40 Burst results for "reagan"

Fresh "reagan" from Rush Limbaugh

Rush Limbaugh

01:10 min | 49 min ago

Fresh "reagan" from Rush Limbaugh

"From one of the most Oh, way down from dumb priest. Route three. Fredericksburg, now from garage door repair dot com Hailstorm are seven forecast partly sunny. Mostly cloudy on this Friday. Chance for showers and storms could create some heavy rainmakers. Isolated flooding, but no flood watches today highs in the low to mid eighties. Today, Lo's back in the seventies overnight under mostly cloudy skies. Mostly cloudy on your Saturday we'll have a chance for rain, but not until late today first half today will be dry, some heavy rain possible Saturday evening in Saturday night with hide A meteorologist at a weather. It's 85 Reagan National Line Maria Leaf on Washington's mall double Rush Limbaugh. The views expressed by the host on this programme, documented to be almost always right, 99.8% of the time. It's Friday from.

Maria Leaf Fredericksburg LO Limbaugh Washington
'Boys State' Helps Teens Learn How Politics Work — Perhaps A Little Too Well

Fresh Air

05:54 min | 1 d ago

'Boys State' Helps Teens Learn How Politics Work — Perhaps A Little Too Well

"This is fresh air, want a glimpse into a potential future candidate for elected office? Look no further than the new documentary called Boy State. It's about an annual event in my government for high school students sponsored by the American Legion. By the way, Bill Clinton and Cory Booker went through the program. Boy state begins streaming Friday on Apple, Plus our film critic Justin Chang has THISS review. Since they were founded in the 19 thirties by the American Legion, the boys, state and Girls state programs have been giving high schoolers a practical education in how government works. Students in every state are chosen to take part in a weeklong summer experiment in which they must form their own representative democracy. As we learned from the opening credits of the terrific new documentary Boys State. No Clinton, Dick Cheney, Rush Limbaugh and Cory Booker are just a few of the program's famous alone's A film, directed by Amanda McBain and Jesse Moss, focuses on the Texas boy state event that took place in June 2018. We see the roughly 1200 participants arriving in Austin. Where they are randomly divided into two political parties, The federalists and the Nationalists. Those names carry no agenda. It's up to both parties to hammer out a platform, choose their leaders and then run against each other in a week long election campaign. McBain and Moss throw us into this mark government exercise without much preamble or explanation of the rules of the game. My politics itself. The action can be a little confusing. Unlike politics, it's never boring, mainly because the movie wisely focuses on a select few participants. Either. The filmmakers were extremely lucky and their choice of subjects or they shot so much footage that they were able to isolate the most compelling personalities. In any event, the four young men, we spend the most time with all in that playing key roles in the experiments, nerve wracking outcome. Most ambitious of the bunch is been the Federalists Party chair who's willing to do anything to win votes, including smearing the Nationalists on Social media. Dennis, politically conservative. He has a Ronald Reagan action figure to prove it. And he despises what he sees as the liberal tendency to divide people along lines of race, gender and disability. Then speaks from some personal perspective. He lost both his legs to meningitis when he was three. Care of the Nationalist Party hails from the opposite end of the political spectrum. Progressive black teenager originally from Chicago. Renee knows he stands out in this mostly white, conservative Texas field. He also stands out on merit. He has a seasoned politicians command of rhetoric and can deftly out argue any opponent. It is also capable of calling for party unity, as he does in an early speech. My grandmother told me a few things you have to have faith, hope and a bit of a pissed off attitude. I want to be civil and represent a whole working body. And we're gonna take the example of a plane body. It has two wings left one, right one. We're not gonna pick one. We're going to stay in the middle, because we're not intolerable party where one that is palatable to all. And so as long as we're able to keep this plane of foot with a healthy right wing in a healthy left wing, we have the ability and the capability to pummel any fairless into the ground because we're the only party that's where voting for because it's this party that's going to represent every individual. If Rene has the sharpest mind and tongue and boy state, its heart and soul belonged to Steven A fellow nationalist party member. Stephen becomes an underdog in the race for governor, the highest elected office. Like Rene Steven stands out. He's the son of a Mexican immigrant, and he counts Bernie Sanders among his political heroes, his humility on the campaign trail and his stirring honesty in front of a microphone. Prove irresistible to the crowd. Again and again, he invites his fellow party members to tell him what issues are most important to them so that he could be a better truer representative for their concerns. We see these young men debating a lot of issues, especially gun control. There's a lot of talk about protecting the Second Amendment. But there are also counter arguments from students like Steven, who have clearly been shaken by the sheer number of school shootings. Another much discussed. Issue is abortion, which leads to one of the film's most revealing moments. A nationalist gubernatorial candidate named Robert, who's running on a strict pro life platform. Admits on camera that he secretly pro choice. Sometimes you've got to say what you've got to say in an attempt to win, he says. That's politics. Indeed, it is. And while the filmmakers are working from a mostly neutral fly on the wall perspective, their attitude toward the boy state program feels ambivalent. At best, Deliberately or not. The experiment seems to bring out a lot of the flaws of America's political system itself. Personal attacks, dishonest tactics and conflicts that hinge moron popularity than substantive policy debate. It's undeniably inspiring to see so many young men with bright, engaged minds and the best of them, as we see from the end of the movie have already gone on to impressive new accomplishments. But it's also dispiriting that so many of them have already learned to view politics in the most cynical way possible as the game to be won by any means necessary. Justin Chang is the film critic for the Los Angeles

Nationalist Party Rene Steven Cory Booker Justin Chang Bill Clinton American Legion Representative Amanda Mcbain Texas Federalists Party Jesse Moss Apple Ronald Reagan Thiss Bernie Sanders Stephen Austin America Dennis
Fresh update on "reagan" discussed on Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

00:28 sec | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "reagan" discussed on Bill Leff and Wendy Snyder

"Division 4333 192 lanes 159th Street traffic on the 930 50 50 times. Only 20 minutes on the committee started going down on Division Street between intelligence and Burn your change downtown 45 minutes from all the way across from 15 minutes on the border between Reagan Memorial pulling heavy around the time of the accident, plain looking a pricey cell found walking untold pleasure. And on the ICA's well inbound approaching Mannheim Road and display NHS traffic is slow Route 3 92 The old post office will.

Reagan Memorial ICA NHS
Film Review: A teenage political experiment in ‘Boys State’

Fresh Air

04:27 min | 1 d ago

Film Review: A teenage political experiment in ‘Boys State’

"Future candidate for elected office. Look no further than the new documentary called Boy State. It's about an annual event in my government for high school students sponsored by the American Legion. By the way, Bill Clinton and Cory Booker went through the program. Boy state begins streaming Friday on Apple, Plus our film critic Justin Chang has THISS review. Since they were founded in the 19 thirties by the American Legion, the boys, state and Girls state programs have been giving high schoolers a practical education in how government works. Students in every state are chosen to take part in a weeklong summer experiment in which they must form their own representative democracy. As we learned from the opening credits of the terrific new documentary Boys State. Will Clinton, Dick Cheney, Rush Limbaugh and Cory Booker are just a few of the program's famous alums. A film, directed by Amanda McBain and Jesse Moss, focuses on the Texas Boys state event that took place in June 2018. We see the roughly 1200 participants arriving in Austin. Where they are randomly divided into two political parties, The federalists and the Nationalists. Those names carry no agenda. It's up to both parties to hammer out a platform, choose their leaders and then run against each other in a week long election campaign. McBain and Moss throw us into this mark government exercise without much preamble or explanation of the rules of the game. Like politics itself, be action can be a little confusing. Unlike politics, it's never boring, mainly because the movie wisely focuses on a select few participants. Either. The filmmakers were extremely lucky and their choice of subjects or they shot so much footage that they were able to isolate the most compelling personalities. In any event, the four young men we spend the most time with all in that playing key roles in the experiments, nerve wracking outcome. Most ambitious of the bunch is Ben, the Federalists Party chair who's willing to do anything to win votes, including smearing the Nationalists on Social media. Venice. Politically conservative. He has a Ronald Reagan action figure to prove it. And he despises what he sees as the liberal tendency to divide people along lines of race, gender and disability. Then speaks from some personal perspective. He lost both his legs to meningitis when he was three. Care of the Nationalist Party hails from the opposite end of the political spectrum. Progressive black teenager originally from Chicago. Renee knows he stands out in this mostly white, conservative Texas field. He also stands out on merit. He has a seasoned politicians command of rhetoric and can deftly out argue any opponent. It is also capable of calling for party unity, as he does in an early speech. My grandmother told me a few things you have to have faith.

Cory Booker American Legion Amanda Mcbain Bill Clinton Jesse Moss Federalists Party Nationalist Party Ronald Reagan Texas Boys Representative Texas Justin Chang Thiss Venice Apple Renee Dick Cheney Rush Limbaugh Austin
Fresh "reagan" from Chris Plante

Chris Plante

00:33 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "reagan" from Chris Plante

"More delays, you continues out on 95 into Stafford County, from center for partway down towards the Rappahannock River Bridge westbound on 66 7 Before you get to the Beltway, broken down vehicles just moved into the safety zone and then on westbound 66 after 29 Centerville Construction has the right lane. Closed interlude with Beltway in Maryland, approaching with 50 slow moving maintenance vehicle in the Plane now from garage repair dot com Hailstorm are seven scattered thunderstorms today highs in the mid eighties. More storms possible tonight Lows 72. It's Etienne Reagan National Line, Maria Leaf.

Rappahannock River Bridge Etienne Reagan National Line Stafford County Centerville Construction Maria Leaf Maryland
The Club

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:57 min | 2 d ago

The Club

"Welcome to kiss myths and Mystery Syam, your host Kit crump today, the Bohemian Grove and a little bit about secret societies. Perhaps, you belong to a club some time in your life maybe the girl Scouts or cub scouts I was a cub scout many clubs have rules and regulations that go no further than the halls were the members gather like the elks however organizations like the PTA Parent Teacher Association can affect schools, school districts therefore students the reach and impact of. These organizations are limited and generally they're intent is not secret records of meetings of the scouts, elks in the PTA and many other clubs are available to the public. But there are many secret societies out there Yale's skull and bones founded in eighteen thirty two and has had both bushes Teddy Roosevelt and his cousin Franklin as members but a complete list of members is difficult to acquire and the intent of the club impossible to know Dan there is the barbarian aluminum. An lighten era secret society founded may first seventeen seventy, six. The BILDERBERG group is so secret that is considered by many to be a shadow world most secret societies, clubs and organizations so far flung with headquarters in different cities around the world. But the Bohemian Grove is located on two thousand, seven hundred privately owned acres located in Monte Rio California and established eighteen seventy two security at the grove is year round ex-military hired to keep out the curious high end equipment including thermal night vision cameras, and motion detectors are used. As. Part of the sophisticated detection and alarm system, they have ceremonies with strange names like the yearly cremation of care ceremony. It was revealed by a California judge during a discrimination suit brought against that grow by the California Department of Fair Employment and housing over the club's refusal to hire women when the judge that issued decision in favor of the club's practice of not hiring women stated the club members urinated in the open and that hiring women would alter the members behavior odd ceremonies and members strange conduct aside members like those. Of Yale are rich and powerful pictures of President Reagan and Nixon indicate they were members. Also, the Grove is particularly famous for a Manhattan Project Planning Meeting this took place there in September of Nineteen, forty two, which subsequently led to the atomic bomb those attending this meeting include Ernest, Lawrence j Robert, Altman Heimer, the s one executive committee heads such as presidents of Harvard Yale and Princeton along with representatives of standard, oil general, electric as well as various military officials. All members at the time oppenheimer was not an s one member. Although Lawrence, an open heimer hosted the meetings grow members take particular pride in this of and often relate the story to new attendees. However, other behavior at this famous campground has led to numerous claims and even some parody in popular culture. One such documented example was former president Richard Nixon's comments on May Thirteenth Nineteen seventy-one recording the Bohemian Grove which I attended from time to time. It is the most Fag God damn thing you could ever imagine now that's a quote from Richard, Nixon was recorded may thirteen nine, hundred, seventy one. Author, Brad Meltzer hosted a program for the history channel. It was called history coded. He hosted a team of three and during one episode sent to to infiltrate the Hebron. Grove. With the disastrous result, they were all arrested.

Bohemian Grove Richard Nixon Brad Meltzer Pta Parent Teacher Association PTA Kit Crump Lawrence J Robert California Department Of Fair Yale President Reagan California Teddy Roosevelt Monte Rio California Bilderberg Harvard Yale Oppenheimer Altman Heimer Hebron President Trump DAN
Fresh "reagan" from Chris Plante

Chris Plante

00:45 sec | 2 hrs ago

Fresh "reagan" from Chris Plante

"Slow moving maintenance vehicle in the right lane after you passed away now from garage door repaired dot com Mail Storm watch seven Scattered thunderstorms this afternoon with the high around 85 more of the same tonight with a low of 72 morning clouds. Afternoon showers tomorrow. 79 right now at Reagan National. I'm John Matthews, 105.9 FM. Washington's mall, double planet. Entire media companies essentially exists to tear down Joe Biden. Is there an equivalent to that on the left tearing down Trump? There really isn't.

Joe Biden Reagan National John Matthews Donald Trump Washington
In Executive Actions, Trump Extends Some Unemployment Benefits, Defers Payroll Taxes

NBC Meet the Press

01:51 min | 5 d ago

In Executive Actions, Trump Extends Some Unemployment Benefits, Defers Payroll Taxes

"Thirty million Americans are set to miss another benefits. Check this week and addiction moratorium expired last month for millions more the small business paycheck protection program lapsed on Saturday, and some student loan relief will expire at the end of September president. Trump's action sets a weekly unemployment benefit at four hundred dollars. Why did you decide on four hundred dollars when previously families were receiving six hundred that will be a hardship for many what do you say to them? Hardship. This is the money that they need. This is the money they want. This gives them a great incentive to go back to work. The President says states many of which are dealing with budget gaps in pleading for more federal support must contribute twenty five percent in order for Americans to qualify which governors and told you that they would sign on they don't they don't that's up to them among the other new. Orders deferring the payroll tax for workers earning less than one hundred, thousand a year, a move opposed by many congressional Democrats and Republicans suggesting federal agencies consider some eviction protections and deferring student loan payments. The constitution does not give the president power to either appropriate or tax without Congress president trump want promised to be a deal maker. I'm different than other presidents I'm a dealmaker I do hundreds of deals ideals to the. Deals come out of my ears do deals I mean you have to do deals we don't want to do the executive orders all the time it wasn't supposed to be about executive orders you have to bring them like tip O'Neill and Ronald Reagan you have to bring them together but now a deal loose it with the two sides trillions of dollars a part of a wider package which Democrats say should include money. For schools reopening for virus testing and aid to cities and states I stayed come back when you're ready to give a higher number at his golf club this weekend, the president spun the facts both on the economy for twenty straight weeks. Unemployment claims topped one million shattering historical records

President Trump Donald Trump Executive Congress Ronald Reagan O'neill
Fresh update on "reagan" discussed on Brian Lehrer

Brian Lehrer

00:48 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "reagan" discussed on Brian Lehrer

"We're becoming our house, divided. George Romney, father of MIT, running for president in 1968. I guess old George started the frat bro naming thing. His name was just George. But he named a second son Mitt Like baseball glove. MIT named his first son tag which, of course, is something you Khun Dio with Emmett. Also running against Nixon was Ronald Reagan, then the governor of California and already a die hard conservative ideologue. Reagan, of course, would go on to be elected president in 1980 but already in 68 He was talking about freedom in anti counterculture terms. There are things for which if need be, we are willing to die. And one such thing. His freedom. Will we as a nation. Or in our draft cards. Or will we serve? Above and beyond the call of duty. Now opposing, being drafted into a corrosive war represented the cause of freedom. Too many baby boomers to Reagan as you heard in that clip from 68 freedom. Was the opposite of that, and Nixon himself invoked similar pro war language that he tied to cultural mores in his acceptance speech at the Republican convention, as he invoked his slogan, the Silent Majority. Here's 30 Seconds of that. Did we come all this way for this?.

George Romney Ronald Reagan Nixon MIT President Trump Khun Dio George Mitt California Emmett
Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to two presidents, dies at 95

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:49 sec | 6 d ago

Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to two presidents, dies at 95

"Former national security adviser and Falls Church resident, Brent Scowcroft is dead. The late 95 year old had the distinction of being national security advisor to two presidents Gerald Ford and George H. W. Bush. No one else in history conclude that honor Scowcroft was also an advisor to Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama. Here's CBS News National security consultant Jeff McCausland. He was awarded the president Medal of freedom. He subsequently was awarded a knighthood by the order of the British Empire and in 2009 probably largely because of his work on the reunification of Germany with President George Herbert Walker Bush He was presented the Grand Cross of the order the merit by the Federal Republic of Germany. Scowcroft, who served in government posts for 60 years, was a Republican who spoke out against the 2003 invasion of

Brent Scowcroft President George Herbert Walke Jeff Mccausland Advisor Federal Republic Of Germany Gerald Ford Barack Obama Ronald Reagan Germany Falls Church President Trump CBS Grand Cross Consultant
Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to two presidents, dies at 95

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 6 d ago

Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to two presidents, dies at 95

"Former national security adviser and Falls Church resident Brent Scowcroft is dead. The late 95 year old had the distinction of being national security advisor to two presidents Gerald Ford and George H. W. Bush. No one else in history, concluding that honor His achievements are worth, noting CBS News National Security consultant Jeff McCausland. He was awarded the president's Medal of freedom. He subsequently was awarded a knighthood by the Order of the British Empire. And in 2009 probably largely because of his work on the reunification of Germany with President George Herbert Walker Bush He was presented the Grand Cross of the order the Merrick by the Federal Republic of Germany. He was also an advisor to Ronald Reagan and

President George Herbert Walke Advisor Brent Scowcroft Federal Republic Of Germany Jeff Mccausland Gerald Ford Ronald Reagan President Trump Germany Falls Church CBS British Empire Grand Cross Consultant
Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to two presidents, dies at 95

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

00:28 sec | Last week

Brent Scowcroft, national security adviser to two presidents, dies at 95

"Security advisor Brent Scowcroft has died. Pentagon correspondent Cami McCormick, Scowcroft's military and government career spanned 2 60 Years he served his national security advisor to Gerald Ford and George H. W. Bush. He was also an advisor to presidents from Ronald Reagan to Barack Obama. He had a military background and was a West Point graduate but believed military force was not a substitute for diplomacy. Scowcroft was 95. This is

Brent Scowcroft Advisor Barack Obama Gerald Ford Cami Mccormick Ronald Reagan Pentagon George H. W. Bush West Point
Should Washington Break Up Big Tech?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

05:35 min | Last week

Should Washington Break Up Big Tech?

"Hi everybody I'm John Donvan, and this is intelligence squared us and we've we've just seen something historic happened digitally in the halls of Congress when the four CEO's of four, the biggest tech companies in the World Amazon and apple and facebook and Google were required to testify before Congress, and while there they were put in the position of having to defend their companies against claims that they've just become too big that they've become gigantic to the detriment of the general public that they are using their market power crush competition that they're driven by nothing but their own prophets that they're amassing huge amounts of data and that basically they're running afoul of antitrust laws. Some people are calling this big tex big tobacco moment, which is a callback to the nineteen ninety s when seven. CEOS of Big Tobacco companies all had to appear before Congress, and be accused of doing bad things to the public but is this fair in this case? Are these companies really doing bad things because of their size are they really too big and are you the consumer losing out because they've become big or are you actually benefiting because of the size of these firms? So we think in these questions, we have the makings of debate and that's what. We're going to do, but we're going to do it a little bit differently from our normal approach. Today, we're going to be hosting this conversation in a format that we call a to disagree, and that's where we streamline things a little bit. Go to the news we find the dividing lines, and then we bring you what we do best a debate in the form of a conversation between just two debaters not our usual to against to instead we're one on one and instead of having a resolution, we're really going with a question and the question this time is. Should Washington break up big tech should Washington break up big tech I'm here with two debaters who are GONNA be arguing yes or no to that question Zephyr teach out and Andrew McAfee. So I Zephyr you've debated with us before on stage and I just want to say welcome back to intelligence squared. So excited to be back on. Thank you for having me for such an important discussion. It's a pleasure and for folks who don't know you are a law professor, you're an activist. And as it happens, you came out with a book, this July, the title of which break them up recovering our freedom from big big tech and big money. So which side of the debater you're going to be on again today I definitely think we need to be breaking up these big tech behemoths and hence your book. Okay. Now arguing against your position arguing no on the. Question of whether Washington should break attack. I. WanNa Welcome Andrew McAfee Andrew we've we've been wanting to get you into one of our debates for a long time. We are delighted to have you joining us for this one and all it took was a global pandemic right. Thank you for having us. It's a pleasure and for folks who don't know you also are a bestselling author. You're a principal research scientist at MIT. You're also the CO founder and Co Director of the initiative on the digital economy. So once again, welcome to intelligence squared. So the way that this format will go we'll go in four rounds, the first round Each of the debaters will be making a brief opening remarks about their position on the the question before us and then We will have you know along and lengthy back and forth discussion. Towards. The end we're GONNA go to our third round, which will be where each gets to put a the toughest question they can to their opponent, and then a fourth round will be closing remarks and wrapping things up. So there's a lot to discuss a lot to argue here and we're GONNA start with our opening rounds. That's where each get two minutes to make the case in their position on the question would should Washington break-up big tech? So our first debater will teach out who will be arguing? Yes. On the question of whether Washington, should break up big tax Zephyr. The floor is yours. We are in a moment of a genuine crisis and our democracy, and so I want to start with some first principles. The principles of equality and freedom. Central Job of democracy and government. is to. INSERVICE of those goals, protecting citizens from any group or any person wielding too much power from abuses of excessive private power from private governor Mench basically arising out of the corporate form Anti monopoly antitrust is a deep and powerful American tradition was at the heart of the American revolution. Think about the tea party protests the great anti monopolist of our country include ebd boys who saw. How monopoly power was used to crush lack political power after the civil war and Franklin Delano Roosevelt who is arguably the greatest trust buster this country's ever seen and nineteen forty to nine eighty. We lead the world anti monopoly using antitrust campaign finance laws, public utility regulation, labor laws, and other tools to ensure that no private company had too much power but since nineteen eighty, when Reagan, tour down. Anti monopoly laws and their spirits. Democrats, and Republicans alike have failed and instead embraced a policy of radical concentration and the result is the world we live in now.

Washington Big Tobacco Congress Andrew Mcafee John Donvan Amazon CEO Google Franklin Delano Roosevelt Facebook Mench Reagan Zephyr Apple MIT Professor Principal Research Scientist
"reagan" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

08:18 min | Last week

"reagan" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"The president repeals peels away so. You really start to see it with Goldwater a WHO Mississippi bits of eighty seven percent of the vote in one, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, four, which is phenomenal best state and sixty eight George. Wallace's running as an independent. He steals it away Nixon get back in seventy two. It's his best in seventy two Watergate derails this process the Democrats nominate a born again Christian peanut farmer Georgia who captures the the native son vote to the south so he wins Mississippi. Back in seventy six, Reagan takes an eighty eighty, four idiots gone. It's now a solid republican state and to the process starts there at the national level and Reagan's campaign in nineteen eighty is part of this long term southern strategy, a political scientists Angie Maxwell, and Tau Cheeto that a great book of along Southern Strategy which link that nineteen sixty, seven strategy with later appeals. They highlight anti-feminists campaigns and appeals to the religious right later decades but they argue it's all. PART OF ONE APPROACH REAGAN DENIES THIS there's a great famous interview with Lee Atwater and Nineteen eighty-one with political scientist Alexander Lena's and the audio is available. You can find this in it at water admits really but the nineteen sixties southern strategy that Goldwater Nixon us was as he said, based on coded race. Right he insists that a nineteen eighty Reagan had nothing to do with that. There was no coded racism there. Obviously I think scholars would say his State's rights language was a lot like the stuff goldwater Nixon pushing sixty, four, sixty, eight, seventy two but they deny. But it's part of a part of that that continue It really is one more thing on this speech and then I WanNa talk about where we are right now and this kind of code languages exists in our politics right now but one thing looking back. At this speech I read what Reagan did say and we've been talking about what he did say it is worth pointing out what he didn't say which is he never acknowledges the civil rights movement. In this speech, he never acknowledges the deaths of those three workers that happened not that long ago, and so you know sometimes it's just as important to recognize what doesn't get put on the table as does exact phrases question it can you talk about the southern strategy and we've and we tend to think of it as something that? We just extended it into the eighties. I. I'm starting to wonder how much it just sort of an ongoing through line throughout American politics. Because right now you know you could argue that there is still a southern strategy of sorts beat employed by Donald Trump I mean he is taking the side of the confederate flag. He is using this kind of language. He's very much I think aligning in the same way I don't know if he's used the phrase states rights he doesn't need coded language so you. Know How much is the southern strategy over and how much does this kind of language still permit our politics I would say in two ways not but it's changed and one of those ways is that the southern strategy is no longer just focused on the south. I mean this was always true like Wallace was up campaigning in Wisconsin and trying to get the white racist there, and this is sort of a through line. Now that you've already got a lock on the south, you don't necessarily need it here. You can expand it to places and in the north. The other way is that the language isn't as coded anymore I mean one of the things that Donald Trump did when he ran for office, was he the dog whistle and he picked up the bullhorn and that's something that you see the in his strategy here as well like he he's not using states rights at the show but county fair he's using Shithole countries on twitter. Or confederate flags at Nascar races or right I mean, no this is a much bigger thing that we will touch on at some point, but I do think your lens of. Southern versus northern is you know that that's maybe disappearance more I don't know if divide is really rural and urban or along educations with, but you know I mean again, I will point out what a lot of people point is in a you just in many ways, you're just as likely to confederate flag in a rural part of the north of the Midwest as you are in the south these days, and so it has switched I guess it's the the sort of language in the is the same, but the geography of has has shifted. So yeah, I would also and Kevin you might have some thoughts on that. This state's rights argument or the the southern strategy now is more explicitly neo confederate and what I mean by that is when Pat Buchanan ran in the Republican primary in Nineteen ninety-two, he doesn't go to the nobody fair. He goes to Stone Mountain Georgia, which is basically the confederate Mount Rushmore with engravings of Robert De Lis stonewall Jackson and Jefferson Davis, and he explicitly starts talking about southern segregationist and how wonderful leaders they were and I think that Donald Trump to uses that explicitly confederate symbolically and arguments and deep defense deep personal defenses of the south as part of his appeal. It's really unusual for a again both guys, Pat Buchanan and Donald Trump to wrap them says as a southerner to wrap themselves in the south like that when their own personal experiences had nothing to do with the south and so I think they see. The in the confederacy against most charitable reading, they could see a kind of a traditionalist Nikki's rouser raised that. They could see a traditionalist America. The could see berry old fashioned a sense of of the we'll call them values but it's a really odd fit and it's one that they have to force themselves to make a dozen. It doesn't fit well, I think on Donald Trump I need a lot of ways watching trump tried to make this pitch as the champion of the confederacy was like watching you know Richard Nixon borrow lines from Wallace back in Sixty, eight and seventy two. It just didn't. Sound as authentic, but yet trump his trident as Nikki said. We're not dealing with a dog whistles anymore. It's it's bullhorns. It is incredibly obvious what he is what he's trying to. We saw this in a statements in Charlotte about Charlottesville. Right. It in the the fight over the confederate monuments and support for the confederate. FLAG NASCAR I mean is. NASCAR is more progressive on this issue than the president who was from New York. City. It's really a bizarre place to be in right now and you know I will I will add one thing which is you know when you're using a bullhorn people it and they react and you know one of the reasons actually this this came up for for us and we wanted to do this episode because we started thinking about. This Mickey when when Donald Trump is scheduled that rally in Tulsa Oklahoma on June on June eighteenth at the site of the Tulsa. Race massacre and there was pushback and there was an understanding of the symbolic around that and you and I were chatting about that moment and you you brought up this speech by Reagan in one thousand, nine, hundred of the moment where that where that symbolic crash. So you know I think we're. We're both. Using bullhorns barrage more attuned to it, and there's more pushback and were. All out in the open and we're having that conversation as we start to wrap up any sort of final thoughts about how this fits into the nineteen eighty election in general, and then I guess like Reagan's presidency I mean it doesn't the I don't think of the nineteen eighty election as as. One that played out along. Racial. Resentment terms I. Don't think of Reagan's presidency is one that hinged on that. Maybe this force us to rethink his presidency or how do you see this fitting in? Well, it certainly covers the white south for the. Republicans. It kind of corrects the with with the all insisted were right that seventy six was an aberration. south had had been locked up by Nixon and seventy two and Reagan reclaimed it in eighty, eighty, four and Bush again, eighty eight, and so the solid south come solidly. Republican. The Racial Angle is certainly air other certainly real objections of the. Civil Rights leaders have to the Reagan record in the eighties It's not usually something we think of in the four round with his administration, but the certainly their time. Yeah. I mean try to think of this as kind of the kinder gentler racist policies of the Reagan era because what this shows us is his early facility with this kind of dog whistle politics and that.

REAGAN Donald Trump Goldwater Nixon Reagan Wallace Pat Buchanan president Nikki Mississippi Georgia Midwest Angie Maxwell Tau Cheeto Lee Atwater NASCAR twitter Wisconsin Tulsa America
"reagan" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

This Day In Esoteric Political History

07:53 min | Last week

"reagan" Discussed on This Day In Esoteric Political History

"Really struck a lot of civil rights workers at least as an obvious sign that Reagan was trying to to win over white southern conservatives who might have hated the rights. Yeah. I think Goldwater is a really important figure in this conversation because if it's cold water who in nineteen, sixty four says you go hunting where the ducks are and the ducks he saw were not in the black vote he didn't believe that black voters are going to stay with the Republican Party. So what you had to do was go after. The racist white vote and goldwater votes against the Civil Rights Act and he does so with a sort of libertarian instead of an openly racist argument and that gets us on the path both of a southern strategy for the Republican Party to try to pick up white democratic southerners But also why you start to get to this language of states rights. And it's a goldwater himself claims that he's in favor of Immigration and as a book conscious of conservative he says that he favours integration on on a private level. That's all well and good for school children to racist got together. But he says the federal government has no right to force southern states adopt that policy and for segregation. That's all that matter. And that line that he was simply promoting kind of libertarian view of the government couldn't couldn't do is one of the many of his supporters cling to to this day but we have to remember at the time Goldwater was on the ground in places like Mississippi talking to the white citizens councils radio show in nineteen fifty-nine appearing before segregationists audiences applauding strong Thurman for his filibusters against the civil rights acts for his party switch and nineteen sixty four goldwater praises and welcomes him to the GOP of, but he was fine. With segregationist and he had been seeking to get the the George Wallace vote in sixty four, and so it's no surprise that Reagan sixty, the George Wallace vote as you that Mississippi Councilman said in nineteen eighty. I WanNa read the quote in which this phrase appears because I think it's interesting to sort of Parse the context in which it lies. So Reagan says quote I, still believe the answer to any problems lie with the people I believe in states' rights I believe in people doing as much as they can for themselves at the community level and at the private level. And I believe that we've distorted the balance of our government today by giving powers that were never intended in the constitution to that federal establishment. So overall, that's a very rainy sentiment. Right government is, is the problem not the solution to our problems and then you have just this like I, believe in states' rights, you know kind of like wedged in there does that show us that it was really a dog whistle a sort of throwing something out given the particular context and sort of couch with something that maybe he believed or was trying to run on a more fundamental level. General. This is what the context is. Important general sentiment is warm but I think if you read that quote and pictured happening in to A. City Council San Francisco or to a club a businessman in New York it would sound much different but those were accented that crowd said to an virtually all white crowd in rural Mississippi meant something rather different and Reagan knew it and all of his aides after this this speech after Young's announcement after President Carter calls him out for this speech Arto Ebeneezer Baptist, church, and in Atlanta after all. These voices have said, hey, that state's rights phrase is a code word for racism for for segregationist a lot of Reagan's defenders cannot say, oh no no, we didn't mean that at all this wasn't an appeal to segregation. You've got it. All wrong states. Rights is just a general principle believe in of the province that allow the people who are making arguments for Reagan themselves in the past at aborted segregation. So Carroll Campbell who is a representative at the time from South Carolina Republican representative a later becomes the state's first Republican governor in one, thousand, nine, hundred, six, gained fame and nineteen seventy for being the spokesman of group that was trying to slow down. The pace of integration in the south, and so this phrase states rights certainly meant something to Carroll Campbell where they wanted to admit it public at large are not and Reagan already knew he had vulnerability on this issue. So just the week before the Ku Klux Klan had come out and said, hey, this republican platform coming out of this convention looks great to us and Reagan had to disavow the clan sort of endorsement of his candidacy. So this was a high risk. Proposition in some ways because he was leaning into a negative narrative about the campaign already, and that tells you how important it was to him that he got that phrase in there because he knew exactly what he was opening himself up to. But he believed that's how he was going to win the election and a lot of his advisers tell them. You can't go there. You can't make this speech there and he waves them off. He'd been invited down interesting by by Trent. Lott? A who who has his own interesting history of racial baggage and lock into them. This is A. you have to make you have to make an misplace right just to sort of give some of the context of the reaction to this. You know sometimes you use a dog whistle actually hope that only the people who intended for here it and everyone heard this right I mean you look at newspapers immediately jumped on it around the country politicians immediately as you said, you know Carter immediately jumped on it. So it's not like they were trying to pull one over maybe they. were. But it certainly didn't work. It was very clear what they were. They were going for Nikki you mentioned you know the southern strategy, which was basically the Republican Party's electoral strategy to increase support among white voters in the south. You know often by appealing to to racism, we think of that as something that comes up through the fifties sixties seventies should we think of this and then if I if you look at Mississippi and Mississippi voted for Carter in the in the election? Before and actually only ended up voting for Reagan but not that much. So where does this moment and Reagan's candidacy in one thousand, nine, hundred fit into the larger picture of the Southern Strategy Yeah I think one of those things when we talk about this other strategy, people think that like the Civil Rights Act passed and all the sudden the democratic. Party was the party of Civil Rights and the Republican Party was the party of opposition to it and all of the sudden you. Have a solid red south the process of the south becoming Republican takes decades. It doesn't become really Republican until George W Bush in the two thousands I mean if you look at the electoral maps in the nineteen, ninety s at least on a national level changing in different ways on the on the local and state level but like Bill Clinton is drink fine in the south as southern Democratic governor in the nineteen nineties. So this is part of a a long process and Reagan. Again, he's looking for those votes. He knows that they're available. It's been clear since nineteen forty eight when the dixiecrats bolted from the Democratic Party and picked up some of these southern states that that's a real vulnerability in the democratic. Party. So he's fulfilling process that again just is taking decades and and as he said, it really starts right after the dixiecrats of the Republicans are talking about going after the Dixie credit votes, votes of disaffected white southern Democrats and. Picking them off the right after nineteen forty eight. There are all kinds of talks from senator, John Bricker and Senator Carl Malone about combining the conservative Republicans the dixiecrats together maybe in a new party mini the republican name 'cause southerners still associated with civil war. The head of the RMC Goes Down Nineteen fifty, nine to nineteen, fifty, two to Alabama and tells them look dixiecrats Republicans. We believe the same things you guys should vote for our Party. So this Krugman. White Senate Democrats is underway from the forties but as Nikki says, it doesn't really finally complete until they're two thousand. So long process of unwinding at long standing commitment that southern White Tab of the Democratic Party, and it's a process as Merle black and her black have describing really begins Matab down and if.

Reagan Republican Party Goldwater Democratic Party Party President Carter party of Civil Rights Mississippi Nikki federal government Carroll Campbell Ku Klux Klan George Wallace Merle black George W Bush South Carolina Krugman
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

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Thatcherism and Reagonomics: lessons for economic recovery?

Between The Lines

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Thatcherism and Reagonomics: lessons for economic recovery?

"Reaganomics shoot Australia's leaders today draw inspiration from the lady what the? Number is saying, is that he rather the Paul? Provided the Richmond Rich. And should we follow the great communicator commonsense told us that when you put a big tax on something that people will produce less of it. So, we cut the people's tax rates and the people produce more than ever before this week Treasury Freudenberg said the of free market policies associated with Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan could help Australia recover from the COVID recision

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Charlie Kirk: Coronavirus stimulus

The Charlie Kirk Show

28:10 min | 2 weeks ago

Charlie Kirk: Coronavirus stimulus

"And you have Schumer Pelosi. In Biden one hundred twenty five years, Charlie Kirk of failure, unmitigated failure, swap failure and I. Think of my kids. You met my son. He's twenty one years old. My daughter's eighteen and I would think about your America their America and when I say you know, live free or die, American, the world on the brink I'm not joking. And very specifically will be probably the biggest choice election by far in my lifetime, and maybe since eighteen sixty, and there's a lot at stake We can go through the issues if you want, but it's. It's there's there's not one issue we agree on that. I can think of for the most part yet, and you wrote this, and it just really sent chills down my spine. You wrote this book to sound an alarm as a warning. Warning to my fellow patriots about the left's undying commitment turn America into a land, our parents, founders and framers wouldn't recognize it. It's perfectly put, and that's the direction that they're headed on page twenty seven. You have a great part about how Ben Franklin says we ever republic. If you can keep it, can you talk more about how this truly is? A referendum election in some sense and the left is trying to do to our country. Well the the story about Franklin's interesting, because it's, it's the constitutional convention and somebody says he comes out one days, says, is it a monarchy republic republic? If you can keep it Reagan, I quote him off. When I give speeches, said Freedom Charlie and you know this is but one generation away from extinction. And you know when if you want understand if socialism is adopted if their stated goal is adopted America as we know, it then becomes unrecognizable look, I can understand psychologically. There's a component of maybe people that that have been indoctrinated in schools, and you're great at this because you're going in to hostile environments every day, and you're saying you know what there's another way of thinking here, so maybe the idea that people think Charlie that some things are oh, everything's going to be free and they're gonNA forgive my loans at I'll have a guaranteed government job guaranteed government food. How did obamacare workout now? We're GONNA have Medicare for all or or double down on the stupidity of Obamacare and guaranteed retirement. Guaranteed vacation sounds great. But simple math shows you that you'll never get there. And that's why in the Fourth Chapter of the book did this whole history of socialism which is a history of failure? The point is look at the issues. If if we're talking about law and order. They've cited in Portland in Seattle and new. York and Chicago with the radicals. Joe Biden his yet that I know of said one good thing about the ninety nine percent of cops protect and serve and put their lives on the line for us every day. You're right. Okay, so law and order taxes. He's pledging to raise your taxes through the roof. That will destroy the economy Then they're gonNA just add all the bureaucracy. The Donald Trump spent almost four years. Eliminating that'll be gone. That means nobody's GONNA WANNA DO Business. That's why the Biden Obama economy was so bad. Then you look at where now energy independent for the first time in seventy five years with a number, one producer of energy in the world will lose that for sure We'll shut down coal fracking. Oil Gas exploration production those tens of millions of jobs high paying jobs career jobs for people. Then it's about amnesty. Or the United Sanctuary states of America versus Border Security and law and order of never mind foreign policy. We haven't even touched that part yet, so. There's a lot at stake. If those plans stated plans are implemented. America will go down the past you know. The Trash bin of history as Reagan, said Freedom One generation away from extinction we will. It I shudder to think what will happen the three you and your children by kids, and and maybe one day grandkids. ARE READY FOR THAT And I love the framing, because as the founder said either we're GonNa live free and defendant right now, or we're gonNA. Have a country that you know. We don't WanNa live it, and that's really the framing. That is so important right now, and you talk about and I'm really pleased about this. Shawn because I think we have forgotten about the Russia hoax too quickly in. In the conservative movement, you have been the leader on this every night. You were covering it. You didn't let us forget you help. Muller Accountable, you had investigative journalism and it just seemed that an Oxana names, but other conservatives just kind of drifted away from like Oh. That's what happened happened. You have two chapters on this in the book. Can you talk about that? Yeah I mean I call it Charlie, the the biggest corruption abuse of power scandal in history and the Ukraine was oh. Okay, we failed with Muller after three years. We won't. We won't even bother with a special prosecutor not to I'm going backwards here but to get to Ukraine. You? Know they're talking about quid pro quos, but you have to ignore their presidential candidate on video saying you're not getting a billion US tax payer dollars unless you're fire. That prosecutor is named Shokhin. WHO's investigating my son Hunter who went on a and said? Do you have any experience in oil? No Gas, no energy, nope, any experience in Ukraine. Nope, why are you being paid millions? No, because you dad, so there was a quid pro quo and millions of dollars for the Biden I call crime family. That's exactly right, so. Listen and China's even worse. You get to this whole thing what we now know and I believe what's coming. It's like, and this is where the media's corrupt because. They're just the propaganda wing of all things democratic. Socialist. We now know and have all the evidence that we'd ever need is that they protected their favorite candidate. Hillary Clinton. For things you and I and everybody you know that follows you and you have a massive audience would. Literally never get away with. If you had subpoenaed emails Charlie Kirk and you decided to delete them, and you decided to acid. Wash your hard drive with something. I had never heard about bleeped bleach bit and bust up your devices with hammers. You'd go to jail. If you violated the espionage act, you'd go to jail. They protected her. Then the narrative began we now know began in August. We know crossfire hurricane representatives actually went to brief. President Trump General Flynn. Flynn on national security, but they were there to try and get information on trump and Russia, the most amazing part of this, because the Democrats and the media live for all these years is that they knew and they said and they wrote, and they even testified. There was never any evidence, but there was a dirty Russian dossier. And now we know even the New York Times acknowledged full full of Russian disinformation and that was used. And they were warned not to use it, but high ranking people abusing their power, wanting to take out candidate, trump, transition, team, trump, and then deep into the Presidency Donald Trump. They use the dirty Russian misinformation dossier to ruin Carter pages life and roomed his civil liberties and constitutional rights, but more importantly to spy on candidate trump, and then they had their insurance policy. The fact that the mob in the media ignores it is beyond comprehension. I have so I have two chapters. One is on the Russia hoax, and the other is on this whole impeachment witch hunt. And I want everybody in your audience to understand one thing here if I can get one point across. Yeah, they hate Donald Trump, but they hate us more. They think we are as Peter. Struck, said the smell by the way I probably shop at Walmart say money. Why not you have a woman I love Walmart I love COSCO's. I Love I love it all. And I've shopped there my whole life I mean people always stopped me when I'm in a grocery? So, what are you doing here? Shopping? Wa I like to eat a cracks me up. So but think about that. smelly Walmart Shoppers while irredeemable deplorables, wow! Bitter Americans as Obama said that WANNA cling to their God. I'm guilty their Second Amendment Rights Guilty Bibles and religion I'm guilty of that, too. But. It's contempt for your audience. It's contemporary my audience. It's because they knew better. And they will ling. This was an attempted coup. Now do I think there's going to be arrests and prosecutions I? Do spend much slower than any of us would have liked, but the evidence is overwhelming. It's incontrovertible sad actually that this could happen. That was going to be my follow up. Question Sean because when I travel and we get thousands of e mails a on this topic. When are people going to go to jail? And can you give me insight on this? Can you give us any clues any crumbs that we're starting to see from Durham? It's I call them. It's funny. You say crumbs because call them the the Attorney General Bar breadcrumbs. It's like Hansel and Gretel. Remember. We're we're trying to follow and see the trail exactly yeah. He did say that the president was spied on. It did happen illegally. The. Think about this. If you go before Judge Judy I wouldn't WANNA lot because Judge Judy I. I've met her once she'll eviscerate. You I watched her show. You. Don't go before a court. The information that you have not verified. It actually said at the top of a FISO Warren Charlie. It says verified. Okay. We now know the dossier was unverifiable. The sub source we now know, said this this bar talk. We were making this up. This was never meant for anything and again Hillary paid for it funneled money separate issue. And so, what is going to happen I don't have a crystal ball but I. do know all of the facts that are in the public. Are Enough to indict many of the names that your audience is most familiar with. I would argue. Komi McCabe struck page. I'd like to know a clapper. Brennan's role in all of this ends up being and and others. The more fascinating deep question is. Will they get to that January fifth twenty seventeen meeting inside the Oval Office? This is when member Biden said George Stephanopoulos Oh I. Don't know. Anything about this, you know this whole impeachment Russia thing. He was the one same. Bring up the Logan Act fifteen days later Susan Rice in that meeting did the Cya memo the day that Donald Trump was inaugurated. Obama in that meeting shot Sally Age by saying a He. He knew everything about the Kislyak Michael Flynn call. If we look. To sum it up. I think we're GONNA get there because the evidence. Is that overwhelming? If we don't. I fear for the country? Because of you. GonNa Raid Manafort's home predawn raid and you're going to raid Roger Stone's home. For lying to Congress by the all many of the names I mentioned were referred for the same crime and you're gonNA. Pull it twenty nine guys in tactical gear, frogmen and tip off CNN cameras and. Have a biased jury for person. We won't have equal justice and equal application of our laws, and worse than that Charlie is. We lose our constitution. Yes, all our laws are are predicated on next great document and some `perfect, but it creates the path to perfection at a more perfect union so. Long answers. I'M GONNA talk. Show I love it. No, this is what our audience needs to hear, and and thank you for that and look I I completely agree because if we do not have people and I, say this as carefully as I can in handcuffs for what they did Donald Trump then I I will lose faith in the American justice system I. Don't want that and I don't want revenge I don't retribution I want people to be held accountable and I would want the same if someone did this to Barack Obama because it should never happen to a leader ever. Yes. and. They've gone after every single trump friend confidant, and yet if you oppose Donald Trump you get different treatment, talk a lot about the constitution in your book and the founding of our country, Sean going to be honest, I've been very let down by some of these supreme. Court decisions lately Can you comment on that and the importance to get more people like Kavanagh? Who's actually ruled brilliantly? Unlike John Roberts. I! I'm a little. I don't know what's happening. Roberts I have my theory I guess I have my sources people that. have their own ideas based on some knowledge? For whatever reason and I think this goes back to the obamacare decision. He has allowed. How the court appears to influence his decision making. I also sense with no evidence whatsoever. You're not a big fan of president trump, but that should not come into his thinking. Now. If getting rid of bureaucracy and lowering taxes and energy, independence, and securing our borders, and law and order are all part of this election. Let me tell you another big part of it. And it's you know we're taping this ninety. Whatever days away from the Election Day, I what about and we got asked. What about the Supreme Court? Yes, I go through a whole list I. Forget what paid maybe sixty seven I forget. A. In the book. Of. All the things Democrats would do if they're getting power one, is they? WanNa, stack the courts. Get rid of the Electoral College. And I. What, they're saying they. WanNa do is scary. They used to hide it Charlie. When I every single Liberal Democrat running for office, they would run to the left in the primary. They race back to the center, but you knew they wanted the left. There now openly embracing the most radical elements in the country and you know. Unfortunately we're watching it all. Play out nightly on TV and and that sad what I see happening when I think we have to remind a trump supporters that these are not trump appointed justices, a gorsuch I think ruled incorrectly on one ruling. That's it besides that gorsuch and cavenaugh have been tremendous and terrific verses Roberts. I just think we have to give the audience a sense. Sense of continued conviction that the trump appointed justices will continue to rule correctly and Clarence. Thomas and you know the the Thomas Family. They get no credit at all. I mean what he has done. And can you comment on that? 'cause I, E, you've actually been you open my eyes to that like eight years ago and I never learned about Clarence Thomas as a high schooler until you I mentioned it just as a quick aside on his incredible career. I like to do on TV and antidote on radio, too. Sometimes I call it the Hannity history, lesson 'cause I lived through all of this. I know this is going to see. You're not even thirty three, but my radio journey started in nineteen eighty-seven crazy right. Now on my twenty fifth year of Fox, I didn't think I last two. So I feel very blessed. As a side note if you haven't read my grandfather's son. Which is about Clarence Thomas is life. It's amazing. But. You know it's interesting because him and Scalia. To my opinion, my to most favorite justices in my lifetime. Scalia this incredible wit and genius and understanding and. They got a little acerbic side to when when he was questioning Clarence Thomas always set by quietly. What they called a high tech lynching at the time, the more modern. Let it. You gotTA. Remember Yeah. And you know. It was then Senator Ted Kennedy you know Robert Bork's America the borking of America. That was Clarence Thomas. Now we see it more recently cavenaugh. It exposes. The, who is Joe Biden? Who is his team? Because Clarence Thomas and Justice Scalia or the people we need on that court. We call them constitutionalists or originalists, the original intent, not people that would sight foreign law as liberal justices have done or not people that feel that they can rule by judicial Fiat and dictate or legislate from the bench. Democrats always wanted the court to do that which they could never. Do legislatively or win at the ballot box and that's why they want. We call them. Activists Justices Clarence Thomas. has shown a fidelity to the Constitution at the Antony Scalia. That is beyond enviable And the differences styles always interesting, too because Justice Thomas will always be quiet. That's very few questions. Anthony Scalia was in there in a wrestling with people. I don't know about John Roberts. I can't get into it, but I do believe the next president United States is a very good chance. You have a lot of older justices may want to retire. And I think that the next this election in just three short months. That's on the ballot and that's that's generational now. And Sean I think we have to pressure the Biden campaign to do what trump did and release a list of justices I mean president trump was so transparent and Joe Biden hasn't done it yet. Intentionally, of course, because he'll probably put repeated to lieber something on the United States Supreme Court I mean as horrifying as that might be so in two two quick closing question Sean and thank you for being so generous with your time anchorage, everyone you know. Know go by live, free or die. the first is this. Can you just talk about? We are heading into the election. A lot of trump supporters. They're failed. They're falling victim. They suppression pulse I wish that wasn't the case, but it seems like the memory of two thousand sixteen as faded where people forget. We were down by double digits. Can you just give a little vote of confidence to some of our listeners out there? That think we're just losing. I WANNA. Give the vote of confidence, but I want people to feel this way. I want people to think I'll use a football analogy that our mutual friend Linda that you know. Who's your biggest fan? My radio producer? He's amazing. Amazing, but she doesn't even know how many points you get a touchdown, so I'm giving these football analogies. I, want this election. I want people to feel the way I feel which is. We're on our own twenty. Two minutes to go. We have no time outs We're down by six. We got a cross. The plane marched down the field, cross the plane and hit the extra point to win. So if people feel a sense of genuine urgency and worry and concern, I'm cool with that because fear often as a great motivator, not irrational field fear, but if people do not vote, you will get the government that they're telling you. They're going to give you believe. That that is their agenda. To be a Republican and win. You GotTa always use this analogy got to run the table I gotTA. Get Florida Georgia North Carolina can't win without Ohio. No Republican's ever become president without it right? You got hold Iowa then you got pick off Pennsylvania Wisconsin hopefully Michigan maybe MINNEA- Minnesota will be play. Maybe the city of Arizona will be in play. By Joe Biden reference for those of you. That didn't get. We got a hold Arizona Gopher Nevada New Mexico. New Hampshire and Maine's second congressional district. If every single mom, this is a battle cry. You started out this interview with this. I wrote this book not because I like writing books. My last book I donated every Penny I made to charity I don't care. It's not that. This is a tipping point. Charlie this is I, don't. See if these policies are implemented how America recovers. Irreparable harm the to the rule of law to our courts to our economy, they want to wipe out the lifeblood of of the world's economy. This this promise of socialism and I go into such detail about how it's always failed. Here's a quick socialism of example. Member obamacare. Keep your doctor keep your plan. Save on average twenty five hundred dollars a year per family right? Okay. Millions lost their doctors. Millions lost their plans. We're all paying about two hundred percent more and add to that. Forty percent of Americans almost forty percent have only one obamacare Biden Carriage James Choice now. How did they do with that promise? Medicare is going broke. How did they do it? That promised social security. Charlie hate the break this here. He paying into it. You probably won't get it I. Barely Skate through, and they might give me ten cents until they means tested and then take it back, How does it? How did Liberal government work in New York City with all the anarchy cutting a billion dollars, so please? How's IT WORKING IN CHICAGO? All. These liberal cities have where the violence we've been talking about takes place. They all have one thing in common. They've been run by Liberal Democrats for decades right. Most of these states have been run into the ground by Liberal Democrats for decades. If you WANNA know what America will look like if Biden Bolshevik Bernie. Pelosi Schumer and Bozo. That team gets place look at new. York state and city look at Chicago the City Illinois. The State Look at California. Look at Oregon. Look at Portland, the city. Look at Seattle. Look at the state of Washington. Yes. And I. Love this country too much. You know it's an all hands on deck moment and Every everyone of you've got this connection with younger people in this country. You have this incredible. A credible platform you built, and it's become powerful and meaningful and transformative to the country, and you're going out there, and you're fighting on these college campuses and you. You know it's not easy to be in the middle of a I call it a shift. Show all the time, but let's well put, but you do it. And it's freedom works. Every time you give up freedom for security, you lose your freedom because the security that they're offering. These promises that can never ever be fulfilled. In America. The land. I'll close with this unless you want to go further I can keep going the. Barry Farber who was a mentor of mine. Just recently passed away like ninety ninety one. And he always said there's never been a country in the history of mankind that has accumulated more power and abused at less than the United States well I add. A country in the history of mankind that has accumulated more power abused at less, but used it to advanced human condition. The reason America is great and exceptional. If I can say that today, it's not perfect, but it's great. An exceptional is because of its people, and because of the fundamentals of liberty and freedom. So that? Natural rights versus government or rights, natural rights come from God doubt by our Creator. Life Liberty pursuit of happiness while you can't pursue happiness these days in Chicago New York Moreland Seattle. So there's a lot on the line. I love your audience. I'm so thankful for all you're doing, and you've got a great team that you building review and you're out there fighting the fight and I just urge you guys. Just fight like your country depends on it. Because America's, we know it. It's all hanging in the balance. Yet was Sean. You've been so generous the last quick thing I defend the president all the time personally as a person. Can you comment on that because I've had the opportunity to meet him? not as much as you obviously and get to know him, but a lot of people here misrepresentations in lies about who he is as a human being. Let's close on this note. Can you just mention one or two things that that people can take away from that? You know first of all. It's interesting. Nobody seems to understand Donald trump yet. They don't want to understand. I mean Donald Trump. The Dog Bites the beasts, things you feeling sad or get cancer. You Complain Trump. I mean that's how saying the leftist. But here's a guy that is so unique he this guy is like a soon nami force of energy like I've never met my life. The most distinct and unique quality he's had is as president. You mentioned the Supreme Court. He put those people that he said he put. He cut the bureaucracy as he said he'd caught, and he cut the taxes as he said he'd cut. He did the North Dakota. A keystone pipelines Anwar Likey said he would. He's building the wall or almost four hundred miles. A wall by the by election will be over four hundred miles. He found a way it was. It was an uphill climb He said he wanted to pull us out of foreign conflicts, but not back away from evil defeated. The Caliphate took out. Baghdadi and Associates took out Sola Mani took out the Al. Qaeda leader in Yemen. So? What makes him special and unique in terms of presidency is that he is who you see is who you get. The guy that's fights on twitter is the guy that's fighting for a better trade. Deal the guy that fights. Against Liberal Democrats and the media mob is the same guy is fighting to keep his promises that to me makes him the most unique transformative political figure in our lifetime. And Right now. The. We tip the scales. You have a choice. It's never been a bigger choice. He will keep his promises. Coronas been a little bit of a curve ball to the world, but even that ten days after the first case, the only guy that I know of thought about a travel ban will be donald trump. They were teaching at the time and Joe Binder Biden was call them Sinophobic, so he's a man of his word. He's a man that will fight to his last dying breath for this country and the promises he made, and that makes them in my view very transformative. Men will. The book is live for Your Die God bless you, Sean, thank you for that. You do and we really appreciate. It helps you soon. Thanks bye. What a great conversation that was! Please email me or questions freedom. Charlie Kirk Dot Com freedom at Charlie. KIRK DOT COM please type in trolley. Kirk, show your podcast provider. Hit subscribe, give us a five star reviews screen shot at an email us. If you want to win a signed copy of the Maga- doctrine, please get involved with turning-point USA at Teepee USA dot com that is Teepee USA DOT com. Check out divest you. Dot Com if you want to divest some of. Of your dollars from the sinister backwards malevolent higher education cartel check out our professor watchlist, professor watchlist, dot org professor, watchlist dot Org. We have some incredible new additions that you do not want to miss of radicals that are teaching your children right now to hate. America is professor watchlist dot org email me directly freedom at Charlie Kirk Dot Com your ideas and questions. You want me to ask our guests here on the Charlie Kirk show. Thank you guys so much for listening. So next time God bless.

Donald Trump America Joe Binder Biden President Trump Charlie Kirk Sean United States Warren Charlie Barack Obama Russia Chicago Liberal Democrats Seattle Clarence Thomas John Roberts Reagan Biden Obama Trump General Flynn Hillary Clinton York
Professor Mohammad Fadel Returns to Discuss the Current Political Climate

Diffused Congruence: The American Muslim Experience

08:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Professor Mohammad Fadel Returns to Discuss the Current Political Climate

"BOCOM professor frontal a really happy to have you on I know you've been on the show in the past prior to when I joined when we had different co host, but I did over the weekend a that episode I think he was episode thirty, three, thirty, four from summer, two thousand sixteen, and I listened to it just to catch up and hear a little about Your your background and your points of view. Is a super interesting. kind of got me thinking of of all the craziness that that's happened. Since two thousand sixteen, right life has been crazy in general since maybe nine eleven you could say but We've kicked it into high gear since the trump election, and now of course everything that's going going on with the virus of macro level. But It's like I said it's been crazy year. And you explain the rise of trump through economics, and that really that really resonated with me. You were talking about how things have gotten global and whatnot, and because there's more supply and demand you talked about more more more supply of workers may be flat or left Earth's or lower demand of of of jobs in the capital, potentially for the for the lower class. things have only gotten worse right so. Do you see. Do you see that that pattern continuing and potentially leading to more and more extremism or are you? Are you hopeful? Well I mean. covid changed a lot of things. So I mean. So let me back up I. Guess Trump from the beginning. Began to charge reorient trade policies began posing lots of openly protectionist measures. And then Cova conflict celebrated that. And layer on top of that a certain kind of anti Chinese Stanton. That Kobe has reinforced. That was already pre existing. and. So now. Yeah was situation where there's a kind of broad consensus among the political class that something has to be done about China. Now it's not clear what that will mean. In terms of global trade, because the global trading system is highly dependent on Chinese purchase patient, but as you, you know just in the last few months atop has been ratcheting up the pressure on China Army Right now trae closing council it's. Posing greater greater sanctions on Chinese tech firms, etc, odds greater confrontations with China in the in the South China Sea among other things. and then coverted has caused a lot of people that make me. We need to bring back a lot of production of things back to the United States. Now I don't know how realistic that. Ambition is particularly if it's more than a few products that might be viewed as critical in the public health emergency. but the General Point that I made twenty sixteen I think about global economics remains the case today. That is of great benefit in the aggregate to the United States. Particularly United States but at the same time there are a lot of losers from globalization The trump response to bat has been to try to engage protectionism. In a in a certain sense kind of change, the terms of trade in a way that slanted the United States by imposing tariffs on trading partners now United States can get away without just an extent because the united. States has such a leading role in the global economy, no country. Wants to be excluded from the US market. So they are. Willing to go along, and there's very limited steps that they can take in the short term. To retaliate against the US, the problem is. Over the medium to long term. States wants to take that approach to global trade. It's likely that it's going to produce. Reactions, right! You might see a rise of different kind of trading bloc centered around China for example centered around Europe right in which other countries enter into our French trading relationships with each other. To protect themselves in the United States. You also see this going on with the role of the dollar. Nice, as has been very aggressive in using the role of the dollar as the world's reserve currency to impose sanctions, Willy Nilly, all over all over the world thereby effectively. Telling the rest of the world that if you want to trade with us, you can have to adopt our sanctions regimes. and so even places like the EU or trying to build out. Heyman systems that can bypass the dollar right so they can escape the kind of US stranglehold on the global, market! So our costs while twice as there are costs involved to trying to either export you use US economic our to impose its will in terms of geopolitics with the dollar or with Tariffs Charles. Trade. In order to protect US workers. There's a much easier route. which I would like to see A. Dog! And it's possible it could happen. If there's a large enough democratic featuring, remember namely we preserve the gains of the post. World War Two liberalize trading system, but combine it with a much higher level of taxation. That would allow the government to redistribute the gains from International Trade and compensate the losers. What we've had going on the United States since the Reagan Revolution is a double whammy to the working class in that. Global. Association has undermined security jobs on the one hand and I guess conservative. mark pro-market policies domestically destroyed the the welfare state internally. Right. And so. Yeah, you have cheap TV's. Education is unbelievably expensive. Helped expensive. Real estate is on XP. Unbelievably expensive right. So. The most fundamental goods are outside the reach of the average worker, even even professionals right. consumption goes are really cheap an audit it feels like the current administration is doing if you look at the two by two of of what you just laid out right like less less fairness, and Lester is redistribution, more fans, smartest redistribution, globalization versus nationalism that the current administration is going towards nationalism without fairness, and you want to go towards globalization, which is good for everybody in the long run plus Mauri, distribution and fairness. Strategy of trump and Publican party is to. Push back against globalization where the United States does not have apparently advantage by using tariffs. Right. And then imposing. Her fragile trading charms on its trading partners where it does. And then instead of we distribute Gel redistributionist policy to to. Income! WHAT THEY WANNA do is used tariffs to protect its France.

United States China Bocom Donald Trump South China Sea Professor China Army International Trade EU Tariffs Charles Kobe Willy Nilly Europe France Heyman Lester
Ep. 008: Hedrick Smith talks grassroots democratic reform & reclaiming the American Dream - burst 02

Citizen Reformers

02:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Ep. 008: Hedrick Smith talks grassroots democratic reform & reclaiming the American Dream - burst 02

"Edrich. How did we get here? Well you know I have to tell him like eleven following American Politics American economics for about five decades and I really watched both the political system and the economic system victory over that time in economics, the things really began to change in the eighties early eighties. From World War Two until the end of the seventies. When the economy grew the middle class standard of living rose with it. You can see him almost move in tandem all levels of society moved up together but then we started to get what they call shareholder capitalism maximum return to shareholders. Wages tended to get frozen. They got stagnant. The middle class of living deteriorated wealth got concentrated. The top one percents the top point went percents top point zero, zero, one percent, and then you had a bunch that happened in the economy partly because of shareholder capitalism, we can talk about that. But also because of the way the tax system was changed huge tax cuts. Under Ronald Reagan under George Bush on Donald Trump for the wealthy added about five trillion dollars five trillion dollars to the wealth of the people at the top end added to the insecurity of the middle class people not knowing whether or not. They could afford their retirement, send their kids to college of for their homes, make it from month to month, and at the same time that was happening a lot of that money was spilling into the political system. So you had the increase. Influence of mega donors, corporate money, and billionaire money particularly since the Citizens United Decision in January twenty ten by the Supreme Court which has given just a free pass to unlimited amounts of money and you've seen the amount of money skyrocket wing go into that. and. That's really affected the political system and the other thing is the party differences have hardened.

Ronald Reagan Supreme Court Donald Trump George Bush
Trump's tanking in the polls

Campaign HQ with David Plouffe

21:39 min | 3 weeks ago

Trump's tanking in the polls

"Anzalone, welcome to campaign HQ David Blah always good to hear your voice. Yeah, you and I met I back in Iowa back in the eighties, not to date ourselves, but the answer. Let me start with this. Let's talk about swing voters for minute. Obviously Joe Biden is doing. Incredibly well in public polls I'd assume he's also doing well in your own polling correct. Yeah I think that it's fair to say that. We're seeing a lot of what the public polls are showing that you know. This is in some ways I. Mean you've seen you've been through a lot of presidential campaigns, and as you said, we've been in this together for over thirty years, so we've seen a lot of historical data and quite frankly what we're seeing right in the public bowls and internal is. Is pretty historic right, so let's start with what we might consider. The Swing Voter Side of the ledger, and then we'll talk about some of the turn out registration targets, so you know you have been part of campaigns world. We Lost White Seniors by twenty points. We a static. You guys right now. white seniors or tied of which means with seniors overall your head. Talk about that like why is that? How much of that do you think it'd be maintained over the next fifteen weeks? I think that there's a couple of things you know. When we take a look at swing, voters There's actually like four really important groups that. You know everyone wants to compare how Biden's doing public Poland's with Hillary but what's really interesting about key group set of moved from sixteen. Is that Biden's not only doing much better and leading in most polling with Voters over sixty five, but he's leading with suburbanites. He's leading with independence, and he's leading with college voters, and so those are like four really important groups that not only did trump win, but is you know Romney won right and so listen? These presidential candidates. Have Different coalition I mean people like to talk about the Obama coalition in. It's important. But Biden's coalition, GonNa look different and clearly part of this started in two thousand, eighteen where we saw suburban women Super White Women College Educated Women but also college educated men really move. I mean take a look at Gretchen Whitmer who is a a a client of ours in places like Oakland County Right She also wanted to Comb County Reagan Democrats which is interesting, which also biting one in the primary, so we're seeing these swing. Voters these groups that Biden is bringing around that is different than the coalitions that we've seen. Seen in the past while at the same time narrowing margins within the Republican base with white voters and also rural voters, and keeping on par with our democratic base, right with young voters in women, and so You know when you, of course you know two thousand eight you. You saw this I. Mean when you are moving, and you have a moment, or if you sustain that moment, you tend to do well almost everywhere, meaning that even in the Republican base voters, rural voters and things like that, you tend to narrow the margins, and they're on margins. In tough places. Is just as important as doing well in some of these other swing areas. Now just specifically unseen Yars I. Listen, you know we see trump's jump rating just getting worse and worse on handling the coronavirus eppendorf pandemic clearly seniors Vulnerable the most at risk, and I think they're reacting directly to that risk in terms of feeling like he didn't get serious enough. He didn't listen to medical experts. He didn't have a plan and now with the kind of the surge feel like he's put his head in the sand and I think it's just cost him dearly with that largest age bracket the motor sixty five, and over the last Democratic presidential candidate to win sixty five and over. Is Al Gore so that Kinda gives you an idea. Of! How important this is! Yeah, reminded. Every election is its unique beast so on whether it's seniors suburban voters, you mentioned both college educated women and men Joe Biden right now, doing extremely well. Two questions for you John Do you think he's close to his ceiling there and the job really for your campaign is to maintain those numbers. Do you think there's room to grow? And secondly just how durable do think it is? Do you think that some of these voters are already locked in and is going to be really hard for trump to dislodge them? You get a feeling that where we are today. is very difficult for trump and listen first of all we should say we. We all have a collective PTSD right from two thousand sixteen, and so none of us are getting overseas, but at the same time you know you have to acknowledge the good polls because you know, there's a couple of things that are different from where Joe Biden is from past democratic nominees, including Barack Obama and and twelve. In that, he's also at fifty percent. Right at this point in time whatever what hundred four days and you know there's been no Democrat or Republican candidate you go all the way back to two thousand who's reached that threshold and so you know that's really import. The other part is is that Joe. Biden isn't scary to voters. I mean that's one reason he's leaving with independence. And if you take a look at I don't know the NBC Paul I think is is a good example or one of the most recent ones where I think it's the Fox foxhole. We're Biden is actually above water popularity. Naturally trump is underwater, but trump's very unfavorable is at forty seven percents, and binding I. Think is at thirty one. There's win been one thing that I think when they write about Joe Biden in the primary and the general election is the stability of his vote, right? It really hasn't moved that much. I mean trump's has moved down during the primary I mean. We're biden kind of started at the beginning. He ended at the end. It was very stable. Other people moved all around, but Joe Biden was incredibly stable and I think. Think that we're GONNA see that same dynamic here and we have really in the last several months. The Joe Biden's vote has been incredibly stable it's in a couple of points to the fifty percent mark. trump has moved down right and that is that is a good thing but the stability is important for Joe Biden. One is how voters view him and to how voters view trump. You know there was the I think it was the B. Poll that showed fifty percent of voter said there was no chance at all that they would vote for trump, and so your question is you know, will biden's numbers remain stable, and there just seems to be a universe of voter that is completely cut off from trump and it's because of how people you him prior. Let's think about this. Let's dissect prior to the pandemic. People you know we always heard the same thing. Whether it was you know for for Biden. Her for US Senate race for a congressional race. Is that people disliked? His behavior is tweeting his bowling. He was a jerk They basically just didn't like him as a human being, but hey, you know it's not like some of his agenda and his policies. They like how he took on. The median shook things up in Washington, DC. Now they're problem with him. Is Not only behavior how he reacted in a protest and things like that doubling down. Of Racism but their main problem is. Is that they feel that he failed the leadership test on the three crises, whether it was the health and crisis, whether it was the police brutality protests crisis, and now the economic crisis, which is hurting his economic numbers, and so they're now viewing him His biggest problem isn't just his behavior which they haven't forgotten. It's his lack of leadership or his mishandling of these crisis, so three and a half years in their judging him president. President. They're not judging him as a personality. That is his biggest problem right now, and you know I don't think that you know that's going to change. I think that we have a couple more crises potentially coming very soon, college kids and K. through twelve kids start going to school and mid August and you know it's GonNa be It's going to be really a a really tense time. I think it's GonNa. Be a problem for a lot of communities, a lot of states, a lot of holds and that is the problem. They're going to squarely put. On trump because he didn't take this series at the beginning, you didn't listen to medical experts. He didn't have a plan. And that's a problem I mean. We have more crises coming quite frankly. Yeah, now that's that's a great point and your point about his very under favorable I mean if he's sailing into voting time in late September and October with forty seven percent, unfavorable lombardo grounds He's really up against a wall there so John. I, think one of the mistakes. Sometimes you can make whether it's politics. Are Businesses your opponent? Your competition does something puts. Puts out, an ad or new strategy and you know you're like well. That's dumb and of course I've learned like you better. Take a minute and think through why they think it's smart right, but on this suburban thing what what strikes it's almost like trump got a briefing saying you're hemorrhaging the suburbs and he's like Ooh I. Know what I'll say. I'M GONNA say Joe Biden is going to destroy the so like. Do you see any evidence that that tactic which seems to be front and Center for trump, and his campaign now has any chance of succeeding. Listen I think that you know you and I have been through a lot of campaigns, and when you're in a campaign where you're behind, and you're behind eight or ten points, what do you do you just kinda start throwing things at the wall and he tends to throw things at the wall I. Mean You know in one week? He's hitting us on. China I mean all paid TV the next week. He's in his on. You Know Nafta now. Now, he didn't on defunding the police and so they try a lot of different things out right but the fact is is that trump was up on TV in the battleground states for a couple of months prior awesome. You sure what the number is, but I think it's close to fifty million dollars. We never saw the numbers. Move I. Mean you see that in the public calling right? I mean our numbers actually got better. His numbers got worse even though he was on TV by himself and very high levels as well as with his allies, and so you know now. We're on TV. So now we're in a position to you. Know have our own message. Ever Own Voice of voters see what Biden's about What's his agenda and his vision and again we don't see any deterioration a matter of fact, if the last ten days are any indication and again we don't you know. We don't get over our skis on this but the. The. Number of polls have showed this in double digits. is a good place to be. It doesn't mean that we're not gonNA work hard doesn't mean we don't take anything for granted. We know that we just gotTa fight for every vote and we know that it's going to get closer because that's what thing, but that's just. The natural physics of presidential races but I think that again it goes to the opponent meaning Joe Biden. clearly isn't Hillary Clinton. You were talking about very unfavorable in two thousand sixteen. Trump's very unfavorable was forty seven percent, and Hillary's was forty five percents, so there was a lesser of two evils dynamic. Going on, you always see this kind of analysis of what they call double haters, people who dislike both candidate. Well you can't call them double haters this time because they are. They hate trump, but they just kinda just like Joe. Biden are they dislike politics? Right is so his very unfavorable with that group is you know literally I? Think it's a quarter of trump's, and he wins that group by forty plus points depending on the pulled that you see, and that's actually really important again. They don't see Joe Biden scary. They see him as a compassionate relatable. Guy you know they keep the fact that he's lunch Pail Joe and he's a guy. WHO's GONNA look out. For Working Families and he is, you know someone that one. The trump and their allies throw punches. you know they? They're not sticking like their sticking and past presidential campaign. Right, so I WANNA. Talk about filling in the blanks on Joe. Biden, what you guys have started to do, but I want on I. WanNa talk about battlegrounds from and so you made an important point. which is you know when you've got momentum? Momentum in a campaign particularly national campaign. You see you see you see progress everywhere. It's just not in a particular state or region, so I a couple of questions one. Are you seeing with swing voters in particular? Are you seeing the same strength for Joe Biden in the south in the Midwest and the West and I guess secondly I would've thought. Let's say ninety days ago hundred twenty days ago, trump's floors, floor and battlegrounds. Forty six. It looks like it may be lower. So what do you think is I? Mean I agree with you that you know when you see a poll right now. That shows Biden fifty forty. You know the other ten percents gotta go somewhere. And you know probably more of that comes to trump it goes to you guys because you're bumping up against a pretty pretty good and healthy ceiling, but I'm curious kind of what where? Where you see both, is there uniformity in terms of the movement across the country and secondly kind of? Where do you see trump's floor now? Yeah, well, I do think that there's again. We you know you can talk about Joe Biden's feeling, but really when you look at it, historically all the way back to two thousand is just presidential candidates ceilings I mean there's not a lot of presidential candidates who've gotten over fifty percent. Who won right and so the fact that we're in this divided country and there are third party. Candidates who siphoned off universe. Hopefully it won't be as much as two thousand sixteen, and we don't think that it will be but the ceiling is is is almost as close to fifty or a little above for almost everyone right I mean that just kinda historically has how it's happened. Happened in the battleground states like you, you say whether it's Michigan Pennsylvania Wisconsin Florida Arizona I, mean he's having trouble getting to the mid forties right I, mean he in places like Michigan and Pennsylvania in Wisconsin in the real clear politics or the fivethirtyeight average of polls, he stood at forty, one and forty two percent now Florida in Arizona and in North Carolina or Kinda GonNa Act like Florida. And North Carolina in Arizona, they're they're always going to be tighter. Right I mean like Scott Ours no always says Florida tight and that's true now we haven't. You in a lead that's above the margin of error. That hasn't happened very often. That, you and I have done enough Florida. politics polling to know that that is a state that tends to tighten up again. I think that we have. An advantage there because of how we're doing with seniors, and we're competing David I. Mean you know it's like this campaign is going to look a lot like you to you like two thousand eight because of where we're competing? The balanced expansion. In the media markets in Florida, well, where do you WanNa? See I mean I. Remember Two thousand like it was yesterday we were. We were up on TV at high levels. Competing with McCain wear Panama City Talahassee. Jacksonville Gainesville, we were fighting the fight in the panhandle. Right and you know. I mean protect protect I four and all that type of stuff. You GotTa do well Miami Dade Palm Beach etc, but when you see a campaign competing against the Republican in the Republican areas That's what you gotTA. Do to win a place like Florida, and a lot of campaigns often have to make the cost benefit analysis, or make the bad decisions, and this campaign, because it's been under great leadership and the reason, a lot of money gives you the ability to run the race. You need to run to win, right? So I want to just ask you quickly third party because you mentioned it and you live through this horror in two thousand sixteen, where trump could win states like Wisconsin with forty seven point two percent of the vote because the third party vote share was. Higher than historical averages right now in your research and it seems to be true in public research. You're seeing that those numbers may revert more to two percent or less that we've gotten used to write, and that's huge because your ceiling is higher than trump's. I would guess at this point right and so I think that I think that this is how I look at that and you know I mean when you pull when you add third party candidates two point, they always get more on the pole than they actually do on election day right I mean. That's just kind of the dynamic, and so you know you have to. You have to test things a bunch of different ways. But I think there's one thing that we all kind of instinctively know that in two thousand sixteen. There were how a lot of voters Bernie voters etc. WHO stayed at home? WHO VOTED FOR GARY? Johnston voted for Jill Stein and ninety nine percent of them who vote did one of those three things were ninety nine percent. Sure that Hillary Clinton was going to be president, and so they were doing a protests about. those voters now know what's at stake. And they're You know their their enthusiasm. If you will to get vote or get, trump out of office is incredibly high. It's an incredibly intense, and so I think that that dynamic and quite frankly Bernie Sanders and his campaign and the Joe Biden and his campaign have worked together on a plethora of issues. will make the dynamics here much different so we don't see that bleed, and and internally we see we see that you know. Joe Biden just has better with Bernie Voters Than Hillary Clinton did in two thousand sixteen well does tighten up. That's going to be such an important dynamic. So, You mentioned You know the Biden campaign. has a very expansive electoral map again. Something we might not have expected months ago. and you know those are pretty weighty decisions. You're involved in those decisions with General. Molly Dylan and Donald other leadership in the campaign, but John when you think about the places that look now plausible. Not Win them, but you know Georgia in other poll out in Texas today publicly had Biden Upright one Ohio Iowa those are likely not going to be in. My view is two hundred seventy electoral vote, but do you think there's a scenario where you could get surprise? Where maybe you don't win in north, Carolina and Georgia, or is there really a stack ranking on these states? Well as you know, there's always a stack ranking and you were at the you know. Know Genesis in two thousand twelve of analytics right, and so there's a there's a lot of simulations things that you know you and I didn't learn about growing up in this business and there's and there's tipping points, states and things like that. I think that at the end of the day again. The leadership of this campaign is incredibly focused and disciplined, and you can see where we're buying TV. It's public and it's always you know reported on. You know we're very focused on the six battleground states, and you know until you know, they move on to another state. We will be focused on those six states in a very disciplined way, because that is the ball game I think that what's difficult for trump is that he's not only communicating in those six days. He is playing defense right now in Ohio and Iowa, so he is spending a lot of money in Ohio in Iowa. Just protecting himself he's also up in Nevada right, which I don't understand, but you know, right. Right and so she's the one that is actually expanding a lot of money. and I can't say in an undisciplined way. He is in trouble, so he has to expand his hip protected. He has to expand but right now. the Joe Biden campaign is very disciplined and very focused and you know will there be expansion states. You know there's a big map on the wall just like there is you know in two thousand, eight and twelve and sixteen, but you gotta be careful, and you have to be very analytical about doing that.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Hillary Clinton JOE Bernie Voters TA Florida President Trump David Blah Iowa Romney Al Gore Ptsd Gretchen Whitmer Bernie Sanders Poland Senate
Washington D.C.-area forecast: Hot today, and turning hotter the next few days

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:53 min | 3 weeks ago

Washington D.C.-area forecast: Hot today, and turning hotter the next few days

"Draper with us tonight. And Amelia, You've got one heck of a hot forecast force from the weekend. Exactly, Shawn. We're talking about dangerous heat moving in for the weekend, especially Sunday and then staying dangerously hot Monday Tuesday, potentially even Wednesday as well. I've also been mentioning that isolated storm chance here throughout the afternoon and evening hours on W. G. O P and seeing that materialized now into parts of southern Maryland down into Charles County, saying some really heavy rainfall just to the south of the low Plato area. Ah lot of lightning as well starting to develop so we could see some heavy rain, some strong, gusty winds out around the Hughes Ville. Sorry. This does look like it's slowly moving on into ST Mary's and potentially portions of Calver and the southernmost point of Prince George's County, so some isolated storms out there Tonight. Most of us do look to stay dry with blows, though, on ly in the seventies area wide high temperatures tomorrow warming into the middle Upper nineties. Humidity levels are slightly lower compared to today. That being said, though our heat index tomorrow afternoon, it's still above 100 degrees, and then Sunday afternoon, Middle Upper nineties and tropical Community make our heat index feel like 100 to 107 degrees, so we could certainly have a heat advisory out there as we look to Sunday and then Monday if we hit 100 which I am Gore casting, it will be the first time Reagan National has hit 100 in almost four years. The last time was in August over 2016. Since scattered lately. Thunderstorms are possible Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday as well with the extreme heat and humidity in the area. But again with the Moving in. This is that you want to take seriously drinking lots of water, taking frequent breaks, avoiding long hours outdoors. That thing said currently temperatures across the area right now. Bigger sounded 91 95 degrees in Arlington, and we're at 93 leaves for for alright, alright, thanks thanks

Charles County Hughes Ville Draper Amelia Calver Shawn Arlington Gore Prince George Maryland Reagan W. G. O P
Newt Gingrich and the Start of an Era

The Book Review

05:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Newt Gingrich and the Start of an Era

"This feels like an episode out of like not just a recent. It's not the recent past. Past the distant past I mean newt is still with us, but this is a very different time for newt, and I think that for many people he started to really appear on People's radars outside of Georgia in the early ninety s with a contract for America, but your book predates that so the book starts in the Nineteen Eighties when you Gingrich. Is this young? Young Congressman who comes from Georgia. He's elected in Nineteen, seventy eight, and any comes to Washington ready to just tear everything down to shake things up to do whatever necessary to help. Republicans become a majority in the House of Representatives which they had not been since nineteen fifty four, and he's intent on a not listening to senior members of the Party and to really. Really taking on the Democrats in ways that they had not been comfortable with, and so he makes a name for himself very quickly, even though he's not part of the leadership in the early eighties. Okay, so you're a history. Professor Newt Gingrich Thought of himself as a history professor and was a history professor, but what exactly did he teach? How did his academic career? Career fit in with his political career well, he received his PhD until Lane. After attending undergraduate school in Emory and Gingrich wrote his dissertation on Belgian colonialism, and he wrote about how and why colonial government had failed to modernize local education and nurture an elite that was capable of sustaining economic growth, and what was remarkable about the dissertation in retrospect, which is what he spent. Spent his academic time on was that he was critical of the design of Belgian policies, rather than on the merits of colonialism, which were much less interest to him, but but that wasn't really his his main focus. I mean as soon as he gets to West Georgia College. That's his first job as a professor. He's deeply uninterested in the academic life I think in. In his first year as a professor, he applies to be the president of the university. He then wants to be share the department and he's impatient with the slowness of academia He quickly gains a thirst for the life of politics, and that's really what engages him, and in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy four. He decides to run against the incumbent in his district. District John Flint who's an old southern Democrat. What are nudes politics like growing up? Because he conservative early on, and did his conservative ideology remained consistent throughout his life. Yeah, he comes from a working class family. The family's originally from Harrisburg. His father left his mother while she was pregnant with him, so he didn't have much of a relationship with him. He is raised. primarily by his stepfather, who's in the military, so Gingrich spends a lot of his youth travelling around. He's what we call an Army Brat, and lives in different places in Europe before the family finally settles in Georgia, which is the final stop? He's a Rockefeller Republican during the nineteen sixties. He he is conservative, but he is interested in Republicans like Nelson Rockefeller and then Richard Nixon who had ambitions of building a big Republican coalition as FDR had done for Democrats in the Nineteen Thirties. He doesn't really make a hard right. Right, turn until about nineteen seventy five I'm what prompts that well. He ran for the first time unsuccessfully in nineteen, seventy, four against flint. Then he's getting ready to run against Flint again in nineteen seventy six, and he meets some people associated with the conservative movement like Paul Way Rick. Who's running these camps for up and coming Republicans and he like many young Republicans starts to become enamored with what's this conservative movement that's bubbling up in America and talking about the need to dismantle government to be much more aggressive on national. National Security and this is when he starts to shift to what will eventually be the Reagan Revolution? Would you say that his guiding principles were firmly aligned with Reagan conservatism, or were there differences there? There were differences. Gingrich for example is much more concerned about environmental issues even in the early nineteen eighties than a lot of Reagan Nights, are he? He actually takes those kinds of policies much more seriously, but generally he lines up by the time he's in the house. He believes in tax cuts. He believes in deregulation. Deregulation, he believes importantly in a very muscular approach to fighting the Soviet Union and to fighting allies in places like Central America so though there are differences between him, and and some of the hard core inner circle of the Reagan administration. Generally they line up pretty well

Professor Newt Gingrich Nineteen Eighties Professor Georgia President Trump Nineteen Thirties America Rick Richard Nixon Nelson Rockefeller John Flint Congressman West Georgia College House Of Representatives Reagan Reagan Administration Harrisburg Washington Soviet Union Flint
After 87 years, Washington's NFL team changed in two months

WAOK On Air

07:30 min | Last month

After 87 years, Washington's NFL team changed in two months

"World turned upside down on its head with the announcement that the Redskins after what a century have decided to Finally change their name and Ah ah image and likeness and you know a lot lot into the store because still a lot of the decisions that have to be made. Let's head out to the wait for Dotcom hotline. We're joined by then. Fisher covers the NFL and Olympics for Sports business daily. You can follow Ben on Twitter at Ben Fisher s V. J. Ben will appreciate time and thanks for spending a few minutes with us here in Atlanta this evening. Have you be there? Anytime. So then let's talk a little bit about this decision. Do you think You know, part of the You know, whatever the internal review and things like that, that they had a pretty good idea that they were going to change the name. Do you think that they probably hired a firm? To already start to put the wheels in motion of coming up with new name, new image and things like that. Well, somewhat surprisingly, I don't believe they have That there's an obvious question the sort of thing you'd almost always bring in 1/3 party, um, agency or since consultants. But it appears by all accounts to be a very narrow circle there. Dan Snyder and a couple other people and not many others. Um, I guess makes a certain amount of sense because they know the more people you bring him more likely than a leak conceit. That's about but I'm not sure they actually have gone through a lot of those traditional steps. You would expect that of somebody doing a big rebranding. How much do you think if you just had to even kind of estimate? How many millions of dollars are we talking about from? I don't know. Hiring a marketing or PR firm to help with You know, with all of this, plus the actual creation of a name and logo and, you know, obviously will be merchandising and all that kind of stuff. What kind of money do you think A team gets into when when this kind of process takes place? What? Um I'd say all in and the big cost there, I think would really actually be the the lost merchandise and the things that you've already created, Or you like to be the Mari created there now useless. Um So I mean, I'd say 30 million. Mark is finished. I mean, that's a very uninformed guests. You know, I have to check a lot of things for that Sounds right time. You got your professional thieves, illegal fees. He spent a lot of time in court. Even if no one really fights trademarking, gotta go the European Union and get those trademarks and all sorts of things you and I probably would never consider And then you know you've got what do you think of all the products in this world business cards, Coffee, moans of sign anywhere that has a Redskins logo or a name. We gotta go be replaced in very short order. And the reason that 30 I mean, 30 may be high, but we're all going on the assumption that they want this happened very quickly. And just like constructing an office power if you need it done extra fast. You're paying overtime and your pain for things that you probably rather not. But That's the cost of expediency. Ben Fisher joining us here in the wait for dot com Hotline covers the NFL for sports business daily. Then talk to me a little bit about on. I don't know. I don't know if you know this. You know the process by which We know the league wants this to happen, and Roger Goodell has supported it. But what any idea what goes into league approval is if the owners in a certain percentage About the logo aboutthe name. You know, I mean, any idea about how that process works, at least get that step done and over with Uh, yeah, We don't need to approve it on and that's ah vote of owners. But other than that, it's it's actually it's not entirely clear, not on. There's not a detail procedure in public. And that is public knowledge on exactly how that happened. But the league certainly does have rights over this. You know each of these 32 teams the individual business for certain purposes, but The league knows they're going strong in its weakest member, and they don't want to be placed. One problematic became with another dude. Definitely I'd say so over that, But you know it's a bit of a black box exactly what they would be looking for, or what? Where the where the possible problems spots are on that son. You know, Ben, when the AH When Houston moved the Tennessee I believe it was Was it two years that they played with the Oilers marker or year year and 1/2 for something that they have the moniker before the seven? Okay, so they had them so they had the order. So my point is, is that it wasn't like the day that they moved to Tennessee, they become the Tennessee Titans. How long do you think this process plays out? And maybe compared from, you know, financial and just, you know, is there some comparison to how long it took with the Titans? Even though they knew that they were going to, you know, end up changing this. Can we kind of compare the situations about how long it may take for all of this to finally come to fruition? Well, I guess there's no reason you couldn't compare them because that is the last time a team change nicknames. Um, without you know, part of Ah, relocation or, you know you could talk about the ground Reagan's thing, Whether that was technically an expansion people, whatever but It was the last time you standing franchise without moving cities of changed his name, but it's so long ago. I mean that the scope of their websites but sort of your very basic, just digital properties that the Redskins will need to rename are so much bigger and I like being all that got so much more complicated, but that there is a good four compared to because that was a situation where The name change was part of a broader strategic vision and means that happened, But it wasn't necessarily important that it happened. By given bay. They were able to do things sort of under normal business. This is something now that it is completely different because there is a sense of urgency and we don't know exactly when they want to set up a new maid. But all indications are reporting is basically as soon as possible. And this is not something that you know, most business experts say wise to do. It's possible There's a 1,000,000 different things you get wrong. That re brandy. You want to make sure everything's perfectly buttoned up. So it probably doesn't take. You know, two years it took the Oilers to become the Titans, but it surely would be taking more than the two months that it would take. To put up totally rebranded team on the field in September. So my supposition that the season is going to be something of a neuron period in regard to the Washington football team name, and the more I think about it, the more I think that they might well play this year, just like known as the Washington football Club work. Burgundy and gold uniforms that simply don't have any luck. I'm not predicting that I'm saying that maybe the most likely explanation for them trying to do this this late in the summer. Amid everything else, the NFL is trying to say You're out with the pandemic, of course. Ben, talk to me a little

J. Ben Ben Fisher Redskins NFL Tennessee Titans Oilers Tennessee Dotcom Dan Snyder Atlanta Roger Goodell Washington Football Club Mari Titans Mark European Union Washington Trademarking Reagan
Atlanta-Based Delta Air Lines Loses $2.8 Billion, Cuts Flights

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | Last month

Atlanta-Based Delta Air Lines Loses $2.8 Billion, Cuts Flights

"From the drop in traveled. Delta Airlines had a record $5.7 billion loss last quarter. Delta is now cutting half of the number of flights and planned to add back in August. United Airlines is making big cuts of both Reagan national and at Dulles, one of its major hubs in Washington Business Journal says the layoffs could be close to 3200 jobs, most of them at villas. It'll be about half of United's DC area employees. United is the biggest carrier at Dulles flying about 65% of passengers there.

United Airlines Delta Airlines Dulles Washington Business Journal Reagan DC
"reagan" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

03:34 min | Last month

"reagan" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Not a bad thing, the push pass our discomfort in realized that if we're GONNA do this shit that everybody should have something for them. Yeah I saw someone also brought a betty in the chat room. And that that was I watched that you can watch that in like a day if you. Feel. Like. The movie that it was The movie is based on Skate. Kitchen is also a really good movie. I think that's on there, too. Right I think I I. Thought it was but but yeah. Even like stuff like that where 'cause I wash it in my. first two episodes I was like I. Don't know what the hell this is about. Having a good time, and then doing drugs and having a good time. Like like the big cuts light one episode just they can't find a bag. I. The stadium is much lower. On like I'm so used to him black people in. Life altering trauma in all our all our thousand. It took me like two or three episodes. Another bag on really happened nobody. Oh, I can just relax and enjoy the like. Win Turn Yeah I'm like Oh. These likely will. Just they can just do drugs and skate all day and nothing like the police aren't gonNA come and kill them or anything why you know. But. It's like a really interesting show that once again. How many people haven't heard of it? How you probably haven't seen the commercial for it all this shit is out here in a lot net somebody's vision that somebody's drained. Somebody's idea of like you know what they wanted to see on TV so. Don't live in time where we get so much of this stuff so. Bikes when Reagan Stars. Producing Hurston. What are you? What are you looking forward to coming out of pandemic? Are you like trying to hit the ground running? Are you going to be like you know? Still dip a toe into wate- let me see when we get this vaccine, are you? What are you thinking? Oh Gosh I haven't even thought about the vaccine. 'cause you know black folks are within though the medicine in all of that I don't know and this is like a major thing so Iago i. let me see how that go. which also doesn't make any sense because I mean the vaccine is going to be saving your life. Other people needed I, but they fucking need to go I right. If any side effects I don't want the not a far. We really should get in I like. Messed up because white people really trying to the. 'CAUSE y'all group getting the word out of. Lodge I had the worse healthcare. If anyone should get the vaccine black to get. And all of us is like your US Edo so. Why are you picking? My Wallet Fires like we were like when they get this. We should get a I. We don't want us on the front line. We want keep going to work then. It was like okay, you're right. We're going to take I. Know Why you want to give it to me I explain. Nine about this. What's in? Right who are who are going to be? There is not back. there. I! Made this vaccine, I want them to give it to an important white person i. i WanNa see likes them as white people first date and they take it. I'm like I. Tell You what give it. Time hangs, and then we're going to see. How I'm. Let y'all win. Lead Tom! Hey y'all wouldn't let down..

Hurston US Iago Reagan Tom
"reagan" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

03:11 min | Last month

"reagan" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"The Hollywood punishes outspoken people would are you being outspoken about because Mel Gibson is still fucking Gibson in whoever else it woody being outspoken about. I, think the thing that is on our side. Is that no matter okay? We know the reality of what Hollywood is made up of these people like that white woman CEO at Sony or I don't know it's made up of these people were not surprised. And even when you think about somebody like a Harvey Weinstein is a Democrat. He lived to the people that you're dealing with. These look good is that you want to work with you? Know but I think the thing that is on our side. Is that even if it's bullshit? We want to be able to say we are liberal. We are progressive. We're at. We are amplifying marginalized voices even if it's bullshit, so. Time way in the whole world is like you need to put the. We need to put your feet to the fire and see what it is. The good side of history because of the whole pr what Hollywood is, they want to do better will. We will see, but the PR of Hollywood is that they're not the Republicans Robbins do not want to hang out with these people they are, you know Barack Obama, and like weren't we get to hang with man Michelle and all people, so it is in their best interest to WANNA keep pushing. The culture forward but they're not gonNA do it easily. We GonNA have to literally kick the ASS a hallway. Yeah, you. have to be shared because the twice as hard stuff. We did I ruin for the day when I. She can be Kinda wagged. Necessary quality. We can be mediocre. And and for me is maybe on the outside looking in. It's very frustrating when we do. We have so much black content like when we were growing. We didn't have as much content as we do right now. You having Landa insecure like you name all these different shows coming on different networks cable and all that stuff. You know all the Black Ish. And it's funny, though how people complain about stuff, even things, it's mediocre. JACOMB PLOWS I. It's not it's the quantity when we could be mediocre is. We have bad stuff, and it just be bad, and it's Ok like best part of the equation so much about their even having blacks, even having black stuff. That's not for you is progress. Yes, yes, taking awhile it's taken awhile for people's minds to adjust and I do think is GonNa Happen One day. You know because we obviously you never see this kind of pressure on my show. Like now why people shows like melrose place, none of us are like, but what about the middleclass working white Americans who don't have representation beverly, hills nine oh two one like that's just fine for the new that and hopefully we're getting close to that because there's so much content now, and there's so many ideas, and then I noticed that there is a pressure. On black people weather like Reagan you're going into producing directing right, and then there's this pressure right?.

Hollywood Mel Gibson Harvey Weinstein CEO Sony Barack Obama woody Reagan Landa Michelle Robbins
"reagan" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:53 min | Last month

"reagan" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"Something else in they. You know it's very much a dude. Bro, kind of culture, and it's like you call who you know you high. Your your friend. You hire your whoever you get your attorney from your friend. WHO has the same? It's very much like a do. Bro Culture, but what do you do if you're not a DUBREUIL? Of. You don't even like fucking hanging out with a new. And they don't think about you and these do they don't even think like. Even, when I think about the Cleveland show the fact that they had auditions. You can say what you want about wrong them. But the fact that the rest of the cast majority black as far as the characters. You don't even have that on these other shows like mouth, and what L. Like you? You know, so at least that's what I say. At least they made an effort like no, we want. We Want Neil Longer Reagan Gomez, or or whoever else, so at least they may make the effort, but if you're not in those circles, which most of us are not in, even if you've been out here for Twenty Six fucking years, you won't get that job. As to because even like a liberal white person, also I'm like I don't see. Color is a positive right like we didn't think of any race when we collect cast this this all cartoons and alien who gives you like? That's weird. You didn't racing. Let me check the roster. Ninety nine percent white into is interesting now not seen raised yielded the same results as whites only like. These race! I'm telling you maybe about maybe about four years ago and this was. The kind of auditions I've been getting has made easier for me to like okay. I'm I'm not, but I gotTA call. Maybe full years ago was four reality. In. My career. Allie shows NEOM. Husband had been married a long time. You know we'll have been trying to get us on a reality show for a long time hours in. This one! I was like that so I go in and it's a white woman. A wealthy white woman older than me. He's like you know the show. Is GonNa? Be About from Texas right I'm from Texas where we eat like barbecue, and like we live on a farm, but my friends are Hollywood end, so they don't understand me. Being from the south like that was the whole show so blind on my do fucking cuss out my mother aging talking here. How do I can sit in? The No, you love! And number three. Do you even know how blackness works so? You're saying they don't do. I'm black. Are. Like fitting Brian, and having all out every single episode, and looked now fire Iran fucking do the show place like so that's. Like whole law and if my. Coleslaw. I've never heard of that l. a liberal..

Bro Culture Neil Longer Reagan Gomez Brian Texas attorney Cleveland Allie Iran Hollywood
"reagan" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

05:27 min | Last month

"reagan" Discussed on The Black Guy Who Tips Podcast

"That loves little safety. Right right, so it's been. It's been really really wild, but you know we don't see. We normal is relative. That's should change all the time, so we what the new normal is scared of them trying to trick us into like you know we. We could never tell the communicate like this again. We everyone come back into. The last, so many people found out these jobs been lying to them for years. A lot of it was about controlling monitoring and dictating what you do. Because some people, some jobs are structured where you're managing supervisor is almost irrelevant. If they can't physically see you like honestly, so you have managers now they wanNA zoom out the time and all that stuff. They WANNA constantly Chitchat and talking artist stuff. They WanNa see that you are at your desk and you are where you're supposed to be, but my thing. That! You're still being controlled in some way, we. In control of your day right. That's why they do the little. Petty stuff like dress up, BITCH! I'm at home. Why am I gonNA dress up at the house. Right that don't make no sense. Right But like with like even outside of work like when I look at, so my husband works. He's in essential worker, so he's been in and out of the House. Since this happened, but even before this happened when I looked at my most of my days, because even though I'm. I'm an actress and all of that I'm still a mom I'm still a soccer mom. We do not have a second nanny so as my kids gotta be somewhere. On the Beetle WanNa take them so when I looked at our family schedule with me and my two kids picking them up school getting home going to soccer practice, my oldest, my thirteen year old would be exhausted at the end of the day so I'm picking her. Up She got arrest come home around nine o'clock. Get them dress in. She'll still have homework in like a normal day would be going to bed and maybe like midnight. Zoo even looking at that, and like how you? How like other countries like they don't? The kids aren't bombarded with three and four hours of homework every day like we're used to these systems that if you take a moment and you if you had the choice to strange must, people would be like that was fucking a lot. That was a lot on the air. My accused that that was a lot, and if I had an option to do something better where we spend more time, together I would choose that, so that's what I'm hoping. This moment is because his forest school. You know we have those three options, but I don't know how. You can just go back to regular with school I don't I. Don't know how you can do that. Some people are going to want it because. Of their jobs like you said like they are going to be people. That kind of have the US school almost for child care because. You'RE GONNA have some people that want to go back to that just for only for that reason like if they had the option. Like we do now where it's like well, you can like not go to work every day. You can tell a communique to work telecommute to work and then that way. Your child doesn't have to go to school necessarily every day anymore. Because your home you know like if all of that stays in place I think people would opt more for that to be daycares. Our hope I don't know. But the but the other, the other way of there's going to be some people that never got to take. Take the day off. They never got to stay home, and so those people will be like..

forest school Beetle WanNa soccer supervisor US
"reagan" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

Entrepreneur on FIRE

08:53 min | 5 months ago

"reagan" Discussed on Entrepreneur on FIRE

"That third one is very meaningful to me and my family. I hope you enjoy these fire nation and we'll dive into them as soon as we get back from thinking our sponsor fire nation. Are you ready to turn your passion into a profitable business? Then this free training and seven figure playbook and resources from my good friends and top marketing experts. Nick Unsworth and Brian Delaney is for you. It's called launch and scale now and you can get instant access today when you visit launch and scale now dot COM ready to make a bold move and finally find the perfect candidate for your new role. No matter your industry zip recruiter can help in right now. You can try ZIP recruiter for free just visit ZIP RECRUITER DOT com slash fire. Zip Recruiter the smartest way to hire our. I fire nation. Let's dive into the first of three speeches today. This one's by Ronald Reagan address to nation on the Challenger. Ladies and gentlemen. I do plan to speak to you tonight to report on the state of the Union but the events of earlier today have led me to change those plans. Today is a day for morning and remembering Nancy and I are pain to the core by the tragedy of the shuttle Challenger we know we share this pain with all the people of our country. This is truly a national loss. Nineteen years ago almost to the day. We lost three astronauts in a terrible accident on the grounds. But we've never lost an astronaut and flight. We've never had a tragedy like this. And perhaps we forgotten the courage. It took for the crew of the shuttle but they the Challenger seven were aware of the dangers but overcame them and did their jobs brilliantly. We more seven heroes Michael Smith. Dick's Gobi Judith. Resnik Ronald McNair. Ellison owner Zucca Gregory Jarvis and Christa McAuliffe. We mourn their loss as a nation together for the families of the seven. We cannot bear as you do the full impact of this tragedy. But we feel the loss and we're thinking about you so very much your loved ones where daring and brave and they had that special grace that special spirit says. GimMe a challenge. In a media with joy they had a hunger to explore the universe and discover its truths they wished to serve in the dead. They served all of us. We've grown used to wonders in this century. It's hard to dazzle us but for twenty five years the United States space program has been doing just that we've grown used to the idea of space and perhaps we forget that we've only just begun. Were still pioneers. They the members of the Challenger crew were pioneers. And I want to say something to the school children of America who were watching the live coverage of the shuttle's takeoff. I know it is hard to understand but sometimes painful things like this happen. It's all part of the process of exploration and discovery. It's all part of taking a chance in expanding man's horizons. The future doesn't belong to the faint hearted it belongs to the brave the challenger crew was pulling us into the future and we'll continue to follow them. I've always had great faith and respect for our space program in what happened today does nothing to diminish it. We don't hide our space program. We don't keep secrets to cover things up we do it all upfront and public vast. The way freedom is and we wouldn't change it for a minute. We'll continue our questions space. That will be more shuttle flights and more shuttle crews in. Yes more volunteers. More civilians more teachers in space. Nothing ends here. Our hopes and our journeys continue. I want to add that. I wish I could talk to every man woman who works for NASA or who worked on this mission and tell them your dedication and professionalism has moved and impressed us for decades and we know of your anguish. We share it. There's a coincidence today on this day. Three hundred ninety years ago. The Great Explorer Sir Francis. Drake died aboard ship off the coast of Panama in his lifetime. The great frontiers were oceans in a historian later said he lived by the sea died on it and was buried in it. While today we can say of the Challenger crew their dedication was like drake's complete the crew of the space shuttle Challenger honored us by the manner in which they live their lives and we will never forget them nor the last time we saw them this morning as a prepared for the journey and waved goodbye and slipped the surly bonds of earth to touch the face of God. Thank you fire. Nation to more incredible speeches coming up when we get back from thinking our sponsor if you're ready to turn your passion into a profitable business but you're not quite sure where to start that I've got great news for you. My good friends and top marketing experts. Nick Unsworth Brian Delaney created a free training there sharing three smart cuts to leverage your expertise or the expertise of others to launch and scale in two thousand and twenty during this training. You'll learn the one skill you must master to launch a scale your expertise to the world. How to quickly create launch the perfect hi-fi offering sales funnel right out the gates. And how do a supersonic stack to scale a business in record time? Plus when you sign up. Today you also gain access to their seven-figure playbook free inside their playbook you'll find brand new funnels scripts and word for word. Copy that they've used to help their clients generate two seven and even eight figures revenue. That means you don't have to start from scratch or recreate the wheel when it comes to a solid start in your marketing strategy visit launch and scale now a DOT com today to Senate for their free training that's launch and scale now dot COM according to ziprecruiter research nearly three out of four employers. Say they're finding it difficult to fill open positions. So what do you do if this is you? It's time to make a bold move to give you a couple of examples. Sixty eight percent of employers have raised their wages in twenty three percent have increased their benefits. Maybe for your role is a different type of incentive. The bottom line is if you have a difficult role to fill no matter. Your Industry Ziprecruiter can help. And Right. Now you can try ZIP recruiter for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash fire. What makes ziprecruiter unique as they not only send your job to over one hundred of the top job sites they also use their powerful matching technology to scan thousands of resumes to find people with the right skills and experience for your job. Then actively advice into apply ziprecruiter is so effective that four out of five employers. Who Post on Ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day? And right now you can try ZIP recruiter for free. Just visit ZIP DOT com slash fire. That's ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash fire ziprecruiter dot com slash fire ziprecruiter. The smartest way to hire our next speech is by chief. Joseph is known as surrender speech in eighteen. Seventy seven the military announced that the chief Joseph and his tribe of Nez Pierce had to move onto a reservation in Idaho or face. Retribution desiring to avoid violence chief. Joseph advocated for peace and cooperation. But fellow tribesmen dissented in killed four white men knowing swift. Backlash was coming. Joseph and his people began to make their way to Canada hoping to find amnesty there. The tribe traveled seventeen hundred miles fighting the pursuing. Us Army along the way in dire conditions and after a five day battle chief. Joseph surrendered to General Nelson a miles on October. Fifth Eighteen. Seventy seven and the bear paw mountains of Montana territory. A mere forty miles from the Canadian border. The chief knew he was the last of a dying breed in the moment of surrender was heartbreaking. Here's the speech. Tell General Howard. I know his heart what he told me. Before I have in my heart I am. Tired of fighting are chiefs are killed looking. Glass is dead. Who will shoot is dead. The old men are all dead. It is the young men who say yes or no. He who lead on the young man is dead. It is cold and we have no blankets. The little children are freezing to death. My people some of them have run away to the hills. We have no blankets no food. No one knows where they are. Perhaps freezing to death. I want to have time to look for my children to see how many of them I can find. Maybe I shall find them among the dead. Hear me my chiefs I am tired. My heart is sick and sad. From where the sun now stands. I will fight no more forever. Who Fire Nation? Our third and final speech today is by Lou Gehrig farewell to baseball address. It seemed as if the luminous career of Lou gehrig would go on forever the Yankees First Baseman and prodigious slugger.

Joseph DOT com Lou gehrig Ronald Reagan Nick Unsworth Ronald McNair Nick Unsworth Brian Delaney Drake Union NASA United States Brian Delaney Zucca Gregory Jarvis America Nancy baseball Us Army Michael Smith Dick
"reagan" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

10:18 min | 8 months ago

"reagan" Discussed on Planet Money

"Voted for this president is watching this speech beach watching this guy? Basically tell Ron I don't care what kind of raise you and your colleagues. Want if you don't get your butts in those little air traffic control towers forty-eight hours it'll be terminated. We're all fire and escape. When he made that speech in that Rose Garden? I just felt betrayed. You know here we. You told us you were going to take care of the system and take care of us and you didn't sell. This is day one of the strike. And you you might imagine that if the group of highly skilled people who are supposed to stop planes from crashing. Don't show up at work that would essentially shut down the skies but the government had a card up its sleeve see the Federal Aviation Administration. The people who make sure planes fly. They've been watching. Contract talks between the government men and the air traffic controllers deteriorate for months. Maybe longer and they've been working on a backup plan. The plan was that if the controllers went on strike doc maybe there was a way to replace them if they could just find enough qualified people out in the world to cross picket lines and then climb up into those air traffic control towers towers. Then maybe the planes keep flying or at least enough planes to show the strikers that. They're not so irreplaceable. After all Donald. Devine Reagan's Reagan's HR guy. He was part of this backup plan. We get more people stealing from the military controllers. They were putting air traffic control. Students agents through accelerated tracks trying to get them ready to try to go to people who retired. Come back but even with all this preparation now that it was actual strike break time donald new. This might not work. It was August after all. What if I don't know there was a hurricane or or what if something else went wrong even if everything was running imperfectly and you had some crazy accident they would have blamed it on this decision on the strike the government was nervous but on they want the strike? All of these replacement air traffic controllers showed up to work. It wasn't enough to replace everybody but by the end of the day. Nearly half of all scheduled flights had flown own. No Crashes Day to the strike. America is dancing to this amazing nine hundred eighty s morning edition themes could morning no movement in the air controller strike. That has cut air traffic by almost half of the big airports the and that morning seemingly small thing Happened that made a huge difference in. US Labor Day is fourth and this is NPR's morning edition. The skies are blue. That is the thing in much of the country little clouds great visibility ideal. If you're say a replacement air traffic controller suddenly asked to land a bunch big planes all of these new controllers that the Reagan administration put on the job. They didn't have as much trouble giving manse two pilots when those pilots could see everything. The news is next. I Good Morning. I'm Carol Castle. According to Transportation Secretary Drew Lewis is the number of commercial. Airline flights has increased this morning from yesterday's fifty. You percent of normal to seventy five percent so that was one thing. Working against the air traffic controller unions closed down the skies strategy. The other thing was Reagan's threat from the Rose Garden. Podium Lewis repeated. President Reagan's promised fire those control. Those who do not return to work by tomorrow remember. Reagan didn't say EH. You're all fired. Starting now he said show up to work in the next forty eight hours or you're fired. He was giving air traffic controllers. Who needed their jobs and option option or from the perspective of the Union's President who spoke on NPR that day? Reagan was trying to break the strike. They're trying to break the union I think they are trying to a US. Every intimidation factor that they can to get the controllers to go back to work. I certainly do believe that they're trying to break. Our Union Reagan's threat and his forty eight hour. Amnesty Eighty were scary to people like Rahm Palmer who are trying to hold steady one guy at Miami. He Walked the picket line first day with a picket sign and got his picture on the front page. Page of the Miami Herald you know. And then he went back to work the following day and all like. Oh my gosh. I didn't know you know. Didn't know as a forty eight hour deadline came to a close close striking controllers around the country gathered together with their families. Ron was at the union hall. Miami we were solidarity. You know we were trying to be solid ella. We were seeing an ice. I got up and sang a couple of songs. What'd you sing? Which side are you on? Which side are you on that moment? The deadline passed asked Ron and over eleven thousand air traffic controllers. Who stayed on strike were officially fired? Not only had Reagan fired. The air traffic controller's he ban them from working air traffic controllers for life when things start getting real Well when the paycheck stops in on thank start really getting real. You're not scared anymore. You just have to get out and do whatever you have to do to provide a living for you and your family and these controllers weren't left with a lot of options options. They couldn't do their job in this country so some of them went overseas worked as air traffic controllers in Europe someone to Canada others like Ron stayed and tried to do something else us he landed first at a car. Dealership then drove. Buses eventually did get a job for the state government in Florida. It was a unemployment employment facility. ooh Wow and for about a decade. This was the life of the striking air traffic controllers. Some of them. I'm never recovered then about a decade after the strike President Bill. Clinton lifted Reagan's ban on air traffic controllers. Getting their jobs back. In Fact Ron finally got his job back and in one final Ron Palmer. Ron Reagan intersection the same year. Ron Palmer got his job back. Congress proposed post to name Washington. DC's airport Reagan national air traffic controller. Strongly opposed this as you might imagine. It didn't matter the name past and after the break why some call this the most disastrous strike in American history. Donald Devine the head of federal employees for Reagan. told me that not long after the strike. This thing started happening businessmen. Come up to me in the you you know when your guy. Reagan stood firm with those guys. I started getting tougher with my unions to. I realize I was giving the store and I don't know how many times that happened. You know maybe only a half a dozen but seemed like a lot. Let's say you well. He did that. I realized I should to what had happened in that moment of the strike was that Reagan flipped the narrative on strikebreaking strikers. Were no longer the sympathetic ones now. They were selfish lawbreakers screwing over regular Americans Reagan on the other hand. He managed to cast himself as as like the hero. Here as the defender of the American public he was able to convince a good chunk of the American public. That strikebreaking aching was in fact. Something Patriotic and at the time America seemed to be on his side just McCartan is a Labor historian at Georgetown. Wrote the book about the air traffic controller strike. He said Reagan's handling of the strike. Got Into business school curriculum like quickly within a year by nineteen in eighty two and there was a group at the Wharton school that came out with a manual which encouraged business leaders to learn from the Pat Co strike so and this was widely disseminated and business leaders. Were reading about it. It was this manual. Like what to do what we learned from the Paco Strike. Thank you if you wanted to be a great chief executive. Take on your union and fight them after Reagan fired. All of the striking air traffic controllers. Suddenly around America. Strikebreaking became the thing to do striking copper miners in Arizona. Fired striking paper workers in Maine fired meatpackers bus drivers so many strikes in the nineteen eighties were broken to the point where unions realized that employers wanted wanted them to strike so that they could fire them and replace them with non union workers. And if you realize that your boss wants you to strike so they can fire you. Who in Rehire somebody else that is going to make you less likely to strike the main piece of leverage unions have the government keeps track of the number of strikes? And if if you look at the numbers you see a lot of strikes right after World War Two when unions were flying high and the numbers trend downward slowly but suddenly in nineteen eighty two. There's this huge dropoff that drop off. That is air traffic controller strike and even with the recent uptick in strikes. You may have read about in the news. Teacher strikes strikes healthcare workers. The number of strikes. Today is still small. Compared to before the air traffic controllers strikes have dropped from about one hundred forty a year in Nineteen eighty-one to about ten to twenty year. Today some people call this the Petco Syndrome. The professional air traffic controllers syndrome. This is the union fear of striking and then ending up summarily fired. Like Reagan did to the air traffic controllers here again is retired controller. Ron Palmer I think Reagan Lord Is. He'll when he lord is he'll on Paco. Everybody in the United States that was a member of union. took a long hard. Look at what happened to us. I am from what I'm I'm basically said they got squashed. Yes yeah and we'd better be careful here. I guess I guess I should ask you know looking back now. Was it worth.

President Reagan Reagan Ron Ron Reagan president US Paco Strike Ron Palmer Donald Devine Rose Garden America Federal Aviation Administratio Miami Herald Miami NPR Podium Lewis Rahm Palmer Petco Syndrome Wharton school
"reagan" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"reagan" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Critics of Reagan's nineteen Eighty-one tax cut were vindicated. When following the passage of the Bill the budget deficit increased and the economy fell into a recession unemployment spiraled upward peaking almost eleven percent late eighty to its highest rate since the great depression. The construction industry was hit hard together with manufacturing and mining responding to the new crisis. Congress passed another Bill in nineteen eighty-two repealing many of the provisions in the original tax cut. Reagan reluctantly signed it and the economy began to rebound, but the event did not change Reagan's basic belief in the long term economic benefit of reduced taxation. More tax cuts would come later, especially in a comprehensive nineteen eighty six Bill that simplified the tax code by the time Reagan left office, the highest tax bracket had dropped from seventy percent to thirty eight and a half Reagan old. Succeeded in his goals of cutting taxes, curbing federal regulations and increasing the military's budget. But largely because of these things he failed in his goal of cutting federal spending instead throughout his presidency spending increased dramatically and the budget deficit soared Reagan had argued that hacks cuts would pay for themselves by stimulating economic growth and expanding the tax base. But this never really came to fruition. It also hoped to balance the budget by cutting nonmilitary government programs and turning many social programs over to the states. But many of these efforts were blocked by the Democrats in charge of congress. The budget cuts that did occur didn't go far enough. The result was by the time. He left office the budget deficit had more than doubled. It would be up to successors to find a way to deal with it. Reagan left office with an approval rating matched only by the role model of his early political life. Franklin D Roosevelt though, his presidency had not been without its controversies. And criticisms he had held the nation together with his personal charisma and charm, even those who disagreed with him politically frequently held favorable views of him. And by the time, he left office Reagan's conservative ideology had become the Republican party's ideology. Reagan himself would become a hero to the right much. The way Roosevelt a generation earlier had been a hero to the left. But while Reagan's politics realized the power and priorities within his own party. His time in office changed the opposition to and the years during and after his presidency Democrats would moderate many of their old ideas party came to be dominated by a centrist faction called the New Democrats this group wed, moderate fiscal strategies to liberal social policies. They're more. Prominent figure Bill Clinton won the presidency in nineteen ninety two as President Clinton moved the party right word on economic policy working with a Republican congress to balance the budget for the first time since the nineteen sixties he championed the North American Free trade agreement over the objections of labor unions, and he enacted comprehensive welfare reform a longtime goal of conservatives, but personal scandals marred his presidency and underscored growing partisan rancor in the country that began in the wake of Reagan's conservative revolution in nineteen Ninety-two conservative Republican, Pat Buchanan stated there is a religious war going on in our country for the sole of America. It is a cultural war as critical to the kind of nation. We will one day be as was the Cold War itself. Powerful lobbying groups like the moral majority led by southern evangelist, and activist Jerry Falwell helped integrate traditional religious values into the Republican party the battles. They engaged in over. School prayer abortion. Equal treatment of women and racial minorities. Helped set the stage for the culture wars that have dominated politics for the last two decades since the turn of the millennium both major parties have moved to the respective ideological corners, the Republican party has become the home of political religious and cultural conservatism, while the Democratic Party represents progressive opposite factions emerged and the rhetoric has grown even more intense. Our current two-party system has been in place since the civil war. It's what George Washington warned about all those years ago, the alternating domination of one party over another back and forth in a never ending cycle. Washington called it a frightful despotism yet beneath the raging debates of the day, whether over cultural clashes taxes or foreign wars, the underlying and enduring questions persist, how should a well meaning people organize how should they guide their government? Struggle to answer. These questions continues today. From wondering this is American

Reagan Republican party Congress Franklin D Roosevelt Democratic Party Bill President Clinton George Washington Jerry Falwell Pat Buchanan America seventy percent eleven percent two decades
"reagan" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"reagan" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"Movie as secret agent brass Bancroft at Warner Brothers where they shot missiles out of the sky, and I really think that he kind of convoluted this whole idea, but the Soviets actually took it somewhat seriously bought it, and at one point our intelligence people said, even if it doesn't work just by letting the Soviets. No that we have it and it's in development, and it's going to be in place in a few years. They would back down, and they did they bought it. It's incredible. Reagan believed, I think in in storybook endings, which was perhaps one clue to his success that he was such a brilliant storyteller. But it also lead to weaknesses didn't it. I'm thinking of another example, which which critics decried him on food Oooo economics. This this supply-side economics theory that says that you cut taxes, and the government ends up gaining more in revenues, right? He decided to go supply side against the Qian's Z and method that had always been in place, and it didn't work. I mean, it was David Stockman has his young budget director had implemented it and pretty soon. It was just a matter of about eight months to a year Stockman realized that he had miscalculated he couldn't find a way to bridge forty one billion dollars. And it was and the budget was was getting wider and bigger and more on Rulli. So while Reagan did initiate a series. Of tax cuts that really benefited and stimulated business the trickle down never never trickled. He had kind of a hands off management style at times. And it got him into trouble. Tell us what went wrong in the Iran contra scandal that went wrong from the get-go. Jim. It was brought to him by bud McFarlane when he was in the hospital, and he didn't really grasp it, but the big idea and Reagan only, so big ideas, the big idea sounded fantastic to him. Here's what would happen. We would give moderates in Iran. Some missiles to show them that we were they're buddies, and they would gradually agree that the United States. Was there pal? We never found those moderates. I don't even know if they existed, but by the time, we got involved in that it was it was a fiasco and so much money in so many missiles had been given to the Iranians and the money that we got back from them in return for those missiles was hijacked by Ollie north and illegally illegally. And the money was sent to the contras that we're fighting against the Sandinistas Nicaragua. And that was. Was a right wing militias that we're fighting a left-wing government. Exactly. And as it turned out. Neither of them were any good. But but Reagan was convinced these were freedom fighters much, like our revolutionary war patriots and the French resistance and he called them freedom fighters. I don't think he really grasped who they were what they were fighting about what happened with aids. He spent years kind of ignoring crisis at a tin ear when it came to. He didn't understand it. He didn't want to understand it. He never believed that rock Hudson was was a homosexual, and when rock died, it kind of really stunned him when it was announced that he had aids, but somebody who was a family friend introduced him to Elizabeth Glaser whose husband was part of the Starsky and hutch cast, and she was dying of aids because she had a blood transfusion when she was pregnant her baby had already died of aids. And this turned Reagan inside out, and he came out very strongly in favor of aids research, but it was too little too late. Let's talk a little bit about father's mansion..

Reagan Iran aids Warner Brothers David Stockman Rulli bud McFarlane budget director Nicaragua Elizabeth Glaser United States Starsky Ollie north Jim forty one billion dollars eight months
"reagan" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"reagan" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"And here was a union that wanted to raise. Then adjust wasn't in the budget. Reagan wanted to reach some kind of a compromise with them, but they announced that they were going to strike, and this was a union that backs. Ronald Reagan in Alexia, they supported him up. Down. He was he was personally aggravated because it was against the law for them to strike because they were government employees, and it would have created havoc. But he determined to put his foot down. He felt that if he couldn't do it right away in his first term, then he would be perceived as a weak president. So he he basically fired them all and it was it was hard for him to do. But it was a show of real strength. And it was a huge gamble. I mean, politically took enormous risks. How did the public respond the public back in one hundred percent? They were nervous. They had read a number of things, especially in the New York Times that said that planes would be falling out of the air. And in fact, Fred fielding who was one of his advisors told me that Reagan said, we're going to be all right, Fred. And Fred said, we will Mr President until that I point comes down. And then you're going to be a one term president. It's surprising that that there was such strong support for for Reagan given that at that time, many more people were members of trade unions than they are today. That's true. But the way he approached it was he went on TV to explain it. The people I want to ask you about what that tells us, and what kind of lessons we could have today. We're speaking with Bob Spitz, author of the new biography Reagan and American Journey. It's how do we fix it? I'm Jim megs, and I'm Richard Davies. What are a few lessons of Reagan style for politicians of today? I think the most important one is to realize that you're the president of all the people not just some of the people Ronald Reagan. Learn this very early in his term as governor in his first term. He was one of the first people in the country to pass a therapeutic abortion Bill. This was six years before Roe v. Wade he was personally opposed to abortion, but one of his legislators and the legislature was all democratic came to him and said, you don't understand the people in California want this sixty five percent of the people want you to sign this. Reagan did a few studies found out that indeed that was true, and he decided to sign the Bill above his objections because he said, I'm the governor of all the people not just some of the people. And I think that's the most important thing you can take away from from him. Jim. I think it's fair to say you're more of a fan than of Reagan than I am. Well, that's not the idea of our show. Yeah. You're the you're the here the softy liberal, and I'm Russ cranky conservative heartless conservative. Yes. So I just want to raise a few criticisms sure run through with you. I can help you with those. I remember that that at the time, and certainly this has been a criticism that's rolled down through the years. People worried that Reagan was living in a fantasy land. And one example of that was was was Star Wars was this missile defense system that he came up with that involve wasting billions of dollars and eventually was abandoned. Yeah, he decided to change our strategic policy from an offensive policy, you know, building up to a defensive policy bud McFarlane who was the intelligence officer at the time, and John Poindexter who was his deputy really convinced him to do this. And they brought the chiefs of staff in who were completely against it. As was almost every other Republican will make our and democratic lawmakers. Well, but Reagan Phil, and perhaps in a pollyanna way that we could build some kind of missile shield that would protect those and would shoot missiles out of the sky oddly enough. Off. He was in a.

Ronald Reagan Reagan Phil Fred fielding Mr President president Jim megs New York Times bud McFarlane Bob Spitz John Poindexter Richard Davies Russ cranky Roe Wade American Journey officer California one hundred percent sixty five percent six years
"reagan" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"reagan" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"And then he also picked another center. Sandra Day O'Connor, Sandra Day, O'Connor, the first woman to the court the right wing of his party was completely opposed to Sandra Day O'Connor. And Reagan wasn't sure for position on abortion. He wanted to make sure that she was opposed to abortion, and she said to him, you know, I'm personally opposed to abortion. But it's the law of the land at as long as I'm a judge. I have to defend it. And that modified Reagan he also had an interesting relationship with his cabinet. He brought some really strong personalities in. They're very smart people. But also some very difficult people. How did he work with them? He would always say, hey, let's roundtable with the fellows except for Jim Kirkpatrick wasn't a fellow, of course. But and there's another because he was the toughest one of the bunch. She was but she was democrat who who was kind to switch to conservatism. Ronald Reagan knew that he was never the smartest person in the room. That was okay by him. But he made sure that he had experts in that room with him who he could rely on. And he was humble enough and wise enough to take the red vice and to really just kind of sift through it before he made hard decisions. This was a practice of good leadership and good management listening to people accepting other people's views. But of course, it wasn't all charm and sweetness he could be very tough and stubborn right? When when called upon certain ways, tell us about the airline traffic controllers strike early in his first this was something that really pained Ronald Reagan. He was a union, man..

Ronald Reagan Sandra Day Jim Kirkpatrick
"reagan" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

How Do We Fix It?

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"reagan" Discussed on How Do We Fix It?

"But he started out being very liberal. He even flirted with joining the communist party did. Yeah. He was a dyed-in-the-wool FDR, man. And Reagan believed in the Democrats 'cause but you know, somewhere along the way he, and I know how it happened. He shifted to the right when Reagan came into office a lot of people were worried about his language his demeanor because he could be very tough talking about communism in the Soviet. We're any Ray gone, right? And and somewhat flippant sometimes about the Soviet Union and threat of nuclear calling them the evil empire. Right. Yeah. So in an early speech he said that he also made a joke. One time. What did he say the bombings going to begin in fifteen minutes? Yes. But he. Was testing the microphone him. Didn't know it was alive. There's a lesson. It was a joke. Right. But here's the amazing thing by the end of his time in the White House. The Cold War was coming to a peaceful conclusion how did he pull that off? You know, I control you. In two words, Nancy Reagan Nancy Reagan wanted him to have an amazing legacy. And she felt the legacy would be if he could bring nuclear peace to the country. And so she pushed him to make peace with the USSR. He tried with broach nev- when Brezhnev has was alive. He couldn't reach entrepot entrepot died. I think within six weeks of taking power he found that he had an ear inn Mikhail Gorbachev and for people who don't remember that era. This was this incredible run the final decade or so of the Soviet Union. They they ran through the leaders at an incredible pace. Ace and the country. It was like every six months, it seemed there was a new leader there. And so he couldn't really get a foothold, but Nancy kept pushing him. And when Gorbachev said he would speak to Reagan one on one, which is what Reagan always wanted from the Soviet premier. He jumped at the chance to do it against the wishes of almost every advisory. Had he was determined to bring peace nuclear annihilation scared the devil out of Ronald Reagan. And it was the one thing I think more than anything in his term that he wanted to correct or do away with today. Our political discourse involves debates and political statements by by politicians of both sides claiming that the other side is corrupt immoral not even worth listening to him, and in some cases, evil, Reagan communicated in a very different way. He did one of the great things that he learned in college and through any practice throughout. Life was the art of compromise. He often as president reached across the aisle relied on people. Like scoop Jackson who was a democrat and tip O'Neill who was a very good friend of his people whose policies he completely opposed. But he was willing to listen. And when he didn't get the advice that he wanted he were talked to the experts around him and listen to what they have to say and then reach a a moderate position. But would that work today, you know, how it would work? It would work in the truth of supreme court Justice Reagan's supreme court Justice did not work Robert Bork. He tried to get him through Bork was a hardliner. He tried to get Doug Ginsburg through another hardliner. And what he found out was. He wasn't listening to the American public. The American public wanted someone who was more moderate, and ultimately he found Tony Kennedy who was who was a moderate who actually throughout his tenure on the. Court listened to both sides. And you never knew how he was going to vote..

Nancy Reagan Nancy Reagan Ray Soviet Union Justice Reagan Mikhail Gorbachev communist party Robert Bork Doug Ginsburg White House USSR Tony Kennedy scoop Jackson Brezhnev nev president O'Neill fifteen minutes six months six weeks
"reagan" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

14:37 min | 2 years ago

"reagan" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"Like that's not funny Trump with. Is it? I think it's endearing in the moment. I don't think. I don't know. I mean, look, he's not as bad as Trump. I think an interpersonal relationship Trump Reagan to me like his charisma is, I don't know. I think it was more like the same thing with like George W Bush was like people were like, oh, his folksy charisma. And I was like, what are you talking about? Like I don't see that. He just seems like an idiot. But I think Reagan was more like George senior, you know, he seemed lies like an old man who used being old to like fake, convey statelessness than being rich. That's an aspect of like one thing called white man. It's hard to say how much Trump's unpopularity is due to the media cycle. And like if Trump had been president and nine hundred eighty one, would he be more popular because. We just wouldn't have as much focus on it, but Reagan was more popular than Trump. Right, which I don't know like, imagine Reagan though that was, I mean, that's one of the things about making a very like vanilla joke, like, hope you're Republican as opposed to like firing off some crazy ass tweets where you're just so offensive. Well, I guess it's more like if Reagan were president now he'd be tweeting some crazy racist shit all the time. I mean, what do you think he wouldn't know how to use Twitter because he's too old. I think he might be mutton dressed as lamb on Twitter, but I'm saying he at least for sure was saying crazy, racist, homophobic, ship behind closed doors, closed doors. But I think that's the. I mean, not that it makes it any better, but it makes it easier to be a charming hers fit in the public upshots. Like what people think is charming about you, which is obviously, Donald Trump's voters are like I love when he talks about it, did grabs them by the pussy, and that's what I like, you know. But I do think there's different kinds. Of racism and they're all talks, but like with Trump, you've got this more like I'm going to be liked explicitly, call verb in news. Organizations are still like a racially charged incident. You know, they still won't say he's being a racist, even though he's like using racist terms and saying, racist things, people still are like, but he's the president. So we're going to treat it with like the import of like the president saying something right, but it's all the same platforms. The Republican party has always had, which are like homophobia, racism, and like hating poor people will. And I think more to the point what you're getting at, which which is interesting in that it ties in here is one of the things that has been so dangerous in the intersection of the press in this presidency is that we traditionally treat the presidency as this Agust position. There's something special about the president like that. There's a certain level of respect that you should have for the president. And that's obviously nonsense as it occurs to Donald Trump because he's just. An asshole on Twitter nonsense in general, it was nonsense. Then this guy had a fucking astrologer telling planning to circle in the sky, really tight. The stars weren't all like the great presidents of history were like slave owners. So they were not keeping their racism secret. You know, we're rampaging. Alcohol IX are too fat to get out of a bathtub like they're just are wouldn't just do disgust freight. And I think the thing about Reagan was it was like we're casting a guy who looks like he should be the president to play the president on television, but he doesn't actually like no care. Well, that's where the astrologer becomes an important holiday back. Let's get back through withdrawal jer. So when we were talking about these strategy stuff, we were getting into the fact that, yeah, Joan Quigley insisted that Nancy Reagan make drug policy be like her big thing. And of course, Nancy becomes the face of the just say, no campaigns during the Reagan administration, the number. Of people behind bars for nonviolent drug offenses increased from like fifty thousand several hundred thousand like four hundred thousand by nineteen ninety seven. So yeah, Nancy Reagan wasn't making policy on that, but she was the face of it in. She had a significant role in setting public opinion and some of that's on Nancy and some of that's on Joan Quigley. That's on Ronnie. Most of its on Ronnie because Joan Nancy weren't making policy feel like it's also it's always like frowned upon for the president to like, listen to his wife, you know, and make policy based on that. But unless she gets her little pet projects, right? But like incarcerating drinking dating everybody. Yeah, the homie things. Yeah. So, yeah, in addition to urging Nancy to make anti-drug policy, a cornerstone of her first lady ship Joan insisted that Nancy avoid doing any interviews with fashion magazines. I think she mainly includes this part of the take another shot at Nancy or another seventeen magazine that she doesn't mention in a magazine by name. He's just like, screw magazine's magazines. Poor people can afford those. Watch only read gold. But yes, she says that not talking to fashion magazines was the hardest thing for her to give that up. She tried to, we'd only into letting her do it, but I was firm Joan claims at the time. She picked for Nancy to do her public appearances and our anti-drug speeches and stuff, or as perfect as possible. She's very proud of this work and says, it's the reason that miss Reagan's reputation improved throughout her husband's time in office. Here's Joan again quite typically when Nancy thank me for turning her image around. I said, and it was something she was already aware of, Nancy, Joe Kennedy pay between one and two million dollars in nineteen sixty for what I have done for thousands of nineteen Eighty-one. She claims Joe Kennedy had to pay publicists to make a Jackie jackie-o popular will come on. Everybody would have Jackie on what she did. She was fucking Jay. Lino NASA slink go to hell John quickly. And then she said to Nancy, really, you must admit it has been a present. And again, she was getting nine thousand dollars a month in modern dollars. Because when you're paying for astrology, any number seems both ludicrous and completely say. Nine thousand you. If you're if someone's giving you nine thousand dollars for this, it seems easy to argue that that's a tiny amount and saying, I'm the only person who can give you this information right also. I mean, it Joan Quigley does not sound like a feminist, but in a way advising the first lady to not push her 'cause in fashion magazines is kind of a feminist stance taken way more seriously if you avoid that channel entirely like, I'm kind of behind that. I'm not. I'm not against that part of it also like Nancy, Reagan just wanted to be in fashion magazines. That's what she wanted to be first lady. So she could be on the cover of vogue or whatever. And if she just been on the cover of vogue and not been talking about drugs. Yeah, maybe we'd be in a better place should have stuck to stuck defection. Yeah. And more, I guess more to the point would would urge me is just like, I'm sure that to Joan Quigley nine thousand dollars a month was pittance, but like that's just further makes me dislike her because it's likely three families could have lived just for this one torito's wants to pay us all. Astrology, no. And you know, as horrible as Joan Quigley is is as good as Courant's. Doritos tastes hot day. Not eating Doritos. Okay. Let's let's move back on co op this for our pockets. So now I really wanted to get a dorito sponsorship, say, Subaru, we're going to try our best I interviewed an influence or and I was like, how do you get brands to sponsor you? And she was like, I just like at them and I'm like, hey, sponsor me. And I was like, that works. I was like, I'm going start. Yeah. Now brands all the time listening. This should hashtag at Doritos in the podcast and try to try to Reagan's for putting us in this whole world where we all need to be sponsored by bringing to exists hell world. Don't you mean not show tastic world. I mean a cool, a cool ranch where the cool rate Santa Barbara ran. You brought it back to fight it. Yeah, I salute you for that. So yet Joan claims that her advice made, Nancy Reagan more popular, and it's hard to argue with that at least in the fact that Nancy Reagan did get a lot more popular. She started with like fifty, seven percent approval rating after her first year, but rose to seventy one percent by nineteen eighty five. So whether or not it was Jones doing Nancy. Reagan was a lot more popular. Right about not doing the fashion magazines too because the fashion magazines would have just been a list of like what expensive things she was doing. Acklin wearing, but also the eighties, I thought that's all anybody wanted. No, I think. I mean, I think she's trying. I think Joan was trying to create the illusion of substance where she found none. Well, you know, the main way. Yeah, right. True way to create the illusion of substances to not talk that much that's true or or do just appear. I mean, when she had Nancy, kind of choose her projects and then mentioned those all the time, she's also kind of editing out anything else. Nancy might want to say overweight, less well giving you're talking point. Yeah, in, yeah, in Joan works started with Nancy, Reagan's image, but it did not in there as the months and years went on. ANSI came to rely on Joe and more and more. It's hard to say what influence her husband's worsening health had on this, but Jones involvement in the Reagan administration became extensive. Here's a quote from Joan. I was responsible for timing. I'll press conferences. Most speeches, the state of the union addresses the takeoffs and landings of Air Force. One I picked the time of Ronald Reagan's debate with Carter in the two debates with Walter Mondale all extended trips abroad as well as the shorter trips in one day excursions. In other words, Reagan did not leave the White House without Jones say-so. She also helped the Reagans make major health decisions. Quote, I delayed President Reagan's first operation for cancer from. July tenth nineteen eighty five to July thirteenth and chose the time for Nancy's mistake Demy so she's got an unbelievable amount of influence. Don't even think it was weird that they were having like press conferences at like twelve twenty five or something, you know they, they did like there were like, that's one of the quotes from earlier, is people talking about. It was weird the times they set for things and nobody really knew exactly why, but there would be mess why? Nancy said this isn't a good time. Seems like I like some smoking gun of that. Yeah, that Joan was picking the time that they were times. No, it's one of those things like it's definitely like no one who is at who's closely administration's refuted. Any of this ANSI said it wasn't that big a deal. True, but Donald Regan's like no thing. It sure was a thing. It's important that you understand John quickly never claimed to be clear voice, which is how Donald Regan described her. I don't think Donald Regan was an astrology guy. She claims that a clairvoyant is a mystic or psychic while Jones yourself is basically a scientist, and this is her view of astrology. I base my Esther logical analysis on the data provided by strana mors in charts calculated by computers. My conclusions are based on this accurate scientific material in the same way, your doctor support this diagnosis by the laboratory reports in a communist basis, his predictions on statistics, so Joan didn't have a computer for own. This was the eighties. She would send a lot of the information that she was calculating off to third party companies who had computers, which means that in addition to the unsecured phone call, she was having with Nancy Reagan about the president's secret schedule. She was also sending off that information to strangers. Was she saying in her what she likes sending postcards basically saying the president wants to have air force Lunt one launching, you know to this place on this date at this time. All she says is that no one could have figured out what they were talking about based on the info. She gave those people, but we're having to take her word from, right, right. So I'm just, I'm just setting that up. Then there's a severe breach in the presence of her mation security as a result of this. This astrology thing that's going on. So Joan is a serious lady. She had nothing but contempt for astrologers who write for newspapers magazines like she used to do when she was young needed, the money. She reaches that there are at present no forced standards for astrologers in that unworthy people cannot be prevented from assuming what should be a respected title. So she's very angry about popular astrology, which is the strategy that people can afford if they can afford a newspaper, miss quickly, spent a large chunk of her book trying to convince us that astrologers have been historically necessary in government. She points out that most great kings had astrologers that Isaac Newton believed in astrology, that Einstein believed in astrology. So like she spends a lot of her book trying to convince. You that it's fine for an astrologer to advising the president. Now in her view of the world, every achievement of the Reagan era, and also every human achievement in general was made possible by the combination of the star is being in the right position. She credits miracle flight to the fact that Neptune Pluto were together in the air sign of Gemini and the early nineteen hundreds. That's true. Okay. Good. Good to know. I thought it was like people fell. Yeah, everybody know the air dying until they got it, right. No, it's good. That's magnets. I could go back and forth about like all the different things Joan believe. I wound up putting a lot more of that in the first draft of this that I trimmed out just because like, let's keep it to the Reagans. It is important that she claims to put an huge amount of work to the charts that she was doing. So for example, exact birth times are necessary for good horoscopes since Ronald Reagan was born back in the olden times before people kept track of when babies were born Joan had to rectify him, which is the term she uses for some reason for figuring out someone's birth time using backwards math. So she claims to have calculated with Gorbachev and Ronald Reagan's birth times. Did. How what backwards math is like, I'm I'm dying to know about back a little bit of magic. Are you? I got that quote when you don't know what time of day in individual was born and for serious astrology, the exact birth time is indispensable. You must figure it out from such clues as the known events that person's past their appearance and psychological and physical characteristics. Not already explained by the other factors and their horoscope. It's not math. No, no. She claims to know the exact minute. It's like reverse. She's like, oh, he seems like he was born in around twelve twenty five. So it seems like an afternoon. Yeah. Seems like a four. Thirteen finality to be like, okay. Yeah, sure. Yeah. Yeah. And everyone who could have proved a wrong on this been dead for decades. 'cause Reagan was born in like the teens? Yeah, you know, clocks than either so. So we have to cut for some. What of those things where people sell stuff and other people learn about products and services? Rita's Doritos. We're having a Doritos break now. So you guys have a crunch tastic time listening to these add taste ads. And

Nancy Reagan Joan Nancy Joan President Reagan president Joan Quigley Trump Reagan Donald Trump Reagan Reagan administration Twitter Jones Donald Regan Trump Reagans Joe Kennedy George W Bush Air Force John screw magazine
"reagan" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

Behind the Bastards

12:03 min | 2 years ago

"reagan" Discussed on Behind the Bastards

"If Nancy Reagan's version of things is true and Merv Griffin didn't counter her at least when she when she recalled this than this lady reached out to Merv because he knew that Merv was gonna talk to Nancy, Joan reached out to Merv and said, oh, I predicted what happened to President. Reagan, I saw it coming in which case. So in which case, one of two things is true. Either. Astrology does work in this lady legitimately saw that President Reagan was in mortal danger had the first lady's phone number in didn't reach out and call her or astrology doesn't work that way in Joan just lied. Merv Griffin because she knew Nancy would hear from she just saying I could have predicted it if you would. Had me on on the job already. That's what her memoir. That's what Jones says in her memoir Nancy's like saying that Joan called Merv Griffin and was like, I could have stopped it yet according to what Merv said, Nancy. Reagan Joan told Merv the president should have stayed home. I could see from my charts that this was going to be a dangerous day for. I'm gonna go ahead and believe Joan. Yeah, me too. Because really? Yes, because I think that it's way more credible that she would say I wasn't looking if I had, then I could have predicted it because why would you know? Yeah, I, I think that that's way more likely because if she had known, she would have also tried to reach out because she'll 'cause it would have achieved the same Louis. But what the reason I believe Nancy's account is because they both admit that Nancy stops calling Joan after Ronald wins the presidency. But after the assassination attempt, wouldn't you think that Nancy would kind of start reaching out, but I think Nancy would start reaching out if one of her friends says this astrologer tells. Me, she predicted think the empties looking for clues. She was admittedly freak out. She was admittedly and freak out mode, but it also she she's presented with a solution which is that this lady predicted the assassination and I could've stopped it if I kept talking her, but don't you think that it also makes Nancy seem like a more reasonable person if she claims that will then Merv who everyone loves called me and said, you know, like astrology is not bullshit, as opposed to having to admit, I was so freaked out that I reached out to my oldest, Roger that I only had to drop because it was like kind of tacky. Well, she doesn't say that she dropped Joan because it was kind of tacky. She's actually totally positive about Joan. Like Nancy, Reagan's never anything, but nice like glue. She the bodies are buried. Yeah. I mean, I don't like Joe never do. Never talks about the bodies being buried junk got paid off to just take this money for this too. Pro Joan people. You know, this is what I want because I can't be mad at somebody for scamming, Nancy Reagan. 'cause Nancy, Reagan sucks. So bad that like she, but it, but tell us more if there was only money at stake. I wouldn't care if it out that Joan was like, Nancy. Reagan like the star say, you should like pretend the aids crisis isn't happening like then I'll turn on Joni. Not quite that. It does tie the war on drugs. I think some of that is just Nancy Reagan. Yeah, that's yes. Some of that's Nancy Reagan. I feel like I think she called Merv so that she could get Nancy because she knew that if Nancy heard from her, like she would like, oh, I could have stopped this like like that rings true were to me the Nancy Reagan calling Joan and being like, could you have predicted it? And can you make everyone love me? I still believe Joan. I don't know. I know people who are very obsessed with their astrologers, and I think some, yes, true that they'll get sort of like not great readings. And then. Something scary happens and they reach out almost like a therapist that is plausible to I just have trouble believing number one that the conversation immediately swung from. Can you stop my husband from dying to Kenya, make America, love me. No, I don't think I think the same thing. 'cause she's like, if my husband dies, I'm not first lady anymore. Like I both need my husband to stay alive and then to be the most Keno because she's an actress. She just wants to be playing the part of the the first lady that everyone loves. Yeah, I guess part of it comes down to whether or not you believe she's a shitty actress, which is why and Ronald wasn't a great. They were both not good actors, which is why they're not believable. I mean in fairness, there were like two good actors back then. Yeah, but they were the the knock good actors who snitched on people at the blacklist trials, so we need it. We've been new, they were bad. Yeah, I don't know. So. Okay. So we're, we're, you guys are coming down on Joan was just responding to legitimate job offer, and I'm thinking Joan was trying to like sneaker way back into the Reagan's life by taking advantage of an assassination attempt. So that's where we are right now. All right. So we'll see where everyone's opinions lineup at the end of this story. So I should probably note right now for the sake of completion. Joan does claim at another point in her memoir to have foreseen something terrible and not told Nancy Reagan about it. She claims that she predicted Nancy, Reagan's cancer and said, nothing Nancy's horoscope had indicated to me months in advance that she would develop breast cancer. I didn't want to alarm her by coming right out and telling her I knew all too well would a warrior. She was. So I did what I always do. In such cases, I advise her to have monthly checkups and frequent mammograms, certain that the doctors. Would discover it the minute developed. Which strikes me is a little bit of a dick move, but I don't know. Maybe that's a strategy standard practice to, I mean, the odds of getting breast cancer. If you're a woman are so high, that it's a pretty safe bet to say. At some point, you'll get cancer. But I mean, if she told Nancy Reagan, I see that you're going to get cancer. What could Nancy Reagan have done other than exactly what she advised her to do. I mean, what can you do? If you know you're about to get cancer other than see a doctor? And I think this again part may tie back to the fact that I don't think she for saw any of this. And she says, claiming later after the fact to have foreseen someone's cancer to make her sound good, which doesn't sound good though. No, administer sound terrible on tariffs. There's no way to say, I knew you were going to get cancer. Didn't tell you, and I'm not surprised that the Reagans would take all their advice from like an amoral scammer because that's what they are. Yes. And we'll we'll, I mean, yeah, we're, we're, we're, we're in that world California scammers. I also feel like. They were coming from California where it's like nineteen eighty. Like who doesn't have a personal trip travel. Yeah, which is part of the thing like they're like one. She's always got. She's got all these pictures in the book where it'll be like someone some Senator or whatnot, and she'll be like Senator such and such didn't have an issue with my astrology because he had an astrologer and it's like, okay, if she had had like a like a priest on call or whatever. Yeah, it seems like it's kind of the same thing. Yeah. I mean, maybe more acceptable to middle America. She's got a priest than if she don't. They love horoscopes. Yeah, who doesn't van Jellicoe might not. Yeah. And I would say the difference between a precent horoscope is that a priest and I, I'm not into religion either, but a priest doesn't claim to be predicting the future for you. A priests can just be like like the priests that most presidents talked to. They're not like being like, hey, what time should I take my plane off? Like should I do this meeting? They're like, what does God say about bombing? People in the Sudan, and apparently God's fine with it. But yeah, anyway. We've, we've gotten past the assassination attempt in Jones prediction of Nancy, Reagan's cancer. So yeah, after after the assassination attempt, Joan gets the offer to become the astrologer for the Reagan White House, and she decides to take it on, she says that, you know, she knew that if she took the Reagans on quote, it'd be giving up all my time and effort like those who take part in any administration sacrificing the rewards, they command in the private sector in order to serve their country. She exclusive to the Reagans. No. No, she's this. This is nonsense. This is just one of their client, and she was paid extraordinarily wealthy. Three thousand dollars a month in nineteen, which is today nine thousand dollars a month for her clients. That's what I wanted. Now. She doesn't go into much detail. Merv Griffin was definitely one of them, but she was like a lot of famous San Francisco, socialite stuff, wealthy people in this. This is a big trend in the book is Joan bragging about how selfless she is for working for the Reagan's. She claimed that Nancy begged her to take them on for free because the Reagans didn't have much money, but they eventually settled on a some which again, Joan claims were basically poverty wages, but which was about nine grand a month in rotted money, which is in my mind, a lot of money, she remarks regularly like pretty much every chapter how heroic she is for taking just this pittance quote, I charge Nancy a monthly fixed fee because she needed much more my time than she could afford. This was very generous on my part because I often worked longer than time for a while when an emergency would arise. I was working as long as nine hours uninterrupted. Oh my goodness. Oh my God. Yeah. In this is I, I guess another call it to the Doritos people if they want to sponsor the podcast, I will work nine hours uninterrupted on a a Doritos themed monster podcast. We're trying to get the Doritos people to the Rita crumbs thrill. Yeah, I feel like they're the perfect ship for dictator based comedy. Mancha's might be in the running, but I think Doritos is more of like the, you know, from delay cram as you might say, yeah, yeah, someone on Twitter came up with a great hashtag nachos, not Nazis, which I think, yeah, yeah, we can. We can sell some Doritos anyway back to the Reagan's. So yeah, in Nancy's version of events, which again, nobody's credible here, which is why I'm grateful to have y'all's perspective on the matter. 'cause I just wanted a painting Joan, but you're right, Nancy. Reagan does not deserve to be taken seriously or literally at her own word either. So Nancy claims that Joan became a crutch in something of a therapist, but nothing more, you know, she would call her when she was anxious about something or meeting that Ronnie was going to have, and I can't not call him Ronnie now because I read that a thousand times. And I think that Nancy is lying about this. I don't think she's lying about using Jonas a therapist that does not seem out of that of the pale at all right. But I do think that Nancy's fibbing about Joe, not having a big role in the administration because Donald Regan's account backs up Jones claim that she was important and she was making major calls. It is interesting to me that Nancy's only nice to Joan in her memoir. She says Joan was sweet and emotionally supportive and expresses admiration for how she handled the press. When the story broke. It's interesting to me that Jones spends her whole book attacking, Nancy Reagan, and making her look like a monster with quotes like Nancy was almost totally innocent of history. I was often surprised by how little she knew about it. She was in no way and intellectual deeply reflective, which I don't disagree with, but is not a nice way to refer to the person who is the only reason that you're noteworthy. Maybe she thinks it's not the only reason she's not worthy. That's the difference between a politician in a psychic? Yeah, Plain Dealer. Yeah, yeah. In Joan makes a big point about how much Nancy Reagan hated. Ille- whistle the holocaust, survivor and author and what he won a. Was it a Nobel? I think, yeah, she says that Nancy Reagan hated. Ily was l because of he made a big fuss. When Reagan laid a wreath at a cemetery were Nazis buried, which is a reasonable thing to be angry about if you're a holocaust survivor when we sell, became vocal about it and sparked an outcry Joan claims. Nancy said he acts like he's crazy, it's his fault. He's a fanatic. And after this point, Joan chimes end to say that she doesn't think Nancy was a racist in the most racist way possible to be fair, Nancy was not a religious bigot. She liked her wealthy Jewish friends as well as her friends of other religions.

Reagan Joan Nancy President Reagan Merv Griffin Reagan White House Jones Reagans America breast cancer cancer Ronald President Joe Kenya Doritos California Ille Ily Plain Dealer van Jellicoe
"reagan" Discussed on Presidential

Presidential

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"reagan" Discussed on Presidential

"So close but not not closer nancy reagan told me in lieu there are times when there is a barrier there that i even i can't get beyond but this is not something that is is exclusive to reagan third lots of great men who keep part of themselves always to themselves the person who most readily comes to mind is ronald reagan's first title franklin roosevelt i dunno three or four dozen books on fdr and in every one of em you find some passage by people who knew him that they didn't know what he was thinking couldn't there were some part of him the the could never penetrate i think it's sort of add to the mystique of both presidents had also could make frustrating to deal with but it's a quality that that you see replicated in other leaders said was in nineteen sixty team when reagan was fifty one years old he officially switched his party affiliation from damage teen being a republican and a couple of years later he gave a speech in support of republican candidate barry goldwater which basically garnered attention in the sphere of national politics and here's here's a little clip preserving ronald reagan.

ronald reagan barry goldwater franklin roosevelt fifty one years
"reagan" Discussed on Presidential

Presidential

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"reagan" Discussed on Presidential

"Well sell at me that leads indeed there's this question that i i've asked on just about every episode as so you know humor me that uh what do you imagine it would be like to go on a blind date with ronald reagan will a lotta pupils is gone was ronald reagan between donald his first merged in the media nancy reagan actually uh talked to a couple of people who did they found reagan's light hearted charming very sociable and polite and good manners they liked that dressed will kind to generous to his the person he was worth but also and this was after marriage that he thought was going to last forever a little bit remote not eager to rush into a commitment but he was he was charming to be with a remote rain was one of the people that i've known a a who who women fell foreign men liked he had a uninsured to him a self confidence the people liked so you had mentioned did you know that he could be difficult to now and i've i've heard that set of him before as well and what exactly is meant by that i mean if he was mormon charming i mean what's what's the part of him that that struck people as unknown our our our our urgent afar with because so armor will show the child will alcohol or can if you're a you you've seen things that you don't you don't wanna share and you put the somewhere in the back of your brain so you allow people to get.

ronald reagan donald his