wilderness including years spent in the arctic. Terry gross spoke with barry lopez. Nine she talked with him then about his essays chronically his travels through north america. She asked him to read the conclusion of one called gone back into the earth. I had just come out of the grand canyon with with paul winter and musician. And and the musician play with paul and anne another small group of musicians who had travelled along with us in several friends and whatnot and we'd had a very deep emotional experience the group of us together and and Then we all went our separate ways. And i was making my last connection to get home sitting there in the airport in san francisco and Wondering what really was it. That had happened. What is the what is the reverberation of of all of this experience that we'd had together making music in the bottom of the grand canyon and what i wrote was this. I do not know really how we will survive without places like the inner gorge of the grand canyon to visit once in a lifetime even is enough to feel the stripping down and eb of the price of conventional time a radical change of proportion an unspoken respect for others that elicits keen emotional pleasure a quick intimate pounding of the heart. Some parts of the trip will emerge one day on an album. Others will be found in a gesture of friendship to some stranger in an airport in a letter of outrage to a planner of dams in a note of gratitude to a nameless face in the park service in wondering at the relatives of the quits canyon wren in the belief passed on in whatever. Fashion photograph accord a sketch. That nature can heal the living life. Any life involves great and private pain much of which we share with no one in such places as the gorge. The pain trails away from you. It is not so quiet there or so removed that you can hear yourself think that you would even wish to that comes later. You can hear your heart. Beat that comes. I do think that descriptions of what it's like to to be for instance in the grand canyon are really good reminders. For readers who are sitting at home maybe in the city or maybe in the country but far away from things of such natural wonder well you hope is a writer that they're good reminders. I i the only way i can really answer. A question like that is to think about my own responsibilities. Or what i feel when i'm in the places that i'm i'm really privileged to travel. I've chosen a kind of life that that allows me to go to these places. And when there i think a great deal about the reader for reasons of timing or having to take care of children or old sorts of obligations that impinge on all our lives can't be there so i hope it's not just a reminder but that in some real sense As a writer. I i am. They're paying attention for the reader in other words. I'm looking at things. That are not only just of interest to me but in of interest to mike what i think of as a community so i hope to do more than than remind would hope that in what i see in in the way. I'm able to to put it together. To give the reader some sense of his or her own participation in that place that it's not some distant geographic location to which they have no connection at all kind of an amusement or something at a distance but something in which they have a personal stake One thing that that emerges over and over again in your latest collection of essays crossing open ground is Your willingness to challenge sanctimony and self righteousness and to take on moral ambiguities and One sim thinking about is about about a trip that you went on sailing with. Biologists deals for research for for important ecological research. Why don't you describe the research they were doing. the It was necessary to to unravel if you will the food web in this area in In the truck along the coast of alaska And and having having done that to see how to see how animals related to each other there. How the food chain operated so that the information could be used to develop a plan for for oil drilling oil exploration and drilling So you had this irony where you had to take the lives of animals In order to protect the lives ultimately protect the lives of animals. Do you have your mind made up before joining these researchers about whether or not. This was justified killing. I never have my mind made up. The life is too unfathomable and and too complicated for any individual to stand up and say that he or she has it all figured out. And my what i look at it as my responsibility is to into the face of things that on the surface seem wrong and horrible deranged and say well yes. Of course they are. And and it's it is heartbreaking. These animals are going to be killed as we say four science but but what is really going on here. If i can't determine that as a writer if i can't expose what's really going on then then it makes it even more difficult for people who are not there to use that information to To to clarify these issues in a court of law or wherever it is that they wished to go. I i don't think a reader comes to a writer in order to know what is right or wrong. I think the reader comes to the writer in order to learn what happened. My job is to say. I went to a place and i tried to pay attention to what was going on in all its detail and this is what i saw and and then turn to the reader as a member of the community in which i live and say is this what we want. Is this how we want our world to be in this recent collection of essays. You also write about Watching the beached whales back in nineteen seventy nine off the oregon coast and There were so many different kinds of people who had come to see the whales. And you're right that there were f- ethical problems that beset the scientists mystical considerations that occupied a lot of on lookers but for the parks department. They had a real practical problem. How are they going to dispose of the dead. Whales and the solution was they burned the whales. And you describe a little bit of what what that was like. And then you say that no novelists no historians know. Moral philosophers know melville scholars. Painters were there. Should they have been i mean. Would you have liked for people that have been invited to witness the burning of the whale absolutely. Yeah i think that that all of the of the momentous events of our lives should be observed closely by a wide range of people It is no longer sufficient for us just to send representatives of law enforcement agencies and and journalists to To or the state department of government or whatever it is to to witness these things I i am deeply suspicious of a government that cuts off Cuts artists for example. It's dancers and its painters as well as its intellectuals. It's scholars off from from these kinds of experience. Now on the other hand i'd have to say that here you have a situation where forty-one sperm whales washed up on the coast of oregon. They are In the beginning they're dying and after several days they're all dead There's a health hazard here. They're all sorts of practical things that have to be solved and the police really have no choice. They've got to limit the number of people that have access to the animals because we are also They're also fools and drunkards. And you're responsible people among us. Who would who delight in torturing animals that are dying and and so. You've you've got to keep those people away but but it seems to me that we should at least think about In in in in the context of these extraordinary events the eruption of a volcano The waging of war That that society ultimately benefits from a full range of minds Addressing addressing an issue. Like this. something that. It's this emotionally complicated there. I'd like to ask you to read. What i think is a very provocative paragraph from your epilogue of arctic dreams. Yes this This comes in a passage in which i have been dealing with a problem. It was very difficult for me in that is trying to understand The hunting behavior of my of my host. These men. I was traveling with from saint lawrence island. We were hunting walrus and And this is a kind of conclusion to some of those troubling thoughts. That i had no culture has yet solved the dilemma. Each has faced with the growth of a conscious mind how to live a moral and compassionate existence when one is fully aware of the blood the horror inherent in all life when one finds darkness. Not only in one's own culture but within oneself. If there is a stage at which an individual life becomes adult it must be when one grasps the irony in its unfolding and accepts responsibility for a life. Lived in the midst of such paradox. One must live in the middle of contradiction because if all contradiction were eliminated at once life would collapse. There are simply no answers to some of the great persistent questions. You continue to live them out making your life a worthy expression of leaning into the light you know i think that One of the things in a way you're getting at there is an argument to a simplistic notion that wants. Ecology is a stored You know nature is good. People are good men things. Things are simple. Unjust and your encounters with nature. Aren't like that at all. I mean there are terrible paradoxes. And really dark things that you encounter and i guess what i'm interested in finding out is if you're if you're confrontations with the natural world have led from dark things that you recognize in yourself or if you start to recognize those things in yourself more through your encounters with nature i. I'd be hard pressed to answer the question really terry. I i i don't i think what happens or what has happened to me. Is that I when i was a child. I i spend a lot of time around animals and in the woods and and something i could never have achieved or even understood as a child was my sense that It was all right to feel that you fit there that these things weren't exotic. They weren't the things of hood In that you dropped them and then became an adult. And as i grew older. And as i as i as i became in in a formal sense of writer i i that that distance between myself as an individual and what we call the natural world It never widened. And so when. I stood in front of something that was Was terrifying or i stood in something in front of something. That was beautiful There was no separation in my mind. About what human beings are. I i recognized in in the natural world The quintessence of human life They weren't they weren't separated. You've written that freedom from moore gives meaning to the world's celebration of life fetches you don't want to impose on wolves you're impression of what will should be like. They'll teach you what they're really like. Learn from that were you ever attached to dogma though when you started writing about nature I would think. Certainly i mean the the disabuse of dogma is part of what your whole life is about you. I think part of the social function of the writer in in this country certain certainly and probably in other countries as well is is to Undermine that that complacency that comes with dogma with the notion that it's all been figured out It is an enormously difficult thing to do to lead a human life. This is a terrifically difficult thing to do. And to lead a life with with any kind of grace and and the trouble that people have in their lives to strive to to to be worthy in their own eyes and in the eyes of their community. This is an incredibly difficult thing to do. And sooner or later you realize that this dogmatic not that this is everything is black and white is just. It just doesn't work. You've talked about the difficulty. Everybody has of living with any grace. And you live in the woods yourself And i was wondering if that has made it easier for you to to live with that sense of grace. I don't think so in fact. I think it's been more troubling for me really i. I like many writers. I i lived in a relatively a quiet existence for for a long time and i had an intimacy with landscape in oregon where i live and i came and went there on a regular basis and and i knew a great deal about the woods around my home and then as i was drawn away i went up north for long periods of time to To work on a book which eventually became arctic dreams. And at the moment most of the time i'm i'm very far away from here in in antarctica for example or or in in northern kenya. So i don't spend very much time at home and that's become to trouble me And i've begun to wonder about exactly where i'm rooted and i think of my life actually as somewhat less graceful Than i would like it to be. Because i i am such an attendant at the moment i this is a period of time. That has something to do with a book. And we'll go on for several more years. But i i. I don't feel that. I move very gracefully in the world at the moment because i'm i'm away from my community. I'm i'm away from home for long periods of time. When you're traveling for instance with eskimos as as you've done a lot over the years do they ever say to you Or convey to you that you think too much that your mood. I remember one time. This man put his arm around my shoulder and he says to me you hear always thinking and it wasn't a compliment. What he was saying to me was your mind is actively engaged on a rational and analytic plane that you miss a lot of what is going on because you're too busy thinking about it and that man taught me to to just in a in a sense. Put my notebook down and become fully immersed in the place you need you. He said berry. You're always talking about how necessary it is to pay attention. And you've got to pay even more attention than you think if you're going to see what's going on when you're out on a long trip and things are getting very physically uncomfortable. You're very cold or you don't have enough food or the kind of food that you'd really like an. Maybe you were wishing your actually home. Does that discomfort ever distract you from your larger your larger goals. The ideas that you've been telling us about are you always somebody keep in touch with the larger meaning for no You know. I'm just as human as anyone else and i have you know. There's nights when mosquitos are tearing your part. You can't sleep nights when it's so bloody cold you can't sleep and and you get very tired exhausted and there's nothing to do but go on. I've been in situations where it's so cold that When no-one everyone has has thought the same thought. I hope nobody brought a thermometer. Because if if we knew how cold it was it would be so depressing. It would be even more difficult to do what we're trying to do but I guess during the day sometime. I try to as as a matter of ritual in the same way you keep a journal. I try to focus every day on my responsibilities and and Even if i just get a few shreds out of it To overcome the discomforts I i would also add that. You know these. What we're talking about are are are really Abstract notions and the reader in the end doesn't care about. I think these abstract notions of of of the other and And and and and ideas about That have certain political overtones or are about environmental problems. The reader only wants one thing. The reader wants a wonderful story. And if you can't tell the reader a wonderful story than than then you're not writing so when i'm traveling what i'm thinking about primarily ninety. Nine percent of the time is the elements of a story. How can i make a story. come out of this. And then if there's if there's anything listening to on my mind you know as as just another man or woman walking down the street if there's anything that's really worth listening to. I won't be able to get it out of the story. It'll be buried in there And that's the magic of that wild animal that we call the language. But when i'm when. I'm in a state of discomfort when i'm traveling i'm i'm thinking that the thing i must do above all else is pay attention to the simple particulars of of daily life. The the temperature of the movement of air the color of stones. The tone of voice when you hear one man speaking swahili in another man's speaking tacona and how they interact with each other and what they what are the smells of these particular leaves. And how hot does this feel on the back of your wrist. And what is the color of that mountain that disappears into the same color of sky. And where's the line of differentiation. Those are the things that i think about. Because i don't have that. If i can't tell the reader what it was like if i can't say to the reader this is what happened then the rest of it is just Is just kind of philosophical speculation. That doesn't fit anywhere in a real life berry. Lopez speaking with terry gross in nineteen eighty nine after a break will listen back to another more recent conversation between barry lopez and terry also jazz critic. Kevin whitehead reviews a new jazz quartet album by bass player. Joshua adams and i'll talk about the tv coverage of wednesday's assault on the us capital. I'm david being cooley. And this is fresh air. This message comes from. Npr sponsor tele doc tele doc offers access to licensed therapists by phone or video to help those dealing with stress anxiety personal or family issues. Tele doc is committed to quality confidential therapy from the comfort of your home available seven days a week matching members to therapists counsellors and psychiatrists tele doc. Therapy is available through most insurance or employers and individual plants are also available download the app or visit tele doc dot com slash. Fresh air to get started today. Today we're remembering writer berry lopez who died last month from prostate cancer. He was seventy five years old -pez best known for his writing about the natural world. He won a national book award for his nineteen. Eighty six book arctic dreams one of his many award winning books that contemplated the relationship between humans and nature but in two thousand thirteen. He wrote about a painful and devastating chapter of his childhood a trauma. He needed to finally confront as an adult. In an essay for harper's magazine he wrote about being the victim of repeated sexual abuse for four years beginning when he was seven the pedophile who attacked lopez. was harry. Shire a doctor who ran a sanitarium near the lopez home and supervise the treatment of people with addiction problems. One of his patients was the cousin of lopez's mother which is how shire entered lopez's life lopez kept the abuse a secret until he was in his late teens and his mother remarried. He told his stepfather what had happened but his stepfather decided not to press charges. Many many years later lopez would learn that shires. Medical degree was fraudulent. Barry lopez returned to fresh air and twenty thirteen to discuss that chapter in his life. Here is an excerpt of that interview. Lopez welcome back to fresh air. It's been a really long time. I'm glad for the chance to talk with you again. Oh me too. I think we agree. You and i that there's no need to drag you in this interview through a traumatic retelling of the details of what happened to you. So let's not go there but there are a few things. I think we agree our listeners shirt here just about the context of what happened to you so we can understand how you were changed by that and how it's affected your understanding of Child predators so you know like like abusers who are priests or famous famous football coach. Or you know people like that. The man who abused you as an authority figure. He was a doctor who ran a sanitarium. Who became friends with your mother. Who helped her financially did that. Make it more confusing that you were being hurt by somebody who had great respect by the adults from the adults that you knew well. Let's this of the nightmare of something like this. I think terry often. These figures have worked very hard to create a position in the society of which there apart where they're perceived as loving and supportive and civic and beyond reproach. And i knew that when i saw these degrees From prestigious institutions all of which were fraudulent on his wall that i was in the hands of somebody that i knew the adult world respected. And that's the cover. They need in order to get away in these gray areas where another adult might say. Wait a minute what are you doing. They're just not questioned. Say your father had pressed charges on your behalf and that there was a trial and that you had been able to take the witness stand and tell what happened and that Your abuser would have been prosecuted and and probably convicted What would that have given. You can't know for sure because you didn't live it like you can only speculate. But i'm sure it's something you've speculated a lot about in your life. Your intuition about that is his right. I basically been silent about this all of my adult life and one of the things that precipitated my decision to write the story was that This was before this and dusky thing broken. In fact this article. I wrote this piece before. The senate dusky thing broke So that wasn't the newspaper story that compelled me to do something i. I had become impatient with the cast of newspaper articles that suggested that in the legal pursuit of pedophile 's what Young men and women Were most interested in was winning a financial judgment or in punishing seeking vengeance and it struck me that that was the last thing. Really you'd be interested in has somebody who had been serially molested what had been taken from. You was a sense of self worth and dignity and the only way you can get those things back is in open Open on judged relationships with other people. And then you. Can you have a chance to develop again a sense of self worth a sense of of place in society. So what you really want in. The simplest terms is for somebody to believe what happened to take you at face value and not to manipulate you in a courtroom for example in order to seek justice. What you really want is to stand up and be heard and believed and once you can accomplish that then you can go on and rebuild a life you. I started to research the story of harry. Shire the men who abused you in nineteen eighty nine. Yes that happens to be the year. We i i. I interviewed you. One of things i often think about is. An interviewer is everything. That i don't know i was thinking there's so much i don't know about the person i'm interviewing. Oh of course and even if the interview goes well there's so much i'm just like never going to know i went back and i listen to that nineteen eighty-nine nine interview really. You said a couple of things seem so germane to me in terms of who you are as a writer and what you've investigated in your life as a writer and i just wanna play. An excerpt of something is actually an excerpt of reading that you did. So you had just published a collection of essays. And i had the as we're about traveling around north america and i'd asked you to do a reading from an essay gone back into the earth which you had written after traveling with musician paul winter who likes to play for instance with wolves. He's recorded left wolves so he's very much. You know how music connects to the to the natural world. And so here's a reading from your essay. Gone back into the earth which is about traveling with paul winter to the grand canyon the living of life any life involves great and private pain much of which we share with no one in such places as the inner gorge. The pain trails away from you. It is not so quiet there or so removed that you can hear yourself that you would even wish to that comes later. You can hear your heartbeat. That comes first. So that was barry lopez on fresh air in nineteen eighty nine reading from an essay written earlier in the eighties and barry lopez hearing that last night after having read your essay about being abused being sexually abused as a child. When you're speaking of the private pain we share with no one needing to be in a place that is you know vast and magnificent an not filled with other people. you know. we're there's a sense of you know that you can. You can hear the thoughts. But you can more importantly or i hear here like your your heartbeat road And and so you know you said that you wanted to take the The darkness that you experienced and turn it inside out and in writing about the natural world. Help you do that. I know this that. When i was so compromised as a child that there was no zone of safety for me. No place was safe and especially adults weren't safe for me. The thing that felt safe in the sense that i felt that surge toward lyricism When when when. I saw something outside myself the world beyond the self and and i was. I felt the surge of of lyrical pleasure. In the way the wind sounded for example in in eucalyptus trees. I knew that i could carry that with me. I could carry in as a memory And i could carry it as structure to help me build a safe place in the world. So i had this strange insight and that is that i hadn't it. The end of it wasn't that i had been brutalized. The end of it really was that had been given the gift. And i now as i grew into adulthood i had to find some way to take this darkness and turn it inside out my desire in my life. I mean the great metaphors for me have been the metaphors of the natural world and the natural world in southern california was the only thing i think really the kept me sane. As a child. I did not trust. The adult world was of no help to me but my embrace of elements of the natural world of weather The appearance of a wild animals in the regions where i lived. That was all grace for me and and kept me from falling further into that abyss. So when i in my late teens and early twenties. When i really started writing with a purpose my effort was to understand what it means to be tolerant. What what is what is it. The human beings mean when they speak of justice. And you know beyond aristotle if you will what is beauty all about. Why do we crave it. And why do some of us destroy it but you can't. You can't just talk about abstractions. If you're not a philosopher as a as a writer you have to find context that allows the reader to move into the landscape that you've created and say. Oh yes. I know that. Or oh that's interesting and my effort. I think as a writer for all of my adult life is i have no interest in being the writer the readers authority about anything i hope. Nonfiction to write in an authoritative way and and to earn the trust and respect of a reader. But mostly what i'm interested in is being the reader's companion. I i wander reader to feel that there is room for them for their intellect and for their imagination in the pros that i try to craft on a page and in the end the only thing i can do i barry can do. I am not a therapist. I'm not an activist. I'm i'm just a writer. And the only thing i can do is what i did on these pages and in harper's which is to say this happened to me. I know many of you have experienced. This here's what i'd been thinking. What do you think. Writer barry lopez. Speaking with terry gross in two thousand thirteen lopez died last month on christmas day at the age of seventy five. Let's end our tribute to barry lopez with another excerpt of the reading. He did on fresh air back in nineteen eighty nine from his book. Arctic dreams no culture has yet solved the dilemma. Each has faced with the growth of a conscious mind how to live a moral and compassionate existence when one is fully aware of the blood the horror inherent in all life when one finds darkness. Not only in one's own culture but within oneself. If there is a stage at which an individual life becomes truly adult it must be when one grasps the irony in its unfolding and accepts responsibility for a life. Lived in the midst of such paradox. One must live in the middle of contradiction because if all contradiction were eliminated at once life would collapse. There are simply no answers to some of the great persistent questions. You continue to live them out making your life. A worthy expression of leaning into the light berry lopez from his book arctic dreams coming up music from bass player. Joshua atoms are jazz critic. Kevin whitehead has a review. This is fresh air. This message comes from. Npr bank of america. You finally decided to learn how to ice skate. So you ordered the essentials. Every ice skater needs a pair of blades. A new helmet and a good set of kneepads. And you used your bank of america. Cash rewards credit card choosing to earn three percent cashback on online shopping rewards that you put towards the cost of an essential piece of plo skating. Recovery heating pad visit bank of america dot com slash more rewarding to apply now copyright twenty twenty bank of america corporation. Bassist joshua. Abrams is a mainstay of creative music in chicago. He's made many dozens of records as a side. Man led his own band natural information society and compose music for documentary films. His new album is for a quartet. Abrams brought together to play at the hyde park jazz festival in two thousand sixteen before recording the next day jazz critic kevin whitehead says they play music in contrasting moods joshua abrams tune in place of memory where drummer gerald cleaver. That's a deep. Slow swing. Groove. it's from the album cloud script by abrahams chameleon quartet of the same name with longtime ally. Jeff parker guitar and veteran chicago saxophonist. Ari brown his economical playing and brawny tenor sound fit the leader. Spare themes a couple of ballots. Really show the saxophone off. This is with the leaders. Nimble bass dancing behind Ari brown on tenor. Sax joshua abrams this quartet can groove and played pretty but they all like free jazz. Two and a couple of pieces. Get exuberantly ornery guitarist. Jeff parker can get down and dirty within the ensemble fabric rather than strutting out in front. Jeff parker doesn't very creative work in the background. At one point he companies. Already browns tenor with clingy. Get the obstinate. But somehow right like thelonious monk's piano bombs behind a horn joshua. Abrams main band natural information. Society plays long hypnotic jams inspired by moroccan trance. Music that influence comes out on harbor. Repetitive music takes another kind of discipline. But these four players catch that wave to ask am That bowed bass is notably low in the mix. Most leaders like the put a little more me in there. That ego free sound balance is typical of joshua abrams assign the music on cloud. Script is less about him than the collective. It's about being part of something bigger. Where each player is stronger for all the ways. That interlock kevin whitehead is the author of the new book. Play the way you feel. The essential guide jazz stories on film. He reviewed cloud script the new album by basis joshua. Abrams and his quartet after a break. I'll look at the tv coverage of wednesday's attack on the us capital. This is fresh air. This message comes from. Npr sponsor nerdwallet a personal finance website and app. That helps people make smarter. Money moves have new money goals this year. Whether you want to use credit card points to plan a family vacation abroad once it safe or take advantage of low mortgage rates to refinance and save your children's education. Nerdwallet is the best place to shop financial products to help. Make your twenty twenty one money goals happen. Discover and compare the smartest credit cards mortgage lenders and more at nerdwallet dot com. This is fresh air. I'm tv critic. David being cooley. There are times over the long history of television when tv brings us live images of something so unusual so memorable and often so shocking will never forget it and will remember where we were when we saw this week after sifting through a night of crucial georgia recount election results. I saw the newest example. A very frightening one. Thousands of supporters of donald trump egged on by the president surrounded the capital. Many of them stormed. the building. Broke through windows and temporarily disrupted the official congressional acceptance of the electoral votes awarding the presidency to joe biden while it happened tv. Reporters and anchors and commentators responded with a mixture of fear and disbelief. Much as they did the morning of nine eleven and watching at home. You had the same sense of witnessing. Anarchy endanger on msnbc chuck. Todd watch live images from a capital surveillance camera with veteran reporter andrea mitchell and former senator claire mccaskill. All of them sounded not only concerned and confused but stunned claire mccaskill. You know the senate. Well i assume you. You have a memory of anything near like this. We just protesters walking through statuary hall. Clare i don't want to interrupt but we just saw people going right through there. They are in our wagon statuary hall. Now that is the area camera. that's capturing those no. I am not sure whether that's the what women camera. But that would. That is the area where those senators good per process to go into house for joints joint sessions so it is through there that they walk unbelievable. The breach listened to those who were watching on. Tv may have found it impossible to turn away. It was well in the evening. After a clampdown curfew in washington dc when order was restored inside and outside the capitol politicians resumed their task of accepting the electoral college results from the two thousand twenty election and some resumed their unsupported charges of election fraud. It was hours past midnight when the senate and house in defiance of the failed insurrection finally finished their task and acknowledged joe biden as the next president of the united states watching. All of this reminded me most of all of the days after john. F kennedy's assassination in nineteen sixty three. That tragic violent event wasn't televised but its aftermath was for four nonstop. Tv days that included everything from jfk's funeral procession to the murder of his alleged assassin that was shown on live tv and to anyone who saw it was unforgettable. That same decade of the sixties gave us two other assassinations. That weren't caught on camera. Not at the moment shots were fired. The nineteen sixty eight murders of martin. Luther king junior and robert f kennedy but the subsequent tv coverage was long enough deep enough and emotional enough. That if you're alive then you still remember watching it on tv. There aren't many of those frozen media moments. We all share. But they're worth remembering and they're very easy to remember. Only one was a happy event. The successful moon landing in nineteen sixty nine. Otherwise these major news events seemed to come out of nowhere. I remember being so frightened by breaking tv. News of the watergate related. Saturday night massacre in the seventies that i worried whether a republic would stand in the eighties the challenger explosion was a major shock and when the deadly events of nine eleven unfolded that morning in two thousand one tv coverage seared that day into the minds of everyone yesterday. The day after rioters forced their way into the capital people on television. Were referring to it as a nine eleven event and for my college age. Tv history students too young to remember or experienced nine eleven. They now have their own. Remember win tv moment but others are watching to. It wasn't until the day after the attack on the us capital that. I saw it from an international perspective when british tv reporter robert moore accompanied the trump mob as it made its way inside the building. He captured their chance and comments as well as their actions. We follow the aggrieved and inferior hit trump supporters as they stormed the building through broken windows and doors full statement for a few heady moments felt tissues to the building purpose of congress itself because i worked for us as they used to say in the sixties. The whole world is watching. It's frightening to note that the events of this week rank is one of the most momentous live tv events ever broadcast but the imagery as well as the actions were that vivid and there may be more to come in the days ahead on monday. Show fran liebowitz after developing a now famous case of writer's block. She turned talking into an art form. She's now in the new. netflix documentary. Series called pretend it's a city it's a series of interviews with her conducted mostly by her friend. Martin scorsese who also directed the series. I hope you can join us for terry. Gross i'm david being cooley.

berry lopez grand canyon barry lopez lopez joshua abrams kevin whitehead oregon terry gross paul winter arctic reiter berry lopez harper's magazine cooley department of government saint lawrence island Kevin whitehead alaska prostate cancer terry port chester
Direct Response Marketing in the New Reality  with Justin Goff

Uncensored Direct Marketing

42:31 min | Last week

Direct Response Marketing in the New Reality with Justin Goff

"You're listening to the uncensored direct marketing. Show this show is designed for direct response. Marketers who want raw unfiltered conversion tips and secrets to scale their offers profitably to reach their next. I'm marie asparagus. I'm the founder of direct it and your host. Now let's dive in. Hey everyone i wanted you to know that. This episode was recorded before the legal issues for pornhub boroughs. I do not condone nor encourage nonconsensual or legal production of adult content. I will have an episode shortly discussing the legal implications and my thoughts on the victim's claims if you have any questions you'd like my input on feel free to drop me a line so my guest today is justin golf for anybody who doesn't know justin He is one of the founders of copy accelerator and is one of the most successful people. I know in the direct response space and everybody already knows him but i will let him make a brief introduction as to who he is and what he does so. Just go ahead. Thank you So i got started in this industry back in like two thousand four doing affiliate marketing mostly. I've done of everything from marketing. Seo to freelance copywriting running a couple of my own businesses info product businesses physical product businesses. So i've kind of Ben through all of it out say my biggest break was two thousand fourteen to two thousand seventeen. I build a supplement company up to twenty three million dollars in sales and Ended up selling that to my partner. So after that i basically took a year off and i started the program which i run today which is happy. Sala reiter was my partner. Stuff and georgie maria. As part of the copy. Loretta group where we basically help copywriters and we help business owners in the direct response to increase their conversions. Get more customers like and have a better business. So yeah. that's kind of a brief intro. On what i'm doing awesome well. I do have to vouch for copy. Accelerator being awesome program so this is my second year in the program. It's it's helped me tremendously. Just kinda learn how to dial in my own offers not that. I'm not selling products. But it's to be product and just learning about email strategy and different tools and techniques. That you guys use just to you know talk to your customers just helped me as a business owner in general so The family if anybody is interested in copy excited you guys should really check it out and you can get some really really good tips on copywriting business in general So moving along. Justin obviously with corona virus. We don't want to talk about that too much. Everybody's gonna beating that a little bit too much to death in terms of a topic but it is obviously a new reality that we have and things are changing a lot and a lot of people who are doing very well are not doing so well anymore in terms of their products and then we on the flip side. We have a lot of people. In the health. Beauty space that are just doubling and tripling their revenue. So what do you. What do you see coming in direct response in the next twelve months or any tips or tricks that you would say to direct response marketers to survive you know corona and just kind of the new reality a say one of the biggest things we've seen would say this year. So far is people not being so reliant on facebook anymore and pushing into other channels youtube probably being the biggest swan Youtube really come on this year in terms of a major major traffic source for a lot of the biggest players in direct response. We're doing couple hundred even thousand miles a day at a lot of. That's coming from youtube. And kinda reason for that is facebook's Compliance is just super super strict It's hard to get around. And then youtube is kind a little more like the wild west kind of back when i met you on. Facebook was like two thousand eight or you could. You can just say whatever the because whatever ads you wanted then you is not bad right now but You can say a lot more than you got on youtube. So i would say that's a big change A lot of people move into that. A lot of people Doing big dollars with native as well. And you're kind of seeing to say one of the biggest things. I've kind of seen as a lot of brands who used to be super super aggressive with their direct response. Have been kinda dialing it back over remorse and i think that's i think that's obviously part of as you grow like if you're a two million dollar business you're not really on anybody's radar if you are a hundred million dollar business. You're people's radars so being super aggressive when you're a big big company is usually not a smart strategy. And then we look at companies that play very by the book like the v. shreds in the golden hippos of the world my their thriving so i definitely think kind of getting a little more cleaner in terms of copy and claims and stuff like that. I think it's definitely going to continue to change. And i mean that's not to say like black hat in gray hats stuff's going to go away by any means like that's obviously not realistic There's way too much money to be made type of stuff. But i think the people who really want to build long-term businesses that can scale and that are not at the whims of getting booted off facebook. Any second are gonna kinda. I think on a fall into those little just a little cleaner Kind of direct response. Because it's one of the things you realize direct response when you've been at it. Awhile is along santa this way and we're getting a great conversion rate. I know if. I say a little more aggressively. Were probably get a much better. Conversion rate edges like those little tweaks kind of keeps. It's very easy to just kind of go over that edge me like the line. It's hard to draw the line. I i see this like everyday people. You know merchants that we work with. It's like oh we're just going to say that it treats this now and see what happens. Whoa yeah don't don't don't do that. So i mean i definitely get your point about crossing the line and it's it's it's so kind of thing right when you're when you're like oh we'll i can get five percent more. I can get ten percent more conversions. If i do this. And but on the flip side you know you get your chargebacks you get your risk and then you get Three letter acronyms that. Come knocking down your doors. So you definitely you definitely want to try to avoid that but Definitely the new the new reality and just talk about youtube and so forth. I'm seeing a lot of people that are just diversifying. In general you know going to youtube going to native like second tier Like yahoo and and being in all this stuff Just the name of the game. I guess is diversifying. Your traffic sources. It's it sounds like what you're saying. It's i mean facebook. I feel like just somebody that big companies we work with were just i mean. Probably eighty percent of their traffic was facebook for so long. And now there's been a lot smarter about that where maybe facebook's down to forty percent of their traffic and they're a better position now to grow and if should hits the fan on facebook their entire businesses are going to fall apart like a kind of a previously. Would i mean. That's pretty common sense by. You'd be shocked. How many people have a twenty million dollar business. That's entirely reliant. I want traffic source. It's it's quite scary when you think about it. Especially as one is fickle as facebook. Like my one of my buddies said advertising on facebook is like driving a ferrari on like an eighth of a tank of gas like. That's that's basically what it's like any minute. Wait for the crap gone on later. Yeah i mean you could be doing. You know two three four million dollars a month and then they make one changing their policy. And you're done. I mean that to me is is just madness. if a business owner hasn't kind of thought about that and planned for it so definitely something to consider if if you're just doing facebook to start diversifying slowly at least to get some more traffic sources and increase your business that way talking about also kind of the changes in the new reality mentally and just kinda your mindset like what do you think has changed or what what's causing people now to like not be able to make it in this new economy. So what are the biggest problems we see over and over again. Is people losing focus and trying to do too many things. So we mentioned got diversifying traffic sources. The big problem is do this though is like someone launches a new offer or they launched three offers and they're trying to make it work on youtube. They're trying to make it work on facebook. They're trying to run it. Google the odds that you're gonna be able to launch something or launched multiple products and get. All of them. Working is slim to none. This is why stephan. I are always were huge. Don like really focused on one offer. Focus on one traffic source. And when you get that dialed in. And you're bringing in three hundred customers a day or five hundred customers a day then start branching out and trying other traffic sources or maybe launched another product. You don't need five products. You need one product. I mean you look at all the people who are doing really well and bringing in tons of buyers every day. Almost all of them are doing it from one product Besides probably like the big big big people like golden hippo agora device reds like they have the bandwidth to do multiple products and just trying to try to focus on three or four things at once the odds of one of them getting to be successful. Just not good. So that's probably a big big issue. We see over and over again is just diluting. Your your concentration. Diluting your focus. I think it's a huge issue and just kind of building on that in terms pre covid post covid is there anything that you would say just on mindset that you would change In terms of your business practices like copy accelerator. You guys came up with you. Know the light program to address the fact that you know. There's some people that can't travel. Maybe have less funds and so forth and i feel like a really good thing to launch during covert just because people obviously may be are considering big investments and so forth and maybe one a dip their toes into something. Is there anything like that. You would suggest or tips or strategies for entrepreneurs and to kind of test out now that you know we're in a different type of market one of the things that was really obvious. During kind of the the prime parts of covid was seeing which niches were doing really well and which ones kinda like took a big hit obviously the the majority of the stuff that happens online in direct response improve because there are just more people online all the big advertisers pulled out of facebook and stuff like that so clicks where a lot cheaper and a lot of people were doing pretty well. Despite the fact that. I don't know twenty. Thirty percent of the united states lost their jobs and international pan-demic and everything kinda shit hitting the fan. But yeah i mean are are you in a niche that when the economy turns are you going to be okay is it. Is it going to be better Our units like a huge hit. Like i think it was pretty obvious to a lot of people and Like we got a lot of people in bizarre that we work with who covered. It was a blessing for them. They're seeing numbers up thirty percent over once they were in normal times. Because there's a lot of people out of jobs looking for ways to make money there was other people like With a guy in the mastermind who was really big into golf forty million dollar golf business while when all the golf courses shut down and the sweet spot of golf is spring and summer has business took a pretty huge hit. So i mean kind of being aware that it's interesting to think like because someone who just gotten his business seven or eight years ago has never been in business when there's been bad years it's just been the economy's gone good. Yeah for everything that good Since two thousand eight. So i think it was kind of a wake up. Call to a lot of people that this stuff going to happen. I mean there's going to be another recession at some point and shit's gonna the fan again and it's out to do you have the kind of business that's gonna bells survived that i think this was kind of giving a good peek into that for for a lot of people for sure i mean just talking about the. You know the biz ops space in general. What i saw in. That's kind of interesting. Is i saw a lot of the smaller ticket. Offers kind of started taking off off stuff that we worked on with a lot of merchants. Were pretty high. End bigger masterminds big kind of event type stuff where it's like five to ten maybe twenty thousand dollars a ticket. I started seeing a lot more just in general those leg. Hundred and forty seven dollars. Let me show you how to do. This four ninety seven. Let me give you a three part series of of that so it seems like a lot of direct response marketers are just you know adopting to the new reality so definitely i think You know the point that you mentioned the economy and most people in our space. Are you know under thirty five. So it's very possible that most of them have not been around two thousand eight and and everything that happened. You know during the the economic crash then so now. It's it's definitely time to kind of think about okay. Let's have some smaller ticket products that adopt to a bad economy. And then when the economy goes better than we have you know larger to get masterminds and so forth so are interesting point and definitely diversifying your offerings. As is what. I got from that answer specifically so i mean in terms of you know talking about two thousand eight and everything that perspire from there. I know we had a really interesting conversation in vegas Pre covid which feels like it never happened. I feel like. I can't believe that we were a copy accelerator like the week before the shutdown i. It was actually unbelievable for me. I came home and then three days later was like you can't go anywhere. What the hell you have cova. Don't touch anybody don't go. I was like what so. I'm happy that we actually got in that event. That was so timely. It was like for me. It was like one of the greatest events by the way that i've ever attended in my fourteen years in the space. I'm not gonna say how old i am. I've just been space for fourteen years Yeah exactly twenty five dollars like twelve. The first time. I went to inter next so yeah it was definitely such a great event and a funny enough when we just i just because i'm late everywhere just by the way and i happen to stroll in probably the last person that the members dinner and the only availables right in front of you and i was like a perfect couldn't have actually planned this better. I get to talk to just in the whole night. And i did. I talked your ear off but We had a pretty interesting conversation about my starting the industry. So i'm actually curious if you have any Any follow up questions to that discussion or anything that you any burning questions that you have about my background definitely so i mean for people listening maria maria is probably what two thousand and eight thousand nine ish we met a at an event back then and this is when you were doing all the merchant processing for baseball all the biggest porn sites which i remember you explaining it and it was very interesting to me because you're talking about i just assumed like oh you got the credit card the credit cards charge. And you know it's like a phd to like get. All these merchant was pretty fascinating. But i'm actually curious. I don't if i heard how you actually got into that. So i mean it's a pretty interesting job. You're saying like running. All the merchant accounts for all of these huge porn sites that process millions upon millions of transactions a month which is just insane itself but like how. How did one actually get into that world. Because that's pretty similar with a lot of people in direct response. Nobody's like ten years old. And i wanna be a direct response marketer like it's not everybody's kind of falls into this by like some weird ways. I'm actually really curious how you how you got into so it is you know. I didn't grow up saying. I want to work for porn or anything like that. That would be really bad My parents would not like that It was just again by accident. I i studied to be a a db which is like super boring. But i had some technical knowledge and i had some friends who were crossing pictures and becoming affiliates in in the Porn space so they were just cropping pictures getting some affiliate revenue from there and then They decided that they wanted to kind of try their own pay sites so they put up a couple of sites and saw you know. Hey you know. There's some traction this and traffic and this was by the way in two thousand and four so it was really if felt like you know porn. The internet was built for porn. And then we were kind of working on that momentum. I just joined in my friends. We had a site called browsers dot com. Rogers was a pay site. You know. Twenty five bucks a month or you know kind of very simple business model you pay you get in your watch porn as you want and you head out and then from there obviously The pace business took off. People were ready to pay for porn people ready to consume it and then from there we noticed that there was a trend kind of of people offering a lot of free popcorn and free access to to content and it got us a little bit nervous on. It was like okay. What do we do next. i mean i can't take the credit for it but the team kind of looked upon youtube as kind of the perfect example of like where web two point zero was going and decided to create pornhub so i was actually there the first day that we got traffic on that side and it was actually super super amazing just to see all that traffic coming in and people kind of going crazy in upgrading to you know pornhub premium to get a better experience and all that kind of stuff so it was really just a big accident of me being bored at like a pretty boring job. I had before after. I finish university and it was like. Hey we're making a thousand bucks a day. Cropping porn pictures. You want to join them like all right. And that's that's it. It's as simple as that such a good story i think people would be pretty shocked. By the volume. That porn sites do like you get kind of an idea of how much they're making like. How many like members they have stuff up you know in terms of their specific numbers. I'm not involved right now. It's been a while. So i don't have their exact figures the company the parent company of Browsers and pornhub. I mean the the pay sites are the content. Paid sites are not as big as the the tube sites obviously the tube sites are making the most money through add revenue so the business model even evolve. People are are not really paying for that content. They're paying for ads on the sites right now that parent companies worth at least half a billion dollars and it has about seventy five percent of the online porn. traffic On hub is one of the top ten sites in the world. So i mean we're we're talking here like millions upon millions of users and in fact what happened after kovic is that the company and just all of their properties just exploded even further so It's you know everything from Cams to amateur content and so forth that like really went through the roof. The campsites just kind of taking it a step further and really Carving out the camp portion of the adult space camps are doing insanely well. Because you know People were going to. I don't know why. I want to call it a titty bar but it's whether it's like why am i calling. Ah but yeah you know. I guess to to a strip club or whatever you know is not possible during cova. There was a lot of people who are stuck in and kind of needed their fix. So the campsites went like two three four times In terms of traffic and then in addition there was a lot of new entries so a lot of new actresses a lot of new. You know just a lot of new talent. You know I think you send an email about onlyfans. Just recently about i read that i thought your it was very poignant but only fans and platforms that. Just have that one on one kind of girlfriend. Experience just went insane so if it was worth half a billion before covid i would easily say at least twenty percent. Extra in terms of the cove effect. So that's that's a business that actually benefited considerably from coal doesn't surprise me. It's interesting away. Yeah like you said the the certain inches kinda took off. Like the cam girls. They basically replace strip clubs that kind of ties back. We're about before how yes certain things just during covid did really bad certain things like code was like a huge blessing. I'm sure porn. One hundred percent covers a huge blessing because people are just online all is on their board other mind people that are actually like locked down and couldn't be hanging out with guys going to be hanging out with girls that was probably just a huge huge uptick in them in terms of Cash visitors and all. That one thing i want to ask you so when you worked with pornhub them. You're actually in the office correct. Yes what is it. Actually experience like working a porn slowed. It's actually really. It was really fun. I have to say it was like. It's it's such a cherished. Memory that i have we were we. Were all twenty. Somethings it wasn't like a big corporate company or anything. Like i think i was the oldest and i was like twenty seven so it was like really like they're like she has experienced on like i'm literally twenty years old. I don't know what the hell i'm talking about but it was You know we had like a very corporate looking office in a nice office building but then it was just a whole bunch of lake you know tech geeks and nerds that. Were just sitting around their cubicles kind of programming stuff. Cropping stuff creating a. We actually had some video. Editors we had writers on staff that were writing the scripts. Those were always fun. Writing a script for a porn. Video is something that i have to say was really a funny experience for me and then we had you know different codes. Like if a banker would walk-in we'd be like tippy toe tippy. Hey that's like super obvious guys like you know. People cut will realize the we're like how will we say like banana cake or something we had like the weirdest experience because we were all such newbies and we never really ran a business and we didn't really know the you know how things should be but that was like the magic of it is that we just did whatever the hell we wanted for some reason we were making like millions upon millions of dollars So everybody was happy. The staff was happy. I mean nobody. Could you know complain about working there especially in the early days. I don't know what it's like now. It's now it's a little bit more of a corporate big company but back in the beginning years two thousand five to let's say two thousand and ten it was. It was a little bit like the wild west. We just kind of people make suggestions and be like sounds like ideal do it. So a find it. Fun atmosphere fisher so the merchant processing with obviously certain industries is really hard because banks will just not put the sail through. I'm curious so you started doing that. Woodside pornhub browsers. How did you actually learn all the stuff you know now because you know just a boatload about how to get stuff through not actually get processing and how to make sales go through and monthly recurring stuff to go through. I'm curious like at. The beginning was all super new to you. Yeah so i mean it's it's really trenches. I started out like my job. There are what i had started doing was. I was the affiliate manager for jug tash. So the big tip niche. That was me. I took care of the affiliates in each. And then i was kinda getting tired of being an affiliate manager was like oh. This is kind of boring. Let me do something else. So then they put me into. Hr because they figured it'd be easier for me to hire programmers as a woman versus a guy calling another guy and say hey. Do you wanna work for a porn site. So i had. I brought a little bit of elegance to the hr team. I say Hired about forty five to fifty developers. I guess while. I was there for in the ajar team and then from there i was like i hate. Hr i actually really dislike doing hr and listening to people's problems and things that they need. I was like. I'm i'm done with this so i was given a project that was supposed to be a one month long project which was We're working with leg third party. Payment providers aleve them unnamed. but everybody. who's in the space knows who they are They were clipping us. Like ten to fifteen percent off every sale so like the processing fee was fourteen nine five with one of them. Plus ten percent reserves so for every dollar remained. We only had seventy five cents in our pockets before we can start doing anything. And we're like okay. Well now's the time to start optimizing this. How do we you know. How do we not pay this much money. So i was like all right. I'll take care that. Let me let me see how this this all this stuff works. I didn't even know what a merchant account was like. What the hell is a merchant account like. Okay so i was like. Oh well we'll just we'll call abc. We'll get merchant account. Rbc is like bank of america in the us. It doesn't work like that rb. Rbc does not want people selling porn memberships through their their payment platform. So i kinda went down. the rabbit. Hole of offshore merchant accounts create and companies to accommodate the offshore merchant accounts. And just kind of setting up a gateway creating our own checkout pages. Because using a third party we had to use hosted pages So funny story is my first. Checkout page was unencrypted. Because i had no idea that i did like encrypted esa all that stuff i had no idea. I just put a page in credit card. Data was just moving. And i got a call from somebody at one of the banks. We're working with. They're like what the hell are you doing. I'm like oh oh that was just a test. Sorry i didn't mean to do that. So it's a lot of mistakes that i made really early on that. I was like correcting along the way So such a good education for me in. And i had a couple of good agents that were basically like me what i'm doing now. But you know they were there my agent at that point and i slam them with every question and every everything i can ask until we got our rate to leg about four percent all in from fifteen so i literally you know myself. In a couple of people singlehandedly Added eleven percent to the bottom line with some tweaks in the payments. That's really interesting to me. Because i feel like as a business owner. That's a spot where we focus a lot. Let's say getting the conversions on the front and getting the traffic and get in the dow then but most of them are probably drastically. Overpaying was stuff on merchant accounts and reserve and stuff like that. And not even thinking of that as like a needle mover. That could really change a business. Because i mean the difference between like you said that merchant account and what you kinda eventually landed on a pledge of the cash flow of the business. Oh yeah i mean and i say this all the time to a lot of the merchants that we work with is like you're spending so much money to get the traffic and then you know you're not doing anything on your cart to convert those sales. You're just sending them to one merchant account. See what happens and then you know if if the person declines there they go but you've paid already to get that person your funnel right so Monetize that that traffic is as important. I think as getting the traffic rights so definitely focusing on payments focusing on your checkout and just really having all that stuff dialed in is is such an easy win that people ignore an and merchants in general ignore. I would definitely saying that you know spending a couple of hours and figuring out what your your processes right now so you can see. You can tweak. His is is huge. I mean for us. There's a couple of big things when i was up born. That really just made us so much money. One of them. Was you know the payments angle taking the payment fees and dropping them down and secondly we were really capitalizing on the fact that we were in canada and we were everybody was paying us in. Us dollars so we started really focusing on exchange rates and moving money when It was most beneficial and we were. It was insane whenever we'd see the canadian dollar kind of like dropped by a dollar a center to we'd move like millions of dollars and then just by waiting a couple of days or a week or whatever we'd make an extra like three percent on our money so stuff like that i mean we were young but We were unafraid. We've just like oh let's do this. Let's change that. And and whatever. And i guess the inexperience really paid off because we made so many good moves that made so much money at the beginning that we were able to like fund hiring like ninety developers in like two years with the you've mentioned the offshore merchant accounts a couple of times and i know it's something i don't really know anything about but i'm curious like who are those actually four like who they really benefit the most. So i mean i guess. Some of the blackhawks marketers are best served with the offshore merchant accounts and when we say offshore really when people think offshore they think like panama or some of the more like grayer jurisdictions. But if you're in the us and you say offshore you can also mean europe so depending on how much volume you're doing you know if you're starting to get to like six figures a month in european volume you can save so much. Money merchant fees because interchange fees are so low in europe. If you get a merchant account in europe you'll slasher fees in half for all your european volumes if you're paying let's say easily if you're in the states and you're processing european credit cards you're paying four four and a half percent you go to europe you're gonna slash that select one to two percent. I did not know that one of the interesting things we always see as as people grow they need to get more merchant accounts. Assay if you had a i don't know twenty million dollar business in the health niche like. What would a person who's at that level. How many merchant accounts would you think they should get that question a lot that you say that it's it's it really all depends on the risk profile of the merchants and how aggressive they are going to be their marketing right. What kinda traffic channels like. If you're in the health space and you're buying sixty percent of your traffic on porn sites. You're going to need a lot more meds in the guy who's getting you know Top tier facebook traffic for example. So it depends on than if you have subscriptions you know that obviously tends to charge back more. I like one thing that you guys Said you know at the copy accelerate. I can't remember. I think it was you or or stephan instead of having subscriptions. Why not offer bundles you know. I'm seeing that trend. A lot in that really does a couple of things increases your revenue like straight off the bat and it also lowers your risk at lower chargebacks and refunds and all that stuff so thinking about not only. How many mids that you need in order to kind of make sure that you're scaling effectively but also thinking of strategies to kind of lower your risk because you know twenty five thirty bucks. A pop recharged back. It starts getting pretty expensive when you're when you're at two three or four percent range so i went ahead on one more thing with the subscriptions subscriptions or one of those things where everyone wants to get people on continuity and then kind of like. You said it's it's really tough. It's almost like running entirely different business like eat. A lot of helped avid subscription got. Because as you know subscriptions decline You gotta follow back up. You gonna try to recharge This is like nine gotta do compared to kind of selling a bunch of stuff up front. I'm curious for people who have subscriptions. What are some kind of the methods you recommend to try to make more of those charges go through so obviously in terms of conversions for your subscriptions. Is you know agassi. Try to charge them exactly on the same day that charging the first time so if you were successful on the sixteenth of the month and you try again on the sixteenth of the following month because certain people pay their bills at certain times so that's one thing the second thing is kind of focusing on the decline salvage so meaning if somebody declines their subscription rebuilt. What do you do with them. What is your strategy is their day. Just gone away because what happens with most. Merchants is one of the declined to just out of the funnel. They're done. I mean that's a little bit of a waste especially if you're paying affiliate on the front end don't know one hundred bucks for that sale and the customer never converted on on their subscription. That's a huge loss for for merchants. So determining a good salvage strategy is in. My opinion is really important. So say your subscription is one hundred bucks a month. Just whatever on september fifteen hundred schools through october fifteenth. One hundred bucks go through and then november fifteen one hundred fails. What do you do with that number one. Try again three days later. Don't try the next day or the same day. Just doesn't really make much sense if somebody pays their credit card today it's gonna take one or two days for to post So try three days later. If that doesn't work then wait another couple of days and try decreasing the price so if you're subscriptions one hundred bucks try fifty bucks or even. Try twenty bucks. You know what i mean. Try something really low just to see if you can capture that money to keep them in your in your rebuild cycle and then hopefully you grab twenty bucks this month and then next month they can rebuild again at the regular price so just kind of Lowering the price so you can capture the money and keep the person your funnel especially if you have a content business like it doesn't cost you anything so why not just at least twenty bucks and keep him in your funnel at an extra month to his lifetime value. Just increase your prophets there. So that's that's another big thing and then another interesting way of kind of salvaging. Your you're declines on subscriptions trying to charge customers at the beginning of the month so just in general people pay their bills on the thirtieth twenty nine thirty first of the month. So there's a lot more credit available at the beginning of the month. So if you're gonna try your attempts you try again on the first of the month to try to capture that. But the one thing that i always have to caution merchants they they get a little bit crazy with the decline salvage some urgency when they start doing it and they start hitting the card like every second day or every day for like three weeks or something. You definitely don't want to be doing that because then you might get blocked by the customer's card. So it's just being strategic with the salvage and if you're using a decline salvage tool like there's companies that do this for you where they charge you. You know percentage of your bills. Just make sure you understand what strategy they're using. And the like you know taking the piss out of customers and trying like fifteen twenty times and then screwing your merchant accounts up. Do you want to jump into john about the code. Yeah sure i mean. What can't we talk about the checkout page. And i think you guys Also in vegas had quite a number of tips. That i've used for my merchants. And i give in. I do some consulting and i do some You know i. I give my merchants a lot of tips because obviously if they make more money. I make more money. So everybody's kind of happy with that but just checkout pages in general is such a either. We're always talking about. Ab testing your funnel ab testing your landing page and all that stuff. I rarely hear merchants testing or ab testing. They're checkout page. But that makes a huge difference in terms of customer confidence. And you know how quickly somebody can get through your funnel and buy something without interruption so just focusing on your checkout page is is such an easy thing to do that takes very little time that can add two three four five percent on your sales numbers. One thing that you guys had had mentioned that i thought was interesting. And i know that you know a lot about this as well but it was like the buy now button or like the place your order. I had a merchant just recently he had something like just very benign like submit order with like a very orange color like just a very drab color we changed to red and put pay now and he literally saw uptick of i think lake almost one percent of so That was something. I learned in vegas. I i can't remember who said i. I don't know if it was you that was like what a small thing to do. That takes like the better part of thirty minutes to increase your revenue by one percent Not revenue your conversions. You know what. I mean soul this big staff and then optimizing for mobile. You know making sure that your page looks good on iphone ipad. On every type of tablet every type of device is super important. I don't know if you have any experience with our woody. What do you feel about. You know. Kind of the checkout page formats. Have you noticed anything on your end where people are doing stuff differently that it's an increasing their conversions. I mean the biggest thing is always creating that trust with the security and making it feel like a safe purchase. Every test i've ever done. We're adding more alike. norton seals. Did i had her or better. Business bureau stuff underneath the button. Every single test like that always increases conversions. Got a guy. Think like the people who are usually buying stuff. Your average consumer like buying something online for them is a big deal. It's not like you. And i who probably order five things a day on amazon and a bunch of different stuff and we don't think twice about it but for your average for especially around a lot of these niches where it's fifty sixty seventy year olds buying stuff. They'll ton of anxiety when it comes to buying stuff online so they think they're going to get scammed they have no trust in your site so the more you got ramp of that trust and get rid of their skepticism found that over and over again Is probably one of the easiest ways. Done the checkout page to increase conversions. I would say the second thing is getting all the super important stuff kind of above the fold. I got a huge conversion. Bump for a client is probably two years ago who had kind of a logger checkout page and the the actual like or form little further down always simply move the order for him up to the top of the page and on the right hand side so it was like a left column and a right column and then a big kind of like just over there start your order here and they got a huge commiserate just from simply doing that. All because it's above the fold and it's there's no hunting for do order so kind of simplicity keeping things above the fold and then just more making them feel safe and secure their order. I mean that's the name of the game if if you know impulse buy right especially if you're selling something that's an impulse buy. Why are you making it harder for people to buy it for me. The the one thing that i find odd every time. I'm testing pages. You know three step checkouts why you know like why are you making three steps to check out that here. Put your credit card go. You know that's how As a merchant you want to try to capture the information as quickly as possible and let them move on if you wanna have thank you pages with other offers or whatever or other information you nona sidebar. That's cool but your your main focus year when somebody's kind of at the end of their cart is get their credit card number. Get their formation. Let them you know kinda move on but also talking about you know checkout pages and we touched upon that before is international sales. A lot. A us merchants. Now are seeing huge. Upticks lake from canada and australia. Just because there's so many people online just optimizing currency literally just adding these different currencies helps tremendously and it's such an easy thing to do like merchants don't even realize how easy it is. You can literally call your payment processor and asked them for their international currency options. And then pop them into your gateway and you're good to go that's it you know it's it's not like a huge amount of integration. There's not a huge amount of work behind. It charging somebody in their their their native currency is going to improve your conversions. it's gonna lawyer chargebacks and it's gonna create a lot less confusion and also you can do price testing in the different markets. Just because it's twenty dollars in the. Us doesn't mean it has to be the equivalent in canada. Were used to paying more for everything so just charges an extra twenty percent. Nobody's gonna notice if people like it's just every time i go buy books at like chapters or something. It cracks me up because you know. They print them with the price already on the sleeve. And i'm like okay. Nine thousand nine hundred thirty nine canadian. I'm like really that's double. That is not even the exchange but you know obviously haven't payments. I noticed like weird shit like that but you know gladly pay it so one thing that you know Just kind of going back to my my browsers. In my pornhub days. I had tried such a cool test was like it was the funnest test. Error what i did is in gdp. I left the same price as it was in. Usd so we were charging twenty four ninety five us. Fuck it. i'm just going to change the symbol. I'm just gonna say. Gdp twenty four ninety five which was almost like a dollar fifty like it was fifty percent more money and our conversions barely dropped like literally like we were making so much money off the uk sales. Like why the hell didn't we do this earlier. so you know testing currencies in different markets not just the currency but also the price point in the different currency is A very overlooked little tip. I think on the checkout page. So yeah i mean just in general Optimizations ab testing currency conversions. This stuff you know is is great. Tips and i think Just focusing on those things when you have your traffic dialed in and you have really good numbers already. I wouldn't say you know somebody who starting out or doing like ten twenty cam month is gonna start focusing on stuff like this. This is really for you know merchants that are starting to scale closer to the six seven figures a month. That's where these things make these like huge differences right so i mean. Thank you for your time. This was like a super interesting discussion and I hope you can come back on the show one time. We can continue this like really exhilarating conversation on checkout pages and Yourself a great day. Thanks appreciate it. Thank you by hope. You found today's session valuable if you have any questions for me or just want to connect. He's still free to visit my website. Maria brackish dot com. That's m. a. r. a. s. p. r. a. g. i s. dot com. I'd love to hear what you're working on to drop me a line on any button issues your businesses experiencing and remember. Don't worry about daily really have to be right once.

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Are we being fooled? (S2 E4)

The AI Future Show with Professor Andy Pardoe

09:39 min | 5 months ago

Are we being fooled? (S2 E4)

"Ah Welcome, to. The future show. With me your host and guide Professor Amdi Party. Today's episode is our first bite sized edition of the show and our bite-sized topic is going to be GP t three. For those of you that don't know much by GP t three or open I. I will be including a number of links in the description of the podcast feed to research a bit more by it. So the title of this podcast is, are we being fulfilled and I've picked that very specifically Andy will throughout the course of the next five, five to ten minutes understand why I've picked that title. So many of you will already be aware of the work that I play a doing in the failed of official intelligence research. But for those that aren't please take time to have a look opened our ai they do some amazing things and. One of the areas that they have really been pushing the binary only as natural language processing. They work in this field as developed as an Algorithm Code gpt which stuns for gender, generative. Pre. Trained transformer. They released gpt to last year and they decided not to release it to the general public because it was so powerful and now a few weeks ago they have released GP three, which is a much bigger algorithm. and has huge capabilities and they have only allowed a handful of developers have access to this and to explore applications, and I have to say some of the applications that I've seen coming off the back of that limited access has been nothing short of amazing I think anyone has seen some of the results will agree it's just fantastic. Won't this algorithm is actually capable of on there's all sorts of different. Capabilities that able to do from actually creating press releases, news articles as well as computer code. This algorithm is a true representation of what's possible with huge quantities of data and huge computational power to train the algorithm. Now, this gpt three is said to have one point, seven, five, billion parameters, and that hyphen gives you an idea of how large this architecture on this network or collection of networks that walks actually is I will. Be the first to admit the from what I've seen is just amazing what is April to generate by giving it some example tax, and then letting it generate the next set of paragraphs of the back of thought is just amazing. However, I wanted to really explore and highlight my view that while the application of this is amazing and he's doing some fantastic things I want to make sure that we're not being fooled by this. and. What I mean by that is we aren't. thinking, this is more intelligent and more powerful than it actually is, and I think this is warm of potentially many examples where we are going to be fooled by the technology to some degree that we're actually going to think it's more intelligent than it actually is, and let's just think about this right. So the architecture of gpt three doesn't really have anything in my view the as creating true language understanding. So there's nothing in the architecture and nothing in terms of the bird that can explain what it's generated and how it's generated it. There's nothing that will allay to say. Quite like what you've generated, can you change the focus of the article to be slightly different? So while there appears to be some understanding and language understanding Were being fooled by this somewhat and Shelly, it doesn't have the capability the we would love to say eventually the you can actually have the interaction with it and say, that's great. But can you change it this way or that way that for me is where we entered the realms of artificial general intelligence and some people are saying by GP three all it's the first version of age I completely disagree with that opinion because it really doesn't have that level of deep understanding the we will as technologists would love to see develop Bart's. It's really moving this forward showing us what is possible and that's fantastic and it's also a bit scary. That's office say why? By DP, T to and for three, they've decided to limit the access to the outgrowth of because as with any. It can be applied for good and bad I. Think we've already witnessed a lot of fake news and applications like that. So I think they're doing absolutely the right thing to control this a little bet. But it's it definitely from my perspective it's not. Gone the type of understanding that we would like to say in these systems and you know this is not just. This sort of doing this. It's a problem for all of us in actual fact that with very focused on learning but we're not really focused on understanding the architecture as I'm learning algorithms that will develop and create us a way of extracting understanding that can then be applied. And I think that's that's why we're being folded amendment. Set to summarize what we're saying from open AI with GP. T. Three Algorithm is nothing short of amazing and really demonstrating the power of having huge quantities of data and processing that with a vast neural network caulk tech CIA that weighs one point seven, five, billion parameters that he's rarely creating some amazing capabilities however. It's no Agi. It's not true language understanding. We all stow far from that but this is a great step forward and showing. The potential of what could be possible. The other cautionary note for this of course, is that. There is the reason why they've to limit access to this. What does that mean for us as an industry I think there's some really interesting. Challenges there with US pushing the boundaries of what's possible high. Do We control this? Thank you for listening. I will be exploring in much more detail, natural language processing, natural language understanding in future episodes. If you like this show, it would be great if you could follow and share on social media, all of our links are available on pod dot AI. I would also be very grateful if you would take the opportunity to subscribe to this podcast on your favorite platform. And if you have a moment, please feel free to post a review. I won't be reading at some of the first reviews in future episodes. If you have an idea for a topic of discussion or would like to be a guest speaker on the show. Please go to padre dot is slash show and fill in this suggestion survey. Thank you for listening to this episode of the a future show. I have enjoyed it and we'll take the time to reiter and to share with your friends family and colleagues also don't forget to check. I other episodes of the show to find out more about me visit party don't. A. A. Related company I would like to sponsor one of episodes or a full series of the future show. Say. Please contact me on my website.

GP t gpt Professor Andy padre dot US official reiter Shelly Bart CIA ten minutes
Apple's Special Event: Card, Arcade, TV, News, and more

AppleInsider Podcast

41:49 min | 2 years ago

Apple's Special Event: Card, Arcade, TV, News, and more

"You're listening to the apple insider podcast. Welcome to the very special episode of the apple insider podcast. I'm Victor joining these Daniel Aaron Dilger Victor. Hey, I am. So glad you're here. So something big happened today. Why don't you tell me what it was apple had a launch event for lunch? Any hardware? I think that's I don't think I've ever seen anything like that before as everyone knows they launched all hardware last week or do I've had I'm acts of the new airfields to get it all the way because they want to focus on content today. They did launch one physical products day, the heart the credit card titanium laser etched credit card. I think it's the finished product apple has ever announced probably. I'm sorry. I had to. Electron? I guess I mean, it's bare metal what is actually a computer. You know the card contact card yet. It's got a tip. That's a computer when you plug it into contact Reiter, powers it up and created numbers. Yeah. Yeah. They they did do those new hardware. We got there. It was a hardware event. So what else did they do? Well, it's interesting that that speaking of the card in particular. It's interesting that they did launch a card even though they're focuses on pay and touch transactions because there's a lot of places still you can't use NFC it from your your phone. So the backup card serves two purposes. One it allows you to use the same account everywhere you can be consistently using it. And Secondly, it's kind of a prestige thing. There's a lot of procedure related to gold cards, or platinum cards nicollet it out in the black card. It means you're fancy so Apple's really tapping into that with, you know, here's a here's an account do carry around optionally to use it when you need to, but they're incentivizing the use contactless Apple Pay from your watch or whatever because they're giving more money back that way this rebate is they're basically subsidizing the cost or they're paying you back because they're charging the merchant credit cards when you use a credit card, it's free to you. But they're charging the merchant and Merson cards for merchant fees. Yeah. So the Bank has charging whoever you buying stuff from. That's why some places don't like cards. Wasn't that big thing that WalMart was was upset about when they launched the MCI pay thing that they're doing with WalMart pay. Yeah. Anywhere. A store can stores like to couple of things one is they don't like to take credit cards if they don't have to. But most do because they're you're willing to pay for credit cards that they're gonna miss Evans from sales if they don't allow credit cards, so a big place like. Walmart is going to take your credit card, but some stories more take specific cards like like if you have an AmEx. Not take it everywhere because AmEx? Typically charge us more. I think so some places I try to use my ex they're like oh sorry. We don't take that. But this is based on MasterCard's network. So it should be broadly usable but Apple's incentivizing that use Apple Pay electronically. Because then they'll give you back more money to percent back as opposed to the back of the card, and then if you're buying apple stuff, they give you three percent back and apple stuff could be anything from a product in the physical store or the online store to the app store or I tunes. Yeah. In really interesting. This this idea of instant money back is kind of a plus take on the idea of just discover card is for member doing it the card you back that was like that whole Moto. But there's also a a no thing that occurred to me with how they're approaching. This and the fact that they made this partnership with Goldman Sachs who they noted was not in the consumer business of banking. So they don't have products of their own. It'd be kind of difficult for apple to partner with a company that was already selling people stuff because they have less incentive to give apple more control over the whole experience and Upolu really good at experience, but it's hard to create a great experience on something. And it's hard to enter into a market where there's other companies that are competing against you didn't have a partner that will help you to get into a new market. And there's a couple things that I thought of is examples of that in one is when they launched the MacIntosh that worked with Microsoft to get off on it. You know, they built their office, suite and more more, recently and more dramatically. They partnered with AT and T at the time is called singular to launch the ice on. And they give eighteen exclusive access to the allure of buying an iphone meant you had to get AT and T which wasn't the best service at the time. Certainly, but it the Frederick network in the United States was willing. To concede giving apple a lot of leeway in controlling the experience. And that's what launched the iphone experience if they'd had to partner with rising all these companies that didn't really want to work with them. They would have had a much harder time delivering a really different experience, and the iphone was really different than any other south on because you know, you you had one company controlling the app store it with this tell you a company that was trying to bring tones and garbage apps that were junk based on job or whatever. So in this case, partnering with a new Bank allows apple to create an experience with credit cards that are different and one of the things that they stressed me. A couple of things they stresses showing you how to pay less interest by paying more kind of saying, hey, here's your minimum payment, you can make an you'll be in debt forever. And on the flip side. Somebody noted I I didn't verify this myself mean noted that the the APR on the new card is rather high like thirteen to twenty five percent or something interesting. But you know, by teaching people to pay it off, you shouldn't really have credit card debt. You should be paying off your credit. Debt credit card is done one of the worst things you can have you you say that. But there I think that are a large number of Americans that carry credit card debt. Yeah. And that's really bad. I agree. And I think apple degree to is why they're hoping that they'll be able to use these kinds of things to stab which could habits. Yeah. So they're really teaching people buy stuff using this card, but then pay it off. I mean, that's I think you or the other novel thing was paid off more frequently. So if you're making the biggest thing you can afford every two weeks like get they'd say, you're going to be saving a lot of in interest. As opposed to waiting entire most pagan interest is a real big trap. I learned that early in life. And fortunately, it was bad enough to where I didn't have cards charge me interest for my life avoided that so. Yeah. And then also the reporting and things like that they making it more friendly as credit card. That's so that was kind of interesting, right? I mean, there were things like mint early on years ago that allowed you to input your transactions, and then be able to categorize them where they would try and categorize them for you. And try and help you see where your money was going and sort of guide you to a monthly budget, and I think mint sort of fell by the wayside because. Those people still use it. But it's it's just become clunky. Sort of forgotten over time. And I think hasn't gotten the attention. It needs from its developers to make it really good appointment wasn't really make a great experience. It was to get your data. Yeah. They're trying to get you for your counselor. If they could harvest just tons of information about doing, right? And that's one of the cooks set about privacy today. Was that Goldman Sachs is not gonna sell your data. Right. Yeah. And that doesn't even know what you're doing says, it's kind of the same thing with Apple Pay do that earlier with thing. You know, we're not keeping track of while your transactions in mining data were, you know, we show your last transaction, but we're not even recording at for you. So that's kind of interesting take as well of offals privacy stance. Now, there are people have been saying that there are other cards that have better rewards programs than this one. And that was one of the things that they launched with apple tales. They said you can keep the card you have because you might like it. Right. Remember Google when they launched Google pay. The original one came up with. Original in this call was Google and then it became Android pay and it was based on a machine. Art. So it's more like what Apple's doing now is it was based on the card with a partnership with the Bank that could go had. Yeah, I have one of those cards actual so that was a test self Google because it made everybody to get rid of the card. You had to use it to get a new card from Google to your well, actually, I when I signed up for that at Google one years like two thousand twelve you didn't have to sign up for new card at that time. It was when they were just launching the NFC products. That's what they did was you you put in your own card, and then you fed stuff into you're sort of Google wallet. And then you could use the physical card that you should you as a way of withdrawing that at ATM's and stuff. Okay. So you were actually sign up a new agreement in the process. It was very similar to what apple is doing. Now, actually. Yes, I'm thinking of the two point they've made launch NFC fodder. Well, this was the first Nazi product. But they were they were pushing really hard that year they had a Samsung galaxy something or other that they issued people that attended. I. Oh, just so that they could show off how NFC payments would work pretty wild. But that's not as important as what apple is doing today. One of the questions that people were asking me earlier today was will it be possible to use the other cards the already have in Apple Pay with these new wallet features? So that you can see where you're spending categorize since the categorization happens on the phone. I didn't get that impression. Perhaps. I'm not sure. But like when I use it doesn't record everything on I'm doing it gives you the last transaction that you made with apple Fay. So like, I said, you know, I'm using various credit cards that frequently used the card self so there'd be no way for while to even know what time for transactions were. So even if they could do that, it wouldn't be picture. Yeah. I understand cool. But it's an exciting in kind of thing. I thought for a long time that Apple Pay was one of the most interesting parts of of something apple could do that. It had a lot of potential and another thing that they've leased the card. I've thought about not specifically related to cards or banking. But apple has a couple different commenting systems linked out an apple support for the incentivize people by giving them micro payments. And that's what they're doing on the card. It is when you buy from retailers like apple or if you use in Seattle. Pay you're getting this cash back, and it goes to your apple cashcard, so Apple's experimenting with paying people to sensitive to do things and then seeing immediate reward. So here's some cash you can use to, you know, split a tub or I'm were stuff about early. So that's interesting. Yeah. By enough absent pays for another app. Do you know if the rewards can be are? If we say personal stuff from apple if I purchase something like the TV plus subscription does that count against the count towards the rewards like three percent back for spying subscription from them. I would imagine that if you are buying anything with your card. That's how it would work. But I don't know for sure transaction at I tunes. You know, if you buy something today on a card, the incentives, it will give you whatever you're paying money. I mean, it's just another merchant. Yeah. So after we talked about the card, right? The other thing that they announced one of the other things they announced was the idea of a news plus service. Yes. And we had a couple ideas of this is coming Rutten was doing news at self and the other was their acquisition of texture, which is all you can eat magazine script created by magazine selves. There was the big publishers for saying how can we get people to to do something that's gonna work for us. So as hurston Carney Nassan, these companies created this product that apple bought, and so they're already in on this, magazines, magazines are almost like a lost art. But it was interesting that apple is really. I think about my childhood in the magazines that had an impact on me. I mean, I was reading science National Geographic and things like that. And the the combination of reading a lot of information with graphics super professional photographer. Showcase that doesn't really exist anywhere else and apples tapping into that to create something that's also huge for pan because I had was kind of ideal way to Rosen formation. That's not just you know, static. He's paper. It can have dynamic stuff type photography and things like that. Animation video. And so with the really treating is one of these epiphanies that head when they were doing it as this is the convergence between PC's television that nobody quite got. Right everybody thought it was gonna be this box. That rise you browse the web while watching television or something like, no, here's a here's something that works on devices. You have that gives you something you can read which is something that television's very good at you can't read text on television. So television's very much just a looking at pictures thing. And it puts that video picture live photo thing into the context of magazine. So you kind of delivering this future of interactive very graphical video based almost like television with the actual reading a lot of content. That's indepth journalism. So it's really creating a convergence between these two things in the past newspapers and television and the web and creating delivering in a way that's make sense, and it feels like a real product. Yeah. And it's reminds us magazines completely integrated. You know, when they're showing on the screen the. Essence magazine in the table of contents for their beauty issue. The cover was animated the cover was a movie the cover rice was motion. Graphic the articles were motion graphics everything was alive. Everything was touchable. Everything was not just a static wealth. We could have printed this on paper to it's there's something different about what's going on here. And they've been working on that for a while. That was we've seen that happening kind of evolving with apple news at and before that, you know, the tried to work on creating new stand that didn't work because kind of because the publishers were too much in control, and they were trying to take what they already had and take, you know. Right. Yeah. Shove it into a PDF or something or you know, in some way, just take what they have wish, you know, make sense for the publisher. But it makes for an experience for the user this not very good, and it was all sort of basin whole bunch different apps. So you had to buy and subscribe to all these different apps, separately, or whatever. But so, yeah, they're they're taking this big picture solve a whole thing and create a new way of working on things for journalism and apps or news related apps like papers and things so that was exciting to see and they've got some big deals with corruption content. Right. They had they showed this. The the skim the highlight by FOX vulture tech crunch, the cut grub street, and they also mentioned the Wall Street Journal and LA times right LA times and in Canada the star. So there in my understanding was that for the content like the times end journal. It's not just some section of online content only, it's everything they have. Actually, not sure about that. I think it's they described it as a created experience. So I think it's not gonna be. I don't think they're trying to replace people who are subscribers of the entire Wall Street Journal, everything like business subscribers Neil Seibert hosted on Twitter saying, by the way, all paid WSJ content will be available Napoli's, plus any reporting. Otherwise is incorrect that that that it's different tweet from somebody else. But I'm sure knows what he's talking about. Yeah. Now, clearly you can't use the WSJ website to get into it. Also, it probably has to be only through the news app because otherwise the WPA would have to know about you as a customer, right? And it's it's my understanding you told me right wrong that w has no insight into whether you're your customer because you're subscriptions through apple news. Plus, yes. The other thing. I would imagine that that publishers would be getting paid based on what you're eating. But I made it pretty clear that they're not going to be trying what you're eating. So maybe they're just getting a fixed amount. I'm not sure how that works. Are. They're gonna model how much each publisher is going to get the money that you're paying for unlimited use of Ariz magazines. The only downside. I see here is in only kind of critical thing can throw in is these are all massive public, Asians that are global or national or whatever. So the the newspapers that serve your small town or smaller cities things like that. It's gonna be harder for them to to benefit from a system like this. However, I mean realistically, the newspaper almost dead small media in, you know, towns in smaller cities is having a really hard time surviving, and they, you know, that's why newspapers journalism they're dying in my were, you know, we're getting our news from Facebook. And in sources of regarded just shoveling us, you know, completely made up garbage. Yeah. We've little videos of nonsense. Just so overall very happy that Apple's creating a marketplace for real journalism people who actually can right and take pictures of. Amazing things and creating a marketplaces the most important thing for them. Because there was there's no way that free and ads are gonna pay for this stuff. We've already done the web. But we know what the web generates the web goes for lowest common get garbage, you get missile top thirteen things that you need to know about. Yeah. When you when you monetize ads, and how many click something gets you get garbage the journalism is dying. Yeah. Exactly. Exactly. So how how I mean is it possible for local papers to people to get into apple news. Plus do they have on kind of thing? How would you do that? I mean, I would you create something like that? Maybe in the I mean, there's a lot of ways to work on things. But I only posit about this because I have a close family relative who runs a small town newspaper runs two of them. In fact, and so I was thinking what can I tell about this to see how she can use to advantage? But another another thing to think about this kind of parallel. To this radio station's is the same thing we radio stations dying in the eighties, but most radio stations. If you have a local radio station in your in your town was we're a long time ago transfer just into clear channel whatever stations. Right. Where you you may have somebody local that's giving station inefficacious, but all the content is, you know, coming from Texas or somewhere else into a lot better. And so there's still there's still some independent stations out there. Very much. I mean that that's kind of a thing that sort of dead little bit on. Genre. Right. You you. Get a lot of Christian music stations that play church broadcast on Sunday. Those are local classical music station next to me W C P is is a local station not owned by anyone other themselves. Andy stuff or something there is out there. But it's obviously a lot less clear channel begin gobbling everything up, and I mean you complaining channel. But it's also the we saw the same thing. Like local entertainers that would do stage shows, you know, before the advent of television, and, you know, for that it was movie theaters kind of took talent in sort of commodity modernize that for an audience of millions of host to a few hundred people that are in a arena in a specific city. And so this just kind of the way things work when we have global economics. But hopefully, there's so copay things will continue to get better. At least for the big newspapers ten dollars a month. Apple news. Plus gets you magazines gets machine learning recommendations gets you curated news gets you all kinds of incredible content, including the National Geographic stuff, you were just mentioning earlier. It seems like a really good value. Yes. I think it's creating a lot of new revenue for those sources if people are. Buying you know, ten dollars a month is pretty reasonable. If you read for stuff, but that's a hundred twenty dollars of revenue that those magazines probably not going to get otherwise. So it's a lot like apple music or people going to pay for new music in tune says downloads were that's sounds kind of dying. But you know, apple music is way to get everyone to pay a little bit. And so far too early getting money time now after they did news. Plus, they announced a thing called, apple Cade. Yes, we enter just made this also it makes sense. I think what is. So it's it's games that Apple's really incentivising games that are going to be good. They've already created a huge platform called, you know, it's like the biggest videogame platform if you compare it to things like PlayStation in any other mobile, definitely mobile stuff. But Apple's created the only business model for creating mobile video games. Even for Android is not. Very good because there's no way to really sell content. You ads on which don't get very much money fortnight on Android. They told you decide loaded rather than going through Google play for that matter. Yeah. So Apple's created this actual platform. But there's only a few games on that's the plane unfair to say. But there are a lot of games that aren't very good because they're this kind of casino model of generating revenue or up purchase. So the whole point of the game is just kind of string you along to get you. Why little bags of gold or something continue cookies and stuff because a that's a really clever way to get money on people. But be it's also hard to sell people on a new game every every minute or you know, as new games come out. And so here with apple arcade, apples, creating first of all they're incentivizing developers to put more money into developing better, far two games that are paid for by subscription as opposed to buy purchase something purchasers or or advertising or. Data, you know, steering surveillance advertising, and at the same time that also of the fact that they're creating good content means that people are gonna have another reason to buy an eye west device. Maybe a higher end a newer device like a newer phone. This can actually deliver games. Woken sound amazing or the play, you know, incredible on an ipad. Pro the new head pros sound on them in just the screen is so incredible. That's a really powerful way to play games. And so creating content for this hardware, sells hardware, and creating content. Also creates a reason to to subscribe to this is a service, which creates the content developers. You know, putting the talented abilities, creative interesting beautiful games. Yeah. And I understood that they were subsidizing the creation of these games that they were supporting the developers to do this. Yeah. Just the fact that it's creating a market it's generating revenue, and they're putting that money back into it. It's I mean, even the. Start self as a way to help dollers make money. I don't know the terms of how they're going to be supporting did not many directly. But just the fact that creating a market that has real revenue in it is going to be amazing for gaming should should steam services likes team be concerned at all to Valby worry right now. I don't know. I mean, there's different kinds of gimme experiences. And like if you look at Collinsville games people. Always hated it. When I compared console games or or even things like the portable PlayStation portable with ISIS when I coming out there saying this is not even similar and yes, it does not directly similar to compare a game plays on the console with a mobile game in the same way. That's not really always fair to compare console game. Playstation XBox with a PC game where you have even higher hardware have a lot more complicated interaction with, you know, you're typing on a keyboard, you know, kinds of buttons or whatever controllers those are all different kinds of experiences, and they have come at different sort of. Of business models. Some of the games that you buy for PC or consoles are, you know, eighty bucks for a game that you're buying a really high-end AAA game. That's not probably ever exist on a mobile device. But apple is creating a way to monetize douse that's going to be amazing on mobile, and there's money for it. Because right now, the asterik if most aims a couple blocks there's a limited amount of things you can do even with huge audience. There's a limited amount of things you can do the again cost two bucks that you have to maintain for provincially forever. Having recurring revenue allows you to do a lot of creative interesting things and put a lot of work into their amazing, and it's customized for the mobile environment. So on mobile devices, you know, and I was really intrigued by the titles and types of people that they have working on these games. You know, they had. Cash. They had the one of the people behind final fantasy. They they had a game that had art direction done by Dave Gibbons, who was the fellow who illustrated the watchman which was a movie a couple years ago comic book before it an award-winning comic. They've got some serious people working on these games. It's artistry that I that really seeing there in the form of a gain. Some really glad that there is a marketplace that apple is supporting this model of paid games that tell a deeper story that are more engaging and one of the things that that aren't they on solid Ohio, very ridiculous. But the the the the the message apple doesn't get gaming as you know, for big didn't get gaming and that kind of fell into it with phone ipod touch. I mean, they really had gained before that for pod. It was kind of. Yeah. It was just about how to distribute on IT, basically. Yeah. Exactly. But here they're trying to do this. Arcade games on. Pads and then with west they kind of stumbled into this market where a lot of majority of apps were games. And so they they ended up with the market. And now they're taking that market that they've already developed and using it to to produce content. That's going to be the best content for mobile. I mean, obviously there because they have the money to do it when you have money to do great art. You know, that's. Kind of shoe in that you can get it done. If you don't have model, you don't have a business model this supports yard. Then you can either make terrible products or you can ask for a lot of money for title. And a lot of the things that are just not going to have on mobile devices. It becomes very limiting to the few that can manage to do it without the budget. So that's pretty cool. There's a lot that I'm hopeful to try out there. The the examples that they showed in the video that they showed in the keynote. We're really exciting to me. So I'm hopefully, beautiful interesting working ideas there, and they're all different it's kicking cutter. Like, here's a fighting game. Here's another fighting gang shootings on again. No, it was these these games were there is no violence where there is no shooting not all of them. But the couple of them were like that. Right. There's a range. There were already a pretty good game in the app store. There's a pretty good selection of games. The do a lot of interesting things, but Majali to write monument valley is find one of these great games where they the one. They said they weren't gonna make. Second. And then you're later, they came out with one, and it was both of them were beautiful, and these great mechanics, and they tell story, and you know, they're not the Saint sort of thing you'd find on console necessarily. But they're incredible. A lot of this pollution wasn't something that apple invented. It was developers. You know, they're they're creative were creating the stuff from the frameworks. Apple was developing. And so once they got it done that you look at W C an apples, helping supporting development. They're not telling developers you need to do this. They're saying here's the tools to do what you are good fats, which is a really good partnership. And here's a kind of continuation of that Lucien of once created a foundation that there's interesting stuff going on. Now, they can broaden it make it available to other people in you know, people who are challenged other areas. Like, like, you're mentioning with anything from common books to a different style gaming on a different platform know, there's there was the the fellow who's behind final fantasy that was more of an action kind of thing. There's the sim type game where? They talked about you just following your characters around living their everyday lives right there. They're all sorts of different ways that this can be explored. I am excited to see it. You know, and I'm not a I off and on a gamer. I am for sometimes attritional game. Or sometimes I go away from games for a while. You know, I have I have a steam setup and I get into it for a while. And then I'll get away from it. I think this is giving me some optimism about an really hopeful about the kinds of things that can be created an OB interesting if they can use this to leverage the development of better games for apple TV. Apple TV is actually pretty pretty decent for hardware. I mean, it's it's nothing like, PlayStation. You know, even though worth child for good. Yeah. It's it's it's pretty good for putting stuff on its vision that clayborn fun, and you know, visually interesting. The problem is how many people are gonna go to apple television put down money regular basis for new game. And it's it's kind of harder to manage titles and stuff. But if you have a system that works kind of like the TV off where it saying. Here's the games you have and you can start you can continue where you left off from over here. It will be a great thing for apple TV and having more people looking at that as a product that is relevant and gaming because right now, there are some games that are kind of fun to play. But the basically had in her just model even makes the game super frustrating. If you're not paying for it or very expensive. I've said for years that the app store on apple TV is terrible for discovery that if you're trying to look for games, and you want to find games that are multi player that can use controllers that can take advantage of the things that you can do is apple TV. It is almost impossible to find them. It is really difficult and really frustrating. And then once you find them, you know, you have no way of trying them out. You just have to drop your ten or fifteen dollars on them or five dollars on them or whatever the fee is or the dollar and pay an app, and it's it's not easy tends to be frustrating. So this kind of pay month plea and have access to everything could be a real win sounds like about how much you throw away. On apps month trying to to either play once that had an app purchases or trying to just try out and find good ones, and you know, all throw dollar this throw dollar that. When the next thing, you know, you spent seven to ten bucks during the month. This starts to make a lot of sense domestic I'm hopeful. I really am. Yeah. Well, I mean, first of all we saw some great art in the show today. They those games. I wanna play those. I do would I pay ten bucks to play all of the ones that they showed today. Yeah. Probably because I would probably pay four ninety nine for one of them. And if they have one hundred of those that are that good of that interesting, or even if they have fifty of them that are that good interesting. They have thirty of them that are that good of that interesting and the catalog grows to the point where I keep getting more. That are good. I I don't see a problem and having having the money. I mean, I think I'm kind of surprised that apple has put more money into up developments either I party, or, you know, buying up successful south really pushing it harder. This could be an opportunity to see apple putting more money into. To ensuring there's good content available. So that people have a reason to buy it's hardware and making it exclusive means that here's another reason to buy an iphone as opposed to, you know, formats considerably cheaper has Similars specifications. A magic box view. Here's some you know, here's another blue bought blue bubble kind of feature that adds exclusively to the iphone gives ipads, another reason to be very useful. And also gives apple TV reason to exist. You know, one of the nice things about subscriptions through apple is that they're very easy to turn off and on again, you know, if you're if you're using apple apple arcade, and you find after a month or so that you don't use a whole lot of it that it's not working out free for whatever reason, it's very easy to unsubscribe, and then come back later and resubscribe, and I have always appreciated that because it feels like I'm not being suckered into something the way it has with with other. Subscribe. Scripts services than I've tried in the past. That's it's really liberating to be able to turn it on and off without a whole lot of where it makes it easier to keep it on in fact, because there's not that sleaziness aspect to it. Yeah. Speaking of things where we're talking about second. You've mentioned running on other devices that are nominally the same. Check box standpoint. We gotta talk about the TV app because the TV app is going to run on other devices for the concept. Yes, there's gonna be they said they're bringing the TV app to Samsung, LG, vizo, Sony, and Roku and Amazon fire devices fire TV of interesting to see how some of the are. Because Netflix a lot of devices until him are awful Netflix. Good on something. And then other devices kind of like, I have Netflix on a Samsung television that I just want us pull it is. I have to deal with it. Yeah. It's much better TV and other devices, and Netflix is interesting as an example because net flicks tries to. Use some devices as beta test of their users for athletes, like they'll use the for years, they used Sony PlayStation as their beta device if you had one used net flicks on it. You got whatever they wanted to send you as the interface that day. And then once they decided what it would be they propagated out everyone else and today the interface for net flicks on apple TV is the same as the interface for it on Amazon fire TV is the same for it. As on Roku because they want to try and get everything to be consistent as soon as they decided what that's going to be fry and who is similar right who runs the same interface on all of them, and Amazon when they were talking about prime video someone did this sort of disassembly on prime videos up, and it looks like they're using the actual same little code on every device that the the IOS app in the apple TV app have code in it for other devices. It's early. There's so I'm not an expert in devices. But there is a pretty significant difference in computing power across all these different devices television stuff and stuff, but it'll be interesting to see the TV's that they're saying they're gonna run this stuff on is are the new twenty nineteen models and some of the twenty eighteen models. I'm not sure how far back they're going. So we presume that they're picking models that are going to have appropriate levels of hardware support for them. Right. And it's getting to the point where it's not that big of a deal to run an app like this is not any any modern computer should be able to do pretty decent job of of running from this kind of already. I mean, it's not like is really complicated out. But, you know, the the machine learning recommendations that they're using are probably not happening on your video TV, that's probably happening recite. Maybe I'm just guessing because I wouldn't expect to run the machine learning stuff for TV app on a video processor probably taking. Taken you could deliver. The experience that you're delivering you can deliver sort of a basic experience everywhere, and then have things better on TV, which would be very kind of expect apple to do. But just having something that works at allows you to use your content everywhere that's going to be a big deal. And when I start talking about this articles about apple music being on Alexa devices in. Propre? No, no. So is what you airplay to and home kit. Compatibility are going to be on some of these television sets sample, and I don't think that is kind of a separate thing. I would I'd imagine. I tunes. We're talking about putting on Samson televisions will now become this IT are the TV app. Yeah. It's basically the next I knew I tunes is really movies in within this off now. Yeah. So imagine by tunes is now becoming apple music and apple TV and centrally they're they're shoehorning other services into this thing too, right? They've got the spectrum cable and direct TV from AT and T and your optimism cable kind of thing, and they've got HBO starves Showtime CBS all access being sold through it. Similar sort of how Amazon does with the channels in their prime video stuff and PS VUE is going to be a part of it. So that TV appar- becomes the port. For all of your watching. Yes. It's kind of an interesting take on basically changing the interface for apple TV and similar tellers boxes. Like that from one. That's exactly the same as an iphone? Right to a new kind of platform where everything isn't necessarily apps based. It's basically wanting to look at the kind of concert that you looking for whether it's Showtime specifically research shows, or if it's action movies or just in general things that you're interested creating an interface. It's kind of based on interest as opposed to and that store with app titles, and the fact that they've given apple TV it's offering to some name TV lasts kinda similar to watch OS where you do have option click on but the functionality watches more based on what you're doing which are interested accomplishing as opposed to map that says has features very cool. Do we know much this TV plus service that that goes along with the the new TV app is gonna cost? I don't think they said yet they're speculation that it's going to be something like five to fifty dollars. I don't know. But they're talking about it in the fall. So. I think it's going to be dependent on how many partners lineup. There's gonna be some worse contracts. Right. They specifically mentioned show chime in some of these channels and storms ethics HBO CBS all access and there were some others. I had the list earlier so the working together. But I mean there we go the price the price is important. But the prices hardest thing to wilt ramble to figure out one of the things I was sort of hoping and I didn't hear anything about it. But I'm still kind of interested in the idea of it is a sort of the way the way that Amazon sort of has in the past giving you access to all of their stuff for the one price of having prime. Them. Bundling this with music or this with with some of the other services, so that it becomes just one thing you pay. There's some good about the all card, and they said, you know, maybe you don't wanna pay for everything all at once. But it's I dunno. I go back and forth. What's your thoughts? If they can define each of these things as being viable enough. Then it will make sense people. Be like sure I'll pay for our kid regains pay for TV. 'cause I watched stuff in verse things like that the recent Amazon bundles everything together into this prime is because Amazon's business really isn't all these different things, it's selling her mind being marketplace for everything and the primary thing of prime is that it's free shipping. And they're creating other services that give you some recent how prime, but the the main benefit to prime is you're gonna pay a significant amount for it to get shipping because you're buying stuff on a regular basis. Incentivize, you to go on my more stuff here, creating things that are very different and appeal to different audiences to some extent. I mean, some people are gonna just described everything and some people are going to be like, I wanna read magazines. I don't games whatever. I I'm sure they could do, you know bundles where you put things together. But they don't do that for, you know, apple TV in cloud and disappears that you can buy now. So. So I'm not sure that appleans to follow a prime model because a business so different than Amazon's. Very cool. So after they talked about the TV app in the TV, plus service. They started talking about their own shows that they're producing and we've talked about reported on that in the past a little bit. But can you speak a little bit about that? While they put together a lot of talent. And in every time we talked about apple TV or TV shows. Everyone likes to say, oh, I don't know they started out so badly with his. Planet of shops. And carpool karaoke carring. Terrible kind of washable like, yeah, we have to learn how to produce stuffers you have to learn the business model and apple is they weren't trying to figure out how to do their own conduct so much as they're trying to figure out how does this model work? How can we scale up to create the money to be able to do something like this, and it was comparable in some ways to their history with I tunes in regionally? It was music from as many labels. They could get to buy into it. And then added video very slowly like music videos, and then some Disney shorts techs are things. And as they were proving this model words then other studios could not be part of it. I mean, they wanted to be part of it. So here's situation where they're saying. We can we can pay develop stuff. We're creating a model we have the subscriber that pay for stuff. So if if you. Have a great idea, and you have a team that can develop it. We can monetize it with this attrition that we are creating I wanna think Dan for joining us. You can find in at Daniel Aaron on Twitter. I met be marks on Twitter. Go ahead and Email us, I'm Victor, apple insider dot com, and we will be back later in the week. With more information covering all about apple. Thank you. Mike will be back.

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FoodTech Fireside: A Conversation About FoodTech Accelerators

Smart Kitchen Show

57:59 min | 1 year ago

FoodTech Fireside: A Conversation About FoodTech Accelerators

"This is Mike. Welcome to the podcast. Today's episode is a special one where we get together with the leaders of food ex and we were exclude labs. They're accelerated programs and talk about the world of tech accelerators. We did this today is alive. Vent, what we call our food tech fireside it news. Great, I enjoyed the conversation we had interaction with audience. We, we got nitty gritty in worried about tickets order. So this is an area that you're interested in. I hope you enjoy this will be having more of these in the future. So make sure you stay tuned for those, but it's wanted to get this out and what you guys listen to it. And hoping joy I ever wanted to welcome today's fireside. My name is Michael Wolfe. I will be your host and moderator. Today's topic is food tech accelerators what they are who should join where do they fit in the overall landscape for food tech and innovation here to discuss this topic with me and help me weren't more hopefully, help you when but more. We have two great guests Tessa price if we were food laughs and Peter Botin Heimer of food, X, welcome to both view. They for joining us, we will jump into the conversation with Tessa and Peter in just a minute. But before we do that, I actually want to say just a few words about our sponsor for today's conversation. Cloudy, Arnold Ortega, they are a full services technology law firm that specializes in helping startups emerging companies, they can help starve starts with pretty much everything from entity formation two exits and everything in between, including developing an inaugural property strategy. Cloudy Arnold or take it works clients everywhere across the US internationally printers globally. I've gotten to know Priya cloudy, one of the partners. She super passionate about food tech. They have clients in the space ready, vivid robotics van Dorn sale. So if you are looking for a law firm that is passionate about the space. I think she check them out. Go to go to WWW CEO, T A, M dot com. That's WWW. C. A. O. T E A, M dot com. Thank you quasi, or not digging for sponsoring the conversation day before we started, just wanna mention very quickly, our flagship event smart to summit coming up in just a little over four months hard to believe if you want to meet Tessa price of we were food labs. If you wanna meet Peter Bodenheimer food, X in person, I would definitely suggest coming guess they will be there, Tober seventh and eighth in Seattle will be talking tech exteriors, and a whole lot more. What's introduce our panelists? I'm very excited to be talking to the people on the on the conversation. Today, the live every through tech accelerators everyday, and I up, we have Tessa price the last manager for we were food labs. Tessa one you start off by telling us and just a couple minutes. What exactly work? We were food labs is and what you do. And of course, things chain. So we work labs launched a little over a month ago now. And we ran to programming tracks each which is designed to help early stage food startups who are interested in achieving more positive food future. So the first program track is actually a pay predestined bottle. We offer early stage, startups subsidized desk, space within existing weavers. And then on top of that we offer them access to really flexible inclusive programming. So that is more of an incubator model. We allow companies to sit in the space for as long as they feel to benefit, the second model is actually, an accelerator, which will be launching in October of this year applications or that accelerator close on June first as this coming Saturday. And that's a much more traditionally, structured accelerators, so we have for spring loud in that we will loss startups and each of those startups lectu be receiving draft investment from we work. This entire initiative is part of the larger Bieber food. Bob stroke Graham, which was launched little. Over a year ago, and now supports its I should mention it's an industry. Stick program that supports about three home startups around the world. So just a couple of days people. They wanna pie the they should go to we work and check it out. Right. So they can head over to our website, which is we worked at convex slash lasts, or they can head over to 'Success, which is the platform where we're hosting application crepe just a couple of days. You're interested in, I'm going to show the poll. Now we're gonna end it in we're gonna show it. There are people are interested in joining or share those results. You guys might wanna head over and, and apply. Only have a couple more days, so Peter. With food x telephoto about food, X food X is the word we're actually the first and were the most active accelerator in food, tech, we started in twenty fourteen we've now invested in, in just under eighty relief stage companies, and we look at companies across the food system. So we do have a couple of areas, sort of buckets, that we focus on around the transformation of food commerce, which I know is something near and dear to a lot of people's heart in that's the change in direct to consumer businesses how we buy and sell the food that we today than I think other areas that we focus on are the intersection of food, and medicine so people that are interested in functional foods and sort of replacing what pharma has done traditionally. That's that's Inari were very interested in in then finally modernizing the supply chain. The food industry has lagged behind the little bit. So we're really interested in companies doing that. But we do is we invest a small amount of money that the liberal under thousand dollars in each of the companies, we have eight companies that come to the accelerator here in New York twice a year, and our, our applications are rolling basis. So they're open today. If you go to food dot com food, hyphen x dot com. It's the dash x dot com slash apply. You can apply today. We have an early deadline, it's coming up in about two weeks. And then we'll be looking at the applicants for Mexico or will start in September and start those interviews in July and on this, and that's great. I hope that provides context provide good context for me to kind of set the table for the. Conversation on what I really like about. Kind of the two panels. You guys is like you're coming at it from different perspectives of a little bit different lenses pearly. Because like one Peter and food acts you guys have been at it for awhile years. One of most established an old old longstanding food, tech executives Tessa, with we were abs-. Everyone knows we work. You guys have a large platform, but you've just now entered your first vertical focused labs. And as part of addicts already. So I think is really interesting. So with that in mind, I'd want to, in this seem like a very rudimentary question. But I think it's a portent because I think some people may just wanna know what doesn't accelerate to do. I mean what is the what does it do? What should it do? Tessa. Yeah, absolutely. So when I think of accelerating, there's so many of them out there now. Slightly different things. But when I think of an accelerator kind of has a few principles. So I think I most the goal is to work with earlier stage companies who are really looking to celebrate their growth. Typically exceleron have a fixed time, you're in so it's not an ongoing program, which you might see in something that's more of an incubator model. So typically, you'll see four five or six month program track there is normally structured curriculum, and that curriculum is typically tied very closely at mentorship opportunities. And then I think the spinal kind of tenant of an accelerator there's typically some form of investment in those companies. So it's a maybe describe it as an alternative, or an enhancement to seed round, or seeking investment from traditional VC, or angel investor in early stages of growth. Peter. I think that's, that's such, I think the terms get money in or interchangeable in certain aspects when you think of incubators and in studio models and things like that to me, it's a little bit earlier. So these may be companies that are not quite yet ready to commercialize. They've got the seed of idea now they're working on how to build a little bit of business structure around that. Whereas, I think traditionally in the way that we view acceleration has these are companies that have proven a little bit of traction, and traction, something we can talk about his I think that's something that can be ill defined as well. Sometimes so accelerator is really somebody looking for companies that have a little bit of traction, and that are working with them in a compressed time period to build some momentum help them. Get funding helped them get customers helped him create partnerships that are gonna take that business from. Very early stage in kind of get them to the next level. So you mentioned basically how you qualify. What companies you think are right for kind of dive deeper on that when you when you're thinking about a startup and whether or not they should apply for excel Reiter? What, what are some, what are some characteristics, you to define that is it, you know, like you said they have market traction. You know what are some of the kind of characteristics when you look at it that you think that should accompany should have or star chef to, to be an excel Ritter? So I think that depends very much on the accelerator were on the program in general. So, you know whether there's funding or not funding, whether it is a corporate accelerator, that it's a little bit of grant money or mcleese with food X hits, a, a venture backed accelerator. So we're looking for companies that we believe in be venture scale committee, which is yet another ill defined charm in what we do, but I think that that can really dictate. So if a company is looking to do something that's a little bit smaller in terms of the market size. They're going after and may not be looking to build a business. That's high-growth high-velocity. And then ultimately have some sort of exit that business than there are a lot of good programs out there that fit for that type of company. Whereas if a company is looking to, to go that venture capital route, then they're other programs that are better fit. I think. In either case it's about having a team. So I think we see a lot of Show Low founders. I know solar, founders get tired of talking about this, but the challenge with solo founders, is that there's just simply too much to do in a business for one person to do it. So it doesn't mean that you can't be successful. But it does create a little bit more risk in the business. And then I think the other thing is that people have proven that there's some demand for what they're doing in. It's not just we're taking something that already exist making marginally better that really we talk about innovation. And I think we really looked for companies that have something truly innovative, something that really is different than what's out there on the market today. And does there need to be desert need to be certain type of company? Right. That, that would be more leaning towards technology starter. For example, Ray I mean. People are starting businesses across the country all the time. There's someone who might be starting like just a retail storefront are there, certain types of businesses that make more sense within accelerator than just than others? Other businesses, you might say, that's just kind of that is. That's a lifestyle business for that, that is not one that fits within a program of ours. That's a that's a an interesting question. Something unique and some degree about the we work up celebrators. We are actually opening the application process to appease across the food, ecosystem and the lens that we've kind of determined when we talk about the types of companies that we want to work with, is less focused on industry's segment. But more focused on is the company moving the needle when it comes to more positive food future. Are they closing the gap the land gap the greenhouse gas staff? And I think obviously, the, the accelerator model has grown out of the tech space, but I think increasingly more. So we're seeing application. Of the accelerator model in the CPT in hospitality and education spaces. So there are definitely advantages in the text base to some traditional growth trajectories, that make it easier maybe to build a curriculum around in exceleron program. But we're kind of excited with food labs to see what happens when we don't just win it the participants in our programs. The simply to the Texas. I mean I'll say that. I think the, the challenge, that's that creates in what we've seen at food expert because we do books teepee, g in technology focused companies is trying to really get into helping each individual company, and it, it, it certainly can be done. But it makes it more. You know, you have to be very specialized in be very specific to each of the companies. And so, I think if if for the people that are, that are listening to this. If you're looking to be in a program, evaluate the programs based on the type of company, you wanna Bill. So if somebody's trying to build a regional better for you CPG brand, there are certain programs that are going to be better for that. I think, you know, tra- Bonnie's incubators great example. And they're, they're number of them that focus on specific things. And then there are others that, that can bring a lot more in terms of resources like we worked food X's that are going to be right. For those companies that wanna see much faster growth. And they can make sense. You mentioned some of the different flavors of accelerated in, and certainly, I think there are there's a lot of different kinds of vertically focused ones. There's more journal ones, you know, you met you body which, and there's certainly some excel create almost like accelerators service alike by Techstars at work with big corporates. Can we kinda like lay out the landscape old bit of an is there some categories of different types that we can kind of bike dentist that white, the white the kind of the corporate white, the more kind of like accelerators service, models, Techstars worse when they work with corporate are there certain types of categories we point to? I there are I was going to say if we want to do the whole landscape. We've may need to expand it to like three hours. Yeah. But I think corporate for profit, which would be, I think venture or you know, obviously we work as a corporation and is a big company, but I think looking at it a little differently than what I consider corporate, which is the big food and beverage companies. And then I think they're also our social impact and nonprofit exceleron programs out there. And then some of them are virtual summer in person, so you can Pat agrees in slice and dice them. A lot of ways those that give money those that don't. You know, do they run it in a court, or is it more of an ongoing process, and what do they bring or what, what are the goals? And I think it always comes back to what in entrepreneur wants to get out of it, and that can dictate. What is the right fit for, you know, given the broad selection of programs that are out there, ever completely agree with all of that? And I think we're seeing some hybrids. And even if you think about the works that's exceleron or yes, we work is a corporate, but there's also a strong social impact component to what we're trying to accomplish. And then also kind of flipped in the sense that traditionally, when you see corporate exceleron in the food space at they are launched by sellers of mood for lack of a better term, and we work is at its core. Purchaser in distributor feed. So we work is really interested in solving for some of the challenges when hem style we feed our members are employees, sustainably, so completely agree with, Peter, that it is just a ever-growing landscape in. There are so many different rations of the executor model out there today. You mentioned like there are a lot of corporate of food companies. I mean, Shubani kind of is a standard bearer and a leader, and they kind of set a template and model is it difficult, though. If you're big food company, and just going to generalize here to, to do, this is something that you maybe need to partner with and kind of inject some DNA from noon ruin knows how to do this, or do some companies large wash food brands like Giovanni, just have that kind of creative innovation DNA within them, they can do it. So, so I think the thing about Giovanni is their unique in that they're of billion dollar company. You're greater that was only founded I think thirteen years ago or twelve years ago, something. Like that. So the CEO has a very real, you know, tied to starting in the company and so they bring a different perspective. I think that a lot of these larger food and beverage companies that have started programs. They're recognizing that innovation is coming from outside of their company, and that they need to be paying attention to that. But there's, there's a lot more. I think that what I've seen in this is just my opinion is there. There's a lot more running these than just setting up a space in, in getting going. The corporate culture has to be there to really focus on helping entrepreneurs and founders as opposed to it serving solely the purpose of Hayward looking for innovation that we can then acquire or bring in house as a company. And I think that tonight. Is, is such a great example. It's very altruistic in the way that they've approached their model and I think what you see with some of the larger food brands is they quite literally see this as a pipeline for at aquisition which which has become the game in the PG space, especially recently. So, yeah, it's, it's a little different lens with Shibani incubator for sure. The unique value of accelerator 'cause 'cause there's certainly no shortage of entities within the broader marketplace, that service resources for starts, or corporates. What is the die you of accelerated within the broader ecosystem role to something like an incubator or a venture capitalist or, you know, a seed investor? What is the unique value that an accelerator brings? I think exceleron I mean, it's, it's silly to say this, but they really do have potential to accelerate the growth of startup over eight very compact period of time. So when you look at an incubator it might be a much longer term approach. And when you look it like a traditional VC investment, like there's not that closeness or proximity to the start off. I think the value in the ecosystem is that accelerators provide a fairly safe environment for companies to come together and access resources in a way that they just aren't able to when they're dealing with more traditional VC angel. Investor. Yeah. I think it's about the network effect in the community around it to a large extent. So one of the things that I think we've been able to build an ice certainly expect that we work will be able to do this is having a density of entrepreneurs working on similar types of businesses, or at least in a similar area of, of, of the industry back leads to good things. So people can go through this path with somebody else because it's hard like you know, we say this shit is hard. And that's that's the truth is that no matter how good your ideas, how good, your execution is there, a lot of ups and downs building a business. And so having a support community is, is really important, and then being able to leverage the network that an accelerator can bring. So if you go in with a clear idea that you say account when it connect to this big corporate company to this big company. Because I think that what I'm doing will be fit for them, and we can work together. They can help me in an accelerator can help make that happen or can help connect to a customer in reduce if the sales cycle might be twelve months cut that down to two or three months in that's where a lot of the value gets created. It in my opinion on, on from what we've seen foods so plugging into two experts leveraging their knowledge and putting into their, the road rolodexes and all that kind of helping took serrate routes to market and kind of putting porn gas on the fire out. But it sounds like is, is really a what a lot of the big value the spring. But what are the motivations when? So if you're putting yourself in the shoes of like a startup and you're contemplating joining an accelerator. I'd want to kinda know weakest thinker the right motivations for them, right? Should should they solely be in it for the money or should they be in it for the connection network. What are the what are the right? Motivations in your perspective for for start of joining an accelerator lately. I mean, I think it the easiest way to answer that is to say that the wrong motivation for joining an accelerator is for the money. They're way cheaper easier ways to get funding than to go through an accelerator program you need to be willing to participate in the programming. And you need to see the value of joining as Peter mentioned that network or that community. It's yeah. I really caution anyone who's just interested in the Czech from joining accelerator. Yeah. I mean there I say often there are lot. There's cheaper money out on the street in exceleron or money because the deal structures, accelerators investment, typically are different than what you'll see from just an investor. That's not running a program now, again, some of these offer grant money but I think that can be short sighted, as well, because if you're looking to build of a large business, sometimes it's about mapping out that path fundraising what you're going to need to get the business to profitability. So I think that's important Intesa mentioned being present being ready to take advantage of it. What we've seen is the companies that get the most out of being in food X or the ones that are open to taking any meeting meeting any corporate comes through, or trying anything different using it as a space to experiment with their. Their pitch their business model in get quick feedback turn it around and really take advantage of this three and a half months in the case of food X summer longer some shorter, but that specific time period to do nothing but focus on the business. There's a saying of, you know, sometimes you're too busy working in your business to actually work on your business, and in exceleron or gives you an opportunity to work on your business with really, really focused after. So Peter, maybe because you've been doing this for a while, IB interesting to hear, like you said, like those that are really in it there for every meeting. Are there characteristics? You've seen where eventually a startup just doesn't fit like you. You can't be hundred percent. Correct. When you're when you're picking up again. It's our their qualities. You've noticed of startups where they just they weren't a fit or maybe they drop out because of that does happen. Any kind of red red flags can after the fact you see. I think they're they're plenty. I think one of the big things, though, is it's, it's about understanding knowing what you don't know. So they're certainly people that have gone through this process and built, and sold a business, and they're probably not right for exceleron, because a lot of what they might learn or the network, they might Bill. They already have, and so they don't need it. But I think for anybody else, you know, it's the people that either don't find value in it or washout, or just not right, for our people that. What they say the business they wanna build. This is different than the business that they in their minds wanna build that can be an issue, then I think people that in this goes back a little bit to the solo founder thing again. That's a much larger conversation. I'm happy to talk about it. I don't think that I think food is face floor, you can be a solo founder in Hanson success, but it's still very hard but part of the problem with being in. Celebrators Sola founders. A lot of your time is taken by the activties around the accelerator enduring your time here, so there's nobody there to run the business. The day-to-day operations in really things humming than that can be instead of being added to the business, it can actually really Param somebody's business. So I think it's, it's about being able to dedicate that time and for people that feel like it's going to be an imposition to be in attendance in to be taking advantage of all the, the meetings in the opportunities, they get presented during any accelerator program. Those are the people that I think, typically, you're looking to avoid because ultimately, they're going to not get as much out of it as somebody else is elitist. I think that raises a great point and a question that we hear often, which is what can I expect from the time commission will I have time to still work on my business, how many hours a day, will I meeting in exceleron or programming? So I'd love to hear you speak to food accident. And what the expectation would be for some joining your cohort. Sure. So shall we talk about it as though? This is more like graduate school or your than it is undergrad. We don't say you've got to be here at ninety and irritant we have she's Lexa -bility. But I would say that in any given week, we trying program to three days a week of, of, I would say half day worth of. Programming that the companies we want them to be involved with, but I think, anybody who runs a program also understands you need to give people time to run their business as well. And so even to the point of being physically available. If somebody's got a meeting that's critical to growing their business that's outside of the door or they've got an order to fulfill for their product or any of the things that you need to do in a business. It would take away from being in the program. That's okay as long as you're planning ahead for it. But typically, you know there are I would say you're gonna have half a week to work and half a week of, of, of food X programming, if he were in, in our prevents. That's just a rough breakdown. That's great. I'm sharing the results from our second poll, by the way, it looks like most people haven't been the next hour. Eater. We have a few that have, and we have a few people that have had vise Arturs. You guys mentioned earlier. How equity or getting money, the money part is not the cheapest money out. There's actually more cheaper money out there. But let's talk about that when he part, right? So that could ask is a big component of it. How, how does the start of way implications that could implications of accelerator? I always kind of advocate that. Members. Joining the accelerator kind of consider exceleron money in a strategic way. So is we work investing in your business Easter, TJ decision will the opportunities presented by we work by the network that we can connect you to be worth that equity. So they're really it can't just leave for the front cash for capital. It really has to be about that longer term relationship in being a part of that ecosystem. I think that about sums up my thoughts on that. And I think to add to that, I think that's corrected. It is about the long term. We say it's, it's not the fourteen weeks for the program. It's not even fourteen months. It's the life of, of the business. In, in, so the funding in the in the case of tax, which is part of SOS's, so we're venture capital firm. The current fund were working off of his two hundred fifty million dollars. That's not just food ex that's the seven different exceleron or programs in different verticals that we run. But our goal is, is to continue to deploy capital into the company and I think the challenge at the earliest stage of any business, even the ones that I founded myself was what he, you know, that, that delta between the value of the equity that you would give up in what you can get out of it. And just like with us investing money into a company there's a risk with every investment, we make? There is a risk, every time you give up equity is a founder and so you might get tax return out of a program, but you might not. And so that's why I keep going back to really. Understanding what you want to build what kind of company, you want to build, in which program is going to be best for that kind of company that, that probably gives you the best chances of strapping net value in being in a position to then go on, and raise the right kind of funding that's gonna help you get your business because venture capital is ripe for some segment. Angel funding is right for another family offices, or even traditional financing through banks or right for for other types of businesses. So it's about trying to figure that out in an established. What's best for your business in this may be a question that a lobby, but I quit. Also, it'd be I'd be interested is it negotiable. Is it or is, this is the offer when you join food actually, join, we work labs, accelerator, you give this, this equity, and we give you this much or is there for negotiation? Dad's great question, so sorry, go ahead. Peter. I was just going to say it's we say that the deal is the deal. People do try to negotiate an I frankly as much as it creates pain for me. I recommend every founder always negotiate when they can. But the expectation is that with exceleron, it's typically thick steel. And same the same answer really for we work through we do have a standard steel, but that being said we were also has a larger investment. Arman, it never hurts task. That's interesting. I think both of you in a sense, have like a growth path, like so there's a stage of a company that makes sense. That's an accelerator. But at some point graduate and they have to think about life after that. How much of what you guys do a lot of his is preparing them for that exit. Also is, they're oftentimes they like a hand off to maybe another kind of arm that can can kind of participate from finding perspective. Or kentucky. What about that? I think it's kind of like an iceberg if you will. Then you kind of have the value of that initial investment in programming on the surface, but then beneath the surface, so much of the work that I do that. My team does is building future relationships that we can connect these startups in our programs. You and some of those are within the work ecosystem in some of those with outside partners that so much of what happens during excel Reiter, is really just proper for the next stage, that company is entering into. And if we've done our jobs as an accelerator, we've created a brand that is incredibly attractive to future investors. And I think this is one of the challenges of running exhilarated over time is, you know, we've now got a portfolio of, of eighty companies that we've invested in some of which are not still around, but many of which are, and it doesn't end after the program. So you're trying to create that momentum in get them on the right path coming out of the program, but that's not the end of the relationship in, in it shouldn't be, so we try to do calls on regular basis with our companies and be supportive where we can be within the context of dealing with a lot of these with so many different companies, but we also you know, I think it's an area where a lot of improvement can be had because we do some programming that helps founders at that next level. Think about, well, what do I need to do to prepare my company for an exit? Or what do I need to be thinking about? Build the right board of advisors in the right governance. Ford as we get from a company of, of a couple of people to accompany of maybe a couple of hundred people, and so those are the areas that there's a lot at the very early stage. And then there's a lot of support from later stage, venture entity, but there is a gap, I think in between those two and you do the best you can to support people through that. And that's something I would advise companies consider are looking at different accelerator options and their hundreds if not over a thousand accelerator programs in the US across various industries now. And I think that looking at the depth of the resources in connections that, that particular program has point to be able to offer you long-term is so important, they're like you don't wanna flash in the pan program, where you have a really great experience for three or four, hunts. Then have now given. Up a certain percentage of equity to an accelerator that you will not have continued relationship with or in some cases can be difficult as you move forward. You know, they say, especially with an investor. It's, it's harder to get rid of a co founder than investor so being selective on the front end really can help you in the long term. And it's a great point in that. I think you mentioned the numbers Tessa. There are certainly a lot of accelerated out there. You know, you guys represent berry premium premium brands, but I would imagine that, like Mike any, any sort of marketplace. There's there's, there's premium brands and there's, there's less. So, and so Peter, you said, you know, you ear may be easier co-founder than investor. He can't. So are there should should buyer beware should start us? Beware of getting involved with the wrong. So writer, I think you want to be wary of getting engaged with the wrong people in general, whether that a co Packer if you're in the consumer packaged in space or if it's a development team. If you're building an MVP of the tech product or, you know, a supplier, there, so many areas that you just want to spend a little bit more time on the front end to understand who you're working with. And obviously, it's easier to switch from a co Packer than from an investor. But I think the other part of that is that. A lot of these programs are well-meaning. They're doing good work in, in weights. But it's, it's about the big picture. And so if, if found her can look program in say yet, maybe it's not a name brand, but what they do what they seem to do. Very well is this. And in all of the programs that I know of at least put the companies that they work with that are in their portfolio, either on the website or press releases go reach out to those companies and ask them because nobody is going to tell you, you know, better than the people that have gone through that program and had both good and bad experiences. Because even if you run the best program in the world, there is going to be that spectrum of, of good mad experiences based on where the company is in the challenges that they're facing, you know, because it is in up and down road that you take building this kind of business. I'm actually going to go to audience questions audience questions are starting to roll in, if you have some fill free to submit them be the Q Nate function. We're going to go live with this first question the way works as make it live. And I'll read the question, and then you guys can can answer it. So Scott Sanchez. He's a CEO the fit. I know I talked to Scott he why do you think New York City has become such a hub for food and restaurant technology startups? But I think one, I think your has of very well, its population dense just has an incredibly dense rich food, heritage. And I think that it's it feels like a natural extension of some release drawn existing ecosystems in New York. New York has always had incredibly rich history in the hospitality space in the CPG's Faso, part of my part of my inclination is that think that it stems from that I need, it's hard to the city that has more restaurants per block than New York. Be curious, your thoughts on that heater having operated food ex for so long. And before that I was based in New Orleans, which has got a great food history. But is less, Dan, Salvi Asli in smaller, and I think New York is a great test bed for companies it's it's a large market. It's immediately acceptable. And so people can can prove out a concept pretty quickly here, and then I think the other part in their couple of places in the world that just are they have that density, in whether it's money or corporations or customers weather in the restaurant tech space. What whatever it is there. You're in the middle of, of this path, where people just come through a great example, I used was from several cohorts ago, somebody we often get, as wire you in New York, and the example I give, is that a couple of cohorts ago in the same day, we had random drop ins from the head of him in a up Seco, and the global director of innovation from Nestle because they just happened to be in town in the area and I don't think there are a lot of places in the world that, that happens. And so that gives New York a little bit of it in vantage in that way. It certainly. Yeah. New York, San Francisco, any other kind of just kind of you. You mentioned you'd worked in New Orleans, any other kind of cities in the US that you kinda hotbeds or kind of uprising for hours. Chicago for sure. The work that the hat tree is doing. There is pretty amazing. I think Chicago is really interesting in the sense that it is. A big urban landscape, but it's also adjacent to the mid west and so much of the relief will work that's happening in the act Technet spaces is just at its back door so Chicago for sure civic northwest, we've also seen some traction while I can holders Techstars started in boulder and still runs. They're kind of flagship program there. And they've got a great set of, of natural foods space investors as well. And then for, for Adcock, I think Chicago certainly I would agree with both food in bad. But also Kansas City seems to had some interesting. It's become a little bit of a point of density for back region of country and that could be because Kauffman foundation is there an syllabi other support systems. All right. I don't wanna stay to US Centric, Tom Cooper, who I know Thomas while he's chiming in think from the UK, he said he just finished an executor. I said we've. Found having a broad range of mentors with different Brown. Backgrounds as useful for anyone setting up a hit. She didn't ask this. He met say anyone setting up an accelerator. What would you recommend dude, insure good mentors are available for founders. I was this question when he went setting up accelerator. What would you do recommend to ensure they have good mentors available for the founders? Such a question. I didn't speak personally from our experience, that we work that we started about eight months out of court, even announcing the program with beginning to recruit from our community, and we and we still continue to that every single mentor that joints, we work laps program is spoken to by a program manager, who insures that they actually has the skill said that, and the, the ability to commit the time that is required of our start at. So I think just developing really strong. That in a really bet at network of mentors is key and give yourself about time that you need to do it. Yeah. And I beat before word ask people like if you identify somebody, you think would make a great mentor of e willing, just ask them and say, here's, here's what we try to do, and then be flexible on how they engage because we try to give people the opportunity to, to, to do it in a way that works within their schedule in, in their life. And sometimes that's giving a presentation, sometimes that's coming in and doing office hours with all the companies in court. And sometimes they say hick one or two companies that I can go deep with, and be a mentor to. And so giving them that flexibility, I think makes it a much easier, ask for, and you kind of Jack my nap year, but I think along those lines leading the mentors be engaged in a ways. And with the companies that they would like to be engaged with you might look at someone in thank they would be. Absolutely wonderful mentor for X. But that might not be there passionately their day job. So always letting them into telling you, how would like to help companies. And then I also think there's something important about the way that you introduce mentors to rand's brands, often think that they need one type of help end up another. So we're always very careful to make sure that the program manager is heavily involved in pairing are mentors are startups. They can't just reach out to one another and vice versa, so making sure that there is some degree of matchmaking happening is really important as well. If I can just one other thing there, I think. It's is much as anything. It's about sharing experience. And we talk about we haven't touched on mentor whiplash, but that's thing. And sometimes in what I mean by mental whiplash is, as a founder, you might have two or three different mentors. That give you vice that's absolutely diametrically opposed. And they're all the aerobically smart people with your best interest in mind, and that means that you as a founder, half to make the hard decision. They're not there to tell you what to do. And I think that's a great thing about a any program if you're getting a lot of different data points from mentors that you can then make informed decisions around that's gonna help you in the long haul, and that's it's generally at least in my experiences, while it's not necessarily the big name mentors that make the biggest impact, sometimes it's, it's a mentor that nobody's ever really. Heard of that just has a really specific expertise that they can share that helps a company get over certain hurdle. Samna window has an ex question. I hope that the right. And this she sheer he asked. How do you help your startups? Phil stampings as grow. In particular. I think a way I would ask is, do you guys address that staffing? Do you say, hey, do you need you need a CTO or you need this type of person? And then do you help them kind of fill that out? So I'll say I mean that's, that's an area. I think we can all that won't say we all can. But we can improve that we do some of that. And I think a big part of the community in the network is where that's helpful. So as SOS be we have a forum that we get all of our founders into when they come out of various accelerator. So they're now like, I think every twelve hundred founders in that, that is a form for people to ask for help finding this type of roller that type of role in often, it will be people that built the business or tried to make startup go and failed for whatever reason in their million reasons that happens that then bring that experience to another startup and actually can be a really valuable team member for them. Tested. You guys address that or is that something you guys will say, hey, you guys based on what we understand. We, we think you need this type of staffing, as you go out of out of we were, or is this something you don't necessarily think you'll dress. I mean hardy for the members preaching student, and in the non accelerator program. This is one of the hugest ask that we see it's typically I need money, I need people. And I think we were has a really great community that we can reach out to, we are helping our exceleron or members source staff, and it's really it's it can be anything from sitting with them in helping them understand their needs over the next six months post accelerator, or it can be reaching out to personal networks to try to connect them with people that we might know. So definitely a huge component of what we do in something that we're trying to really actively built into the program, this next question comes from being sue. And I think it's such a great one says, do you care, and I, I know but you care about the social back of startups. In addition to fire financial terms, and this is the most interesting part of the question. If yes, how do you measure that, how to measure that? Excitements actually, why we started the salt thing we actually have an amazing board of advisors. We'd all trust ourselves to know what is we don't we don't trust themselves to measure the potential social impact where sustainability impact of one of the up. So we actually rely really heavily on our board of advisors which is led by Marion Nestle NYU. We have representation from Harvard Cornell the culinary institute of America at Drexel. We just have a really great team of people that we can go to, to kind of help measure the impact of our startups that, yes, hugely important to what we're doing. I mean same for us. But we have an an on give it with the caveat, which is were a venture capital firm. And so we have a financial responsibility to make the best investments that we can. But at the same time, we're looking for an intersection, we're looking for businesses that we think can scale but also businesses that we think are going to positively impact at substitute in solve some of these bigger problems that we see as being, you know, critical to, to find resolution to over the next twenty five years. Do you ever do you ever have these dilemmas where you're balancing that? Right. Maybe find a business where like, okay this is just glue clear. We're gonna make money hand over fist. Example, maybe maybe like a some sort of that's harmful or whatever they think doesn't have any sort of contribution from a kind of a social impacts with where you try to nudge, in that direction, you try to say, hey, maybe needed. Think about this. Not not so much on that end. I would say we certainly had struggles on on the flip side of that, where we were like we love this company. We love this team. We love what they're doing. We just don't see that. It's the right type of investment for what we do. And most I hated. But that's part of what we do. We have to put things through that lens. But narrowly if we saw something that was a harmful product and we thought it was gonna make a ton of money, and we've seen some of those, it were just that's not what we're in this to-do instill. Ultimately, it, it's not a hard decision for us. Joe next question's from Joe Mendelson, and he asked pretty straightforward question. What are your thoughts on? Be corpse. Can they be good fit for either either your programs? Yes. I mean, we have a B Corp in our current cohort called simply jar. So we think that they absolutely can be a good fit. And we, we see more and more of them every application period. Completely agree. This is from Peter Straub in. He says, looking at your star portfolio, what are the key drivers food, innovation either because eight think where we get the most excited is where we see companies were kind of bridging gap in, in the foodie, go system. Where they're, they're not just maybe making like a new innovative exciting consumer packaged good. But their product actually, then turns around and solves for an issue supply chain or solves furnish to in distribution. So I didn't really excited about the companies that can kind of spam divides that have occurred over time in the broader foodie goes system. Yeah. I think that's that's a good insure. Go really hard question. His different for different companies, I can't allot of it is about people who are thinking very differently and I know that's like, you know, an apple silliness pun, but, you know, if somebody can take a different approach in say, here's something that is considered a waste product and I'm gonna develop way to turn that into a meaningful part of our food system. Our food chain or icy away that this technology that I understand can be applied to actually create efficiency or improve access to food, or reduce the use of refrigeration, reduce carbon footprint, or, you know, develop really innovative packaging solutions that is one of our mentor said stand up plastic packaging his is an absolute environmental disaster in its, but it's in demand. And so people that are trying to solve these big, big problems. In thinking about interesting ways to apply. Unrelated technologies or techniques to create something that's truly new. That's, that's a really exciting prospect than I think there's more of that happening now than ever before. Or we have time for a couple more. I'm going to try and power through a couple ones quickly, we khanate Morin grow quickly cow, Wilkes as he has a long question. I'm gonna kind of cut to the chase form. Do either we work through have or food X have interest in working with starts in the consumer appliance space. We were. Absolutely. Yes. So we actually in our space. We'll have an iron Deka Chen and a large section of that is devoted to the future of the appliance. We're incredibly excited about some of the energy efficiency that are arising. And I think we talk a lot about on our team. Not like what does the kitchen look like in twenty years, and some of us honor team actually think that there won't be a home kitchen in twenty years. So yeah, we're so excited in the consumer appliance is richer. We certainly looked at some and the, the question for us is we have another program called hats. That's a hardware specific programme. That's based in San Francisco in Xinjiang, China and so often will collaborate with them in we'll try and figure out if a company in the appliance space where the robotic stays or hardware in general, is a better fit for hacks, or for food. That's because ultimately were were the same entity investing in its. We wanna route people to where they're going to get the most value next question and us Affandi ass did food export is food support interested in food robotics businesses. So I think that's that's where we would probably depends on the business in what stage. So if they're still figuring out the hardware and things like that, and I mean, we think robotics is a really interesting space, but it may be that it's a better fit for for Hannam for acts than it is for food. That's, that's what we tried to Termine. But in general, yes, we look at that stock. But we wanna make sure this to the right right place to get valley Tessa. We work food interest in robotics in Senate can be a little bit of a hard fit because to Peter's client depends on how far along, they are in the hardware development. And sometimes by the time that they developed the hardware, there's, the, the value of the, the investment that we're offering doesn't quite make sense. One last question, fitted, in there were we're gonna say, our thank yous. Edwin or TS ask, what are your thoughts on testing and early start up in a major city like New York City versus second. Theory markets in a very competitive food every market. It's a really. Yeah. I think it depends on who your target audiences. I mean New York has a ton of delivery, but they also have every single player here already on. So you can see how it's going to differentiate or not. But also, if you're trying to take a different angle for a city that's less pedestrian in more driver focused or something like that, in a different market can be just as value. I agree. I mean, I think that it is true, if you can make it in New York, especially something like deliver, you can probably do it anywhere. But there is definitely at need in secondary markets. And I think there's definitely a little bit more room in the sandbox. Well, Tessa imperial. I just wanna thank you so much for jumping on this phone and doing this with us and being brave enough do for nog rel food tech fireside. You guys have been great. I think that are I'm sure I can speak for the folks. Listen in were great. I think he answered all the questions and I really enjoyed it. I think this much, so we will send out your guys information that people are interested in. I actually think is very relevant right now. 'cause tests as you mentioned, you guys are coming up on a deadline Peter, you guys are also having applications in for next cohort. So folks, if you're listening, we'll send out information on that. But thank you for for for listening. What's again, if you are interested in meeting, Peter, or tested in person, you can meet them at SKS Seattle and just four months market to some dot com. Oven that thanks guys for doing this, and we'll talk to everyone soon have day one. By rile.

founder Peter Tessa price US New York CEO exceleron Mike Michael Wolfe Reiter program manager Peter Botin Heimer Arnold Ortega
Conquering Skin Death After Tummy Tuck

Plastic Surgeon

32:31 min | Last month

Conquering Skin Death After Tummy Tuck

"Ever wonder what motivates people to get plastic surgery. Did they regret it. What can we learn from the stories of plastic surgery patients. We're here to explore these questions. And get some answers today with my guest jessica on the plastic surgeon podcast. Hello my friends. Welcome back and thanks to our listeners. For the amazing feedback. We had so much fun and so far and look forward to more insights and suggestions please. Reiter viewers us on apple podcasts. And help us get you more. Awesome content on the plastic surgeon podcast. We listened to real plastic surgery stories of triumphant pain from real patients and providers to further understand the motivations of wide. They would risk their life under the knife on doctor. Devout sergeant in. Today's my amazing guest. Jessica who had a tummy. Tuck by me with the fantastic journey. We're here to talk to you about your journey. How we came to norway juggler the procedure you underwent and how it affected you. How's it going jessica. Hello thanks for having me here going great. Thank you in so today. What we're going to talk about. Just the guys wanna talk about you. Learn about you understand why you wanna tummy tuck. How journey went. I know what We had a small hiccup or little complication in. Then how we handle that in your life is now so jessica tell us. What do you do for work so for work i do. It support for medical billing software company. i've been in the healthcare industry for about twenty years and i was raised by a nurse so i've always been some sort of involved in health care one way or another in. We'll go you thinking about a tummy. Tuck well last year. My son left home. My he's my youngest. And i had an empty nest and i kinda thought now's my time now is time for new life for me instead of thinking of you know you're always going to think of your kids and want to protect them but you're you Unselfishly raise your children to think of them before yourself and it was. It was a process of knowing. What do i wanna do with my life. Now how do i feel about myself. I was a single woman. I was forty four years old and it was between do. I wanna corvette. Do i wanna convertible. Do i wanna go on an exotic trip. Have out something just for me. Just for me and i thought all my life. I've not really been secure with my body and not really insecure. But you know there's things that you think. Well maybe you could just change a little bit and having children really puts into perspective of the where of child bearing on your body while for me in anyway i decided i wanted to do a tummy. Tuck i had extensive stretch marks in you know the things that come with bearing children and i thought i would like to feel better in that area my whole life. You always wanted to change something about yourself may know your mid section is something that you were focused on is an area that other people highlight it to you or something that you thought of yourself. Alam my whole life. I had up and down weight issues. was always a yoyo so kids can be mean and then you second guess your worth and how you look and stuff like that and that was kind of always an area that i never felt releasing cure with. Did you ever have any relationships that highlighted the to you know now in fact when i had decided that i did wanna get the tummy. Tuck everybody's like. Why was your family supportive or were they trying to talk you out of it They were actually shocked Nobody thought that that was something that i would ever want to do or interested in any plastic surgery or cosmetic surgery at all so for that to come up. They're like oh well. I kind of thought about. How would that would be cool to have to in good for you. So they were very supportive. Had anything done before this. How did you hear about me. So i did an internet search. I looked at several different plastic surgeons to see cosmetic surgeries and i looked for examples and of body types that were like mine like how would mind luck if i had this done so some of them were very good at sharing before in after's and i was impressed with the dialogue that you had on your website. I wanted to also know that if there was some sort of complication because of course. I didn't think that was going to happen to me. That if something does happen because working healthcare you just. There's no guarantees. it happens That i would have good healthcare as well and supportive provider that would help me through any dilemmas. That might have happened in renew our thinking about doing the tummy. Tuck what was your main goal about. Yourself. what were you really after. Just have a more fit slimmer. Feel more self confident Less stretch marks in. Then you decided to have the surgery re-consulted with me. Hi the concert go. So when i went into the consult i thought you know. I don't want to go to the first sergeant. I have a consult with thinking that. That's going to be the the idea of who i wanna go with. And so i came in with an open mind. And i was just very very impressed with you and i felt secure in having that surgery and knowing that you know if there was a complication that you would be supportive. How did you finally decide that you wanted to go. Forward that When i decided to make the consultation. I knew that that's what i wanted to do when i had the interview with. You and i've just had a good feeling from your energy and your knowledge and how you are concerned about you know complications. You did bring up. You know things that could happen and laid it all out. So i felt you know this is. This is the way i want to go. This is who. I want to be supporting me in. This journey sons You say that you knew wanted this research did you to get there while i have a friend who had the experience herself and you know. It's kind of scary having that severe of a surgery done on your body and she did say you know it is. It is a hard one to recover. But you're not gonna regret it in your friend had another doctor menachem name. Anybody what made you wanna come to me versus the doctor. Your friend might have had I was impressed with the before. And after hours on your website and What you had to share with you know the teaching part of it. I thought was fascinating to that. You also want your patients to learn with you the process and growing together from that. Where did you get teaching part. It just in between the words that you had said on the website i felt like you want your patients to be educated in knowing what they're having done makes sense and then when you came in for the concert i drew what skin going to remove or approximate plan was. Did you book that same year. Did you think about it a little bit. Now i looked at that that's awesome Then there was time between done in surgery. Did you do things to prepare now. I didn't know if they're Walked more watched. What i ate and then covid came. There was a lengthy amount of time from the time that i booked it until the surgery and cova came. Probably right in the middle. And we have to cancel reschedule. Yeah and so. All of the effort of walking and watching what i ate of course. The holidays came in between there so there was a little thwart in that process but after call in things getting cancelled and not knowing what to expect in life anymore. Just like i'm going to enjoy what i have going on in my house and food his. I think all of us did that. I don't know anybody who didn't right. There was no nothing to do. Gyms were closed. You know very limited activities. Why not So we be delayed the case because of covid then surgery came. And then i saw you for the markings and we had a discussion that they are doing the tummy. Tuck in remarked out. How were you feeling when you were there. that day. really nervous. Of course you have it in your mind that if there are complications that it won't be as as major as you think it will be that you're just over thinking things and it's probably good thing to over. Think things because you just don't know what's going to happen. But i felt confident. I knew that it would would. We would be able to work through any issues that whatever is had no idea. What would we working through correct in. You're so right. Surgery is the technically for many people. Right it's not a hard thing to do as far as getting the procedure done. The hardest part i think of the whole process is the healing right. Because that's something we don't have one hundred percent control over. When i do the operation. Jessica i have control over for a tummy. Tuck how much can. I'm going to remove how tight i make the muscles. How much fat. We're going to remove with liposuction and then the question comes. How is it all going to heal. And that's the hardest part when you were a doctor doing what i do. There's science to it. You have to understand the blood supply to the abdomen. Have to understand how to fix the muscles right. And then there's a lot of art to it and that understanding how much can you can remove. Give the contours a patient wants. And i would say the hardest part of what i do jessica biz. When i do these operations so many of them. I have to walk a fine line and that line is. I have to do an operation that significant enough where you have a result and you can see a result while not giving somebody a problem because you can make things very tight very small. But it doesn't mean they're going to heal that way so in that's something we talked about. I said you know jessica. We're gonna do the surgery for you there you know. There are some risks. One of their wrists we talked about was necrosis or skin. Death we talked about backward happen in then are you. Are you understood. That was risk correct. Absolutely yes and then I made my markings drought for you. Exactly my proximate plan for skin removal for liposuction and then we went forward with surgery reynaud. We stab chatted. Your surgery did you. Did you watch operation now. I didn't even know you snapchat in it really we. We don't save them. Sorry anyway so so some certainly did the surgery Very smooth and then you how was the. How was that timing recovered. You remember how it felt a. I am going to admit. I underestimated the amount of recovery. That it would take i thought mile bounce back you know bounce back from childbirth. I don't think i've ever had really major than Appendectomy in that took a couple of weeks to recover. And i was pregnant at the time that i had that. But i m maybe you know age has something to do with it being forty four forty five at the time. That was There's a lot. There's a lot of energy in your body that takes in recovery. How was the first night. I don't remember much other than my mother's try. And it was rainy coming back and she would slam on her break. Somebody like whoa girl. That's a little rough. Were you having a lot of pain. I wouldn't say it was a lot but wasn't comfortable. Were you able to walk around and use the bathroom. Okay i did yes. Yeah how was eating. I didn't have any problems eating the first couple days or okay. Yeah that's good. Then you came for your first post op and tell me how that went. Well seeing. I had never taken off the binder since the surgery when i went into the post office and taking that off that was quite an experience too just is such a different feeling that you're used to your body having how did you feel it felt like i needed to have something secure around me and then we took it off and you look at your abdomen. How was that look to you. Well i thought it looked. I thought it looked great other than you could see on the skin where it was dying. Yes in a remember that apartment. We looked at it in a shared with you. There is an area in the bottom of the middle of the incision where it look like. The skin wasn't getting great blood supply. And how did you feel when i told you that i still felt positive that it would work out. You know you don't know what to expect until it's right in front of you so you knew that it was going to be a process. There's something else going on here that you weren't quite used to but i still felt confident that it was going to workout. I think just put a lot of positive eighty into the healing process. And so that's what i worked with getting through it. And i think that's a lot about you having got to know you over. The past. Several months is been so amazing fresher. Pleasure but i can tell you. Your outlook on life is amazing. Right when you look at things you don't look at what's not there you look at. What's there when you see a problem. You don't focus on the problem you focus on. How are we going to make it better in very few people have that in life and i think that's why you're always wearing a smile almost every time i've seen you every appointment in red i will see you more frequently. You always had an amazing outlook. And i think that's one of the most unique in special things about you. I appreciate hearing that rice. I see when. I have the pleasure of you know doing sergio nice people and i try to surgery. Nice people i feel somewhat not a not a good fit in our. I've tried to take them on as a patient. Because as you've seen more than ninety percent of the time things go perfect. A certain percentage of the time you get a hiccup in when you get a hiccup then you and the doctor and the patient become besties right whether you like it or not. I like i tell everybody when you were my patient. You're my patient till you. He'll whatever that takes me to do it. We'll talk about you. Know what we would special precautions took for you in the process And that's why when i select people. I'm very careful who. I have the privilege of being surgery. Sometimes i say no when people get very upset however this surgery is a two way process in my opinion patient and doctor and you have to be congruent. Because it's a relationship. That's there for many people lifetime. Why wouldn't you say so absolutely. Yeah i don't think that. I could have gotten through it without the positivity from you as well thank you so i saw your skin. Your skin. Warning area didn't look very healthy I shared with you. That i felt the blood wasn't blood. Supply wasn't very good. A new you live three hours away and it was you know untold. We're gonna watch carefully but we're not going to rush to do anything but we're going to act when needed and then you went home that day. Correct but yeah. I actually was recovering at my mother's and port townsend. So the two weeks. I went to her house to recover our those two weeks. Are things going everyday. Day you noticing. I felt like every day was a new experience. I felt better every day by the third day. I thought oh. I'm gonna get off the pain medication. That was a little bit of a jump so it took maybe probably another three days before is fully off of it but i was feeling so much better every single day. You were using a walker in the beginning. Promo patients in a walker to minimize stress on the incision into help them maneuver in walk. How was that. It was so helpful to have the walker. Because you don't really wanna stand up bright man having the extra support very helpful and then you came back and saw me Our weekly initially. Because you were close on your you live longer away in. That skin area wasn't getting could blood slowly went from dusky right which was like a blue to a black area in a shared with you that you were getting one of the complications via chatham out which is called skin death or necrosis. And how did you. How did how did that go over. Well there's not any going back. So i just knew that we would move forward however that process would be and we would work through. It came for your appointment and shared with you. I would have to cut out or remove the dead skin because when somebody gets crisis you wait till you see what area is in doing healthy. And then you have to call debrief -ment removing that area. I removed skin for you. And then we had our wound right Tell me how that process was removing the skin Pain with that. No there was no pain with it but the visual was it. That was a little. How did you cope with that. Oh well It was it was kind of a step back. You know you have to take a new direction when you find a complication like that and going through all of that effort of having the surgery done and then you have a little bump in the road that you need to get around. You'd have to take a step back to reassess which direction how you're going to maneuver. So i felt like we did well with that process. And i debrief it you for people that don't know when you remove some skin that didn't make it you end up with us a hole in the abdomen. It doesn't go to your organs but it goes basically deep underneath the skin in. We had that area in then we first started a little bit more conservative. Wound-care were you. Were changing ause a couple times a day right. Yes parts of my body. I never thought that. I would see how i was doing. That wound-care yourself. My mother helped me up. I i've. I'm lucky that my mother is experienced in healthcare. She's been a nurse for fifty years and so she helped me in the beginning When i first went back home for about two weeks. And then after i started doing it on my own it it got easier after the first day. We do that. that for awhile and you lived a few hours away About three hours right. Yep and i. I remember you were working and i don't want i knew this was impacting your life. Obviously not for the best. It was a little roadblock over. We're going to get together. And so we i made some accommodation the best i could and i decided that we were gonna see you every saturday right me and my wife. She was going to help me. How was that okay so the fact that you were thinking of me and my job and would sacrifice your own weekends to take care of my health. I can't tell you how impressed in thankful. I was for you to do that for me and i. I knew at that moment that the healing was going to go so much better. That would have that support. Of of course i would do it. No other way When someone trust me with literally put in their life my hand jessica. I take it very seriously. I know. I don't take it for granted i don't see it as my right or i deserve anything you know. I meet a lot of young doctors where people doing this a couple of years. They're like they come in. They ask me for advice. Even older doxygen surprise like he. You why are you so busy. How come you're doing so much What do you do. That's different in the some of them. not all. They're like you. I went to school for twenty years. I have all these board certification by. I should deserve all the tummy. Tucks are you getting any tummy. Tucks back look in the. They're complaining about money the Some of these people. I sit back and i asked myself. The problem with hugh is right. Now your focus is. I'm burning in journey. Your focus is doing the surgery and not thinking about the people you're treating or people. Ask me jessica. So haydock on The same people other doctors like. Or what's your secret for being busy How do you do so much. Any other. Podcast in august the youtube series. On all these things that you do in the patients are in your wire the waiting to see a nobody wants to wait more than two weeks me. I tell them. It's very simple. All you have to do is tweet. That patient like your family or friend literally not not not doing disable believe it. And that's why i was happy to give up my saturdays. Whatever it had to do an enormous he give up you know some people sacrifice. I don't see it that way. I see it as i had the privilege of operating jessica. Who's an amazing sweet person who i really value and got to know you. And now we got a little little stumble fumble whatever you wanna call it in now. We're going to get through it together. And i'm happy she's letting me helper and that's the mentality that i have. Just you see things positively. I see it that way. We had a bump in the road. Now we're going to do it together and for me. It was never a sacrifice are never give up it was always about. We're going to get through this and we're gonna have. We're going to get become friends and that's what it is right and i am happy. You felt that way. Because i was really important to me so we went through. We went through it. Every saturday i saw you. We did the gauze dressing. We cleaned up the wound. And then we did that pumping right. Oh yes yes so i. We got the wound controlling clean. Then we did. What's called a vac. A vac is a vacuum assisted. Therapy where somebody puts a special dressing. That's connected to a pump. The pump does is. It applies negative pressure so that negative pressure pools pulls the wound pose a nutrients in and then it slowly heals much faster much faster at fault like after. The pump was installed We're removing boulders. We're moving mountains with that pump. Little poem right in the pockets and so restarted with so we got the palm. And then you were coming from the yakima. Muslims later moses lake. Yes you're coming from. Moses lake every week in we did the pump changes slowly with healing more and more and more How then eventually you feel comfortable in. The pump. Changes at home right. How was that well. I had a good care team. I had some friends that helped me do that and After we did we did it in your office and we video dead so we had a guideline to go by how We didn't have any issues at all in any time that we had to install the pump on the abdomen. Eventually we did the pumps and then things healed. I at the end i gave you some. Gaza helps healing because it was too small for the palm in then everything epithelial lies or skin grover and now things are going. Well now how do you feel now. It's still a process. I'm still extremely happy with despite what we had to go through. I'm happy with the results. I feel great. There is still healing going on Not with this not with the outside of the skin but i still feel internally that things are still healing inside you can feel a little bit of difference within the areas where the skin the flash is a little bit different than the rest of the yes in that area. He'll slower so now we're in the face of it sort of becoming more like you and it's going to. I haven't seen it recently because la fire. Way when we're gonna we're gonna keep tabs on in check on you right. It's i'm telling you you can probably tell me a little bit firmer. Little bit more numb is not a soft it. Oftentimes when somebody ends up getting a little bit in a crisis were happens is where that end comes in the scar falls in like a like a crater in like i shared with you certainly once things are settled in your ready and you want to. I typically. What it what will do with. I'll do a revision for you and obviously there's no cost for that where we take off the skin. They're in pulled the stomach a bit to help. Get rid of that. Crevice things on more flatten incision is more congruent. Because when you what happens is with healing. There's two types of healing primary and secondary intension basically and when you have a wound that doesn't heal you heal by secondary intention. What that means is the body heals from the inside out basically in when that happens the the biggest issue oftentimes that you deal with a scar. That's thicker which can be easily treated doing a scar revision sundays. So thou if you want that. Obviously i'm happy to do it. That would be the final phase of getting things tidied up and getting. Us tight as possible while giving you a nice car that fits the incision line that we made. I do have to say despite the complication there. There a positive side of that as well as the wound healed it also lifted up the pew area. So that's a nice refresher. Yes yes when you get that things. Do end up a little bit tighter. Oftentimes you're correct. Tell me how do you feel about yourself now. I have so much more confidence than i've ever had before. I wear clothing a lot. More tight around my midsection than i ever would and Every day i go to bed in every day that i wake up i feel more confident with my body. Much more confident than i've ever felt my whole life. That's wonderful however. I do clothes fit. I liked to wear a lot more tighter clothing around the midsection now than i ever did before the people notice around you jessica that you had surgery. They actually thought. I had a breast augmentation. Are here that because everything else looked a little bit bigger. Yeah i'm impressed with that aspect as well aside from having more confidence which is which is really a one of our big objectives and doing his operation our share with you. Some people may have said you know. Maybe the surgery should have been done. We we know week. We should have waited till a later time on may be. Had you lose more weight which we know we did talk about. Do you feel honestly That the timing was right for you or would you prefer to wear weighted i failed. The timing was right for me. Definitely you know even even going through that little bump the road and even if i had lost weight. There's still a possibility that something could happened so either way. I'm happy with the results I feel valued as a person from my surgeon. And i value the friendship that we have grown as well Thank you thank you so much aside from more conference anything else feel different about the way you feel now. The way people notice you now actually not really. I mean other than wearing different clothes and you know they think maybe i had something done with my breast instead. I'm okay with that. Have been any changes in your personal relationships like a significant other during this time period. None at all there was My significant other was a little bit more apprehensive for intimate moments. Because he didn't want to disrupt any of the healing process. But i'm like i can give birth. I'm pretty sure we can work. Just got thank you so much. It's been such a privilege that i got to know you. We spent a lot of saturday's together in the rural fund I'm happy you're on your way to a very strong recovery your personality. Your spirit is one of the brightest an amazing people. I met my entire life. Patients often tell me they learn something for me. I can tell you. More from patients like hugh than than is obvious. I learn more about what drives people. What motivates people how they are and how they see things in changes hawaiian so it's been such a privileged thank you. I appreciate the time and care that you and your wife took taking care of me through this situation. And i admire your guys teamwork. Thank you thank you so much for being our guest today jessica. Your story is one of true success. Triumph and pain and we got through it together. I have learned a lot. I know your deal will teach our listeners. How and what to expect as they start their own cosmetic surgery journey. I appreciate your time and am honored to have you as guest and a friend now slasher. Thanks for listening to the plastic surgeon. Podcasting please rate and review us on apple podcast here. More amazing content tune in next week for my amazing guests who's going to talk about his journey through gender confirmation for my life surgeries on snapchat and my adventures throughout the week catches on all social media at real doctor seattle. See you next time scam and.

jessica jessica biz Jessica reynaud Reiter Alam menachem cova norway Tuck apple moses lake sergio townsend rice hugh yakima youtube
Dr. Natalie Harder, Chancellor of SLCC, Working to Raise Educational Attainment Rate in Louisiana

Discover Lafayette

48:30 min | 1 year ago

Dr. Natalie Harder, Chancellor of SLCC, Working to Raise Educational Attainment Rate in Louisiana

"The. This is John swift. And you're listening to discover Lafayette, a podcast dedicated to the people and rich culture of Lafayette. The gateway to south Louisiana. Discover Lafayette is recorded in the offices of raider solutions. A technology company located in the light center in Lafayette raider offers a complete fleet of IT solutions for businesses of all sizes, raiders motto is you just want it to work. We understand if you're wondering if writer can help your business. Please visit Reiter solutions dot com. I'd also like to thank our premier sponsor IBM Bank for its support of this podcast. Founded in eighteen eighty seven IB Bank is the largest Bank based in Louisiana and is headquartered right here in Lafayette with three hundred twenty nine combined locations throughout the south. They offer the resources of national Bank with the personal touch of a community Bank. For more information, please visit IB Abang dot com. Dr Natalie harder is our guest today. Dr harder assumed the post of chancellor of south, Louisiana community college known as SLC in February twenty twelve the first in her family to attend college. Doctor harder earned her doctorate in community college leadership from Old Dominion university in Norfolk Virginia during her first year of service. Dr harder oversaw. The merger of SLC indicating on technical college today SLC has campuses in nine parishes with nearly sixteen thousand students served a leader in training Louisiana's workforce, students can choose from diverse programs. Such as nursing emergency medical technology, industrial technology, digital media design and marine and aviation technologies in, if I may Dr harder. I know you is Natalie. So if we can start with that, welcome to discover Lafayette. Thank you so much happy to be here. Yeah. So Natalie since. We met seven years ago so much has happened. I met you when you first moved here, you and San and you have been, so busy, and have done so much to grow our community college system. I wanna thank you for your dedication to educating all of our students. Well, thank you so much for that, jam. But I have an amazing team. And you know, it makes me smile when people talk about that. I mergers because we've done a second one, right? Yeah. Which is how we now cover sixty two hundred square miles and from home to Ville, Platt. And I think to myself that I think if anybody had said to me, you're going to take a job, you're going to do to mergers, and six years. You're going to go through double digit state budget cuts. I might have rethought, whether or not the first CEO position, I would have wanted. But in truth, it's been a heck of a ride, and we've come out the other side, just so strong and so, committed to raising educational attainment. My, my team is just really and now early. I know that your goal is to see every student be able to cheat their potential in do wanna talk about your background. But let's let's kind of talk about what, what you brought up the students that you serve in south Louisiana. I mean, there's a, you know, a lot of diversity and economic ability to pay and the programming that you've expanded into that you offer really has opened doors in so many ways that some of us never expected because we come from that traditional, you, you traditionally think four year educational outcomes. But in fact, those students aren't able to always have training to be able to perform a job when they get out, and you've been looking at what our needs are not just in south Louisiana, but throughout the state, right? And, and, you know, Janet's it's so interesting because you're right. So if you looked at SEC when I first started, they really were sort of general education aimed at transfer when we. Did that first merger? We brought the technical education training programs in and those are really the high wage high demand jobs in our in our, not just in our community within our state, and you mentioned some them from nursing to commercial truck driving non destructive testing, and so on. And then over the last few years, we've also been pretty aggressive in trying to do adult basic education. So I tell everybody, you know, whether you have a third grade reading level or you've got a doctorate, and you need to upgrade your skill. And we have those folks that come back to us, we wanna be able to offer the gamut of education and training. I think the, the key thing for, for me, personally not being from Louisiana is the low educational attainment rate and you talked about that a bit. You know, when you are looking at the majority of the adult workforce in Louisiana without a college credential. Well, we, we can't compete, you know, we are we have a number of socio economic indicators that are terrible because they're directly linked to educational attainment. And so, you know, we've made it our mission to, to increase educational attainment, whatever that means. So you come in, and you're in you're eighteen and you have a third grade education or you could be eighty and have a third grade education. You know, we're going to move you along a trajectory to help you to help you better your life. Maybe someday, you will complete a doctor. But, but if you decide that you want to be a welder instead or that you want to earn an associate's degree and transfer will help you do that as well. There is so much work to be done to raise educational attainment in this state. You know, we dropped from forty eighth in two thousand seventeen to forty ninth in two thousand eighteen and I don't know why we don't consider that a crisis. I was looking online statistics and I don't know how accurate they were. But looking at the difference between, you know, community college, people that actually graduate and whatever they choose versus the four year colleges and I was surprised at in both systems. You know, I thought there'd be higher levels of graduation. But also that it takes a while for people to finish their education in every hour that you have to take adds up in expense. So I'm curious if you can weave in your background. What got you in to the community college leadership track. And does it have something to do with the numbers of people that you can actually help it wasn't intentional? So I think the universe of the good Lord to put me on this path. I actually started out working at a foundation for a community college in my, mid thirties, and I had no idea what a community college was until that time, but when I saw how it really existed to serve everybody. You know, you could be the eighteen year old valedictorian from Dell com- or your the single parent of three from Crowley. You know, you're the returning veteran your the individual with a bachelor's degree that, that, that can't help you pay your student loans back your the laid off oil and gas person. That's, that's a look into say I've been welding for thirty years, but I need the certifications, approve it, we, we serve everybody. And so it you know that when I was exposed to that, that's really when I was bitten by the bug to see, you know, just what we can do, or I could do to support community college institutions. You know, I've been in Texas when I was in college and was exposed to the community college system, then back in the seventies, and it seemed like in some states of, there's less of I don't wanna say, stigma, but that in Texas, it was like the track to get, you know, very few people could get into UT or whatever. And so it was just looked at as one option of many good options. And it's not always like that. And I know that, that's, you know, people are working to remove that stigma, but you moved here from up north, what is it? Like, like, what is the community college system like nationally is different from state to state, or is it typical, I, I would say that, that in an majority of states, there's, there's clearly respect for what the community college does. I mean you mentioned Texas states like California, New York Virginia, there, isn't the stigma that of yeah. It's definitely considered either a feeder, if you want your bachelors or, you know, today, many of our technical degrees, pay more than a batteries degree. And, and so I you know, I think there's a there's a healthy respect now for the education and training community colleges. Do we have we have worked to get there and Louisiana, but that comes from the history of how higher Ed sort of started here? And, and, you know, there's there's a ways to go. I think it's just a matter of educating people on how to get educated. Because, you know, we all know the story of the barista that might have even a masters in history or something, and job opportunities available. And remember you spoke in an upper Lafayette meeting early on when I was still working with them. But maybe back in twenty twelve when you had just moved here, and people were shocked to see as you said, that some of the two years certification classes for depending on what it is people can start out making fifty thousand and up great benefits and I read like your VA vacation maintenance technology in the marine technology. These are high end feels where there's a demand for qualified workers in. I don't know that they need a four year certificate to be trained. Yeah. Actually Jan the pressure today is they don't even need an associate's degree is long as they receive a certification from whatever agency. So you talk about. Aviation. Thank you. Didn't FAA certification. They don't need an associate's degree. So I think, you know, the pressure is on all of higher education to maintain relevance, when, when students have those options today and they should have those options today. I mean I I'm I clearly one of those individuals not to throw it baby with the bath water because I think that a well rounded education benefits everybody, but I think that the days of piling on credits for the sake of, of what higher education thought was relevant. Those days are slipping away very quickly and with technology evolving as fast as it is. And I know job skills revolving, even faster someone like me with a traditional education. I mean, you know to think about paying for that today compared to what I paid for when the state subsidized most of my education, just as a child of ROY z on appearance. I mean I paid so little, I thought it was a lot at the time and I had stew. And debt. But I wasn't crushed. When I graduated from law school, I was able to roll it in without having to work two jobs and stress about can't buy a home. I can't do this and that so. Yeah. And I think, you know, there's, there's a couple of, of factors that, that play into the whole student at peace, and we could talk a whole nother session about that. You know, but there's I mean, people make choices and, and if you're uneducated that's often where you find yourself in debt. And so, I mean, for example about sixty percent of community college students graduate was Eero debt. Right. And then those that do graduate with that. It's, it's very regularly under seventy five hundred dollars. I mean, actually most of our students borrow far less than that, because for two years to tunes Pell, for example, covers the bulk of your tuition and fees. But if you believe, for example, that going to an expensive college is what's important to you, but you don't pick. Major that provides salary at the end of that. You know, if you are picking expensive college and getting your basic liberal arts degree, and borrowing to do that, you, you will have trouble. So, you know, there's a ton of research out of out of Georgetown about what you study is much more important than where you study it, and it's absolutely true. Right. But we've heard so much in the news lately about parents, buying their ways in, you know, we, we laugh about that sometimes thing. Well, look at that, but for the average person how nice would that be? You know what I mean? Like if you, if you had parents that can just pay your tuition. You know, most of us don't have that and we look for options and, you know, can you talk about that or kids in high schools these days? I know there's a lot of focus on going on and getting an education. But do you think that the counselors, they really telling the kids, you know, liberal arts? Sounds great. And it is it is important facet here educate. Shen but to get a real job where you're trying to do something, you can't just rely on a liberal arts degree. You need some type of training, you know, Jan I think that biggest challenges that counselors don't have time to have those conversations with kids, they really don't you know, there are there dealing with oftentimes students who don't think colleges. And then when I think about Louisiana students that don't consider college to be an option for them, or people that have been put on a certain college pathway, or think or thought process by a, a family situation, a consular isn't going to really be able to bridge that. So, you know, I think it's incumbent upon upon institutions that as students express interest that were honest with them, not just about what the cost is. But what your, your job options are going to be when you're finished? And if you want to obtain an expensive of a degree. Three in a field that, that doesn't have a lot of options for you after graduation. You can take that on yourself. The I mean I have a bachelor's in economics. Have you ever seen a job at for someone with a bachelor's and economics, but I didn't have anybody to tell me not to do that. Right. And I bet it was really interesting. I'm sure that was fascinating. I loved, I mean I have, you know, like my fourth major, but that was general studies. But, you know, I had an economic teacher that I was just like, oh, I get. But I got out and I couldn't find a job helping you today. Oh, no, I you know, definitely is and, and bread, she'd and I never, you know, I've still a little bit of a policy because of it, but, you know, but I had gone to college you mentioned being first generation to get a good job. And then I was like, what do you mean? I can't get a job with this. So. I feel particularly strong about about really trying to educate people on what their options choices. So when a, a student comes to celsius, e what are the options for financial support is an example, tops cover. Associ-. Oh, yeah. And and you know there's different there's different options. So yes, you have state financial aid tops, tops, tech, you have federal and there's other things called goal grants and things like that there's federal financial aid, Pell dollars, you can get different kinds of loans, and then our private scholarship dollars. So, you know, we tell folks that given our state's economic situation, almost everybody, who applies for financially. Get some sort of financial aid. So, you know, but where we get caught is you have an individual who's working in the average age of our students is either twenty six or twenty seven fluctuates a little. Bit every year they're working, they're generally don't aren't eligible for financial aid. So you're asking them to give up hours, either with their family or with their job. So they could pay more to be better educated when they have responsibilities. They want to do better. But they are in a they're in a financial cycle where it's really hard to pull them out of that. So, you know, it would be great for our state to recognize that, that tops is a good thing. But maybe we need something like tops for adults or grownups. Always wondered it seems like you have to start school immediately after high school to keep tops. And I'm not sure I'm right on that. You have to use your tops within a year. I mean, most people are not that mature at seventeen eighteen when they're graduating. No certainly wasn't, and change major so many times I can see how people lose tops, and our don't finish college because then they lose the financial support. And you always thought if you could Bank, it are like you're saying, for older, people that maybe didn't have access to tops to have some way that they could qualify. That could really turn our states. -cational attainment around, you're right on Jan in particular, when you think about in our rural communities, where there, particularly stressed from an educational attainment level. I mean those people don't always do great in highschool, while they're older. Now they have kids, they wanna do something different. And we hold them back because of the relate because their age because of their GPA. We, you know, we put up too many barriers to people who want to try to do something different in their life. I mean the which. Is why you know you talked about community college part of our commitment. I love that. We're open access. Again, you get a third grade education or your got a doctorate and you need to upgrade your skills in something, you know, we are there for you. And we are we are fervently committed to being open access, and I'm glad you're mentioning because most people probably don't know that about the qualification. So thank you for bringing that up. And that gets me to think about the fifty five by twenty five initiative. I know that there's a goal to increase the proportion of people that have some type of post-secondary degree in saw that it was just announced in Katya issues me vermillion parish that they are adopting, and also, would you talk about that because you're active with one Acadian pushing for this, the, you know, the? And years ago. When I first started out, professionally an economic development workforce was never in the top five or three times, even the top seven of what people were looking for, if they wanted to move a business or grow a business. Now, if it's not in the top one or two, it's rare. And so it's if we are going to be a competitive state from an economic perspective, you have to have a trained workforce. We can't be forty nine in terms of educational attainment and expect to attract highway high demand jobs. And so, and every every social cost is, is directly correlated to educational attainment. So the less educational attainment your state has the higher incarceration rates. The more you the more individuals who have substance abuse problems. The more money you paid out. You pay out in terms of. Title men and social programs, the higher, your mortality rates, the higher your healthcare costs. I mean, everything that is a socio economic cost is directly related, but from polar perspective to educational attainment so doesn't make sense if we want to, and I say this all the time. If people are interested, for example, in the state, reducing its spending on Medicaid, and she came more people, the more educated, you are the less Medicaid you need. So I think if we can agree that there's the common focus, there ought to be increasing educational attainment than maybe we can put resources where they make the most sense. What are your thoughts, though, on changing that cultural mindset, you know, free their education hasn't traditionally been important? Let's say in some families, especially in rural areas, how do we change that mindset if the state can wanna help people if groups like one Acadian and others? Want to get behind the bandwagon. How do we change this cultural? I don't know what, how to define it. But you know what? I'm saying. It's, it's more than just one or two, people that can go out there and change this. How do we do? You know, I think I think having spent the last seven years in this state, it isn't the college going out there and telling you that this is what's good for you. It's not elected officials going out there telling you what's good for you. I think one of the great things about the state is, when people see change then they wanna be the change. So the more opportunities we can give people in rural communities, or the who are socio, economically challenged, and then their community. See what that means to them, that is how we will change the mindset. I love a post that you, you tweeted about women in blue traditionally, blue-collar feel, such as plumbers electricians, truckdrivers, demand, nail and some of these positions as we were talking about our high paying so. Is that what you're talking about? Just getting the word out letting people see that success is what you define it. You know success, is what you own. You're absolutely right. Jan and you know I sorta didn't close the loop on so fifty five by twenty five if you become CDL, certified commercial, you get your commercial driver's license you count towards being part of the fifty five percent of adults that have high quality credential or more by the year, twenty twenty five so, so I think we have a we have an interesting con in Louisiana, so we have a lot of traditional industries or industries, where traditionally men were employed. Right. So that's, so that's not necessarily a isn't that as a negative? But that's another stereotype, we have to get over. And women were often particularly working class from working class families were put through college programs that didn't lead to highway high demand jobs. So we would be speaking out of both sides of our mouth. House. You know, get a college degree away, but you can't really get a good paying job in live off of that. So I think the neat thing is about technology, and we were talking about that before we started this whole conversation. Is it really gives everybody a chance to say that they can do whatever they wanna do you wanna be a female CDL driver, great female commercial truck over you want to be net? Male nurse be amount. You know what I mean goes both ways. So, yeah, it absolutely goes both ways. And so I think that, that's a, a lot of what's exciting out there. Now, you know, you talk we've talked about commercial truck drivers, what a lot of people don't realize is first of all after nursing, it's the second most number of job openings in the state of Louisiana is about to ask you, what are the jobs, and it only takes you about ten weeks to get to get yourself prepared to take the test, and you can easily be making six figures in eighteen months. So, you know, Jason maybe we need. To go. What's it called the CDL commercial drivers? You know, we have a program called non destructive testing. It's a it's a eighteen month program, they start out at about fifty six thousand dollars a year. That's if you stay in the state of Louisiana, those that travel, there, easily easily making six figures, and it's incredible years. But, but the point of calm for our institution for south, Louisiana community is that we wanna tie highway high paying job to every one of our programs. So or make it a ladder. So you may start out with medical assisting, go to LPN Daren in or CNA. LPN daren. But we have we have a lot of different programs out there for folks, triumph and see what works for them. But yeah you talked. You talked commercial truck driving maritime a great a great industry. Particularly down there, Saint Mary parish and and, and. We do the majority of it in Morgan city. We have a million dollar simulator for driving tugs, and boats, and it's really neat. But, you know, those, but, again, you don't necessarily need to degree any coast guard certifications. So it's a very different higher. Education is going to have to continue to progress or in some cases begin to progress. You know, we have to figure out how to be like Uber. You know what students want where they want it? And when they wanted, you know, you can be in middle school and learn to code from YouTube. Why should you come to me for even a two year degree? Right. So we have to we have to continually reinvent ourselves and changing those mindsets. Right. Right. What are some of the other top feels? Are there others that come to mind nursing care, huge? I mean health care. There's a so much demand from from a healthcare perspective. There's, there's a lot of demand for, for certain. Fields in terms of business, particularly accounting IT navigation software development. There's a huge demand for that. And, and I'm sure on the show you've, you know, whether CGI professionals on. But if you think about it, those companies come, and then what do they do? They look at other companies for their people. Right. So it's all it's a big churn going on right now. Yeah. Which, though, but makes it tough for the small and medium size businesses to compete for good people. So I mean application software is, is definitely I mean that the networking side of IT is has always been very strong for us, oil and gas is really our program is really strong right now. Not sure what's driving that a lot of hope and optimism, maybe, but, but, I mean, there are things picking up around Louisiana and around the country, that, that makes sense from that perspective. But I didn't think that program would have bounced back as quickly. Good. Good news. Yeah. And you mentioned that SEC will be an partnership with Lafayette, general, on Telehealth, if you could talk a little bit about that sure, as, as you know, we mentioned technology continues to affect our everyday lives. And, and, you know, maybe know where do you see that happen? More quickly than in the medical field. And so, you know, they were they were generous enough to that when they love, general health foundation wrote a grant to, to get some funding from USDA to install these cards so that we originally thought about serving our employees and students from Telehealth perspective, as well as doing the training. But with the app, you can get, for example, through vid general health that we really are going to focus on the training piece and been. So we hope to have those carts at eight of our campuses over the next year know this big push, especially from Lafayette, general, not only have Telehealth. Where people can get treated without having to go into the physician. Once they have a relationship, but also corporate wellness and other things to keep people from even needing a doctor in the first place. It's a real push for outcome based medical treatment versus reacting to a problem. So I know it's an exciting time for students to be running and Jen, go back to what I said earlier, you know, at the number one indicator is of good health outcomes, your education level. So it's all it's all tied together. And if we as a state could make decision that education is the most important thing that we do a lot of these other things would would be better. And, you know, if your education I don't mean to be generalizing here, I am Dionne it, but there's hope, like if you've taken care of some things to set your future. You're probably also taking care of other things, including your health, and all the other things you were talking about in. I don't mean to make light of that. If you don't. Have hope for a good future. The by wings, you can focus on that because you're not in the daily grind of job hopping and try live, man. Exactly. It's the survival piece of it. So, you know, we had talked about, at one point about students, completing higher education. You know, the, the number one reason, students don't complete college any college isn't because they don't have the academic aptitude. It's life. And the number one issue, there is finances, not, not some generous something big and catastrophic, but they have a flat tire. And now they don't have a hundred bucks to get a new tire or their babysitter gets sick. And they can't find another babysitter to hire, or whatever it is. It's, it's seems like small things but they derail you when you live paycheck to paycheck and you're sort of right on the, the line, there of, of surviving, as you indicated teach a class at SEC and long. One of the reasons I do it is because I just never want to forget, what is going on in our students lives, and I had a young lady just very impactful at talk about her all the time. About a year ago. She's a good student. She misses a week a class and I was like, you know, you all right everything okay? She didn't check in didn't get her homework done. And she was moving herself and her three kids into her sister's porch. Oh, gosh. You know her the wasn't receiving any child to poor. She actually lost her job out of oil and gas. And I mean, I'm thinking to myself, let me straight, you live in someone's porch with your three kids, and you made it to school, too. I mean does how do we count that, you know what I mean, as I mean the resilience right? But you can imagine if something happens. And now she doesn't have a porch to live. I mean where I mean so we just first of all, you know, we talk about stigma, we have stigmas all over the place. Nobody that I've ever met here wants to stay on employed enjoys being on public assistance or as happy living in a porch. And so, you know, when we talk open access, and we talk commitment to change in our communities. Just gotta do today to time must be heartbreaking for you to see some of this and learn what some of the students go through. Yeah. And I don't always I don't always catch it Jan. Which bothers me, you know, we, we went through a real time last year where sort of slapped me in the face the food, insecurity, people in Louisiana very proud, and they don't tell you that they're not eating. But luckily, I had some great faculty members in a in a student as on from new Iberia, who was telling me about faculty driving students to food pantries and people bring in food for students in our student government sociation, having extra food advent, so they could give it to students. So they had something to eat, which made me like say, oh, my gosh. So, you know, we're we're working on, we've got these little food pantries now at our at our campuses, but it's not enough. So we, you know, we gotta figure that out two point. Oh, I mean and deal with the homeless. Issue. Right. I mean, if you don't have a porch, where of the she and her three kids going to sleep in her car that was her answer to me. So sounds like she's going to define that. You know what she was? She has an amazing. Yeah. No, she's an amazing young lady, and she graduated and bigger and better things. Class reteaching, what teach business class economics principle of management. Yeah. So, but I have all kinds of students, and that's one of the reasons I do it. So I just never ever forget, any big news coming up or any announcements besides the Telehealth that I should've asked you about we do have a. Yeah. We have so many things to begin. I think one of the things it's going to be very exciting for us. This week is announcing our career technical academy and Saint Landry parish. So we really want to give opportunities for public high school students in Saint Landry parish to do what early college academy sort of does here, right? Where you can earn an associate's degree our focus up there will be on technical. So you would earn. Let's say technical diploma in welding when new graduate. The superintendent there has been he's really committed to great. Yeah. To superintendent Jenkins to doing better by that parish from public education perspective. And so we're excited. That's par for him. Yeah. Talk about all the economic indicators. I think there's a there's a lot of good things that are happening there. We've got our new our new lab. Welding lab and training center. Being built down at the porta west Saint Mary, she's a great collaboration. So now we. Have we have things popping up in every parish, no power lineman program in Acadia parish was a great partnership, you know, leads to great paying jobs, and an very high demand area. You know, I don't know the last time I could climb up a power pole, but there's an there's a shortage of people, but you need certifications and things like that. So we have we have good things going on all over one of the things. I'm I'm really proud of is, you know, we really embarked on using open educational resources a few years ago. And so what that means is that, you know, you have a student comes in. And if they're taking out, a full lo let's say their first masters of freshman books could cost you up to seven hundred dollars and, and I learned that because my, my youngest son is now in our early college academy, where you graduate with your social degree the day you graduate from high school, and he brought home his book list, and I said to him. Him. And my I'm the chance, I'm like these book prices must be a mistake note or not. And. And so the college has really rallied and this year, we save students, one point nine million dollars. So I mean when you're thinking about whether you can afford to take another class should I buy the textbook or pay the babysitter? Not having to buy resources for the class. Is a huge is a huge head can have a huge impact. And when you have open educational resources in other words things you can download I was gonna ask us out online. Yep. Books. You know, you come to class with your materials that day, you're not waiting for a check, you're not waiting for financial aid. You're not, you know, I mean you could come to class prepared and instead of waiting tons being behind, so I'm really proud of my team for that great. We're here with Jason Sikora from raiders solutions and Jason. As always, you've been writing a lot of no notes. Well, so first of all, Dr harbor, thank you for being here. I took some notes head of time and you answer. I'm so glad you hit on socio economic student loans, debts and finances, because that's that's huge for students. Deftly hold some back. And luckily, I was looking enough to get a bachelor degree, although it was a news. And I work IT department. A couple couple of notes and comments that I wanted to make. The wave speak about education in kind of changing everything reminded me of a presidential candidate in two thousand call Dr Hagelin. He's quantum physicist in his platform was, if you fix it Eucation, and you get a properly, educated society, everything else gets fixed. And I think that's very strong statement. If you have well, educated, people crime goes down health is better wages are better, there's jobs. So I think that's huge. And so thank you for hitting on that as well. And with my wife being a teacher, we have high educational things at home that we always talk about. Also that you talked about certifications, so here raider solutions were IT department, and we're twenty eight to twenty people now but I think only three heavy degree in computer science. So, but we need to get certified. I'm certain things networking and programming. And just to make sure that we're staying up these things. So, yeah, you don't necessarily have to agree. But you need to be certified to know these things. And that's the best way to go about it. So thank you for hitting that as well. And can I say one thing because it goes back to John's point. I what I want people to do say everybody has to go to college. You don't have to forty degree don't have to get a two year degree. But you have to go to college. If you wanna be a plumber, you need certifications, right. You have to go to college so. Jan talked a few minutes ago about the stigma I hear it still on a regular basis. Well, they weren't good enough for regular college, and you're like I'm sorry, we were in college in our name. And by the way, you better be darn good at math, if you're going to be a welder, so, you know, I, I don't know where society decided that if you use your hands it meant, you know, you weren't using as much of your gray matter, but we sort of have a tagline that says, heads that no enhance that know how I mean, it's it just because you're using your hands doesn't mean you know, you're smarter than the person next you who isn't using their hands so that we just got to move on from that don't get it. Society. We all depend on all of us. You know, we need college presidents, we need lawyers. I guess, maybe not as many. You know, we need all these different trades. We need plumbers electricians. I can't imagine if everything broke in my house, and I had to fix it. Well, ask yourself how long you often have to wait for a contractor, a good contrast. And, and then you pay. They, they make plenty of money. So it's, it's so anyway, I'm sorry. I mean interrupt with the whole it is at everybody has to go to college. You just have to figure out what you got to go to college for. So even a plumber. So say you're good at plumbing, and you're going to get certified, you still have to learn about being insured and being certified with the state and all the things that are outside of actually physically plumbing pipes and a house. So I need to go over in those things. So if you wanna do it on a commercial basis, you need you need plumbing. Certifications to become a subcontractor. So you're, you're exactly right. And, and, you know, one of the things that's great about our state is that people love to be entrepreneurial. And you know, we have a history of learning things on our own. But what we saw in this last oil and gas downturn. And SOC was very involved in retraining folks is people learn how to weld in their grandad's garage. You know what, but, but a major national company isn't interested in that they wanna know you have your take certification meant. You know what I mean? So we were like great. You know how to do it just come back test with us easy. So, you know, that's kind of the quality level that that some of these employers are now saying you can't just say, you know how to do it. I need to see a quality certification. What's your website, and any other good online resources that we should be aware of? I mean so we have SOL ACC dot EDU. Is our website. We, we have a Facebook page for south Louisiana community college. We have a we do do linked in. We do Twitter, so we try to be in the social media spaces as well. We have open houses, and you can just drop into any one of our campuses, and advocate for sation. We have online chat feature through the website. And so there's all kinds of ways to figure out powder. Connect with us what we're doing final question. Tough one advice for parents with kids in high school. What kind of conversations should they be having with, with their with their kids? My first. Suggestion to parents is to take a deep breath. If your child is telling you that they are not interested in college. Give him some flak, we live longer than we've ever lived before. There are more ways to be educated. If you if you shove your kid at what you believe is best for them. It's generally doesn't work out. Well, so I'm not saying you allow your child to, you know, take twelve years off and live in your basement, and drive your car, but I'm saying let them figure out what it is. That's of interest to them had them. Take one core of semester. Or do something online to try some things out before you fully commit to a program that they're not sure that they're going to enjoy for a couple of reasons. Number one, it's very aggravating, right for you, as a parent, tamp put all that emotion and, and, and belief into what your child is going to do, and it doesn't work out. So there's that emotional piece add to that, what could be the financial component of that. Now only is it just whatever you're doing out of pocket, but they could potentially lose their tops. If they're if they're a high school student soon to be graduate. Waiting and up in debt or something else. I mean obviously, I encourage people to look at the community college, I think, because of our price point, we are an inexpensive way for, for young people to figure out what they don't want to do. Maybe they won't know any year exactly where they're driven. But for example, we have plenty of people that come in and think they wanna be in healthcare, and after the first semester like never mind. I don't wanna touch that stuff anymore. Yeah. Right. Exactly. Whereas if you, you know, pick up your child, and they end up with room and board and they're far away from home and, and it, it becomes much more difficult. I would encourage you to have them earn as many dual credits as possible. So, you know, if they're high school is an offering dual enrollment classes, I would ask the principal wide. They're not offering Roman classes, the state provide some funds for for schools to do that. But the more college credits they can get under their belt in high school. The better off, they are. I'm Ben surprised to learn that about sixty percent of high school seniors. Do not even take a full course load and their senior year. What are they doing the ought to be putting them in a college class? Yeah. So she media, right? And the, you know, the and I also would say the idea people having summers off is over. I mean, not that you need to be intense fifty two weeks a year. But why we till August enrollment? In a class? I mean, just, you know, hey, they think they have an interest in IT will pick something up and see if they are really good at that coding are building a computer or something like that. I think, you know, parents, you know, can can be very driven. I think you got to listen to your kids, you know, set boundaries. You know, one of the things I recommend to parents is if they if they think that this will work for them, you know, your child can borrow for college, and when they're successful than you can pay that loan off. But if you're not I still parents, this all time if you're not maxing out your retirement, you can't borrow for retirement, right? So why do you want to spend those dollars that you may never get back? If your child isn't going to be successful for whatever reason. So let them let let your kid navigate as much as possible. You know, don't be a helicopter parent they're gonna make mistakes, but, but if they changed their major, it's not the end of the world if they wanna stop out semesters now. The end of the world. I'm sure many people listening to this. They're going to be like it seems counterintuitive right you need educational attainment. But if you are a parent thinking about your kid's college, you're already seventy five percent there because you've had those conversations at home. Your kid is going to be okay. Might not be the path you want for them directly to, I don't know whatever doctor, you know, might not. It might be a totally different path. But you got most of it under your ballots, just figuring out how to maneuver around your kids, your kids interests. Excellent. Thank you very much. Thank you change. And, you know, the, the stress that kids, I mean, I know that they a lot of kids have, you know, everything their disposal, but the, the stress that they're under in today's world is incredible. And some of them feel so much pressure from parents to do what their parents yet, and, you know, and I'll tell you this Jan, and I'm college CEO I don't sweat the ACT. I mean fewer and fewer. Colleges are requiring ACT and SAT. We are not. I mean, it's just it's one indicator you're gonna you're gonna decide a kid's fate in place. One test. I just think that there's so much around being a good person being good citizen being a good student. I just think that we need to we want one test because it's easy for everybody else. There's a number. It must indicate this, and it just doesn't work like that. So I mean, I know there are professions very geared toward your G met and your Jerry. I remember when I went back for my doctorate. And I was arguing with the program director. I said, I can't understand why I have to take a graduate test bene- professional for ten years. And his response to me was what we've always done it this way. And I knew like I have to get into educa-. No. Because this is not right. But I mean I really think it's, you know, I'm not saying take your your foot off the pedal. You know you give them boundaries. But the fact is that it's not the end of the world if they don't get a thirty six. On the ACT. Yeah. But that's interesting. You brought that up because king Alexander has come under great criticism for. LSU. Yeah. Really? Just think the very best indicator for how they're going to be in college. Is this is one test? No, you know, your kids they got all kinds of stuff going. I mean so why did we ever allow it to happen? We gotta get away from me. I could let this interview go on forever Natalie harder. I'm a big fan of yours and grateful to have your, you know, your presence here on this show and sharing what you're doing. And maybe we need to get you back in the future and talk about how these new programs are going. And, you know, I, I was really curious about where you were going, and it looks like technology is driving. A lot of what's going on, as well as traditional skills can get certified in. Yeah. Thank you so much. Thank you say, since Sikora with raiders solutions, and to Beria Bank for being our premier sponsor into our listeners grateful for your support, please go to our website. Discover Lafayette dot net where you can find Dr harbors interview, and all of our interviews or you can also go to apple podcast Google play Alexa, anywhere that you get your podcast. Discover Lafayette is there. Thank you for listening on Jim swift.

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Das Boot, Edge of Democracy, Dark Season Two, The Good Place

Bald Move TV

51:42 min | 1 year ago

Das Boot, Edge of Democracy, Dark Season Two, The Good Place

"This episode of ball move TV's brought to you by away luggage thoughtful luggage for modern travel for twenty dollars off a suitcase. Visit away travel dot com slash bald mood and use promo code bald move during checkout. Hello, and welcome to another episode of bald new television officially unofficial podcast for all television. I'm your host Arun. I'm Jim and obsessively and I won't say their reboot myself because we're gonna be talking about daas boot, the who reimagining of the classic movie about submarine warfare World War, Two German. See I watched a show called dot booty. So we might have different things to talk about this episode. That's, that's for sure. Underwater. That's got there's got to be a porn person, right? Oh for sure. Yeah. I think that's what he watched. We're also gonna talk a little bit about the Netflix document documentary about the political situation in Brazil called the edge democracy. And then Cecil is going to try to talk me and Jim into the net flicks. What, what would you call the is it true cry? Or is it crime? Now, they call it a Netflix original foreign drama, which is kind of broad train, right. Yeah. German, it is a German. Series is a horror because you said true detective which is not horror. Well, that's, that's part of what I'm gonna talk to you. Okay. She's gonna try to talk up all of the things we'll get to that here in a bit dark. I don't know if we actually said that say dark dark, dark boot, let's talk about dos. Booed upfront, Jim, and I have seen the I ten minutes short of seeing the entire second episode says seen the first episode, I was really looking forward to this because I enjoyed the original movie, and I like naval stuff. I love eighteenth century age of sail. I love Tom Clancy's, you know hunt for October. On I was really looking forward to this. And I felt like in the first episode, I wasn't sure the show would grab me and the second episode showed me a little bit more. But this is an extremely slow burn for like I guess the regional dos. Boot was, too. But this, there's not, there's not as much as is expected. Jim says Lee what do you think? I think. Yeah, I felt like the first episode was a little too scattershot for me. They kept jumping. They did very short scenes, extremely short scenes with a lot of different people. Many of whom look almost identical out of uniform captain first Lieutenant and the rate officers of this show, I think are identical people I had a very hard time keeping. Oh, that's three separate people. Yeah. Yeah, I'm German American, these guys all so, so it's so it's so bizarre. They're all very tall angular and stoic. And once they get on the boat, and, like the captain whereas like that helps a lot note rank and stuff like I I'm, I'm getting it, but I, I was doing a little bit of reading because I only watched the first episode, but I heard that it's sort of like a prequel and expansion on the original dos. Boot, and that it, obviously would include more women in the story, the sister, and an American spy. And I'm really interested in where all that goes because in this first episode we're doing spoilers or not not yet there's a woman were introduced to you. The sister of a man who's immediately sent out on dental Reiter officer, who's also have to I I said, a different guy, okay? So Naro sonar he rose through the ranks very quickly soda officer. He's like, the he's the. Guy runs the indictment machine. He's the communications officer. Okay. So phantom thread, his sister. She starts to picking up his communications without knowing what she's doing. And from the very first time she says, Heil Hitler and the train systems like, no, there's no way that she's on board with this, but there was no room in my mind to allow for the fact that people were on board for this at that time. So we don't really know where legions is li-. I clearly they ally with Nazi Germany. It's just she's having a crisis of conscious when someone who's trying to convince you otherwise. Also, pretty clearly get a whole episode like it. I don't think they're telling the story of oh, girl who's being come like, joint going there to join a spy network. She got roped in on her brother. Yeah. She got caught up in something that is not the spy network, but just the resistance to the whole regime, I guess, itself, I mean, she was very concerned with the being something illegal, you know, when her brother Astra, take on this task. So I think she's she's in on it. I don't question her loyalties too much. But I, I also think it's a fundamentally interesting premise like this idea that she is now caught up in her brother scheme. She loves her brother. He's been sent out in a boat full of hostels as far as I can tell. All of it builds and, and creates this atmosphere of drama, which is throughout this entire thing. However, I just never could get a grasp on what they were trying to do throughout, especially the first episode. I think there are a lot of scenes of like starting to get to know the crew maybe in these bars and brothels and, like, I don't know why they showed us any of that because we're gonna get a lot of fucking time with this crew the coming up on this from look like when some one guy came up later and said, it's called the other person's snitch like, oh, Jesus. That's the same ga- like I also like the first they had this guy, cold open where you boat get sunk. It was really well done, but, like I kept on trying to connect that to like is, is so is this, the really famous revered, captain? That's guy's father is look, like don't think that's actually the case anymore after seeing episode to but there. Yeah, it was a felony. The wire, the first episode of game of thrones where like I don't know what the fuck is going on. Plus, subtitles yeah, where I can't even I can't even look up long enough because it's sounds very quick to like, the German language uses one word when we use eight and so we're is is, is two hundred fifty six characters long, so it is. But they say it very quickly. And so the subtitles don't remain on the screen very long. So I'm constantly glued to the subtitle area, which makes blindness yeah, yeah, so I had a real hard time with this show. I don't think I'm gonna continue watching it even though I think the hook of the story is very strong. I mean anything with World War Two not season resistance. So this is going to be, but I did a little bit of reading before because I was similar view boat, and I want her dos boat and I wanted to see dos boots. And I wanted to third time's a charm, I wanted to see kind of like what and you know, these are based on two novels, and I guess. Dos. Boot takes place in forty one where I think that the, the one the articles, I read asserted that it wasn't public knowledge that concentration camps were being ran or in. They were the fact that these were extermination camps wasn't public knowledge. Yeah. And in forty two, which is they've they've accelerated this by year. Not only were like the losses to the fact that the allies at cracked in 'nigma machine. A lot were with loved that scene, where they're like, oh, we've got the thick can't saying come from bachelor 'nigma machine. So it's like one of those things where you're the omniscient near like haha, but they've moved to forty two which probably is going to fracture the crew a little bit when this stuff starts. I imagine. But like I struggled, I, I guess, I just don't know it, it's not that the shows bad, but I'm prime to like it. And I kept on thinking, like this is a really detached. I I'm watching I I'm supposed to be rooting for like Lizzy Caplan and the, the allies, right? But I'm spending ninety five percent of my time with very committed Nazis doing Nazi shit. They're priming, even if they're not actually, they find the whole Jewish question, distasteful. They're still fighting the war on that regimes behalf. An I know that. So it's kind of maybe the same problem ahead of the Americans where and the end yet, and even then, like the Americans like a half that team was kind of, like split in the head kids. I what is the interest here? What am I supposed to learn about the human condition? I mean, yeah, I think that's the whole point is that you're supposed to question whether or not you should just follow orders, which is what these people are doing, like this young new u boat, captain sixteen or something like that was just the son of a war hero. And clearly there almost everyone on this ship is more qualified to be running the ship than he is. But he's just following orders and they're just following orders by listening. His orders. And what kind of what kind of bad things are gonna happen from that? Yeah. And that's the other thing that kind of bug me in the second episode. Is that a discount this young captain seems like he? So inept that fending off the very obvious undermining that. His first officer is doing to him. And I've seen enough of this type of stuff to, like, I I'm not sure if you're supposed to understand that this guy is inept or unsure of himself, which he seems like he is like he had man executed. And then one to recant the last minute, but then there's a lot of like weird muddy things. Plus, also like he come back to like every time I look at the uniform, it's a fucking swastika. So, like, right. Yeah, I, I don't know. And I think that it's interesting because this like a joint American European thing and like maybe it's a good. It's a good reminder to, like take a look at the cow Nazis operated, and how like a lot of stuff they're doing with the Jack in Hagar is very reminiscent of like the lives of the. Lives of others. Where it's like, you know, your, your everyone's under surveillance, the fact that you have to show papers when you're traveling, and, and it's very oppressive and torturing people, but they're doing it like secretly and their trials explain this a lot like Christoph waltz in. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. He's a very charming inglorious bastards. He's doing this very charming thing. And it's like he's going to he's so skilled, he's gonna leave you an opening that's going to doom you. Ten other people that, you know, you've doomed yet, but it's all very interesting. But it's a very kind of a neutral and I don't know how this thing is going to shape up at the end, I think this rate episodes. But I I'm with you. I'm not saying that this is a, a wrong-headed project or anything like that. I can see why it'd be a good idea to revisit the horrors of Nazi Germany, if in every generation should probably get a good film that does it. I just don't know that I need to watch it. And again, if you're having trouble hooking me, who kind of loves this shit anyway, then you're probably going to have a hard time hook in anybody, I would say, the second episode is definitely better than the first. Yes, the, the they put they put hats on the make them all look different. Yeah. And the story just convinces little in a little bit nicer of away boot. There's a lot more food. So if you're thinking, oh, maybe I'll give this a try. I would say, give it a least two episodes that first episode is kinda rough in like you said. The wire kind of way where it's just all over the place. And, and it's really interesting like you know, there's a couple of real moral quandaries. And there is a lot like let's talk a little briefly spoilers like going to your point about Jack and garlic. I thought it was like absolute chilling how he's a sitting there casually watching this will be torture. Yeah. I was watching that scene. Going I do that. I don't think I could buy right? Like nothing. It sit in that room and not wince when persons. I really like Ted Bundy like Syracuse five. I'd be like Jesus Christ isn't the whole point where better than the butcher, you know, like, I, yeah, I was, I was thinking the same kind of things there's kind of the interesting thing where this second this first officer is trying to undermine his captain. And you can kind of see that, like, maybe. They're going to set up that the captain's like a coward, or he's going to be, like, you know, white gloved by the higher up Nazis for propaganda purposes. It's going to further undermine him. But, like I, I don't know. Like, I think in Jesus Christ. I'd like to see this guy tried to shit with Jack Aubrey. What am I like you know, I it's just like he just seems like he's completely unable to get this guy to reign in, and I don't know it's like wartime. Maybe should dislike. I even joked at the towards the end of the first episodes, like, man, five seven this guy, I would've, I would I would have done one of those alarm deals and all God, the, the first officer took a bullet, you know, if you guys didn't see it, but there is a like, yeah, just shoot. This guy in the head throw him off the boat. He's nothing good's gonna come from it, and it's kinda somewhat frustrating to see this in. And then, again, it's like the okay is this captains going to either going to be an inept loser, which great, he's a Nazi, or he's going to be a very successful you boat captain, which Jesus Christ. He's a Nazi. I. It's, it's, it's not a more thing about the more this is very much the Americans where I'm just having a very hard time just finding that Germany engaging with elements of the protagonist, as they're being portrayed. Sure. Yeah. And like, if like I'm not feeling any of the moral quandaries that they're facing themselves into because to me, it's like there's easy answers and all this. And maybe that's a problem with me. Bailed IMF empathy empathize or engage. But, you know, I I'm trying to think of where in life, I'm going to be asked to sympathize with a, a Nazi u boat, captain, and the answer is probably zero. So right now, that's about it. Yeah. Right watching this, this Hulu show. So that's, that's it for dos boot. And that's where I kept on coming back with, like, if I was gonna watch a Hulu war-film I would go back and finish catch twenty two because I was far more engaged and interested. And I thought there was so much more life to that production than there is this dos. Because kind of dour dos boot affair. So, yeah. We assessing and I watched edge documentary, which is brief the documentary edge of democracy documentary. What's his film, the by this young Brazilian filmmaker whose parents were very it's, it's interesting story because her parents are were kinda revolutionary figures of overcoming, Brazilian dictatorship and, and ushering in a wave of like free elections, but a lot of their lot of her family's on the other side of that argument and they show like a twenty year period of like the end of the military regime of Brazil, a very popular president introduced a lot of populous policies seem to help the like the poor minorities of Brazil him, turning things over to handpick successor. And then Brazil start to have a little economic problems. And it turns into a whole referendum of their regime, they undercover a little bit of corruption may. Maybe it's trumped up. Maybe it's not. And then they the last thirty minutes or so is the rise of this bowl sonars at his name. I, I kinda fall. I've kind of followed this I world news at, at a distance ball scenario at his name. And he's, you know, stopped me if you heard this, he's a right wing very business friendly. He hates gays and, and trans, and he thinks he's, he's also openly threatening the other party. The reds the Workers Party saying he's going to drive them out of the country's going to jail them. He gleefully engages in cost play where they're locking up the former administration when he gets elected he liked tears apart. This effigy of his opponent. It's and it's, it's, it's, it's really kooky and kind of scary. When the interesting perspective, I love about this documentary. Is that the dock? Humanitarian herself as a young woman who was able to be one of the first people to vote for democracy and country as voted for the first president. Yeah. Her parents like you said, were freedom fighters who spent a lot of their time in high not in hiding but just the skies in their identities. Because some of their family their previous family. Generations were huge contributors to the problems that face Brazil today. So it's, it's interesting for her to have this, what she attempts to have is just a biased perspective, but also being very forthcoming with her own biases, and the, the family history that she has. But at the same time, it's, it's very frustrating, because she takes it at a very big picture issue, which was one hundred percent more information than I had going before going into the documentary about what's facing Brazil, which you. As she states. There's a lot of worker issues. There is a lot of sexist issues. There's some things going on there, but the biggest issue which faces Brazil as well as the rest of the world. Honestly is whoever has the most money controls everything. And that's just the way it kind of goes. So, you know, there are some nuances which you Iran kind of pointed out to me things I didn't know before watch. I didn't know either. I just like I, I have a when I watch documentaries, I'm trying to score, like how much my being snowed over and how much of my being forced to point of view. And I noticed that there's like the thing that. Okay. So, so the thing that seemed like the started to downfall of this Luiz the president and his successor was that there, you know, Brazil found out they had won the largest oil reserves offshore oil reserves and win the contract started being given out there was a standing, like one two three percent bribe that was, including that contract that went to the president and some of his people and the documentary person says that in like a thirty second sequence and then it's never mentioned again. And then they highlight like the she does something that everyone does this person just got persecuted for doing well what I'm saying is like if you are. Arguing the documentary. Yeah. Oh, then she. But I'm saying it's like she very quickly breezed over that. And then then highlighted the unfairness of the, the show ended it did look like all that stuff seemed like it was accurate but I kept coming back, like, well, wait a second. If you're a Workers Party president, and you come the power and all of a sudden, like fifty million dollars a month starts flowing into your Bank account. Don't you be like, whoa? What the fuck and people say, like well, you don't understand president, Louis like this is just the way things are done. Like, don't you say like we'll fuck not anymore, this money's going to go in the hospital. Is this going to school is this money but they didn't? And like that's the kind of corruption. But here's the thing, that's bullshit. And I've seen this overtimes in my own goddamn life, every single every ten years, our country has a recession right where things kind of roll backwards and like, you know, people point fingers but, like we keep on rolling. And no one says, like we'll fuck this. We have to do we have to. Oh completely different thing, right? Where like it seems like anytime in the world is someone is experimenting with, like socialist programs when there's a recession it's all about. Well, we gotta fuck in. We gotta go right back to straight capitalism, and all this stuff. And that's what it seems like is happened in Brazil, and it seems like actually what happened in the seventies of our country. And numb like we had the great depression, that kicked off, like a thirty forty year of roughly progressive policies in the United States than we had some foreign policy blunders we had a softening comedy. We had an energy crisis, and then everyone's like, whoa, we gotta get. We gotta go back a pro business friendly, and we've had twenty thirty years of that. And now we've had success in of recessions, we have a problem with income inequality. We have a problem with people being able to get access to healthcare, they need we have problem with people being on Ford, any kind of education, but no one ever, like I think it's happening now but like very few people in the recessions I've ever sat and thought, like what are we? Doing, you know, like wh what have we gotten away and I feel like that's the thing it's like, yes, there was corruption. And but it's it's inexplainable inexcusable. I don't because the, the problem is these people left themselves open because they were hypocrites, like they're taking the bribe and the dole and turn is that they couldn't get him for that because they had this big a corruption investigation, the car the car wash project, right? Trying to get all the grime and dirt. And they couldn't get the pres- the former president in the current president on these because were legal. They were contracts or resign. This was it's not like this was like this was a legal thing. They couldn't get if that's what they try to get him on these other stuff. And I'm like I don't is it that hard to find the leader that just like when someone shows up with a bag of fifty million dollars to be like, I'm not going to do it. I'm already living his palace already have limos have helicopters. I have armed guards. I've everything I need. So I'm going to make sure this money finds its way to people and become a fucking hero. I don't sure I mean I get that. But I also I also. Think that there is an I'm not saying it's one hundred percent nobility and self sacrifice on the on the backs of these people like, but this one woman was tortured for twenty two days in jail when she was a resistance fighter, and then she's forgotten all this when she's gotten all this money, but the point that Lou the, the president that, basically, instilled her before that he was a Workers Party Representative that was the first person to get his foot in that door. And what she's arguing is that he made some compromises to accept money or let p or, you know, make some compromises with the PM db, which is the other major party in the Brazil swore Brazil. Right, exactly. So that these people are making these compromises, which are self beneficial. Absolutely. But I think are necessary to sort of bridge that gap because you can't go from all of this, huge powerful Ma. Money-backed corruption to just the way things should be in a fair equal way. And I'm not saying that any of these people are heroes are saints for doing that. But them making those them have taking those actions and making those choices are a bridge to the future, because it allowed for this documentary to be made it allowed for people like me and utes understand what's going on there. It's a cautionary tale for all other countries that have maybe an up and coming democracy that they could learn from because that's the is Brazil's, not like banana Republic, it's a big ass country with a lot of people. It's very modern. It was at one point, the seventh largest economy in the world and the. Power, which is just like ten years ago. So like this is this is a country to be taken seriously, and you can draw a lot of parallels, and. I just thought it was striking that this ball scenario coming to power and lionising the previous the millet, the military dictators that, you know, would would would extra judicially steel people off the street and torture them. And he saying, this is what we need to go back to because this is what socialists and communist deserve. And it reminds reminds me a lot of like you see some of the edgier places, online, talking about the, you know, given free helicopter rides to socialists, which is a reference to Pinochet's regime, or they take suspected socialist, and communist, revolutionary worker parties types and take them up in a helicopter and just throw him out at five thousand feet. Oh, yeah. I saw that on narcos season two. I think yeah. So, like there's there are an that's happening like you go there. They're like, oh, you go to a Trump rally, and you can buy a t shirt that says free Pinochet helicopter rides. And I don't know. Like I don't know what, what power Trump has the control that stuff. I imagine it's a lot even if these. Guys were like on the sidewalk across the street from his rallies, and just kind of wink, wink selling like d not have a responsibility to condemn that type of thing. She does the same thing. Like, like, if there's people setting up shop selling guillotine to rich shirts across from Bernie Sanders rally, I think Bernie Sanders should probably shut that shit down and speak out about it. But the fact that this guy is gleefully supporting it, it, it, it was, it was scaring shocking, and it also just seems like a lot of stuff that we're going to be seeing, and this election cycle that starting to heat up right now. Right. I think that all of these documentaries coming out all of these things that are sort of illuminated, that is not just an American issue that we're facing as Americans at something that's happening around the world. And that is you can't just take things at face value, and accept being told, and this does not equal bad. This does not equal good. You have to make an educated decision because it's not black and white. Yeah, that's the thing like I had no idea how to like this. This is not impartial documentary. But I'm pretty comfortable saying that Paul scenario is pretty bad dude, just on the whole locking up people, and persecuting your political opponents and. You know, just his stance on homosexuals and transsexuals and the extreme rhetoric Iran, religion and cloak like this. They're, they're going to this guy when he eventually goes down. You're going to that's the other irony is like these worker party types, and their bribery, whatever they were accused of whatever actually did I guaranteed as Bolsonaro guy's gonna be like fifteen times worse, if you're and that's the other thing is like as soon as the project car wash got the desired result, which was ousting, these presidents putting them in jail, making them political pariahs, suddenly oh, we don't need it anymore because all the corruptions done. So let's shut it all down. Let's dismantle these laws. So these commissions can't because like it's just a waste of time. It's, you know rules for the not for me kinda thing but yeah, it's, it's I'm curious about a lot of coverage a lot of buzz. I hope a lot of people watch it because it's definitely if even if you don't like follow. The knits nitty gritty of the I find it very kind of hard to follow the nitty gritty of the Brazilian political process. I found myself rewinding a lot and be like, okay, what did they say? And. You know who because they do a lot of recorded phone conversations, which is people's names. And I'm like, okay, this was this guy again, just a broad strokes. And just seen like the political climate, they're comparing the political climate and our country and a lot of these a lot of the countries around the world. You know, like there are a lot of stresses globally with, you know. Immigration migration, refugees economy, the economic instability, and anytime there's this concern. There is seems like there's a tendency few the for humans of water run to, like, preceived, strengthened security, and their, the parties that say absolutely we are. Right. And we have a plan, and we are strong. We are firm look more attractive than the party's being like gee whiz. This was a very complicated issue that has to be attacked in a multi like when in a crisis situation. The one party looks like the one that knows what the fuck is going on. Even though they might be completely wrong into parties like oh, you know it just depend. They're the ones that get fucked. And I mean you can just see happen around round the world, but is interesting and it was it felt like it was a lot shorter than it was. It's a two hour documentary. But like it kind of goes at this kind of relentless pace, and this woman's got this very odd detached. Narration. Great like lilting voice, you could do great ASMAR think. Right. But it sounds like she's delivered like someone just went in there and clubbed her. And she's like Yoshi just came to the boot, and she just she just achieved consciousness booth and she's just like what has happened. I don't understand look at this and I it's a kind of a haunting quality to. No. You didn't think you'd think that description plus the word haunting. I don't think are the same thing. I think she sounds like she was clubbed because unlike the Vichy sound like okay, she's sound like stump. She immediately got out of a good sized car accident or really intense Pringles binge since. Pringles benja-. Hey, can I don't know too much less tra- probably not helping? Do you have any do you have you? They also you want to I'd say, that's all I've got for that one before we talked about the next show. I want to talk about a way luggage away. Stafa luggage for modern travel away. Knows everyone has different travel styles. 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The I think the conversion for leaders it's, it's four more to leaders of coat capacity. Okay. Yeah, I can't tell you for sure. How many square feet when appreciate it's like a baseball stadium? Cecil you and I have had our luggage for I've had in my luggage for a while. Jim, you've actually had one of the earlier for like first generation chaos for years. What's what's, what, what, what, what, what, what do we think forward to traveling this Wednesday? For the first time with my luggage has removable battery hand it came with ports, so that I can plug mile electron IX in any kind of European or international port. I could possibly think of. Yeah, the charging thing comes with a free like international conversion, every weird system of prongs and polarity. Voltage, you can think of are actually pretty expensive. I can't believe that they pack those in whiz, right? I think there this is the best luggage I've ever had. I've had a decent amount of luggage. I do a decent amount of travel this thing is just so much fun though, fact that the wheels, like I didn't think that'd be as big of a feature as it is. But the fact that you can like flip up the wheel and go like long and skinny or you can go broad or wide for stability, and like. You can kind of dance with the data gate if you're bored, because it does like nicely pure wets and stuff. I took it to a wedding last weekend and it killed. That's right. It's right as my plus one. I yeah, I think the fact it's got two detachable batteries, really cool because it's invariably you know, whenever a traveling, you're, you're out. You're taking pictures and you're doing video with your cell phone, and then you're, you can't you're run out of juice. Well, now you can charge up to two different things. It's like ten thousand Miller amp capacity. So it can charge them a like a modern iphone three or four times easily. So on your next getaway remember getting away means getting more out of your trips to come for twenty dollars off your suitcase. Visit away traveled dot com slash bald mood and use promo code bald moved during checkout. Once again, the want to get the best suitcase I've ever had. I a pack a week a week for the clothes in his thing compression system and get twenty dollars off, visit away travel dot com slash bald move and use promo code, bald move during checkout. All right. Are you ready to hear this pitch dark? Okay so season to apparently came out today on Netflix, ex I watched the first couple of episodes, when it came out in two thousand seventeen I think was an of two thousand seventeen I watch the first couple of episodes and just didn't come back due to lack of time not interest. But it's also a German subtitled show, which I think is a, a turn off immediately for a lot of people if they know it's going to be subtitled because. If I turn on dubs, it's not going to be lined up with our mouths and it's going to take me out of the, the whole experience. But I, I watched I kind of press through in the last week, and it has been quite inexperienced. There's I feel like are you familiar with the fawn from weekend update on SNL? You know, the Bill gator goes like this, like, oh, yeah. Hottest nightclub in New York City. Do that. When I pitched this to you guys like this show has everything. Okay, it's, it's, it's gone. A lot of like teenage relationships that are handled quite well. It's like it's like kids on bikes. Explore time travel. That's what I had heard is that it's time travel science fiction, kind of thing. But with, like a dark aesthetic. Yeah, I watched the first two episodes of first season like Jim. It's not that I wasn't. I didn't see this wasn't. I thought it sucked. It's more of like this is good. But I have zero time to watch it right? Yeah. Right. I in a reminded me like I, I heard like a German stranger things that's fundamentally darker. And more serious does. Older kids. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Like late teen stranger things. Right. And appropriately. More mature. Right. It's, it's yeah. It's got a lot of that, that tiny Weiming elements. It's got I could compare it to any number of shows that I know you guys all ready watching like like those things, it's again say that it's got time travel handled in a way that I haven't seen done as complicated. But also, deftly as this one does like they, they make it very complex. Gated. There's people their stories like coming back in on themselves. We're in other shows, I could see it making you think like way way. Wait, this doesn't add up to do this complicated math, and my mind, just understand the story, but it lines it up and well enough that you just know what's happening. Okay. That's good to hear. Yeah. Without holding your hand too much, or being too obvious with flashbacks and things like that, you can accurately assume or predict or understand the characters that you've seen in the past, or the future presently who they are in the past, or the future presently. Now, when you see them interacting with each other those inferences, there's enough groundwork laid that you can just understand what's going on, which is helpful in a show, that's working with such complicated. Dynamics. They do. Do the thing where they have some educated person at some point in time, whether it be a police officer or someone who makes movements on watches and clocks explaining how time works in a voiceover type of deal, but I think that's all perfectly fine. This show is made me feel the entire spectrum of human emotion at all right? You will feel about every single character, whether it's a small child or fully grown adult man with dementia. You will think that they are the biggest piece of shit on the planet, but also the Saint of the world because that's just human. I think you can be all of those things at any given time, just depending on the choices you make. And you're not always going to make the right choices and maybe that will define you maybe it won't. But they're all choices you're making and it's also a compelling character drama in that way. I kit the did the characters because I did. The character's make consistently smart decisions or lake at least understandable decision. Yes, all the choices are super consistent with the characters themselves as this one that drives me crazy about, like, kind of horror, spooky shows as when they just have people doing dumb shit. I will say that the first three episodes, spent a lot of time in that character land, and I could see that turning off people like you guys where you're waiting for them to get into like the interesting gripping stuff. They, they build those relationships first, and then you can start to understand. I mean, that's the groundwork. I was speaking of that helps you understand later be. I think it's super interesting. I've yeah. There was a lot of points where like every single episode. They're each about, like forty five minutes to an hour long. I think every single episode is expanded upon the narrative, none of that time is felt wasted to me there. Maybe a couple of points. I was able to say like I saw that coming, but they said for sure, this is what happened in this episode kind of thing like the three separate veal. But it didn't seem like any time was really wasted. Yeah, that's fine. I mean, I'm totally cool with knowing where something is going as long as it serving servicing the characters as kind of its primary mission. I don't know. This is the thing that from the description of it, it sounded like I would be super into it. I watched one episode, I don't even remember why didn't watch future episodes. I might not have been into a subtitle drama at that point like just something about it. Back at that time, there were a lot of stuff that came out that exact same time, there was, it was like around the time of OA like I watched most of season, one of that there was a lot of stuff going on, then it's interesting because, like I e e mentioned thinking about the subtitles, and I've never like-minded subtitles, I, you know, mitt talked about dos. Speed is a little bit challenging when you're having trouble with the people's faces or you know, it, it's, it's it makes it that much harder to, to get down to characters when you have a giant cast of characters make me, new rebound respect. The people that I guess, watch game of thrones or the wire, and they don't have dubs. They have subtitles like, wow. They probably took his six get into it other than three but I didn't think that would be a super common sentiment in, like bald move, but, like there was a threat a couple of weeks ago that was about sure noble loosely. And I was surprised at how many people said, they just don't like subtitle films, subtitled content. That's crazy. Because I. Even if it's English that I can understand perfectly. I'm watching everything with subtitles on because I like the fact that sometimes things are picked up in the background, maybe. Or maybe there's a word I miss, and I could just quickly look down and see what the word was that they used and I don't have to rewind, and it's an efficiency thing for me is, but also my brother worked at blockbuster in two thousand seven two thousand eight when PAN's labyrinth came out, and they were required as blockbuster employees to let the person know that the movie was only available in subtitles. And he said that, like seventy five percent of the people said, no never mind. You guys keep it. I'm not going to check this movie out. Yeah, I just think it's hard it splits, your focus. And that's not something that I particularly enjoy it's something that I will sort of suffer through if I think something is good. Or if I think I'm really gonna be interested in something, but it definitely splits, my focus. Now, I can't pay attention to the facial expressions of these characters which say so much more in some cases than the dialogue at their speaking. So, like I find that it diminishes my enjoyment of something, although it doesn't mean I certainly won't enjoy it. It just means enough to work a little harder for it. And if you know if it's a week where I'm like, I don't really just I don't want to engage with subtitle thing right now. I might totally miss it because Netflix is going to drown me and gone to the next week. We watch his show with dubs on some. Not sure how good or accurate, they are. But, like I watched Layla with dubs tweet. Tweet to watch. Janet was not good with dubs, right? Because even sometimes I still have to 'cause they have the English being actors still have the accents a lot of the times. I think that's good. Yeah, that's great. But, you know, it's still, it's still has me, like paying attention to the landscape and the environment. And there's also a completely different kind of like culture that you're dealing with Sudha like this show has the most amount of casual face slaps in hard face slaps to Eddie what I've ever seen. It seems perfectly acceptable to just slap a police officer because they arrested someone or slap a slap someone that you just had sex with, because maybe you weren't happy with it. I don't know. There's so many. Sloppy hard enough during his. Right. That's what you like. That's how you ask her a manager at. He just slaps by oh, excuse me. I'll get. And then, of course, you know, the manager after the initiate, the slapping protocol, Graceland you and you slap them. Bagging. Wants as you lose them the dubbing. I wonder what is the thinking is you guys were talking about this. I. Would a silent movie type of thing work better where you like get five seconds of the scene. And then it pauses and then shows you the dialogue that you saw. And then it keeps going kind of like how old what you'd see a guide liver line and they'd show you the title cards. And then because you're right. That is, that's the only thing I don't like about subtitles, the fact that I can, I'm enjoying the like the tone of their voice, and that adds to the performance, but I'm missing half of what they're doing facially because I. Am split between watching n with someone who's being in different language? You don't get a lot of the emotion from the actual spoken words. Yeah. Because some of language that different cadences. Exactly. So you're not reading their language as well. So you really gotta read their face, and it's just hard when you're reading a line of text. Yeah. I would say, I would argue it's the opposite for this show like I could I think I could go with a lot of these scenes, not even reading the dialogue. And I understand what's happening because the because not only is it really well, written. But all the actors themselves are I haven't seen them in much of anything else. But I think they're doing their best work here. Gotcha. Yeah. I wonder like sometimes I wonder after having this discussion about subtitles and stuff like maybe because I know we've, we've covered a lot of subtitled stuff on bald new TV, like we barking up the wrong TV because I loved kingdom, and it seemed like a lot of enjoy that, that didn't Leyla Jen, the dark the. The, the break as an a French detective show. I've been watching a feel like that this language barrier shouldn't be a barrier to us. Covering really great television. But still is stigmatized kind of try not to let it be, I also think that maybe one of the since you do tend to watch English, speaking stuff is sometimes, I think there is a skill to it, like, the, the first couple of times, more of a slob, because it like to shifting your focus back and forth back and forth is like not natural. But like the fact that you do it all the time. And I've kind of had to do it too, because I live with you. I do think you get better at it. You I mean maybe get used to it. Like I said my brother used to work at blockbuster. So somebody a certain person in this room built their horror bones on just watching only like Korean Japanese horror movies. Boy, is it the best and the scariest shit I've ever seen and. Yeah. I just think I just have a propensity to it just from practicing, I guess, and it's not something I can tell you just go out there and do, but I think dark is one of the shows that if you need to look over it, I think you should do it for, I think horrid action films, that John is the are the more six and then it's, it's interesting because, like, that's the reason the like big dumb action films, do well overseas is because they'll allow have a lot of dialogue. You can just watch the action. I think horror movies are the same as I don't think this is like a stupid American thing. It's this thing, it's like round the world. It's annoying to have to read subtitles. I didn't mean to imply that you got. No, I'm but I mean like I think that a lot of people like you get there. You know, I've been around like serious film people enough to know. There is a little chauvinism there. It's like oh, you're not going to art theater and watching a subtitled French film, once a month in our even really going to the cinema at all. Boy by just like yeah. No, I think that like horror and action make a lot of sense because those things typically don't have. A lot of dialogue and they have a lot more going. Whereas like something is conversational and like intricate his like daas boot, for example, a little bit rougher. All right. That's my pitch. I can't speak for the second season but the first season has been amazing. So or you even sort of the second season now. Okay, how many episodes the first season at ten. Oof. One of those four, four bangers. It's good. Like I said, not, not a second wasted pass like the fourth episode towards the end of each episode. I was like, oh my God. Oh my God. I'm figuring it out. I'm figuring it out. It makes you feel like a detective. But also at the same time you having your mind blown nice. Oh, I'm not even without telling you guys all of the spoilers. I'm not even telling you seventy five percent of the insanity that I want to tell you about. It's a great show. Please watch. Somebody talked to me on the forums about it forms up. All move dot com. Started a threat this morning organic topic. But I'm jetting into last minute. We just finished season. Two of the good place. What what I don't know are you in right now? I don't know in place. I love the first season and they throw a giant curve ball at the end of the first season and then towards the middle of the second season I started to get back into fundamentally liked the characters, but I I it's so weird because I went on, like mill and maybe I'm crazy. And I went to look like metacritic and some of these others and every the ratings for every season, get higher like season, one is like an eighty percents season to, like ninety percents season three something ridiculous like ninety five percent. And I'm like, in my because I felt like at the end of the season two I felt like the thing, the show is starting to run out of gas run out of steam. Yeah. Like a lot of our fans and the foreign people all everyone's been telling us, we have to watch it and so good that I first season I'm like, yeah, I totally get. I totally get in. But then the second season came around and it's just I it's just really, really. Different. And about the only thing I'm really consistently enjoying is the Janet character. Because I just think she's really truly interesting. And like she's not a robot he carton and you might recognize her is like the needy suck up from berry while I've seen part of the good place. So she liked the thing. She's the come out robot. Yeah. I know you're talking about the formless void. Yeah. I love this one about the I love how like every time people have describing the background. She's like she's like, I like the, you know, the root of nice lady, Nana, Laniado lady, you know, the robot on robot. It's like it's just a construct of knowledge, she's super interesting. And what they're doing her character. And I'm kind of, like, you know, if you're long-term, bald new listener, these sort of not robot characters, I have as weird affinity for and I'm really enjoying her in the same kind of way enjoyed seeing data go from season. One dated like season six and there was is it six or seven newer seven seven. And then the move like I enjoyed the arc and I'm seeing that same thing happened. What happened with her? But I yeah, I don't know. I, I guess that's the other thing on the forums is like is they do this thing where she's I don't think this is a spoiler later say that she's a program, so she gets updated said they have this built in way to make her more. More personified, I guess, to have more and more human characteristics. Because every time she gets a reboot, or an update, she's more human. She's learned from us update or saw, so gives us like excellent comedian away to flex those skills. But yeah, I guess I would love to hear like I like I don't really care if you love all these one off season to this, and you still love season three like I guess I'd really like to hear people that were like unsure at the end of season two or kinda like has, like, that's where I'm at. I'm not. And I feel this way at the end of season. One, I was like all in board. But like season that I felt this way very early in season two and that never really went away. Yeah. Yeah. Like I said, I, I did enjoy where they're taking Janet and that's about it. So a little bit of a good place. I definitely know I definitely think I'm gonna go ahead and try a couple episodes of season three but I can see, like three episodes in their only twenty minutes, long, three episodes in, if I'm still feeling this way, I think I'm going to. Drop it. Maybe I just don't think I have time for. Like sitcoms, situational kind of stories that can go on forever, and they can look back in on themselves. And like how I met your mother or for friends, I never watched that. But those things that can just go on perpetually forever. You can tell me as a great show, but then I look it up, and I see it's got six seasons. I'm like, there's no end in sight him. I'm not even gonna start. Off might be the only exception. So that's that's worth, like going back and walkways, anything else, you wanna talk about all right? If you like to send us feedback also. Yeah, I'll be checking the mailbox because I wanna see I I've, I've made it a bunch of feedback, so TV, evolve moved that com or you can go on to forms forms of dot com to discuss any of these episodes that you'd like we'll be back actually we're not gonna be back next week next week. We're gonna take bald new TV off assessing. Eric traveling on vacation will will probably back the week after that to see what do around up, what we missed and see what new television is coming out that week I know a big one stranger things have full coverage of. So don't forget about that. Have a great weekend everybody and we'll see you next time. And now I fought from Geico. Motorcycle. It took fifteen minutes to click on the banner ad entitled, you won't believe what these child stars look like now, Vida satisfied and kinda sad about. How the child stars look and now your computer is plagued by in session pop up ads on this can't be good to add insult to injury. You could've used those fifteen click bait minutes to switch your motorcycle insurance to Geico. Geigo fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on motorcycle insurance.

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158|Viz Agencies: CLEVERFRANKE and Interactive Things

Data Stories

58:11 min | 10 months ago

158|Viz Agencies: CLEVERFRANKE and Interactive Things

"There is no massaging the data to fit your concept but there is for other types of media and I think that's one of the fundamental differences. Hi everyone welcome to new episode of Data Stories. My Name's Marsha Fan and an independent designer of data visualizations. In fact. I Ca- self-employed Truth and beauty. Reiter out of my office. He and the countryside in the north of Germany. Am Enrico fifteen professor New York University TV. Where I do research and teach every nation. That's right and on this podcast together. We talk about data. Visualization data analysis and generally. The role data plays in our lives. And usually we do that together with the guests or to the we invite on the show exactly but before we start just a quick note I would pop kasese listener supported so there's no ads. Any few enjoyed the show. Please consider supporting with recurring payments on patriots dot com slash data stories. Or you can also send us a one time donation on pay pal the me slash data stories and I just WanNa say if you can do that especially during these hard times. That's totally fine. Just keep listening to the show in the if you WANNA have right maybe a message tweets. They're talking about data stories or may be reviewing our show on. That would be really appreciated other than that. Please don't feel obliged to to donation right right. Saw the sovereign in. Let's get started so we have a special topic today. We decided to make even a two episode feature maybe even more episodes to come because actually this huge blind spot so whenever we review our trailer board with episode. We realized sometimes. Oh we've been so many but we never talked to somebody from field X. or from that area and it's been like this really with for years. Small to medium data visualization agencies. Which is insane because some of the best data is obviously comes from these types of companies and we talked to a lot of practitioners and researchers and whatnot but never really people. Running data visualization studios. Huge Blind. Spot happens but now we're catching up quick and we're inviting to even guests today and and we record another episode with two guests and this will be the next month so hopefully we're back to a good ratio of data agency folks and going and I'm personally super interested. I'VE KNOWN THE FOLKS. We'll talk to you for many many years. In fact I realized last year at encode conference that a lot of these agencies have been around for ten years longer and so it's really now fastening to hear of their long-term Perspective on how the field has evolved. How the field has changed if there is even a viable business and making high end. Crafted data visualization. Or if we will all be unemployed soon so curious to learn more about all this so as I said we have two guests the first one is Thomas. Clever I Thomas High Thomas Highmore. It's I echo. Thanks for joining us. And we have Benjamin Vita Benjamin Haven. Hi Maurice Ionescu great to have you on so Thomas. Maybe I could you briefly introduce yourself and your company and then Benjamin can take. Oh yeah absolutely so as you said. I'm Thomas Flavor or clever co-founder of Flavor Franca or clever Frankie. Most people call us these days. We're data design and Technology Company and we create anything from one of data visualizations to data driven products and tools. As we like to call it we have. We have our headquarters here in the Netherlands and we have another office in Chicago and Dubai. Yeah how many people are working for you right now around thirty two. I think if I'm correct thirty two now great Benjamin Harvard. You all right. I'm an interaction designer with sort of like a focus on information Shirley station and interface design from the beginning and then back in two thousand eight. I started writing a blog on data virtualization whereas publish my work and my research. It's also how we met I think. Also that's how I stumbled over an earlier and like a year later. I co founded interactive things which fairly similar to clever Frankie is a designer development studio with a focus on data driven products. We are a team of seventeen people. We're sort of like a slightly weird beast as we are five equal partners in the company. I think today's like my main focus is leading the company as the managing director. I have a few teaching assignments at universities on data visualization and and sort of organizing database. Sirak meet up here in sick right. So Benjamin there maybe just two people get a sense of okay. What type of product elected do or what? What's your approach is there? Maybe one quintessential project where you could say okay. This is really quintessential almost inactive things project where you could say. That's that's really good example of the type of work we do and we like to. Yeah that's you know like picking your favorite child right. So I think the project that sort of comes to mind is is actually two one two projects and that's education inequalities and education progress so these two websites that we have built for UNESCO and they are sister products in a way even though they're seven years apart so education inequalities already seven years old now and education progress was just released. The first was an exploratory tool our allies in disparities in quality of education and to second is Dan an explanatory publication summarizing the key facts and trends and so in a way they present to coins of the data. Visually say are two sides of the data. Visualization Coin Servic exploration for discovery and explanation for understanding and besides being interesting from data visualization perspective. I think the project also rank very high in our in our view because of the purpose they both advance to sustainable development goal for forward which I think is an important aspect so inclusive and equitable quality of Education. For All the second is the client. Unesco has been a long term and very very committed clients to the success of each of their project and then in terms of craft brew bows challenged in design. Antidevelopment went we work on these projects. And and typically we've seen iskoe. We are allowed to pursue a very iterative process instead of Servic fixed scope waterfall type of process. And I think sort of these Su- yes bex or for aspects purpose client crafting process are important to us and I think they are. Well reflected in those two projects. Great Tell us how about you is a similar example like Ben set. That's always very hard and I think if you look back over over the years that we've been running the business. There's always some quintessential project some lighthouse projects that I think really define you as a company to take a next step in where you are if I have to choose then. I think the the Mobility Index website that we created for the Chicago Metropolitan Agency of Planning is is one of my personal favorites really because it brings together a lot of lot of things dear to my heart. Dear to our companies hearts in the sense that it's it's a mix of experimental data viz with an important message behind it. The CMAP approached us because they had written a new mobility plan or a new urban planning plan so to speak for the city of Chicago which was pretty much. The first comprehensive urban planning plan since Daniel Burman Burnham which was about one hundred years ago and really outlined around economy mobility and liveability where the city should be heading and also the challenges that they face so mobility is a very important topic to the city of Chicago. Think Twenty five percent of the workforce is somehow tied to freight transportation. All those type of things and you know the the investment that needs to be done in the infrastructure there is about thirteen trillion dollars To really convey that message they asked us. Can you can concise. Can you digest plan of six hundred sixty pages into one interactive websites? And of course we said yes remembering that on the way there on the plane. I was reading through that plan and thinking. I'm not sure how we're going to do it. But it was really it was. It's a really nice project in in how we did a lot of editorial stuff on on understanding the plan and thinking how can we explain this plan to you know anybody down in the street but also to business policy makers journalists politicians and? There's a whole editorial sort of structure that you know. There's a bird's eye view over Chicago. And then as you dive into the topics you'd literally dive down into street level. There's different types of visualizations from charts to. We were using new technologies at the time. This twenty fourteen so yeah a lot of a lot of boxes that are ticked in that project and I think you know looking back. I just realized when I heard Ben talk that that was the first time that we set foot in Chicago and here. We are six seven years later right here. We have the office in Chicago so really. It's also the moment in time. I fell in love with that city life. One thing I was wondering if is if you can briefly describe I was an agency like yours. Different from other ways of organizing business around visualization. So I'm thinking about in-house data visualize irs or financers or even more classic Web Agency. Yeah that's a good question. I have to admit that I founded this. My this company together with my business partner had hats When we were still in university so of course we did some internships but never never worked at a company. We've always been been our own boss so so I have to admit that that is that is a side note. I should make but if I if I if I look at you know other design agencies other web agencies those type of companies and of course people that have joined us over the years I think there are you know we might be nine hundred thousand nine hundred five percents the same. I think in terms of the complexity of the work is where where I think. It is a little bit different. And I'm not saying one is better than the other. Don't get me wrong but I think when you look at the type of clients in the type of challenges that they throw at us. It's very much at the intersection of data strategy and business and business can also be an organization like a UNESCO like Ben mentioned but There are goals there and these are all sort of. We're trying to marry those and really understand what is does business. What is there the core of their challenge and once we get to that core either through data or or with data? That's when you build up the product and start thinking about you know the users the the the stakeholders and all those type of things. So there's A. There's a delicate balance in the projects that we work on From from a business perspective then of course there's the data which is You know we use data the way that another design agency my use photography or or or music or film cinematography but data has of course some Iran's challenges with as well data quality privacy that we can go on. There's there's multiple podcasts in that I think you know really data complexity is what what you really have to Digest and understand and both from technical and design perspective Philly after rewind in terms of Atlanta's a three D animated map. And you go back to okay. That's okay great for a second. Let's keep that in mind but what trying to achieve or like what's your what's your product actually looking like. Who Are we talk? Yeah that's absolutely I think Thankfully of only had the question of a three D. Bar chart once in my life I did design it just to prove them wrong but other than that. Yeah there's a lot of focus in our work on just understanding the challenge the landscape that this has to work in has to operate in also think looking at the design and technology. People that work in our company I think we attract a different type of designers and technologists than. Let's say you would add an at an AD agency? I mean you're not going to see our work out in the open in like this. A train station per se on big billboards right. It's it's very often a different type of project so curious to see how how Ben would would think about this. No I share on the one hand side of share the same caveat. I've never worked in another design. A agencies airforce like don't really have to inside scoop there and I agree with the things that you've mentioned of the complexity of working on data intensive products and also non linear of development process. There simply isn't really a chance of conceptual. Work Design Work Development. Work what you would. Typically or what you would have traditionally found in application development or civic website development so the notion of a cross functional team having to continually and iterative. We working together. I think the just is an inherent part of how such a data design agency works. There is or I mean. That's also something that we had to learn. There is simply no other way and similarly to the point that sort of more it's mentioned educating the client on on how this work happens the idea of like dropping a CSV file on our doorstep and expecting an award-winning experience of like six weeks. After to be picked up is is something that like might still exist in. Fantasies is just not part of the reality and so Also understanding that this sort of intensive work and non linear work involves like many different stakeholders. And that's sort of like the data provider that's the product owner decide to end users. These are domain experts and so it is definitely working as a client with an agency is definitely more hands on than they might typically expect from working ways web design agency or a branding agency or a marketing agency. And I don't want to again so I don't have to inside scoop into these holidays agencies function. Maybe they're exactly the same level of service hands on knees deep in the client's materials and for them it's just videos or textual content or imagery for us. It's just stares raw data and a that may be the case but that I think is something that might be suffocate misunderstanding of like input data and output outputs of data driven experience. And not sort of situation. This whole idea of data is a third. Stay cold the baden-wuerttemberg thing in Fernando Vigo's brought into the game things such as the detailer. Their client desires also data as an invisible third stakeholder at the table and it has right to interests and preferences maybe or afford answers and and. I think there was also this paper. Data changes everything in Waco or published last year with also argued. That data design is fundamentally different from other forms of desire to me. The material is not as malleable as it is for like working with video working with images because like you might be angle like able to sort of change the angle reshoot. Ashim rewrite the text there is no or I hope there is no massaging the data to fit your concept no but there is for other times of media and I think that's one of the fundamental differences where we do have to follow the constraints sets come with whatever. The data is and often times. You don't know what today's oftentimes to work with. An mkx data source and you can even expect to understand what the data will look like at all times over. The life cycle of a product might have demo data set to start with. You might have like a snapshot of now. But oftentimes the product gets connected to data. That will be refreshed and dancing will look different than so like you have to design for eventuality said are not under control in maybe during the creation process. I have a practical question to me. It seems and this might be a total misperception but a systematic bias. We have in the field but it seems like a lot of the successful data. Visualization work that gets a lot of visibility awards or in on twitter. Something often done by individuals or small teams. And I was wondering what's your experience with. Scaling data visualization productions. Like can you scale it to like? Is it easy to separate the work? So you can work with five people on one data virtualization product or even with ten or. Is there like a natural limit where this tight collaboration between data and design and technology and consulting breaks down de? Did you find maybe a formula that makes it easier to to divide the work and have really clearly defined interfaces or? Do you have a lot of small teams at all? Do little projects like? How did you deal with this? Whole practical issue of scaling. Up Data visualization design and production has a good question. I don't think we ever thought about scaling. Up Data visualization designed in that sense. So that's that's thirty. Two people working so do they all work on individual projects. Or how many people would we usually work on a project? That's a good question. I think we have multiple projects running at the same time in the studio. Those are combination of larger and smaller projects. And but I think you know looking at at an ideal team set up for us I think you know you're looking at around six to eight people on a on a larger project. That's when you know going above those numbers people start to get in each other's way and that's at the same time that's sort of the the number that our team really collaborates with each other so really is an important collaboration. Of course they're smaller projects that that may be one or two people might work on but if you look at sort of scaling in the larger projects that's for us an ideal size and often I think a lot of our clients are surprised. They would even say that. Our team is small on a project because very often big firms are working with twenty thirty forty people on on something and here we come in with with eight and they sort of look at you and think you sure you can manage but really it's about efficiency and just having a team that trusts each other and knows exactly where each other's skill set lies. So yeah I think that is that is the optimum size. And that's I guess two three four type projects that you have at the same time lets studio. Typically are developers to work on projects for a longer period of time in one stretch whereas designers by nature get bored so they WANNA have with big pieces and small pieces and try to figure out. Benjamin how about you know. You put a lot of thought into your process into your culture at enacted things so fundamentally. I think it's very similar to what Thomas and there are multiple projects of running in parallel at the studio at all times off different sizes and and I think like that's healthy and for us. Definitely the natural state of work now individual project teams for us are typically slightly smaller. So I think we can say they're more of four to maximum of six people to work well for us. Maybe also to KRILL FOR THE TYPE OF PRODUCTS. That we're producing. I think of course like depending on for who you work what the product needs to look like and how quickly it has to be delivered like those are all factors that define the project team. But in general we survey formed these project teams that are dedicated to sort of working on niche product. They are typically cross functional. So it's you know designers ways variety of skills its developer's variety of skills working together We try our best to keep those cross functional teams altogether from starts execution to the end. There's always work to do for everyone. Which is a slight shift from how we sought work would happen at the beginning so over over time like that is definitely one of the learnings and something that we try to make our principal way of working in this type of project a so as a result scaling up. I could see scaling-up working like self organized teams so if you. I don't think that it makes sense to scale up at least for the type of projects that we do to scale up the teams to like double or triple the size that I just mentioned. But that doesn't necessarily mean that. An Agency of Clever Frankie size for example like the doesn't work in in my perspective that might. I mean you mentioned that your survey a little bit beyond thirty people so I could see that scaling and then you have a higher throughput of projects individual project team size per project is roughly the same and I think if you look towards the principle of self organized teams and self organized organizations like Teal and all of these buzzwords Dan I think that's also reflected in their thinking like don't try to instate too big of a division of labor like don't build up silos then don't try to centralize functions or don't have too many centralized functions instead imbed those into the individual teams and then an organization should be fairly flexible in scaling or contracting but again that's just theory. I don't really have practical experience status. I'm not sure that I'm interested in earning that that area of sales organization in Stephanie. Something that I think is interesting and on this very small-scale here at interactive thinks. That's something that we try to pursue. I think you're absolutely right. I think the scaling is is definitely terms of more project teams next to each other rather than ramping up the size of an individual project team. I I see absolutely no benefit in in in creating a project team fifteen people so so yeah I think the the self steering teams and all those type of things are are definitely something that really work well in this situation. Maybe one note that I because more open to question ways. Successful work is done by injury tools or a very small teams. And I think there's one thing that I'm observing which is a slight glorification of the Unicorn visualize earlier in our view room so people who excel at all involved disciplines and can take a raw data set and turn it into a keystone experience Present Company looking over to you maurits slight pointing case and I think this is great but I think this does also have parallels to the web design industry of did Unicorn design. There is somebody who does everything well from user research through Pixel Perfect. He signed to like you know from then development across platforms. And I think this could. It's sort of a race slightly unrealistic expectations for employers. Who are looking for this type of people or overwhelming feelings of inadequacy for newcomers. There is. There's a big role to play for someone who's just extremely good at front. End Engineering or extremely good at information visualization but doesn't have the other skills and they just hope that we don't get disillusioned. If I'm fairly narrow in my skill set I will never have a chance in. Data is because all they're winning projects. Don't buy these again by these UNICORNS. Who like can't do it all and I think that's something that we just in order to keep inclusive for people who just don't have the bandwidth don't have time to learn all of these things that there's still place to work in. That are also. I think this type of Unicorn approach as you call. It also works just for type of project so if you really want to build lasting tools that are used over a long period of time and that really integrate with people's work. You have to be a good team player you know. There's no way you can just do this in this hit and run fashion and just you know take that SIA sweep to make it beautiful and off you go you know. That's that's not really sustainable in applied setting. I think you see even more not just in in our field of work so to speak but looking at job vacancies from technology companies or just businesses looking for design design talents. You sometimes see this list of you know must be skilled in everything called adobe but then also have fronton coding skills and even myself. Well you know I'm I'm I can't do that what what is happening here so. I think it's a very valuable point. That ben makes here about about the talent and people looking to go into. Davis is you. You shouldn't feel ashamed that you're not a unicorn. There is a space. There's a place for every donkey and horses and everything exactly and I. I'm about something here so when you assemble a new team I guess it's always a mix of designers and developers right so if you can tell us a little bit more about how do you carefully assembled a new team and maybe even how how you hire New People. I guess these numbers in encoders done necessarily always go very well together. I'm wondering if you have any any insight on that. I think that I mean I get I. Get the point. The trope of designer's going well together but like I would love to just completely dismissed this notion Perfect stay do do it. These are people who are like making building creating things. They're building products and yes for some. The tools is Java script for some. The tools is go for some. The tools is patient for others. The tools is sketch and for yet others to tool is tableau so yes the tools. Change and it might. It could be said that sort of like a designers might said e slightly different from a programmer's mindset but at the end of the days of confronted with a series of challenges. There are message that we apply to overcome these challenges and find solutions to problems and at the end of the day we see a progression in at the beginning. There was nothing that the end. There's GonNa be a product and sort of like you just continually evolve this distinct until it's done or good enough or avoid winning and if you assemble a team that I think believes in each other's responsibilities and also beliefs in each other's strengths and it doesn't necessarily matter if they're if they consider themselves to be a designer or an engineer or or hybrid somewhere in between and to me that is always one of the most important aspects in our hiring like one of the big areas that we that we want to explore with a potential higher is like what their perspective on collaboration communication and community is to learn how they how they see them selves and I think maybe I'm in the privileged position to make a pick and therefore have people on our team that where I don't even have this conflict. How that person doesn't really go well with a very creative very experimental design there so of course. There's a curation so I have to slight. This is Dorothy view. If I just took general population of these adults and develop percent yes decumulation would have to happen on a per project basis but in the locker situation of having a steady team. I don't have to make this curation and the establish a common understanding and a common respect between all the people as a fundament and Dan per project not really a question of curator team Sure Yeah I think I think that ties in well with how we look at a hiring people. And of course there are discussions within the studio between designers programmers developers but also among designers themselves and developers the themselves I mean in the end. Rt is passionate and a lot of passionate individuals. So you know there's also discussions going on between interaction designers visual designers about the dialing of a button whether it's ugly or not and it is fundamental discussions like that that go on and at the same time like Ben said. I think a lot of people that work in our our types of companies and Dave is are often this hybrid or multi skilled individuals that have this interest in in technology and design so very often. I joke that we have. The design nerds designers in our company. And and really we. We hire on on culture on cultural fit more than talent and skill set. Because I'm a firm believer. I'm educating people on on certain things of course you need to have some fundamental form of talent for either design or code but a lot of things you can learn on the job and and we trained people in that but it seems that you can't learn are just having trust in your colleagues Working together and really one of the fundamental questions. I ask in any job interview to myself. As could I sit next to this person in an airplane for four hours and you know four hours is just long enough to start getting sweaty and annoyed and uncomfortable? And you know. Are you happy with the person sitting next to you at that moment in time? Are you going to have a good conversation and it is a very good test for yourself to think about you know? Does this person fit into our company and that doesn't mean that people have to be the same on the contrary. I want to have as many different people in our company working together But there needs to be this fundamental respect and trust for each other and for each other's capabilities whether your junior or senior you know all these things I mean sometimes You know a junior designer can tell me Thomas. I don't like the type tastes that you're using. That's that's absolutely fine type of people you want around right. Yeah so really. It's much more about culture than I feel about about other things and I'm sure it's an ongoing challenge but also exciting to build these teams and figure out what works what doesn't and then you think you figured it out and two weeks later things look totally different. Eternal struggle. Exactly. Yeah I wanNA use the opportunity now. That have you here in the call. Let's talk a bit about the long term. View of the whole data of his field has changed. Like you've been following your own now. We've been following your curious but you've also followed the development of the field and how things have changed so my question here was like do you see any any can say they have been shift in how over the last ten years maybe clients requirements have changed what types of projects where feasible interesting to do or is it all pretty much still the same but we have just fancier technologies you know or do you feel like the whole field is sort of evolving in directions of curious here to your thoughts your thoughts. Yeah I think the field is definitely evolving. When we started our company. You know you saw even in data sets that were thrown at you. It was very much about web analytics. And those type of data sets and then it went into financial and then as you The iphone was introduced which was a huge improvement on one hand regarding data phys going from B. Two B. TO B. TO C. Space and I think in from our perspective I think where we see our value. Add in the years to come is really around. Data Physical Digital Space. Iot Sensor Technology and how visualization plays a role in in. Interfaces adaptive interfaces moreover. Because I think you know we're not as well probably like this handling of I think you know the the we're we're heading towards a world where you design and develop something that that you don't know how that is going to be used across all these different platforms and touch points and an areas and field so you're really designing much more a system and it requires a systemic approach to design and to data viz a more than anything. So that's where I see. The long term view for us is really those adaptive interfaces and systems that are much larger than just a a single visualization and also. I think maybe even going as far as questioning whether we should visualize data in future whether we should actually be helping people in such a way that they don't need to look at data. Which is I think an interesting a philosophical question that we have discussions about quite often in our studios. How can you? How would you design? A data visualization for voice control rights without any screen those type of things there's a huge sort of Greenfield for us to explore. Benjamin how about you again am definitely following. Thomas Train of thought here. We have seen over the past like ten years. We have been working actively in the field huge shifts first and foremost in lake understanding what the value is of the of the work that we're doing so even understanding like diversity of using data in more aspect stands analytics data prone feels working with data for decades before and instead. I think that's reflective when Thomas says we have seen new data sets like maybe things were analytic sets before and then financial sets because these are traditional industries that have been working with data for a long time but now we see consumers working with state much more we see journalists working with state much more educated working with data people who have to report on their data switching from specific interpretations in in written form to more exploratory experience. So I think all this new data that we get to work waste is a result of more diverse people working actively with data and don't necessarily to all the interpretation and transmission into spoken word again that instead allow their stakeholders to actively still explore an experimentalist the date and I think that's that has been a huge change and suddenly it's all about digital transformation in general rather than making away charge right right. We we started. I mean we started right after the financial crisis and and before and sort of slightly off the coin of data instant oil the term data in West Point and so at the beginning. We definitely had to explain much more the type of work that we do in again the benefits of working with data these days. This is like everybody's understanding in almost all industries and so it's much less of this explanation of what type of work disease and why this is important and what can be benefits. It's we start much later. Sort of like in this education process whenever we talk to clients and I think that will definitely continue to shift. I think we have again like there's a mass market for data visualizations now but I think that also poses the next challenges because I think we also have reached a certain level of the audience. That definitely now. Have a much higher. Data Literacy or data visualization literacy. But there's still much more ground to be covered. And maybe as Tom Assess. Maybe visualization is not necessarily the right media many more so if we look at trends like I want answers instead of I wanNA analyze. I won't have something personalized instead of WanNa have something generic. I WanNa have something. That's quick snack consumable instead of sort of this long form so these shifts in consumer behavior and how we consume information in general I think point in the direction of their work where I think human data interaction will go and divisional media is extremely powerful. It is also like exclusive so it also excludes people with certain disabilities to even start interacting with data. And so I think not as a you know not as a fallback but instead of taking the human data asked the actual norm Dan. Thinking is visualization direct medium or is yet another type of medium more adequate going forward. I think is something. That's very very interesting so touch on a really important point which is data literacy and maybe that is something that that our field is is is shoot should consider is the on the one hand we have the data literate people and on the other hand. We have the data illiterate people and I think looking at maybe a broader trend and you replace words like digit data with digital it becomes Where the new rich and poor people split divide comes right. Are you digitally literate or illiterate? Are you able to manifest yourself in a digitized society That is throwing all these data and insights at you or not and I think companies like our Also have on the one hand progressing the data literate people to to a new level but at the same time taking those data illiterate people or or the the ones that don't have the tools and means to to access that and help them advance to that to that same level to that equal playing field and I think There's there's often in in the tech world and the world that we operate in. We talk about you know. Everything is being digitized. But let's not forget that at least fifty percent of this. This globe is still people are fighting for shelter for safety and some some kind of running water. They don't really care about. Data visualization at this point in time and still we can design and develop the tools for them to come up to that level very quickly. I hope and that's a great like general observations that designing more for fit for an audience to think of all the different types of audiences and also the types of formats channels. I think they are. The last. Few years has has really risen. I think maybe five to ten years back. We would have thought more in a one one-size-fits-all approach or like let's just make project and everybody will see it right. And so I think it's a natural progression right as you said ten years ago like okay. We can't make visualization we might use flash like people you need to plug in creation then. Okay we can't create a visualization that-that's vape native then okay. We can't create before that can also be seen on a smarter device Dan we create visualizations stead. Sort of go across devices end. And I think going forward it's like maybe individualization is not a necessary. Sort that the most important part anymore interaction with data like learning about the data understanding the data analyzing it taking insights from it. Making it actionable and so forth like that's the important part and I think that's where a lot of s Thomas says a lot of Greenfield still is and I think that's where we should be pushing forward into disturb never stops regardless of Gaza shifts. Or you know we can do that in two years. The end I'm thinking the the basic skills and principles behind communicating data. Don't really go away. Once you change a medium. Our channel right saw. I would be really curious to see what happens. When we more more people start going away in a way from from his position and using other channels that super interesting. Yeah great stuff so we need to wrap up soon we need. We have one more like special special idea. So we want to end these episodes. We ever being a Benjamin ask something a question to Thomas in Thomas us a question to Benjamin all right so I think I tied directly into the last few statements. Thomas Made Thomas Sensor lab. What is it all about? And why might question? Sensor lab is a nonprofit that we started when we moved into our new office space here about two and a half three years ago. And you know we have this this prototyping lab within within flavor Franco. Where we you know. It has anything from drills to soldiering machines to older nurse stuff that always want as a kid so so finally. We had the space and we felt. Let's let's built this prototyping lab where we can just go wild on anything but like most things in life that stands idle for nine hundred ninety five percent of the time so that's a shame like owning a car. You don't use it very often if you think about it. So that's why we said. Hey why don't we consolidate that into what we call center lab and open it up for students and people that Wanna come use our equipment and use our tools and you know hopefully There's the the old intern or delayed employee. Walks out at the same time or walks in. I should say and then walks out as an employee. But so that's really what what sends lab is about. It's it's it's nothing. It's not a different company or anything but it's something that we we promote separately And it's a little bit bigger than just the prototyping lab. We also have an event space in our office that we host presentations and those type of things. So we have university students coming. In and learning about data visualization we have created this workshop that is a very small introductory workshop three to four hours for students to learn how to connect a muscle censor to an interface and get the data in a Jason File and how to structure it and then create their own. Visualizations out of it. So really it's it's it's just fun and games so to speak but But in a structured way that makes business sense in some way shape or form also. Yeah so I mean this. This like Ben said his question is into the last part my mind ties into maybe the things that we talked about earlier and not having the experience of working in another agency like you. There are always things that you want to learn from each other and see how you deal with with challenges so you you mentioned that you work with these these multi skilled teams four to six people. And you you run into this. During a data this process you switch from analysis to design to development to narrator back to analysis a to find the best angle and way forward to bring this message across. How'd you switch a perspectives at the right time within your team? And I ask that. Because that's a constant challenge on our end always fantastic question and I think that applies to both interdisciplinary teams but that also applies to an individual who which is sort of execute a project from start to finish on their own. Because you do have to put on different hats or put on different glasses to have a different perspective and focus on. What's what's relevant at that time and so I mean one one of tool that helped us sit this mindset depending on the project face is something that we started a few years ago. We have in our office for each project. We have project ports very similar to how other companies work with Kanban boards or similar System in on our project boards we have a few different templates four different stages that the project is seen and besides having things like a time line and a list of requirements or list of assumptions and Dance Affect Kanban board for our tools. We also have a big sheet where we have our mindset written on it so in survey written out English we eat right what is our current mindset that we operate under in this phase of the project and evolve over time and so in a way it acts as a token access as a reminder. It takes it again civic. It's something that you can point to something that you because you have it in daily stand up meetings or in in also larger discussions that you can point to and say hey. Let's not forget where we try to explore different options so it's not necessarily the point in time to cut out everything. That's bad and only pursues like one direction or conversely. Hey now is not the time for more exploration now is sort of like refinement and polishing and so these things written out in physical space if you work in a physical space or written out on a digital space. Four team is a very helpful token for not forgetting aid as the project leader yourself but also having everybody sort of like be able to point to it and then actually actively using in discussions and in their work. So that's something that helped us great. Thank you that's inspiring so these are physical big cardboard and you can pin stuff on them and everybody could see where projects at at a time. Yeah so there is a predefined format of a corporate wall. It really is fairly big but still small enough to handle yourself. Peter Kastner one of the partners interesting. He wrote a lengthy blog post about the thinking behind. It it's also like it has been sort of like a few years in the making until we're where we are and it's an evil thing so like these things change and right now we're sort of trying to move away also in the current situation trying to move away from the physical necessity to like half board in the room to have an equivalent in the digital space that it's a little bit more portable and sort of allows for a little bit more remote access so I can. I can happy to send a link where we explain. They look at where we want. The clock pulse. We want to see a photo of Al. Yeah we're experimenting with something in the digital space like you said having those project boards or or even doing sprint Rato's online because everyone is working remote now. We found that Mito is very nice to learn to use and also to have workshops with clients at this moment. Yeah yeah anything that allows like this effortless awareness of where everybody's at and what the reading. The room has so much becomes much harder right remote. This is an interesting time to figure out things to to create this this type of awareness over distance. But I totally agree. The all these physical things that you can point to and like disgust together can be so valuable and building up that mutual and common ground between people and say we're doing the same thing here and this is where we are. Food sounds trivial. But it's very important. Yeah wonderful there was great chatting to you. We should wrap it up otherwise we are losing too many people who don't have so much time to listen. But if you have any additional questions you can ping and Benjamin on twitter for sure some other social platform or send us an email and we'll respond baby and Yeah well linked to stuff. Take a look at the show notes and super looking forward to seeing what you come up with in the future. Tim's projects thanks for joining US expert. Coming on the show. Thank you very much. Us has been an absolute privilege and joy. Absolutely I concur. Thank you bye. Bye Bye guys say. Hey folks. Thanks for listening to data again before you leave a few last notes. This show is crowd funded and you can support us. Unpatriotic at Patriotic Dot com slash data stories were published monthly previews of upcoming episodes supporters. Or you can also send us a one time donation via paypal at pay pal. Let me slash data stories or is a free way to support the show. You can spend a couple of minutes rating nineteen. That'll be very helpful as well. And here's some information on the many ways you can get news directly from us. We are on twitter facebook and instagram. So follow us there for the latest updates. We have also a slack channel where you chat. We DOES DIRECTLY INTO SIGN UP. Go to our homepage. A data story DOT. 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Episode 34  CMR Surgical

Job Ready Employer Says Yes

13:28 min | 1 year ago

Episode 34 CMR Surgical

"Job ready employer says yes. This program is presented by educate- education and innovation. Hello is jonathan brill and i'm working in edinburgh but talking to save award in cambridge hello seda. How are you today thanking yourself. We are in good form enjoying edinburgh and all that has to offer sarah. I'd like to talk to you a book you do for a living. It says here that you ought to research search engineer at seymour surgical. Could you tell me a bit more about c._m._o. And then what you do yes so <hes> <hes> saint non-surgical is a british company but is trying to develop a new statistical robot. That doesn't really mean that the ruble does surgery it is a robot to help surgeons <hes> today surgery to eighteen hole <hes> what i do in the company at the moment although it says my title is research attention here is i'm actually hurt me. Help me out with the test what we do is we get the system and we know that system should do a whole bunch of things and we have to check the actually yes it does dana before we're allowed to sell any of these systems or anything like that they for example. If you had someone who is designing a book day i won't a hardcover book to have tobacco pages and things like that and then we received the check it make sure does have all of these things so you're kind of in compliance. If i could use that gusty term yes my other least-favoured were regulations <hes> but yes we check at the system complied behave as it should be so this thing that you're producing this robot. Does it look like a robot. I might find in the comics. What sort of thing is it not quite like what you might find in a slightly more lying. I would say an industrial arena bit not quite on that scale. It's a lot more elegant than that. <hes> there is a big screen with some attached sort of hand control related that you got the surgeons exactly men can control took some smaller arms and those arms ben will be. I used to actual surgery. A man result of this is that there's a patient lying on the table presumably asleep they they will have a better experience because you've gone through a keyhole rather than invasive. Is that what we're talking about. Yes that's correct. The main goal that we have actually amar is to enable access for more able to keyhole surgery because the complication rate in the whole surgery are much much lower and people heal much faster cheaper. We can get having the kind of surgery. The better outcome will be so. Let's go back in the mists of time here you you are at the cutting edge. I can make not pun all in an industrial and surgical terms. Is that what you always wanted to do to some extent <hes> not right from the very beginning when i was younger i loved animals and i was convinced going to invent <hes> but as i got older i i actually found have incredible interest in being involved hands on with technology and so i started it to think about engineering and things like that i was good at math but i thought maybe i should only through with something along those lines <hes> but i still wanted to do something thing. That was really useful to sue. I thought maybe something in the medical field on my grand wants suggested to me what about making prosthetics aesthetics started exploring that but i'd say the first time i really knew that medical robotic was what i wanted to dave woods in about my second year university when i chatted to some friends who are in a biomedical engineering colt and what was it stimulated the sense sense of robotics. What do you mean by that. Well is everyone who thinks <hes>. I'm going to help people most by working with robots. Whoa that's a fact tastefully back. Manson listen as a whole sort of held my interest as something helpful but it is a little squeamish about the process of actually really doing the surgery myself and would class myself as having the best bedside manner but perhaps there was something i could do from behind the the scenes to help <hes> and therefore <hes> medical devices and medical robotic is the most interesting of all medical device raced complicated unimpressive less really interesting. So what sort of qualifications do you need to you do what you're doing. What sort of qualifications do you have well. They wanna have this will immed- are are sometimes slightly different. <hes> i have a background in electrical and biomedical engineering then fuller to buy a master's in robotics however that many people here who you work alongside me who has very diverse backgrounds some have dom vnc in math physics computer scientists. We have mechanical engineers electrical engineers throughout che. I think that the field is quite open to people with a lot of different skills that because we need people with that background in various <hes> when we talk to a companies in this area not necessarily sicilian robotics but in engineering they say that that is true but if you got no maths you would find it very difficult is it's not true new data to some extent yes if you're doing one of the more engineering base roseau urine electrical engineer or even test engineer. <hes> mass is quite important. That doesn't mean those are the only roles available we also have a team that looks at clinical reiter <hes> on a team that is on the commercial side of things i team not look at usability not say for example how pleasant experience is two years the robot and interact with it and i would take many of these people might not have a background in math he can still be old without math but if he wanted to do the engineering crystals you probably need you are working <music> an area which is often described as stem that is science technology engineering and maths and there's not own that many women in that particular field. Have you encountered any difficulties <hes> because because you are a woman i have to admit that i really never have <hes>. Perhaps i'm very lucky but i've met a had a negative experience based on that. I am a woman. I do see sometimes in a meeting. I might be the only woman among the the ten than room but are not treated any different before laura so while you've had a relatively benign expedience not have discriminatory attitudes that you've noticed you're still as a woman underrepresented in most areas that you encounter. How can we improve on that. Do you think i would faint the biggest issues. Getting women and girls interested earlier ron. When i was at school i wasn't particularly aware of engineering. Nearing is a career <hes> and when i was aware event it was sort of a trade almost as a boys' job irony really abdullah a proper interest in it when i was on universe actually doing a maths degree and had friends who were in engineering. My thoughts thought will what they're doing is great. I can swap them into that. I think the key thing is trying to shoot goes. They're young but it is something they can do the perfect acceptable korean and actually very interesting and that would be enabled by doing it a bit in middle school high school rather than just saying oh these engineering if people would like to have a galactic why not yeah obsolete we having the option to do a few sort of practical hands on courses levels a doing computer science <hes> at p._c. Level at a we never oliveira sorts of things not to build up your experience. What engineering actually years so here you are working in and robotics what you've always wanted to do and you are still young a young in terms of your career or sort of path. Do you think that you see opening up for you. How do you see you career developing in the future well personally. I'm really hoping that i can continue in this career. I've seen her reason why why couldn't go i would like to contain working with robotics and ben a pain the sort of cutting edge technology <hes> pertinent criminal not not a standstill if you think about the fact that i've not a decade go we didn't have move off things and robotics and the slightly separate topic the anti they is the key technologies at the moment that sort of taking alternate light to take with them where i am at the moment in in the m._r. I have lots of opportunities. I'm starting to get leadership experience. I have a small team of engineers. Do i manage reg on unlike to just continue. Doing the main learner is a tremendous thought that you are at the starting starting point all an industry robotics a._i. Artificial intelligence and that you there in a sense on the on the ground floor so if young people listening to this are inspired by what you're saying. What advice can you give to them. When you're you're looking at your younger self. If you like and saying <hes> i should have done that or i did the right thing. How would you advise young people well. I would say <hes>. There's nothing i did that. I regretted even though we took a slightly winding path to get where i was more more main advice would be be curious tried to find the thing that you're really interested in on. Don't worry if what extent announced in doesn't end doc being what you want to do. There's absolutely no harm in off your thirsty ear saying actually all the thing seems really interesting. I should try back bologna. Get away. You want to be in the end that you wasted. Son's like valuable advice says auden sade awards linked in profile that she is passionate about helping other the people and she's chosen a route to do that not immediately available to everyone but something that a lot of young people might like like to think about sarah. You've given us a very very inspirational insight into the sort of work that you do see aimar. Thank you indeed and the best of luck with their future. You'll find us online at educate dot biz job. Raby imply says yes <music> server.

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