30 Burst results for "radiolab"

Tucker Carlson writer resigns after racist posts revealed

Radiolab

01:06 min | 5 months ago

Tucker Carlson writer resigns after racist posts revealed

"The top writer for Fox News star Tucker Carlson's Primetime Show, has resigned after CNN revealed he'd written a Siri's of racist and sexist posts under a pseudonym. NPR's David Folkenflik reports. The incident brings fresh scrutiny to Carlson over his commentaries. The writer Blake never posted about blacks, Asian Americans and women for years, suggesting whites needed to defend themselves against a society increasingly defined by people of color. Among the way CNN identified him a selfie Neff posted online showed him in the reflection of a window taking the picture. Fox confirmed Neff's resignation but would not comment. Carlson has repeatedly been condemned for flirting with racism and sexism, or according to critics even embodying them. Most recently, Carlson question the patriotism of Senator Tammy Duckworth's a double amputee from her U. S Army days when Iraqi insurgents blasted the helicopter. She was flying out of the sky. Issues of Thai descent. Crossing did not come in about Neff. But in a segment Friday night, he complained of an online mob, especially, he said, CNN. David Folkenflik. NPR NEWS

Tucker Carlson CNN Neff David Folkenflik Writer NPR Tammy Duckworth Fox News Blake Siri FOX Senator U. S Army
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

06:43 min | 1 year ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"And I was I had done a favor God had taken the baby back in my mind the baby was better off back with God than it would have been with me and they wouldn't play it on the radio back at that time is one of my best song ever played on the radio they wouldn't play it on the radio not because kid died but because she got pregnant because it was a nail that that tom see that was when I wrote that that was in my early days of my career and I wanted to put it out as a single RCA wouldn't do it keep in mind this song was written five years before Roe v Wade but I suggest as the Dalai that maybe one of the reasons are seed in WanNa put it out is it it's just too Dr well you as a songwriter and see you gotta remember too that's how I grew up all those mountain songs and all those old songs from the World English Irish Scottish Welsh ballads about the Knoxville girl ah getting killed and throw it in the Knoxville river and I was very impressionable okay okay okay just take a digression here because that song the dollar just mentioned sent me down another rabbit hole in the didn't catch it when she said the Knoxville girl getting killed and throw it in the Knoxville River but listening back I was like wait what a Knoxville girl thrown in a river it turns out this is a very old Appalachian Ballard that is sung from the perspective of a man who goes to meet his young wife or girlfriend I guess and they're taking a walk along over and then all of a sudden off the ground and that bagger state he begs for mercy but he keeps beating the stick till she's unconscious and then hey eh drags her hair into that then he throws her in the river I was like wait this is what she was talking about I grew up with that what is this twisted song who's the so why does the guy murder her so I ended up calling this journalist Paul please you're doing John Steams Paul slade he's a music writer based in London and recently wrote a book all about this old unprepared to die which looks at the real murder stories behind Knoxville girl on a range of other American about its first you told me is that there are tons of these songs stabbed her with you almost always about a man shot or Sousa killing a woman often his wife by shooting her or online under to drown you will he drowning her that's a big one but with the Knoxville Girl Song Paul did was he traced it back from East Tennessee where Dollywood heard it back to England the first version of the Song I've seen sixty nine hundred five or thereabouts we can't be talked about the songs originally called the bloody Miller I went looking for surviving copies of the bloody milas ballot sheet which now obviously there are no original recordings of the song but he did manage to find a copy of the sheet music from the original printing three hundred thirty years ago and at the top of that sheet music there was like a little intro says this true unjust account of one Francis Cooper of Hog Sto Nash Roseberry Company one and Nichols for the space of two years and being urged by her father to marry her he most wickedly on barbarously murdered her Oh wow so it lays it all out right there well yes we've got the name of the killer his victim and we call their location which is Shrewsbury all goes to Shrewsbury around the archives finds a copy of a diary from shoot keeper at the time confirms that yes there was a murder that happened right at the time that the song was written he visits the grave the murder victim confirms that yes she was a real person he checks the burial records to confirm that yes her death was actually very violent and it was the age old story the woman and Nichols was pregnant and the Guy Francis Cooper he's got these go pregnant and he doesn't want to marry her though by wise likely happened is that this Guy Francis Cooper the killer gets caught and on the day of his execution as songwriter showed up to witness the hanging and then mmediately documented it and song which was a common practice at the time very often the sheets themselves actually soda public hangings while the condemned man was swinging the that'd be people wondering around selling biology telling the story of that particular crime so it really was like almost journalism yeah yeah that's that's the big point eh and are these songs usually sung from the perspective of the murderer deal eight much more common to to tell them in the words of the murderer Paul says these songs were actually pretty big business songwriters would go to the hangings and then travel from town to town singing the songs for money they would changed the name of the song match the town that they were in and that's probably what happened at some point one of the waiters hopped on a boat came to east Tennessee changed the song to Knoxville girl and that was his son to little Dolly Parton on her porch perhaps one to see dollies early SAS songs period is that she was taking these songs that she'd heard as a girl these pulpy ballads of men brutally killing nameless women Sung almost always from the perspective of the men and she was flipping it so that you finally heard from the victim.

three hundred thirty years two years
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"What is that first line. Lb Mistake ever made the doctor didn't thank thank me he just slapped me face well as Iraq come up come up really good live really good so where does it go from that was really really early on in those early early days growing up in the early eighties I mean what am I mean associations with Dolly before this project was she sort of a punchline like she was her own punchline you know like I remember she would go on Leno or Letterman you look terrific and upstairs earlier today we were discussing you're wait they talk about our wait for a little while they didn't talk about how she looks then inevitably always asking but then she would make it even better joke about arrests do you know what's worse than a giraffe with a sore throat and they said no answer is the chase cold here's another example the headline on the other major new story today to which we intend to devote some time simple hello dolly the first cloned sheep is known as Dolly the sheep this is Helen Morales author of the book pilgrimage to Dollywood scientists is managed to clone a sell single memory cell from a six year old you sell was from a mammary gland so these mental be good idea it would be a good idea to call the Dalai after Dolly Parton Dolly I don't think I need to explain anymore than that but the sting in the in that story is characteristically Dolly Parton is that when she heard about this she invited the sheep wanted served scientific purpose to come and live Dollywood so when you go on these shows and they make a joke about you and you double the joke you what is that pardon me thinks pardon me loves that part of me thinks why wouldn't you just tell these people like come on I've written five thousand songs we bought my songs so I don't know I have to go out with my tits hanging out showing them pushing them out there and not expect somebody to make some kind of a comment on it and I know what they're thinking so I'd rather say it before they do and then we get fed off our chest so to speak and by the way yeah no I've said it before but I really do like I just think well you know I mean this is how I look of course you're going to would you sit see I do that too for the public I mean it's like a little comedy thing in that sense by the way Dolly was actually referencing something she'd wants told Barbara Walters like years ago show business is a money making joke and I've just always liked telling jokes but do you ever feel that your job doc people make fun of you don't make fun of me but actually all these years the people you know have have thought the joke was on me but it's actually been on the public so yeah grown up and I think I speak for many people of my generation when I say this lease many men Dali part was seen when is this kind of joke maker this cloud of jokes always swirling around her jokes people would make about her that you'd make about herself maybe on the public I don't know but her persona was so big that often is the only thing that got noticed but then I'll be honest one of the first bits of guidance that we got as we were embarking on this series and by we I mean myself and producer Shimon really is she most talking with writer Hell Morales you heard earlier Helen was basically telling Shema look you can talk about the persona in the jokes but it would pitchy if somewhere and you'll series they want something about her solar I take the only thing I would say is tree to lyrics seriously in a way the Johnny cash books about his lyrics Hank Williams has been taken seriously that Dolly Parton hasn't in those early songs as some writer and you've got to remember too that's how I grew up now hardcore dolphins will know this but Dali's discography goes back all the way to nineteen sixty seven and the songs on those first four albums it's an ocean of pain those songs which are which many people don't know about they're not the one sort of made the that the charts that they provide an insistent witnessing of women's lives that's how Helen Morales puts women being treated really badly by man.

Iraq six year
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

14:59 min | 1 year ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"Hey this is radio lab is supported by IBM problems inspire IBM to push the world forward that's why so many people work with IBM on everything from city traffic the real and they start talking about her uh which brings us back to I used to analyze sabotage that's what was really surprising there's some darkness.

IBM
What's Left When You're Right?

Radiolab

03:53 min | 1 year ago

What's Left When You're Right?

What's Left When You're Right?

Radiolab

02:37 min | 1 year ago

What's Left When You're Right?

Taliban attack kills 8 election officials in Afghanistan

Radiolab

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Taliban attack kills 8 election officials in Afghanistan

"Taliban militants have carried out a suicide attack on the office of Afghanistan's independent election commission in Kandahar, killing at least eight people can't Hawes provincial. Police chief said full vehicles, packed with the explosives have been detonated during the attack in Maruf district Afghan security forces also said, also said to have suffered

Taliban Maruf Kandahar Afghanistan
Flooding impairs drinking water treatment for Kansas City, Missouri

Radiolab

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Flooding impairs drinking water treatment for Kansas City, Missouri

"News. The missouri. River has crested and it's starting to recede. But that doesn't mean problems are over for people in parts of Missouri, and Kansas SAM's f for member station. K C, you are has more the flood is caused water quality problems in Kansas City. The water department says the high river is making it harder to filter out a tiny parasite the city says it's not an emergency and technicians are adjusting filtration, but people with compromised immune systems, the elderly and parents with infants might want to use bottled water. The national weather service says the Missouri will slowly recede, but won't be below flood stage for a day or two the flooding has closed major highways in northwest, Missouri. A busy bridge between Missouri, and Kansas and shutdown Amtrak's river runner between Kansas City and Saint Louis

Missouri Kansas City Kansas Water Department Saint Louis
U.S.'s Lighthizer, Mnuchin to travel to China for trade talks

Radiolab

00:20 sec | 1 year ago

U.S.'s Lighthizer, Mnuchin to travel to China for trade talks

"The White House says President Trump is sending his top tray. Trade negotiators to China for top level trade talks within days. Treasury secretary. Steve Mnuchin will join US Trade Representative Robert lighthizer in Beijing. The current plans are for the Chinese vice premier and his delegation to continue talks in Washington a week

Us Trade President Trump White House Steve Mnuchin Beijing Robert Lighthizer China Representative Washington
Oscar TV Ratings Hit All-Time Low 26.5 Million Viewers

RadioLab

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Oscar TV Ratings Hit All-Time Low 26.5 Million Viewers

"In an effort to shorten the Academy Awards telecast, some Oscars will be presented during commercial breaks this year. Here's NPR's Bob Mondello last year's Oscars ceremony ran three hours and fifty three minutes and had the lowest viewership in Oscar history on the theory that those two facts are related the motion picture academy committed to producing a three hour show this year one way they hope to get to that running time is by awarding four categories best cinematography, film editing live. Of action short and make up and hairstyling during commercial breaks. Although an edited version of those presentations will be aired later in the broadcast some academy. Members are not satisfied director off Lonzo choir on a multiple nominee this year for the film. Roma tweeted in the history of cinema. No, one single film has ever existed without cinema, tog RAFI, and without editing. The Oscars telecast will air Sunday February twenty

Academy Awards Bob Mondello NPR Oscar Roma Director Fifty Three Minutes Three Hours Three Hour
Pope says priests' abuse of nuns went as far as "sexual slavery"

RadioLab

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Pope says priests' abuse of nuns went as far as "sexual slavery"

"Pope Francis is for the first time is acknowledging the sexual abuse of nuns by priests and bishops speaking to reporters today board, the papal plane, the pontiff said, should we do something more? Yes. Is there? The will. Yes. The pope then going on to say that is a process that has already begun Francis noted that Pope Benedict the sixteenth or taken action against the French order after some of its religious sisters have been reduced to what he called quote sexual slavery at the hands of pressure. Their founders the issue of nuns being abused as come to the forefront as a church also deals with abuse of children by Catholic

Pope Francis Pope Benedict
Hedge-Fund-Backed Media Group Makes Bid for Gannett

RadioLab

00:41 sec | 2 years ago

Hedge-Fund-Backed Media Group Makes Bid for Gannett

"Owns Alden. Global capital is offering a premium over what can that was worth at the end of trading. Last Friday, all news is secretive hedge fund based in New York City Gannett owns one hundred local media outfits, including big ones in Detroit, Phoenix and demoing nationally. It's powered by USA today. As recently as two thousand sixteen Gannett was bidding for other large newspaper companies. Now, the tables are turned Gannett is known for relentless cost cutting its newsrooms famously kept lean to meet quarterly earnings demands for shareholders in an industry where most of the trend lines are down Alden has if anything gained an even more brutal reputation at the papers, it has acquired with severe cuts even in newsrooms posting double digit prophets. Can that says it

Gannett Alden USA New York Phoenix Detroit
DHS to ask Pentagon for more troops on the border

RadioLab

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

DHS to ask Pentagon for more troops on the border

"The department of homeland security is asking the Pentagon for more systems to shore up the border with Mexico is NPR's. Tom Bowman explains one request is to construct or refurbish some one hundred sixty miles of fencing. Pentagon sources say the effort could include more troops at least several months to construct. The fencing other assistance is expected to include military, medical units, and surveillance aircraft. There are now some twenty three hundred active duty troops on the border in the deployment is scheduled to run out at the end of the month. They're also more than two thousand national guard troops on the border one senior. Pentagon officials said defensing is expected to be constructed along the California and Arizona border the requests from homeland security. He comes as President Trump is negotiating with congress over funding a border wall. Trump said before if he doesn't get the money he'll have the

Pentagon President Trump Tom Bowman Defensing NPR Mexico Congress Arizona California
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"All right. So let me set this episode for you at radio lab. Part of the whole ethos here is that we've got this incredibly talented team of producers. Porter's and researchers in fact checkers and everybody's got slightly different superpowers. And so what we'll do on occasion is get together and share like tips and tricks and somewhere along the way, we ended up asking reporter producer, lots of Nassir. How do you go about finding stories because one of the things about lots of his he he finds the weirdest. Most interesting stories stories like the one you just heard about the praying monk bot or the forgotten history of our southern border with Mexico or the game theory of badminton. And you know, a pitch meetings were always like how the hell did you find that? So we asked him to talk about his process and the ended up giving a talk about it to the whole staff, and then he ended up writing an article about it for transom dot org. And that article sorta went viral, and we figured we should just pass along some of his advice to everybody. And so one of our Newark. Juicers, Rachel Q sick got on the phone with lots of and he went through some of his tips and tricks, and I think their stuff in here that we can all steel that'll just make twenty nineteen more interesting and fun. So yeah, here's a bit of that conversation. I hope is you're listening. You'll be motivated to help us out for twenty nineteen. But here it is Latino there, I am also getting this is an excerpt of a conversation between Rachel cutic- and lots of Nassir on story. Finding like if the game is you want stories that people haven't heard before like you have to look in places where people aren't looking because people like the the low hanging fruit is all taken you just just assume that and it's like, okay, I'm gonna do some bizarre aerial acrobatic move. And that's gonna land me on this weird random tree branch. And then oh, wait a second. There's all this fruit over here that nobody's even touch lots of ended up listing for Rachel a few of his moves a few of the things he is engineer. To get him onto those out of the way, tree branches. And these are some of my favorite fun things to do to find new stories lamb on me. So okay. So one of them is Google alerts. So you may or may not be familiar with Google alerts because you set one for yourself because that's what most people do. But the most fun way to use Google or two I find is that so what I do. Sometimes I just come up with phrases that I think are fun or funny, and I just sat Guler on them. So one of the ones that has been very interesting for me is I use the phrase the human equivalent of. So I just set little for the phrase the human equivalent of anytime anyone on the internet uses that phrase the human equivalent of like, I find. Here's another one I use bizarre. But brilliant. People say often and no not it's not. But that's the thing. That's why that the few times then it does get used like you're like, oh, exactly. Or like, another one. I have a self-fulfilling prophecy. I love that. So when whenever anyone on the internet is talking about self fulfilling prophecies, I'm gonna know about it and not to say that it's important that read any of that stuff. In fact, most of the time, I just elite it I just like glance at it, and delete it. But every like, I think of them as like little scratch off tickets or something they're like story lottery. Tickets like one day, they're going to yield me something. But who knows? So that's that's one Google alerts on weird phrases. What what else was on the list? Is there more let me see here? Oh, okay. And this is one we I think we just do a right now. Although maybe I don't know if you have to run out the door. No, no, I'm good. What do you want to do? Okay. Let's so it's just a Wikipedia surfing. Like, I this is my go-to way of procrastinating. I just love whip Lia..

engineer Google Rachel cutic Porter Rachel Q Newark Mexico reporter Guler Lia producer one day
Trump Blasts Fed as Mnuchin Bids to Reassure Investors

RadioLab

04:55 min | 2 years ago

Trump Blasts Fed as Mnuchin Bids to Reassure Investors

"Fed officials don't have a feel for the market. He tweeted the fed is like a powerful golfer who can't score because he has no touch. He can't putt over the weekend. There are reports. Trump wanted to replace fed chair Jerome Powell reports which Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin tried to walk back, but Mnuchin also made investors jittery he called the heads of major banks to confirm everything was. Okay. Just because to make some sense of this. We've caught up Binyamin Appelbaum from the New York Times. Thanks for being here. Glad to join you. So there were reports over the weekend that Trump has asked advisors if he can remove Powell I want to start with just that big picture question here. Can he it's a really big and open question at the moment. The law says that he can only remove a member of the Fed's board of governors quote for 'cause unquote and most legal scholars basically made think that that means you can't remove head of the fed just because you don't like his policymaking decisions. But there is a separate question about whether he could be removed as the chairman of the board of governors, even just because the president wants to the law doesn't address that directly in some legal scholars think the president has greater latitude to remove Powell from the chairman's job then to remove him entirely from the board of governors. What would the implications be if he did push him out if he tried to push him out even? You know, I spoke with a stock market analyst yesterday who said what we've seen to this point in the markets would pale in comparison to what happened if the president removed foul, and the reason is basically that financial markets have a really strong preference for allowing technocrats to manage monetary policy. They don't want interest rates in the hands of politicians. The whole reason for the creation of the fat was to avoid a situation in which politicians like the president could exert pressure on the fed to hold down rates in the short-term goosing the economy, but causing it to overheat. So the fear of the markets would be that the removal of Powell would signal a loss of independence for the fed. And there'd be a likelihood that investors would respond to that. In a way that none of us would probably appreciate right? Are there? Other ways the president could move the fed more to his way of thinking without sort of pushing Powell out. Yeah. And you know, what's so striking? Here is the past presidents have often exercise. The pressure on the fed quite successfully in a variety of more subtle ways. So probably the most obvious and important is that the fit the president gets to decide who sits on the feds board. He appointed Powell he's appointed three of the other four governors, so far two more nominees are waiting for Senate confirmation. What's striking is that all of those people appeared to be committed to raising interest rates. So the president is not giving radically. Yeah. He's chosen people who don't agree with him about monetary policy, which is kind of remarkable and past presidents have been much more careful to pick people for the feds board who do agree with them. Presidents also have sought to pressure the fed privately and publicly through history, essentially by jawboning in the same way that Trump has but most of them have been much more subtle and discreet about it. So the president being as public as he has been maybe contributed to the big market drop today. But we also saw Steven Mnuchin make investors. It seemed nervous when he started calling Bank heads sort of saying, no, no everything's fine. Don't panic when no one was panicking. What do you make of that? I it is. It was a remarkable display state has been under enormous pressure from the president to calm the stock market. I think President Trump believes that the stock market can be made to go back up, and he's demanding that someone do that. And and secretary Mnuchin responded to that pressure by reaching out to the heads of banks to have these conversations on Sunday where he basically sought their assurance that everything is going fine. But as you say, it was the equivalent of an. Announcing that a problem didn't exist. No one thought it existed. It's like saying, you know, everybody rest easy. We have plenty of zombie vaccine in store and all of a sudden people are thinking about zombies. So it was a very odd performance, and it really appears to have contributed to the market's declined today. Really freaked people out. It's the type of thing we only hear Treasury Secretary saying when things are actually going quite badly. So you think it was just a misplayed hand it certainly feels like it. Yeah. And we've heard that frankly from observers across the political spectrum that it just feels like Mnuchin made a mistake that he gave the market comfort in a form that the market found very disconcerting Binyamin Appelbaum from the New York Times. Thanks so much. My pleasure. So just how bad was it today? We'll have the details when we do the numbers.

FED President Trump Jerome Powell Steven Mnuchin Binyamin Appelbaum New York Times Donald Trump Chairman Secretary Senate Analyst
Saudi crown prince pledges Aramco IPO by early 2021: Bloomberg

Radiolab

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

Saudi crown prince pledges Aramco IPO by early 2021: Bloomberg

"Saudi Arabia's crown prince insisted the stalled plan to sell shares in oil giant Saudi Aramco will go ahead. The story on that from Bloomberg's Charlie Pellett. Mohammed bin Salman is promising international public offering by twenty twenty one and sticking to his ambitious view that the state run company is worth two trillion dollars or more the common show his determination to press a head with the IPO, even after Riyadh's original timetable was undone by skepticism over the company's valuation and a plan for Aramco to buy a

Saudi Aramco Saudi Arabia Bloomberg Riyadh Charlie Pellett Mohammed Salman Twenty Twenty Two Trillion Dollars
Peacocks attack cars - BC News

Radiolab

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Peacocks attack cars - BC News

"This is weekend edition from npr news i'm scott simon president trump is trying to make nuclear peace with north korea even as he launches a trade war with some of america's closest allies trump's on it off summit with north korean leader kim jong is on again now for the moment two men will meet in singapore in ten days or the president tries to convince him to give up nuclear weapons canada mexico and the european union tried to talk trump out of using an economic weapon tariffs on imported steel and aluminum but the president wasn't persuaded that cares took effect early yesterday and here's white house correspondent scott horsely joins a scott thanks so much for being with us.

Donald Trump North Korea America Kim Jong Singapore President Trump European Union NPR Scott Simon Mexico White House Correspondent Scott Horsely Scott Ten Days
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"Collective right individual right of the militia to own a gun in the first text to consider is the phrase protect agree right to keep and bear arms and he says it if you look at the phrase the phrase keep and bear arms how it was used at the time every person who used the phrase bear arms use it to refer to the use of arms in connection with malicious serfs under says that if you look at some of madison's rough drafts of the second amendment it's pretty clear that when he says people have a right to bear arms all he really means is report for duty even if the language of caving in very arms wayne vigorously amendments first clause confirmed that the white this militia relate to sue if you're if you're right mr joan jer chief justice roberts thompson's like what will will walk why would they say the right of the people to keep arms hidden in just the people in the state militias why wouldn't they say state militias have the right to keep arms the chief justice i believe that the phrase the people and the phrase the militia were really in sync with each other the federalists farmer uses the phrase the people are the militia are the tense right doesn't that cut against do if the militia included all the people includes all the people yes i do believe that includes all the people at this point everyone's her jumps in a bunch of justness there's no list art in rubbing each other's should claw it's kind of like a scrum and they're all trying to figure out okay so when madison with the free people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed like who were the people he was talking about thinking a bit epo with those words than it was the people just the militia or everyone all the people what is the relationship between the second part of the sentence the people part and the first part of the sentence the militia harford verdoot hillary keita the go to like wife sonia commonlaw right he speaks of the commonlaw scottish highland stylish highlanders for some reason firearms at one point of this subject arms in both clauses even sorta start to diagram madison sentence i think as this court and the net result according to adam winkler.

madison justice roberts thompson hillary keita sonia commonlaw adam winkler
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"The other direction and because of that court ruling and john ashcroft letter lease three libertarian lawyers um um alan girl a constitutional attorney bob levy a cheer the board at the cato institute and clark neily he's a kedo to thought the timing was right we thought it was a good time for some litigation now one thing you need to know about these guys is that they weren't necessarily doing it for the guns they had no association with the nra or the gun rights movement for them it was more about getting the government to back off in our country when the government wants to restrict our liberty it is incumbent on the government to make the case for it is a comment on the government to say here's why you shouldn't be permitted to exercise that right so that was their ankles acid that is if you have always wondered why the gun rights movement has become such a proxy war for like antigovernment meant ism yeah well i mean if you think about it and this something professor sandy levinson told me is that sort of embedded in this amendment that is the very idea that you can take up arms against the government to protect yourself and your fellow man from tyranny on the far right or occasionally on the far left you find people who are willing to say this that this is really what's terrific about the second amendment but mainstream mm conservatives the mainstream liberals are not very happy with those arguments they are embarrassed by them and so mainstream conservatives want to talk about selfdefence against burglars and mainstream liberals wanna talk about how the second amendment protects state organized militias and almost nothing else anyway getting back to the story these three libertarian lawyers they decide to put together case and their idea was to target this really restrictive gun law in dc all handguns were banned you could own a shock on a rifle but the law specifically made it illegal to ever put around in the chamber even in selfdefence others there's really we we described it as a ban on all functional firearms but in order to challenge that law they needed to find a plaintiff interesting how do you find a plaintiff you look for somebody who got robbed what he do well we can actually instigate litigation of we can take.

bob levy cato institute clark nra sandy levinson john ashcroft attorney professor
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"In our new series opportunity costs you told us about how you're class status affects the rest of your life there couldn't be any gilbert purple heart about the idea you have i can't report on listen and subscribe to that sex and money wherever you get your podcasts god save the united states in this regard now were in two thousand eight revives the second amendment or you could even say breathe life into the second amendment because the second amendment had never been take them truly seriously by federal courts until two thousand eight or that sandy levin levinson professor at the university of texas law school jatibening rod here with sean roms firm all right so sean jad uh it's uh i guess now it's time for chapter three dick held the right near we're going to get to dick but first here's what's going on in america during second amendment has become one of those issues that can get you elected academics have begun to have a vigorous debate about its meaning but the supreme court is still staying out of it they're leaving this up to the states which already have all sorts of gun laws of their own to deal with but then december twelve 2000 republican george w bush become president elect after a divided us supreme court affectively halts recounts in florida's contested presidential vote tally but then george w bush is elected the nra likes george w bush the national rifle association and he likes that as a proud history of protecting the second amendment to the united states constitution and in two thousand in one the bush administration declared that the second amendment protected an individual right to own guns ucla law professor adam winkler again right that was not limited as most courts had held to service in the militia and almost right after he gets into office bushes attorney general john ashcroft put out a letter this public letter to the nra announcing that the department of justice had adopted a new interpretation of the second amendment and then right around the same time as the bush administration memo came out a court in texas ruled that the second amendment did protect an individual right to bear arms and that was a first two big deal before this all the decisions had kind of veered in.

university of texas texas department of justice attorney president george w bush america dick united states sandy levin john ashcroft adam winkler nra florida professor
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed nice clean totally uncomplicated sentence conveniently left out was the part that talked about a wellregulated militia being necessary for the security of a free stay as john like what about the militia part of the sentence why isn't the nra ever tug above that the militia okay beds now you get me back through is getting you if you in in sean i love you dearly trust me but it's only been in less what thirty years that if you will pardon the expression the bullshit media has turned the militia into a fourletter word the militia is you in me sean postcoup the nra took a very hard line on gun control and became an irrepressible political force in america friend and foe agree the nra's power to scare congressman lies in its ability to mobilise its members in any congressional district as a touch of a computer button based are pouring millions of dollars into lobbying and just a few years after that cincinnati revolt the nra endorses its first presidential candidate the constitution does not say that governments show decree the right to keep and bear arms reagan reagan the constitution says the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed at this point everyone and they're hyungchol lease health the militia part.

john nra congressman cincinnati reagan reagan america thirty years
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Radiolab

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"The morning four am and nobody left they were all there there were ten small months any we really do to pull this off but joe says one of the big turning point is when a guy named bob coup club gets up to the mike he was at the time the head of the institute for legislative action he gets into the mic and he played it take you remember cassette tapes right this was one that bob kuka secretly recorded i don't know how he did it but what you hear on this is bob kugler talking to his bosses at the nra and they're yelling at him be reading him for growing two or three times somebody talks about gun control their basically like bob shut up he had the tape there and he played it over the era and of course that electrified the ordeal you could actually here people gasping so that the rank and file was young audibly this would this was evidence that the other side was going to deep six the gun control fights these people on the tape they're all in the room oil there's there's sitting next to him a table over the course of this one nine hour meeting on a hot steamy night in cincinnati every single one of those fifty proposals was passed we stopped the building in colorado ensured the anory wooden change its name here they fired the leadership no just like the political cevantes that figure that hillary is going to get the presidency they just absolutely took it in their shorts and maybe the biggest change the most important change was that the institute for legislative action this political lobbying arm of the nra it was given the keys to the car they were not the bastard stepchild anymore they were the nra know what we won they had centrally staged a coup they call seventeen seventy six mrs same thing when the sun rose the very next day the nra had a whole new board committed to a new no compromises view of the second amendment in which individuals have a right not only to have a gun but to have almost any gun that they want and have as many of them as they want and can take those guns almost any place they want american gun politics literally changed overnight and just shortly after this coup the nra bolts this abridged version of the second amendment right on the wall efron center in its headquarters.

joe bob kuka bob kugler nra bob cincinnati colorado hillary wall efron center bob coup one nine hour
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Radiolab

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"The nra now right when joe and john joined the nra the organization had just for the first time so to set up this lobbying arm yeah it was the brand new institute for legislative action john actually got hired to work there in nineteen seventy six and the is true for legislative post fight for gone rice heart capitol hill that's what they both wanted it to do but let's put it this way we were the if you would the best route children of the national rifle association really yet when the is su for legislative action was formed in nineteen 75 the nra refused the institute any office space in the building in the mid 70s the part of the nra that lobbied politicians had to rent office space from the hotel next door to the nra the meeting is crazy in then right after he was hired seventy eight people fired very interests england's big firing in and there was word the theory wanted to leave washington dc sell the headquarters there and moved colorado springs in what's in colorado springs while they were going to move the headquarters and put it near this the olympic sports draining group so that they could then stirred writing all the magazine's about all the olympic sports they really didn't know however door they wanted to turn the nra from organization of firearms owners too a publishing company they wanted to get out of the politics posts the older guard didn't seem to have the stomach for whatever done fight some members wanted to hat they were very moderate they thought like maybe we should try and kinda get out of this whole gun business playing well haguenau time to get now john says there was even a moment when a report surfaced that suggested that we should change the name of the association really yeah they were going to take rifle out tell me more now we have an r a do you remember what any of those propose names or no but they they were considering at least taken rifle out oh yeah huh ha you in it it it bridled i mean i was just so pissed off and that's when the seeds have revolt were planet.

nra joe john colorado springs england washington
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Radiolab

02:31 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"Guys truly battered their way through to doors joe says he and his wife in his dog huddled in one room with a gun while these two guys stormed through his house and robbed him anything of my wife purse maybe some other money and they left i mean by that employees got there they run chose whole relationship with firearms his or predicated upon that this idea that it's for selfdefence and here he's got people breaking into his house he's got the cops not being therefore him he's got the government trying to take his gun away so what do you do you join the n r a then i joined to fight this crime control stuff but this came at a moment where the nra was at this cross roads unlike any it had seen before or since back when joe joined in the early 70s the nra was not the die hard supporter of gun rights but we know today because according adam winkler it was never meant to be the idea behind the nra marksmanship continues to be fundamental right down to this day was to increase civilian marksmanship training so that the next time there's a war americans would be capable of fighting and you know you don't hear much about the nra's founders but the nra was formed in the 1870s right after the civil war by a reporter for the new york times who thought that the union soldiers had been so ineffective in the civil war because they were not familiar with firearms really yeah for one hundred years their main focus was like teaching boy scouts how to shoot straight not the second amendment an and apparently if you go back through issues of american rifleman in the forties and fifties the nra's version of playboy guns instead of girls you'll be amazed that you can't find a single mention of the second amendment anywhere in those magazines the nra at that point was sort of like a gun trade group they were not super political and and the people who ran it they were hunters shown hunters they were just like these wealthy businessman who like to hunt according to joe rich guys through your own they were obvious but you had all these people coming in like joe and like john who were convinced that guns warn about shooting docks they were about selfdefence protecting yourself against criminals in a time of starkly rising crime rates and this would lead to the straight up headon collision at.

nra joe adam winkler reporter the new york times joe rich john playboy one hundred years
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"My father was a veteran of world war one is shown recreational shooting with my mother my i used to love to go to the amusement poured in spin old age shooting route twenty two's a little things it moved in the shooting gallery but neither one of them was particularly hard core about the gun police until around the time the black panthers kimmel on earth he means the fact that here or bunch of people who were slight lady darker complected than new england on ivy league grads running around with firearms and di did that scare people hell yes that it's scare you now then scare me i didn't john told me joe as well that it wasn't the panthers themselves that were the problem i don't like anybody that tells me i can do something it was all the gun control laws that came in the wake of the panthers lung the gun control act was passed to sixty day we began to disarm the criminals and the careless and the answer auto things disappeared that i had been used to joe says he starts to see gun shops in his neighborhood close like the furniture store and buffalo that used to have shocked on friday hours they stop selling up and he says that is really bothered him because the reason you have a gun is for protection it's like another form of insurance which wasn't an abstract idea for him buffalo in the '60s and '70s not the safest place in the world his house was even broken into i can only describe as a home invasion amid is.

di joe panthers john sixty day
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Radiolab

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"Think we should act when we turn to our mulford status symbol mulford who represented oakland is trying to put a bill in step black panthers intention to make it a misdemeanor to murder loaded rifles and shotguns and weapons in public places says bill the mulford act is up for debate at the california state capital in sacramento and bobby sealed decides the panthers should be there for the debate and that they should take their guns i took a delegation and armed delegation to the california state legislature may 2nd 1960 seven i had six women and 24 males how many guns twenty three guns and where they loaded yes so they roll up to the assembly in sacramento and guess who happens to be waiting for them right there on the front lawn of the assembly when we talk and what will you retook gets his governor i don't know who who was the governor guy by the name of win one for the gift for ronald rick i went up there whom we got their ronald reagan happened to be on the frontline reagan reagan did not know he was going to be there on the frontline that's when he was on the front lawn talking to two hundred future leaders of america's kids kids so you got ronald reagan's fifty sixty feet from us and a bunch of white kids in lebanon twelve hanging out on the front lawn of the of the state building sacramento and this at the 1960s this will be insane now with some of the kids saw us with shotguns on our shoulders and he says some of the kids come running over where we are they thought we were gun clubs at some car and then the press followed so reagan's like what's going on the press is like what's going on and body seal as his arm on a read a statement the black panther party for selfdefence calls upon the american people in general the next when i read the statement and the black people in particular to take careful note of the racist california legislature which is now considering legislation aimed at keeping the black people disarm and powers at the very same time racist police agencies throughout the country or intensifying the terror brutality murder and repression of black people and he says while he was reading that uniform capital guards come running out grabbed ronald reagan took him in.

oakland murder sacramento bobby panthers ronald rick ronald reagan reagan reagan america lebanon california reagan fifty sixty feet
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"Said you could carry a gun as long as it wasn't conceal the gun is not conceal is not a illegal so oh the black panther started policing the police we did it would go out in armed patrols and follow police cars on seven street bobby told me about the first time they did in west oakland california nightlife district he says it was a weekend night a police officer pulled over some guy and they started watching from down the street and a crowd starts to gather and is holding a gun yes he's holding the shine a gun is just a shotgun shotgun that i bought him that gun you see what it is a it's a high standard gutted caused eighty nine oh seventy nine dollars i bought the bam gun us is here you got you a shotgun now to get this white cop on onesided street arresting somebody on the other side of the street you got a dozen black eyes holding shahkot strictly fobs avaition was standing in a line ahead of everybody standing alone he told me the moment the cop noticed key immediately stopped what he was doing with the guy had pulled over and walked over to them and said you have no right to observe may and he was his no california state supreme court ruling states that every citizen has the right to stand and observe a police softer carrying out the duty as long as i said a reasonable distance away a reasonable distance costs through his h ten pre of standing approx eur 20feet for you observe you whether you like it or not he said man what kind of negroes of these let me see that gun no you cannot touch my weapon the cop says are you a marxist a who is a are you a fascist or you marches are you of fascist then the cops it well i ask you first and you say and i s you second oh you up though i mean it's like a standoff in this is where the domino's start to fall the sent off resolves itself peacefully but the cops in oakland are not happy and they they immediately start running this up the chain next thing we know we got to protect society from nuts with done and i.

bobby officer oakland california supreme court seventy nine dollars 20feet
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"Are zach zakho coco is the kind of it seems pretty high bobby theo i created the black panther quite i'm the founding chairman the national organizers of black breath party we are we standing right now we're in oakland california the black panthers so this transition from the militia to the individual my right to bear arms you could argue that that whole individual gun rights movement started in the 1960s with the black panthers in oakland it's an unlikely an kinda surprising origin for what's known as the individual rights interpretation of the second amendment we were devoured breed here i mean we so well rid guys we do our hit we know our history just give some context as 1966 it's been an exceptionally bad time for race relations all over the country what a fifteen people were illustrate quotas tres are being beaten at citizens attack dogs and hoses and in particular through the brain khalifa negroes robert getting his major tension between the black community and the police officer is most troubled lie animosity between police and negroes is open california late '60s there were several highprofile incidents of officer shooting unarmed black man this is what was happening you know what we did is that yet we took a position october 1966 body seal and his friend hugh ep newton they start this organization called the black panthers black panther party for self defense now qe bobbies cofounder huey was two years in laws you is going to the university of san francisco school of law and one day he sitting there as as you do a law school thinking about the law thinking about malcolm x thinking about what he can do in oakland and it hits them via second amendment of the constitution guarantees the citizens are right to bear arms on public property that they could argue that the second amendment gave them a right to have a gun he's said best luck constitutional democratic civil human right and no one has ever said that before well there's always been those who claim that the second amendment protected an individual right to bear arms but adam winkler says people who argued that were in the minority they went taken too seriously this is one of the first time that the individual rights reading was forced into the mainstream because the this.

chairman oakland california officer black panthers huey zach zakho bobby theo hugh san francisco school of law malcolm adam winkler two years one day
"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

Radiolab

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on Radiolab

"A whole the pieces don't seem to fit together there's some now confusion i mean it's obvious that the sentence is about someone's right to bear arms but who who gets that right at the beginning of the sentence you get a wellregulated militia the militia states have a right to form alicia has to assemble groups of people and those people got to have their guns that's easy enough but then later in the sentence there's comma the right of the people to keep and bear arms comma shall not be infringed the people which people those people over there in the militia all people if you mean all people why did you say militia it's like the first clause seems to point to some sort of collective right to bear arms and the second claus seems to point to some individual right to bear arms like this supposed to be a popularly ratified document is actually not that easy to really not that either and it's not it wasn't that easy to redone this is jeweler poor staff writer at the new yorker magazine she's also professor of american history a steady the eighteenth century i really train is a 17th and 18th century american political story and jill says from the beginning when people thought about the second amendment the tended to just focus on the first part that the primary motivation for the amendment is about militia a wellregulated militia that this confusing sentence was widely read as this collective militia right not an individual one in this truth that the second amendment in fact guarantees the right of an individual to bear arms and that the government federal government can't limit that in any fashion jill says that just didn't exist wasn't a thing a disagree with the way you've characterized that although what you said is stated in the media frequently this steven hall brooke he's represented the nra in several case of written several books on second amendment issues he actually thinks a the sentence is just fine as is i don't think is complicated all be the framers worth thinking about an individual right to bear on the second amendment refers to the right of the people to keep and bear arms first amendment refers to the right of the people peaceably to assemble amine who is added its individuals some colonel collective the.

claus staff writer new yorker magazine professor jill nra steven hall
"radiolab" Discussed on RadioLab

RadioLab

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"radiolab" Discussed on RadioLab

"Serve you shoot me because you think i have a gun i had best have a gun and if i don't have a gun you're asked going to jail because you were wrong i don't care if you're really thought so i don't care if i was tell you had a gun if i if you are not right in fact than you have to go to jail i think that is that that would be a standard that will allow us to prosecute these police officers but then a police prisons gonna disconnect argue that like you don't understand the pressures that are under it's a splitsecond decision monday morning quarterback arron if you do what you just said we're not compelled to our jobs and i would say you police officer on sick of you i would say screw you you have had your chance you've had your chance to police my community without murdering us and you have failed for three hundred years enough that's what i would say that more people might get hurt if i wasn't i'm willing to risk that i'm willing to try it that way then i read rather i'd rather ten a legal shoplifting people go free then one illegal shoplifting person gets sought in the street like an animal counter if you wanna talk about changing the standards that is a standard change that could help now that is as ellie said radical in probably not realistic given that most americans according to polls respect the police have confidence in the please perceived police to be in the enforcers of the law by it there are other ideas out there that are starting to bubble up and if what's constraining us if what's keeping us stuck where we are are the words of graham then what offers us a way out could actually also be hiding in there what do you mean okc knowhow um chief justice ringquist when he wrote the decision any nine he put in a all these phrases that took the idea of a reasonable officer and and constrained eight zero.

arron officer ellie graham justice ringquist shoplifting three hundred years