35 Burst results for "purdue university"

This diabolical ironclad beetle can survive being run over by a car

KYW 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | Last month

This diabolical ironclad beetle can survive being run over by a car

"Be a whole lot tougher. Thanks to a Beetle is not just any bugs. Oh, it's called the diabolical, ironclad beetle and it's so strong. It can even survive being rolled over by a midsize car. Purdue University civil engineer says It's super tough because it shell can withstand bird pecs animal stomps Not to mention being run over by a car produce. Residents say the Beetle has a layered armor that is peace together, kind of like a jigsaw puzzle, and it keeps it from breaking when it's compressed. In Supreme Court

Supreme Court Purdue University Engineer
"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:59 min | 2 months ago

"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Places like Walmart Fateh. You know you mentioned visor going down the list? In fact, almost all of them are now moving to. A hybrid. Cloud. They are renting. Space in the public cloud, an Amazon or Azure or Google cloud, and they also have some private cloud stuff. But more and more they're moving the sort of I don't know what you call it a pedestrian computing to the public cloud and using their private cloud only for. Specialized things. For example, if you're in healthcare, you may need to keep certain records head or compliance get. We don't want to move them to a public cloud. Right. Right. So only for Security and privacy reasons if they need to keep some data, they seem to have some sort of a privatized former fed So if they are doing that dog Arianna Pat so that is obviously is scale. huge amount of scale in this business for Amazon. Microsoft. So a large companies saying the per unit cost off compute and storage is going to be lower by going to the public cloud strategically. Ultimately, they're going to do that anyway unless they have a need for some sort of privacy security data storage, right? Well, there's there's just. One side of the coin is all the cloud providers are telling everyone hey, we get quantity discounts. and. We such cloudy discounts that you can't get these the big cloud providers are called hyperscale. Now, you've heard that term, but there are so big that they're far beyond what any organization is and and if you go to some of the organizations and look at their infrastructure, you'd be amazed for example, dig about an organization like. Walmart. About an organization like Bank of America, every AGM is on the Bank of America network. Huge. And Yet And yet the big hyperscale. Have even more infrastructure, and so they get bigger discounts and they also claim that they amateur is the cost of training. Over many customers so that Amazons of the world aws Azure they each have multiple tenants in their data center and they're saying, look the reason we're so cheapest Yay, you need somebody who's a real expert on pick a topic. Oracle, database configuration, debugging all of the things about Oracle database. Well we'll have we have that expertise. But you don't have to pay for all your self. Will discharge you a small fraction because our experts are shared among all were tenants. Hundreds or thousands of tenants. So it looks like they really win on economics but the other side of the coin. The other side of the coin is. They're trying to lock in customers. Yeah switching costs at quite high. So once you get them, you have to continue, right Yes, they're working very hard to make it easy to get in. It's like my mother used to say about trouble. Trouble is easy to get in. It's really hard to get out. Right right. But you see eastern advantage from a business interruption perspectives. If you think about.

Amazon Bank of America Oracle Walmart Arianna Pat Microsoft Amazons Google
"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:25 min | 2 months ago

"purdue university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

During the pandemic, social media can be an information lifeline for rural communities

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:44 min | 2 months ago

During the pandemic, social media can be an information lifeline for rural communities

"So hard to quit facebook is that it's actually really essential for information support and connection. That's especially true in small rural communities where local news is mostly happening on facebook and people are turning to the platform is a resource for information about covid nineteen. But K. UNC's Adam raise reports from Colorado that in groups that were meant to keep people updated divisiveness is creeping in. Like many school districts across the country in Morgan. County, Colorado has been working on a plan for the fall. So some parents in the rural county have been turning to a more than five thousand, nine hundred member facebook group to get and share information. This is exactly what Christie spots Cobley had in mind when she created the group in two, thousand, twelve, I kept thinking we need a place where the community can go and find information many posts from people, asking questions or sharing information about covid nineteen restrictions, local politics, community resources, the local paper that covers the counties biggest city used to have four reporters. But now it shows just one full time reporter with another paper out here in. Rural America sometimes, we don't get information as fast as doing urban counterparts asked Nathan Trout he works on a farm near the town of Gan's and primarily uses facebook groups to buy or sell farm equipment, but he sees a broader value in them. So I think it's really or that we need to open up all meetings or communications that we we as AS Roma citizens know what's going on in our rural communities. These groups can provide a platform that wasn't available before Roberto Gherardo has helped rural areas take advantage of social media as director of the Purdue University Center for Regional Development. If you use it properly, you can convey value win formation. You can really truly have discussion and discourse. That helps he says there are also downsides and Morgan County facebook group administrator Cobley is seeing those now with covid nineteen I think there's so much longer before the pandemic she says, facebook group remained fairly civil now small number of posts provoked dozens of argumentative vulgar comments some with misleading or false information cobley was a hand off moderator before the pandemic but now I think I, it was time I. I need to get control back over of the group in March she posted some ground rules. That's vital part of moderating community based social media says Jeremy Lipshultz he's a professor at the University of Nebraska Omaha. Who Researches Social Media I think if you're honest and transparent and you keep your audience in mind in your fair with everybody fares as you can be, you're not going to make everybody happy. But I think it will work fairly well over time the moderating rules for the Morgan County facebook groups seemed to help but we still has weeks or she doesn't even want to look at the group and yet I think it will always be around one way or another. It's not something I will ever shut now still in mid-july. Cobley to crack crackdown on threads about mask-wearing requirements that devolved into arguments laced with profanities. That's K. UNC's Adam race from Colorado. And now, for some related links, it's hard to get numbers on how many people are joining new facebook groups during this pandemic. But lots of stories from all over the country and the world point two people gathering figure out how to deal with school reopening teachers getting together to share tips for remote learning small businesses, creating support networks for each other and sadly stories of groups devolving into such toxic discourse that their moderators closed them down. I will say I opened facebook for the first time in over a year to try to around and get a sense of how many community groups there might be, how many people are in them little light research and I did almost immediately find a page in my area had some updated information about my county and some restrictions on hair salons had recently been eased, and now I have hope I might be able to get a haircut soon. So that was actually kind of helpful although I did not read any of the comments. The thing that's frustrating is that although facebook makes it easy to create groups and you can kind of assume sadly that most people are on it. This is literally what the Internet started as a series of forums and chat groups and bulletin boards. It's what people have done online since online began and in some ways, the great lie about facebook is that you can't do this anywhere else. Have the groups, dumped the engagement algorithms and the hyper targeted ads and you know what you've got. The World Wide Web I'm

Facebook Cobley Colorado Morgan County Roberto Gherardo K. Unc Morgan Adam Jeremy Lipshultz Nathan Trout America Reporter Purdue University Center For R Christie University Of Nebraska Omaha GAN Director Administrator
36 Purdue University students suspended after off-campus party

KYW 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | 3 months ago

36 Purdue University students suspended after off-campus party

"Another case of covert 19 transgressions. CBS's Jim Crow Sula, Purdue University has suspended three dozen students for attending a large off campus party. The action came less than 24 hours after the president of the school in West Lafayette, Indiana, made it a university violence. Jin Tau host or even go to a party that didn't follow the school's Koven 19 guidelines on Appeals

Jim Crow Sula Purdue University Jin Tau West Lafayette CBS President Trump Indiana
36 Purdue University students suspended after off-campus party

Jay Talking

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

36 Purdue University students suspended after off-campus party

"Another college. Another case of Copan 19 transgressions, CBS's Jim Krystle Purdue University has suspended three dozen students for attending a large off campus party. The action came less than 24 hours after the president of the school in West Lafayette, Indiana, made it a university violation Tau host or even go to a party that didn't follow the school's Koven 19

Jim Krystle Purdue University Copan West Lafayette CBS President Trump Indiana
36 Purdue University students suspended after off-campus party

Broncos Country Tonight

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

36 Purdue University students suspended after off-campus party

"Suspending three dozen students for attending a party and breaking Covad Protocol, School officials say Just one event can undo everything they've done to allow students to continue their educations in person. Colleges and universities across the country have opted for online learning after finding positive virus cases on campus. Next news Update at

Covad
36 students at Purdue University suspended after party

WGN Nightside

00:14 sec | 3 months ago

36 students at Purdue University suspended after party

"Purdue University has announced. It's a spending 36 students who attended an off campus party at Co op housing School says the students violated a protect Purdue pledge a rule that's been in effect since May, students will have a hearing and could be booted from the

Purdue University Co Op Housing School
36 students at Purdue University suspended after party

Lance McAlister

00:11 sec | 3 months ago

36 students at Purdue University suspended after party

"Purdue University has announced. It's a spending 36 students who attended an off campus party at co op housing schools says the students violated a protect Purdue pledge a rule that's been in effect since May.

Purdue University
"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:02 min | 3 months ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Mr Dennis Morgan on back home again in Indiana, killing us all now to the starting line, and Luke Walton. Purdue University band marching away from the starting area there in the pit area. The cars lined up in 11 rose three abreast. Look, Walden is standing by to pick up our immortal words from Tony home and the president of the speedway, Luca, you said. The engines are being started as you can. Well here in the background. This is the moment we've been waiting for.

Mr Dennis Morgan Luke Walton Purdue University Luca Walden Indiana president Tony
Obituary: Herman Cain

TIME's Top Stories

05:52 min | 4 months ago

Obituary: Herman Cain

"Herman Cain helped define the American black conservative movement. He also set the stage for trump by Philip Elliott. Herman. CAIN remembered the nineteen ninety-six moment that changed his political trajectory as clearly as any in his life. The businessman was advising Jack Kemp's vice presidential campaign and accompanied the boss to the iconic Sylvia's soul food restaurant in Harlem for an event a man in the crowd shouted out to Kane and colleagues Black Republicans, there's no such thing. The. Same Man in canes telling called them Uncle Toms. The episode. So angered Kane that when he got home from that campaign swing, he switched from a registered independent to a card carrying member of the Republican. Party and over the next quarter century, the child of the segregated south became one of the best known black Republicans in the country briefly rising to be his party's presidential front runner for the two thousand twelve nomination and remaining one of the most quotable stars in conservative media. So committed to his party's stick it in the I e host was Cain that he flew to Tulsa. Oklahoma for President Donald, trump's first return to the campaign trail after one hundred thousand US corona virus deaths despite dire warnings from public health experts at that endure rally on June twentieth the stage four colon cancer survivor posed for pictures without wearing a mask and sat in the packed stands with fellow fans of the president on June twenty-ninth Cain tested positive for the corona virus. On July second, his aides announced he had been hospitalized while fighting the disease his twitter account continued to criticize mask wearing and to promote unproven endorsements of hydroxy. On. July. Thirtieth CAIN aides announced he had died from the White House trump attributed the death to the thing called the virus cain among the most prominent Americans to die during this pandemic who was seventy four In many ways, Kane and trump were cut from the same cloth neither had been elected to any political post before running for the White House, both delighted in needling the Republican Party's establishment and the mainstream press they shot from the hip campaigned in slogans and didn't much care to learn the details. Both men were dogged by allegations of sexual affairs and inappropriate behavior, and both denied the allegations they proved disqualifying for Kane who ended his bid in December twenty eleven under intense scrutiny. But they did not derail trump just one election cycle. Later, they were also both savvy exploiters of the media. In saying things they knew would provoke outrage and thus amplify the celebrity at the core of their bids indifference toward if not hostility against what had come before was a cornerstone of their strategy, not a flaw. CAIN was born in Memphis in nineteen forty-five to a domestic worker mother and a janitor father when his dad was hired to be the chauffeur for the head of coca-cola, the family moved to Atlanta where cain would graduate from Morehouse College. He then completed his graduate studies at Purdue University after civilian service in the navy from there Kane moved from engineer to executive with Pillsbury and its subsidiaries of Burger King and Godfather's pizza where he would be its CEO. In nineteen, Eighty Eight, he oversaw Godfather's. From, Pillsbury throughout the same time yelled positions with the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. That part of his resume lead trump to consider cane for a position in his administration a move that drew dissent from fellow Republicans who were not eager to revisit the allegations against Kane for three years. Kane led the national. Restaurant Association a lobbying arm for the industry that paid settlements to at least two women who detailed canes unwanted advances. His was not a typical career in his post. CEO Years Cain became a sought after motivational speaker and unsuccessful presidential candidate in two thousand and a Senate one in two thousand four. As, the tea party movement started to organize after Barack Obama's election to the White House. Kane emerged as one of its strongest spokespeople when the twenty twelve election cycle began kane decided to run the scrappy est of campaigns focused on untrue additional travel schedule that often seemed more like a book tour than an organizing effort. His novel nine, nine nine tax plan proposing a nine percent corporate business flat tax, a nine percent personal income flat tax and a nine percent national sales tax drew I rolls from economists but curiosity from voters. Antipathy toward front runner Mitt Romney proved sufficient to give cain a chance to rise in the late summer and fall of twenty eleven until his personal life just proved too much. But he didn't shrink from podcast life. Instead he became a ubiquitous voice and reliable critic of Democrats

Ceo Years Cain Kane Donald Trump Cain White House Mitt Romney Jack Kemp Pillsbury Philip Elliott Republican Party Godfather Oklahoma Twitter Harlem Barack Obama United States Tulsa
How Absentee Landowners Keep Farmers From Protecting Water And Soil

Environment: NPR

04:55 min | 4 months ago

How Absentee Landowners Keep Farmers From Protecting Water And Soil

"Some of our biggest environmental problems like water, pollution and endangered wildlife caused by large scale farming, which means farmers are in a position to reduce environmental damage or at least mitigate it. Why don't they one reason? They often don't own much of the lands that they farm here's. NPR's Dan Charles Lisa Solti more loves nature. I reached her while she was visiting. The forests of northern Minnesota I can only describe it as healing. All the stress of our world, and said she just forget about it when you're in one of these beautiful old growth, for as she teaches ecology at Iowa State University, but when she moved to Iowa seventeen years ago, she struggled a little. She didn't have that same feeling standing in vast fields of corn. She wasn't hearing any birds or seeing many bugs all I can here are the leaves of the rustling corn around me and not one other. Biological Noise at all right. It's you know they call it the Green Desert and there is a lot of land like this this year. Corn and soybeans covered land. That's equal in size to all the East Coast States from New York to Georgia. But solti more says it doesn't have to be a green desert. She's been studying what she calls. Prairie Strips stretches of land, running through fields of corner soybeans. We're farmers of set-aside may be percent of the land for tall, stemmed grasses and wildflowers. It's a different world there. She says birds singing their bees buzzing. They were crickets chirping. There was stuff hopping around. These bits of prairie also protect soil and water capture carbon dioxide from the air. For this to happen. Though farmers have to be willing to give this land back to nature and many experts on farmland say it can make economic sense. One of them is Steve Brewer President of People's company in Des Moines Iowa who buys sells and manages farmland across the country. One of the first things that we do and we do this on every farm that we managed as we run, these profitability maps. His company creates a detailed map of the. The farm what they spend and what they earn on every acre, and they're finding consistently that some of that land loses money. It's amazing about ten to fifteen percent of all the acres in Iowa. aren't profitable. They're those hillsides with eroded soil spots where water collects in a big puddle after every rain. That is where they advise farmers to cut their losses may be bring back the prairie. Some farmers are doing this kinda thing most are not. And one reason the farm experts say is an under appreciated fact about America's farmland farmers only owned about half their land the rest of it. They rent year-by-year from a collection of landlords. Linda pro copy from Purdue University has studied those landowners. There are very diverse group of people much more diverse than farmers. Many are elderly retired farmers now renting the land to the next generation, some inherited it from grandparents. You have younger urban people who co owned a piece of land with cousins. Don't know anything about farming so when it comes to managing that Land Steve Brewer from People's company says it often plays out like this. Let's say somebody owns one hundred sixty acres. Thirty of those acres are lousy for growing crops, but they'll rent out. The whole thing is a landowner you want. Those thirty acres farmed because you're trying to get rental revenue on every acre that you can get, and the farmer will go along because he or she really wants one hundred thirty good acres. Sarah? Carlson longtime environmental advocate with the group. Practical farmers of Iowa gets annoyed by landowners who just want their rent check? We need to start calling landlord, slum lords and a lot of cases. They're just as guilty she says consider something else. Cover crops vegetation that farmers can plant in the off season to protect and enrich the soil. It's great for the environment and for your crops in the long run, but it costs money upfront, so tenant farmers who may not be there in the long run are reluctant to spend that money. Carson says some landlords do care enough that they'll spend the money to protect the Environment Bill. Does prairie strips pay for cover crops? But they're the exceptions. I mean even my mom wasn't that kind of landlord and I'm her daughter like I'm like what do you mean we're not going to do? Cover crops was wrong with you Steve. Brewer land. Brooker says he does see. Signs of things are changing. There's a new kind of landowner showing up people who didn't inherit the farmland, but decided to buy it. Some of them because they care about how foods produced and the environment, others are purely investors for them. The land is a financial asset, but they understand that this asset can't increase in value if they protected Dan Charles NPR

Green Desert Steve Brewer Dan Charles Lisa Solti Iowa Iowa State University NPR Minnesota Des Moines Iowa Dan Charles Npr Purdue University America New York President Trump Brooker Iowa. Georgia Carlson Sarah
Absentee Landlords Interfere With Farmers Protecting Water, Soil

Environment: NPR

04:55 min | 4 months ago

Absentee Landlords Interfere With Farmers Protecting Water, Soil

"Some of our biggest environmental problems like water, pollution and endangered wildlife caused by large scale farming, which means farmers are in a position to reduce environmental damage or at least mitigate it. Why don't they one reason? They often don't own much of the lands that they farm. Here's NPR's Dan Charles. Lisa Solti more loves nature I. Reached Her while she was visiting the forests of northern Minnesota I can only describe it as healing. All the stress of our world, and said she just forget about it when you're in one of these beautiful old growth for as she teaches ecology. At University, but when she moved to Iowa seventeen years ago, she struggled a little. She didn't have that same feeling standing in vast fields of corn. She wasn't hearing any birds or seeing many bugs all. I can here are the leaves of the rustling corn around me and not one other. Biological Noise at all right? It's you know they call it the green. Desert and there is a lot of land like this this year. Corn and soybeans covered land. That's equal in size to all the East Coast States from New York to Georgia. But solti more says it doesn't have to be a green desert. She's been studying what she calls. Prairie Strips stretches of land, running through fields of corner soybeans. We're farmers of set-aside may be percent of the land for tall, stemmed grasses and wildflowers. It's a different world there. She says birds singing their bees buzzing. They were crickets chirping. There was stuff hopping around. These bits of prairie also protect soil and water capture carbon dioxide from the air. For this to happen, though farmers have to be willing to give this land back to nature and many experts on farmland say it can make economic sense. One of them is Steve. Brewer President of People's company in Des Moines Iowa who buys sells and manages farmland across the country. One of the first things that we do and we do this on every farm that we managed as we run, these profitability maps. His company creates a detailed map of the. The farm what they spend and what they earn on every acre, and they're finding consistently that some of that land loses money. It's amazing about ten to fifteen percent of all the acres in Iowa aren't profitable. They're those hillsides with eroded soil spots where water collects in a big puddle after every rain. That is where they advise farmers to cut their losses may be bring back the prairie. Some farmers are doing this Kinda. Thing most are not. And one reason the farm experts say is an under appreciated fact about America's farmland farmers only owned about half their land the rest of it. They rent year-by-year from a collection of landlords. Linda pro copy from Purdue University has studied those landowners. There are very diverse group of people much more diverse than farmers. Many are elderly retired farmers now renting the land to the next generation, some inherited it from grandparents. You have younger urban people who co owned a piece of land with. Don't know anything about farming so when it comes to managing that Land Steve. Brewer from People's company says it often plays out like this. Let's say somebody owns one hundred sixty acres. Thirty of those acres are lousy for growing crops, but they'll rent out. The whole thing is a landowner you want. Those thirty acres farmed because you're trying to get rental revenue on every acre that you can get, and the farmer will go along because he or she really wants one hundred thirty good acres. Sarah Carlson longtime environmental advocate with the group practical farmers of Iowa gets annoyed by landowners who just want their rent check? We need to start calling landlord, slum lords and a lot of cases. They're just as guilty she says consider something else. Cover crops vegetation that farmers can plant in the season to protect and enrich the soil. It's great for the environment and for your crops in the long run, but it costs money upfront, so tenant farmers who may not be there in the long run are reluctant to spend that money. Carson says some landlords do care enough that they'll spend the money to protect the Environment Bill. Does prairie strips pay for cover crops? But they're the exceptions I mean. Even my mom wasn't that kind of landlord and I'm her daughter like I'm like. What do you mean we're not going to do? Cover crops was wrong with you Steve, brewer? Land Brooker says he does see signs of things are changing. There's a new kind of landowner showing up people who didn't inherit the farmland, but decided to buy it. Some of them because they care about how foods produced and the environment, others are purely investors for them. The land is a financial asset, but they understand that this asset can't increase in value if they protected. Dan Charles NPR

Lisa Solti People Iowa Steve NPR Dan Charles Des Moines Iowa Minnesota Dan Charles Npr Purdue University President Trump America New York Brooker Sarah Carlson Georgia Brewer Carson
"purdue university" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

03:51 min | 4 months ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Purdue University is requiring all students to get tested for the Corona virus before they start school in the fall semester. Purdue officials say failure to complete a covert 19 tests and have those results filed prior to arrival. Will effect a student's ability to move into a residence hall or begin in person classes when they resume on August 24th. Despite some calls to change the name of ST Louis, Missouri is governor says it's not going to happen. A petition with about 1000 signatures seeks the name change, citing the treatment of Jewish and Muslim people by 13th century French King Louis, the ninth Cities namesake. W B B M NEWS time. 11 46 when searching for improved Chicago truck driving job search Schneider Jobs Now SPORTS Here's Josh List, either. The best golfers from the United States clash with the best golfers from Europe every two years, But the Ryder Cup this year at Whistling Straits and Kohler, Wisconsin, won't happen, according to tournament organizers. Playing without Spectators is not a realistic option. So the Ryder Cup is finally officially postponed. A yearlong talked about it will happen in some September 2021 up in Kolar. To top three rated players. Ireland's Rory McIlroy, an American Brooks Capta had been outspoken asking for the Ryder Cup to be postponed. Now the event has followed through and the President's Cup event where the best US golfers play, the best from outside Europe has been pushed back a year to 2022 Quail Hollow in Charlotte, North Carolina. Postponements. Put the Ryder Cup in president's cups on their odd year, even your schedules like before The 9 11 postponements delays in Major League Baseball's covert 19 testing, causing some teams to cancel workouts and laying the Cubs yesterday's interest quads Grim Ege pushback several hours and before Wilson Contreras popped a two run homer off Craig Kimbrel in a short practice game Cubs working out again today, the only team without a positive virus test at socks camps still two missing. John Moncada remains away from camp. Those two socks who had positive tests are unnamed Black Hawks are not currently considering a name or logo change, and today's opening match for the fire of the MLS is back tournament was called off because its opponent Nashville, had five positive tests. Josh List News Radio 7 80 in one of 5.9 FM W BBM news time. 11 48 traffic and weather together on the eight sponsored by AM Code transmissions in total car care. Here's Bo Durant. Our biggest challenge right now is the Bishop Ford on the In bound side. We have a Couple of issues. The first is a serious crash, 159. The two left lanes are blocked because of reported painting crash here you are jammed off of 80 94 up to 159th. Once you get through that delay, you're going to see really jammed up traffic again from Sibley up to the steel Bridge. That's because of a crash that we had blocking the center lane. But crews now have that on the shoulders of the lanes are back open Those delays er, easing up at least But when you put this all together, the inbound side of Ford is 35 minutes 18 94 into the Dan Ryan. By the way, state police have been called to assist on the scene here on the in bound side of the force of 159. Looks like some issues may have arisen out of this crashes whilst they maybe some lane blockage here for some time on the in bound side of the force of 159 Outbound bishop 4 90 minute from the Dan Ryan out to 80 94 on the Edens Expressway. No delays in or out the Kennedy and 30 from O'Hare, 20 and from the junction, the outbound side of the Kennedy, 14 Montrose and 24 to O'Hare yourself from forwards in the Belmont with moving roadwork and Elaine the Eisenhower inbound 32 from Round 3 90 16 from Mannheim. Outbound Ike. Okay, Stevenson, no inbound delays. But on the outbound side, you're jammed up from First Avenue to before LaGrange with moving roadwork in the left lane, Then you're so approaching cast because of a crash. It's on the right side. 25 minutes from Lakeshore Drive out to the Tri state 38 after 3 55 The Dan right in about 18 from 95th downtown 18 on the outbound side as well, 57 No problems in our outbound lakeshore drive. You're looking pretty good. The old light always. They're all looking great. 80 both East and West found Okay through Juliet 80 94. Westbound heavy from Ripley to 65. No eastbound delays. Those 65 in the Indian A toll road..

Bishop Ford US Purdue University Dan Ryan Europe Josh List Kennedy Missouri Cubs President King Louis O'Hare ST Louis Rory McIlroy Chicago Nashville Kolar John Moncada Bo Durant Whistling Straits
Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

BrainStuff

05:53 min | 5 months ago

Why Was a Doctor Once Ridiculed for Recommending Hand Washing?

"Even, when there isn't a pandemic gone, we all know were supposed to wash our hands especially before we eat or after we've touched something gross, but that wasn't always the case. As recently as the eighteen hundreds, a doctor was mocked for even suggesting that physicians wash their hands before working with patients, and that dear listener is how we begin the strange and sad story of Nets, some of ice, a nineteenth century doctor sometimes called the father of infection control. them vice was born in Hungary in eighteen, eighteen and graduating medical school. He started a job at Vienna. General Hospital in Austria in eighteen forty six there there. He became a gas to the mortality rate of new mothers in one of the hospitals wards. In this ward up to eighteen percent of new mothers were dying from what was then called child, bed, fever or pure berle fever. We know today that this is a fever caused by infection of the reproductive or urinary tract in new mothers? Yet another of the hospital's wards where midwives instead of doctors delivered all of the babies, only about two percent of mothers died of this then mysterious fever. similize vice began reasoning his way to the root of the problem. He considered climate and crowding, but eventually ruled those factors out in the end. The midwives themselves seems to be the only real difference between the two wards. Then Zuma vice had an epiphany one of the hospitals doctors, a pathologist accidentally nicked himself the scalpel that hit used during an autopsy of one of these unfortunate mothers. The doctor was sick and with child bed fever and he died. Zamel vice made the connection that doctors were performing autopsies on patients who died of child, had fever, and then immediately afterward going to deliver babies without stopping to wash their hands. He suspected that this was the source of the deadly problem. We spoke by with Dana Towards e eski philosophy professor at Purdue University whose name I hope I'm pronouncing correctly. She explained, basically has hypothesis here was that it was cadaveric matter from scalpels, the entered the pathologists blood, and caused the infection and same material could be transferred to the women on the hands of the doctors, because the doctors do autopsies, and then go straight to examine the women who had given birth without washing their hands, changing their clothes, or basically taking any hygienic measures at all, he then tested this hypothesis by requiring people who had performed autopsies to wash their hands with chloride of lime, a disinfectant before attending the weapon and this, the mortality rate in the first clinic fell to that of the second. You'd think that some of fellow doctors would have lauded him for this discovery, but you'd be wrong. You see in the eighteen forties. Germ theory hadn't been conceived yet. That's the theory that diseases are caused by organisms, not visible to the naked eye and people still suspected the diseases transferred from one person to another via toxic. Not Bacteria or viruses, this was called miasma theory in washing their hands. They probably wanted to be rid of whatever was causing a bad. Not to kill germs that might wreak havoc on them or someone else. We also spoke by email, but Michael Melanson, an adjunct professor of medicine at. University he said physicians of Vices. Time simply did not understand or believe that something microscopic could be wreaking such havoc on their patients. They literally believed their own is less. We feel too smug. Consider how many people currently embrace a lack of COVID, nineteen deaths among people like me geographically racially economically or otherwise as evidence that scientists are overestimating the pandemics risk. Better hand washing regimens dramatically improved death rates at the maternity ward, but some vices colleagues were at best miffed at the implication that their ignorance was killing their own patients, and perhaps implication that midwives were better at delivering babies than they were. It didn't help that Zimmer Vice essentially laid the deaths of the wards mothers at the feet of his superiors. His own supervisor countered that the hospitals new ventilation system must be the reason for the decline in maternity deaths. Also, Zimbabwe's was a Hungarian in Austria A. Working in country in the throes of xenophobia. So those doctors rejected his theories and some of ice himself as being inferior, they opted to stick with their miasma theory, and for good measure in eighteen, forty nine did not renews vices appointment. As vice eventually got a medical position in Budapest where he according to the British Medical Journal quote publicly harangued doctors nurses about hand, washing and reduced maternal mortality. He eventually published a book on the subject some fourteen years later, but it was poorly written and poorly received. Possibly, experiencing mental disorder or extreme stress from his rejection by the medical establishment, Zim of ice ended up a patient in an asylum in eighteen sixty five weeks later, he was dead of an infection from a wound that he received in the facility. She was just forty seven years old. similize left behind monumental legacy, but the tragedy of his story has made it Garner a few minutes. One of those being that demo vice was the first suggested theory about doctors transmitting germs. Kaletsky said he wasn't really a pioneer. Other people before Zamel vice had hit upon the idea that child bed fever could be transmitted from doctor or midwife to patient for example Alexander Gordon of Aberdeen showed in Seventeen Ninety. Five child had fever was almost always transmitted by doctors or midwives, and also that it was connected to a kind of streptococcal skin rash. He also thought that the best treatment was copious bleeding.

Fever Zimmer Vice Zamel Austria Vienna General Hospital Hungary Nets Zuma British Medical Journal Purdue University Kaletsky Zimbabwe Professor Garner Michael Melanson Berle Adjunct Professor Supervisor
Wendy's runs out of burgers at some locations

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

01:06 min | 7 months ago

Wendy's runs out of burgers at some locations

"Order so if you go to Wendy's today in pregnant frosty you want in the of fries a jawan but can you get the burger you want let's take a lot of great vigor well you know Wendy's is got a little bit of a burger problem you know this is a company that's really built its fame over the years on the size of its beef and you know just the fact that it's never frozen will now Wendy's is short on beef limiting supplies to restaurants this is all connected to crown a virus outbreaks at meat processing plants across the country and so as a result there's just isn't enough to go around thousands of workers and a single location and they were close to each other so it seems likely that you know if one of those workers got sick they could spread easily from worker worker and and you know shut down one of these that these plants are big enough to have national impact you know it's not at this early time to panic even if your favorite favorite burger isn't available there you know try try it you can say which is that that's just a Moscow some advice there he's with AG's studies over at Purdue University tells can X. that this supply interruption probably going to last at least two weeks may be longer some Wendy's

Wendy Moscow AG Purdue University
Bitcoin College Radio - Mo Sadoghi

Bitcoin Radio

08:06 min | 9 months ago

Bitcoin College Radio - Mo Sadoghi

"What's up my man. Welcome to the show dude. Hello hello everyone. Hi Ashley. High Joe's wonderful to be here absolutely for everybody who I obviously just gave them a very brief introduction moe you're an assistant professor at UC Davis. Right yes I'm faculty at UC Davis and Iran Expo Lab and absolutely and as I was saying introduction. You may got a chance to hear that It's you know we're in a place where blockchain the this technology is becoming a useful. It's becoming it's not just a speculative ICO craziness of two thousand seventeen like there's really important incredible people working with the technology governments. You know there's different agencies and and people that have been doing things outside of the blockchain space whether in tech or not including this and you know you're a perfect example that being on faculty at UC Davis and putting yourself position to to take on this role as a Ambassador for the CRYPTO space in the blockchain space. You know it's it's probably got a lot of pressure on you. Well when you look at research you don't ever take on Sort of a mature technology always gonNA take that. There's a lot of associated and started several years ago The picture was not as credible as you kind of express than it is today. So it's definitely a excitement of taking that risk and have been happy to be part of that at UC Davis absolutely. So let's first start off with this before we get into your background Let's talk about what exactly is the resilient DB DOT com website? What's it doing what we're what are we looking at here so I could? Maybe perhaps before that I could give you a little bit introduction of Harvey or is it sort of Jordan that brought us into resilient and resilient dot com. Is that for the last ten years or so I've been looking into transactions space and transaction all know what it is the you'll make a credit card transaction. You go to Walmart you go to Amazon. You buy something everything that we do realize around the concept of transaction and transaction. It's reminder of go back in the days a simple contract so when people want to engage in into any form of transaction they're really writing contract and transaction in computer science is the digital form of The old age a concept of the contract. So we've been looking at paradigm shift in the last decade is that how do we look at the changes in hardware? That changes in the application needs in order to improve The the efficiency of transaction processing. And what are the new application that could result from this in Dover and but in the last few years there has been the move and the push of this idea of the cryptocurrency. What if you look at digital market that is surrounded around this crypto and also the way we are going to look at the blockchain is no longer as we're going to put our trust into a single entity like like a single bank but we want to be able to at a level of a society? We want to be able to have what I consider those ideal of cornerstone of our societies. Democrat is Asian and decentralisation so now how do the form does digital contract in very democratic and decentralized way so that's exciting problems that we started looking at it also kind of looking at it as a secure transaction as a kind of a transaction that brings accountability trust and integrity without the need of relying on essential entity so that has been what initiated or research and as part of that we have In Expo Lab my research team at UC Davis behaved launched our fabric or blocking fabric. Which is a global scale Resilient blockchain fabric and called resilient. So that's that's where we are right now. Yeah by the way I really love the name too. I think it's really relevant and You know it stands out especially in the space so as as this process is kind of taking taking place How have the students really transformed this idea? Like as you as you noted and of course I don't Wanna get ahead of ourselves because it's actually one of the questions I have down the road but when he didn't know noted that process. You're right like you guys didn't happen yesterday. This has been going on. What you guys have been building's been going on for some time like what has that that that student. How was that student transform? What are you looking at these days when it when it comes to the people who are getting involved in this kind of show a lot of a funny story about the name has since as you mentioned it so we have every entering a new space and technology is there's going to be resistance and especially the risk of the technology is the more resistant you get? I had a pleasure working about ten or so graduate and undergraduate student along this journey and the one thing that we have Encounter over and over again the rejection of our papers the rejection of our ideas and so the resilient. Abo was kind of is that our team has become so resilient in building this blockchain fabric and. That's what actually the name of is that not only did. The fabric has become resilient but also the team has become precise in sort of pushing through this Yeah pushing pushing through from every aspect and we'd be successful at many fronts and we're still pushing and others. So that's that's how the name came came about and and you see that transformation into students is because it's part of it is even have to educate research committee. Not Everybody is aware of what the blockchain is. It's it's not a traditional topic so the student needs to educate himself. They need to educate the community and While this education sort of rippled down to other part of the university is that this is writing for example Move Spell. Come into the picture. In sort of empowering that the grass root is not just in computer science but sort of campus wide in order to get to that education of the auction as well too for sure. And I'm a firm believer like in and I'll say in this goes with mouse brought to you know when you find personalized story in a kind of Esprit de Corps to an extent of why you exist in your name you know I mean mouse ball stories a little bit different dalen Patrick and Gaylon walking with an actual mouse belt cord around his waist belt You know I it stands by the same thing I love watching people pour their heart and soul in these to these entities these these projects to these ideas and when they when their own. It seems like they're always far more successful as the best way to put it all right. So let's go. Let's go into a little bit about you. Who are you what did you do? How'd you get into this so I graduate? I did my phd at the University of Toronto. I graduate in two thousand thirteen and the focus of my research back then was I have sort of stream of data coming in and how to use modern harbor to do the analysis for efficiency and then from there I went to. Ibm Research and I was a IBM Watson in Westchester groups on Heights. That's sort of the headquarters of research and there are more and more came into the problem of transaction and Sudan in particular I looked at the problem of. How do I unify At an analysis the analytics with the transaction in a very general than unified way so and so that has continued at IBM. So I was there for about four years. Then I was faculty at Purdue University and that's where we really got into the space of large-scale disabled transaction and by the time I had a rich. Uc Davis you've already sort of planting seed of Looking at secure transaction or the blockchain and the moment sort of join a UC Davis that has been the The main

Uc Davis IBM Ashley Sudan JOE Iran Expo Lab Davis Purdue University Assistant Professor University Of Toronto Jordan Dover Research Committee Ibm Watson Walmart Westchester
"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:51 min | 9 months ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Purdue University announced a partnership with modern states education alliance last week that will let students save as much as eleven thousand dollars he also talked about national is going on in the number of universities around the country so it's it's something that a number of schools are connecting with Gerry Dick with inside Indiana business tells ninety three W. Y. B. C.'s Tony cats it's important to get and keep talented people so we don't get passed up by big time employers like Amazon and he was driving a hundred five miles an hour in a fifty five mile an hour zone say state police they arrested the driver who they say had a point eleven blood alcohol content while driving on the Indiana toll road Saturday night the legal limit this point oh eight I'm John Herrick on the level on the go and on Twitter at ninety three W. Y. B. C. and W. I. B. C. dot com now here's the forecast from the American standard heating weather center with Ashley brown overnight areas of fog will develop use caution as you're traveling out will definitely those low beam lights for that Tuesday morning commute will see showers on and off throughout the day on Tuesday temperatures in the mid to upper forties custom truck A. T. meteorologist Ashley brown ninety three W. why BC it's often said that the only sure things in life are death and taxes but there's definitely a third one and that's change life is full of inevitable changes and your success and happiness can depend on how you respond to changes you face I'm so trump attorney and CEO the domestic litigation firm Cordell and Cordell we help men deal with the light changes triggered by divorce such as child custody and property division among many others but life changes also occur after divorce these changes come in parts of the existing court order here relevant for harder to follow in either case you need the support of a trusted legal partner talk to us a Cordell and Cordell we're a partner men can count on and that never changes contact investor relations firm of Kordell and Kordell to schedule.

Purdue University Gerry Dick W. Y. B. C. Tony Amazon John Herrick Twitter Ashley brown attorney Cordell Kordell Indiana A. T. CEO partner
Causality 101 with Robert Ness

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

07:35 min | 10 months ago

Causality 101 with Robert Ness

"I am on the line with Robert Osa Zoa Ness Robert is a machine learning research engineer at Gammel on and an instructor at northeastern North Eastern University Robert and I met at the last nerves conference where he had an accepted poster session around his paper integrating hitting Markov processes with structural. Causal Modeling Enables counterfactual inference in complex systems which he also presented at the black doc in a in a workshop This kicked off a bunch of great conversations between the two of US leading ultimately to collaboration. That we'll talk a little bit about in this conversation. Robert thanks so much for joining me on the Tuomo. Ai podcast thanks for having me Sam. You're injured us. It makes me think I should've. It came up with more clever name for that paper. You know what a lot of papers we talk about on. This show are quite the mouthful so yours is no exception exception Maybe someone will build a model. You know that. seeks to determine a inverse correlation or correlation between the lengthiness papers the title and It's number of citations or something like that. Let's set that aside for now and have you spent a few minutes introducing yourself. How did you get started in machine learning what piqued your interest You know ultimately will be spending a lot of time here talking about causality. How did you come to Become interested in that you know my path to machine learning was a bit. I'd say unconventional I started off working In Asia Tanna specifically I was the degree at Hopkins in International Studies and was planning adding to pursue a degree in economic In economics focusing on economic development I got involved with some Internet companies out in Beijing That got me into coding. And database is in data in general and I decided I was interested in in debt in that and went to apply for programs in statistics. Particularly with a focus on computational statistics I back to the states came back to the states went to Purdue University to do my PhD in stats My PhD work was on causal. Inference graphical models Basically how to learn causal models from data particularly in the context of systems systems biology and from then after I graduated I went to trade industry. Got It now. We hear very frequently folks refer to their path into machine learning as unconventional are indirect In your case you came into an interesting gaming net leads you to apply live for Or into Grad School for statistic. What was that particular connection really? It's when you're on the back end of an APP and you're looking at the data and you're realizing that there's a lot of insights to be had if only we could model this data and turn it into some service on the front end Um I realized I mean this was you know people had were just kinda starting to talk about data science and then Hell Varian had just recently came out and said I said that's the districts is the new sexiest will. I can't remember the exact quote was pick your Metaphor Metaphor New Black statistics is the new. I don't know Rockstar and so And Yeah that's that's kind of why pivoted to do the two stats in machine. Learning I guess through stats view. May people might argue whether or not stats machine. Learning Are same thing. Might the problems that I was working on my PhD or using Publicity graphical models so which has strong roots in artificial intelligence. So that was my introduction machine learning. Yeah one of the things that's come up in our conversations about causality and The work that you're doing with your courses is the idea that it historically talking about causality has been the you know the domain of statisticians and in Yeah folks like economists And that a lot of that conversation is inaccessible or isn't really tailored to do the needs of developers and data scientists machine learning engineers. I didn't realize all the time we were talking about that. That your background wasn't economics. You you have some of the exposure to the way that causality is has been traditionally kind of us and talked about. Maybe I guess I'll just use this as a segue to Kind of opening up the floor to to ask you. What how do you define causality? The interesting thing about causality may be part of why maybe is a challenging thing to deal with particularly for statisticians I would say is that. It's very difficult to talk about it without finding yourself having a philosophical conversation and you know so going you know this is something that fill in. What is the causality? These in that philosophers have been wrestling with through the ages. Right hume had has counterfactual definition initial possibility. That's you know a follows from being had a not happy would not have happened But you know philosophers going back to the Buddha all kind of take their stab at what is caused -ality so there's a different philosophical arguments for causality and what it means I think from a practical standpoint. What most people mean when they say? causal inference is. They mean the estimation of Causal Effects. So if you're safer example at a tech company and you want to run some kind of experiment about the about whether a feature will drive a click or some other key performance indicator or metric. You're asking you. Your experiment is essentially trying to get at the question of what is the causal effect of this feature on this outcome and you'll be using the assumptions and methods from Statistics to estimate assuming Air Assumptions are valid those causal effects. But when we've talked in machine learning where now hearing you know. So I hadn Europe's like you said This talk about having agents that can understand that. Causal Structure of the world and and that causes allergies essential from moving from system one system to cognition day Pearl was very preeminent. Causal inference researcher talks about causal reasoning in in terms of free will and the ability to understand Dan intention and so there are definitely definitely a lot of angles to tackle this question from the perspective of artificial intelligence is that you know people who are running experiments in facebook. Netflix are not really thinking about

Causal Effects Robert Osa Zoa Ness Robert United States AI North Eastern University Tuomo Purdue University Gammel Netflix Research Engineer Hell Varian Instructor Grad School Rockstar Beijing Asia Facebook Pearl Hume
China shuts down transportation in at least 10 cities, builds hospital to treat virus

This Morning with Gordon Deal

02:40 min | 10 months ago

China shuts down transportation in at least 10 cities, builds hospital to treat virus

"The corona virus making international news in unprecedented lockdown of cities in China with more on that story CBS's Laura protest in Emory green China is desperately trying to contain a fast spreading virus that has killed dozens of people transportation was shut down this morning in at least ten cities with a total of thirty three million people the number of people infected in China has jumped to eight hundred and thirty at least twenty five people there have died and fear has spread to the US to lower but as it is here in New York Florida what we know about the possible cases here in the US and Marie Washington state confirms the man is still undergoing treatment for the pneumonia like virus there are also two suspected cases in California Tennessee and taxes are also reporting potential infections a Texas a and M. student showing possible corona virus symptoms put the college station community on edge there is a confirmed case contact resume again and all the contacts we monitor for development sometimes if confirmed he'd be the second coronavirus patient in the U. S. in China where the virus first emerged police barricaded roads blocked access between airport as the city shut down in an effort to contain the virus hospitals people are scrambling for screening and supermarkets worried residents clear shelves the streets of this typically vibrant community now who's town Chinese authorities are ordering similar shutdowns in nearby cities Wong gong and Joe affecting a population of almost twenty million more than the populations of New York City Los Angeles and Chicago combined China's capital Beijing canceled major events around the lunar new year holiday indefinitely as the virus spreads to eight countries sickening over six hundred in Boston at Madurai X. has ramped up its research to create a vaccine specific to this new virus the company is partnering with the national institutes of health which says a vaccine could be ready for human testing in as little as three months there certainly unknowns are certainly risks with moving quickly Maxine but if we don't move now there's a chance that if things spiral out of control we will be able to respond Purdue University in Indiana is also working on a potential hill to help stop the spread of professor there says a drug used to treat the sars virus could be the answer in treating the corona

Maxine Madurai Chicago Los Angeles New York New York Florida Laura Professor Indiana Purdue University China Boston Beijing JOE Wong Gong Texas California Tennessee Pneumonia Marie Washington
National Archives removes exhibit that altered images of Women's March

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 11 months ago

National Archives removes exhibit that altered images of Women's March

"Photos from the twenty seventeen women's March are on display at the National Archives but they've been altered to leave out some controversial messages the exhibit is intended to mark the one hundredth anniversary of the nineteenth amendment and women's right to vote but a closer look at the images on display showing waves of crowds along Pennsylvania Avenue for the two thousand seventeen women's March you'll see the parts of the image have been blurred out the National Archives tells The Washington Post yes words on signs held by mergers referencing women's anatomy or criticizing president trump or blurred the reason archive spokeswoman Miriam Kleiman said in a statement quote as a non partisan non political federal agency we blurred references to the president's name on some posters so as not to engage in current political controversy a history professor at Purdue University wait in telling the post the decision shows it's okay to silence women's voices Melissa held

National Archives The Washington Post Donald Trump Miriam Kleiman President Trump Professor Melissa Purdue University
Can We Win the War on Cockroaches?

BrainStuff

03:06 min | 1 year ago

Can We Win the War on Cockroaches?

"Hey brain stuff lauren. Vogel I'm here with great news. Cockroaches are quickly becoming resistant to several different insecticides. All at the same time. Cool cool cool one Michael SCHARF. A professor in the Department of Entomology at Purdue University along with his team found these pests are developing cross resistance to multiple classes of exterminators insecticides insecticides. The team's work was published in the June twenty nineteen issue of scientific reports. The problem is that each class of insecticides works differently to kill these his creditors so exterminators frequently mix them or switch them up to combat infestations. Cockroaches are resistant to multiple insecticides. Well you can see where this is going. Sheriff and his team used apartment buildings in Indiana and Illinois. That had infestations of German cockroaches as their experimental grounds I because it is very glamorous. They caught some of the roaches and tested them to see which insecticides had the lowest resistance on the roaches low resistance Austin spins the roaches would be more vulnerable to the treatments which scientists went onto us for six months. Sharf said in a press. Release if you have the ability to test just the roaches. I and picnic insecticide. That has low resistance that ups the odds but even then we had trouble controlling populations the researchers rotated -tated three different insecticides. That method kept the roach population stable over six months. Meaning it neither increased or decreased when they mixed to insecticides leads. The Roach population flourished according to the press release flourished being just about the last verb. Anyone wants to hear when talking about cockroaches when the the team used just one insecticide for the entire six months and the roaches had low resistance to that particular insecticide they were nearly wiped out. Well great right not really. Because of even ten percent of the roaches had resistance to that insecticide. The population would increase. Sharf said quote four to six fold in just one generation ration-. We didn't have a clue that something like that could happen this fast during this test. The Roach is also developed resistance to several other kinds of insecticides decides even if the new generations had never been exposed to them before so now what Scharff said he recommends combating roaches with more than chemical warfare including traps and vacuums quote. Some of these methods are more expensive than using only insecticides but if those insecticides aren't going to control or eliminate a population you're just throwing money away oh and hey you've probably heard that

Sharf Scharff Michael Scharf Vogel Lauren Professor Indiana Purdue University Department Of Entomology Austin Illinois Six Months Ten Percent
"purdue university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

12:05 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"From Purdue University. Specializing in military history is secondary areas of study included, the American civil war in the history of technology. He has published more than fifty books and has been focusing on threats to our world's infrastructure for years, one second after came out in two thousand eleven one year after two thousand sixteen forty eight hours, just several months ago, and Mr. force, June, one of our favorite guests and a dear friend, welcome back to coast to coast. Pleasure George how you doing? I'm doing wonderful. I hope you are too. You're still out there in Nashville. Absolutely God's country, we might be there again for another show next year. Yeah. Can you show kicking that around? It's, it's such a great city for us. I mean they they fill the stands and everything else. So it's perfect place. It'd be great to have you out here again. Not love the love the people to love the people. Tell me about forty eight hours, the book, okay? Forty eight hours. I start with that one. I did three books related to EMP as, as you mentioned, one second after one year, after and then the final day publisher wanted more. But I really felt the whole issue of EMP is I wrote anything beyond that it just starts dragging out. I wanted to work at something different initially the work was on C, M A, which you and I've talked about before solar storms. But there's a real nasty one out there called C, P, E coma proton emission or ejection that if it hits an a certain sequence. Would become an isolation event and the whole forty-eight hours means we have forty eight hours of notice that this is going to have it. Well, yeah. Hence the title and the title, and it has a plot device. It's a real threat. I don't want audiences worrying. Oh my gosh. Got forty eight hours starting tomorrow. But question became what would we do individually and societally if we knew we might be at the end game? I mean, forty eight hours, left some people would survive if they're in shelters. And then the plot moves into who gets to use the shelters naturally shelters built for what's called continuity government. The power elitists. Which in one sense, we understand if the sirens, go off, and there's like two hundred missiles interacting coming in Ecorse, they're going to get in there. There's going to be time to deal with the rest of us. If you have forty eight hours in this hundreds of thousands of people scanning at the gates into these place places insane. What about us? But what's left after that, Bill? A full blown C T E could be boy. We're throwing around a lot of acronyms, this warning could be an alien extinction level event. It's a pretty well, wipe out everything on the planet, and we'd be at a restart there is some fierce Hussein, maybe it was not astronaut and at. Two more. You've invented a new word. We could extrapolate. Asteroid and maybe it wasn't pastor is triggered some of the massive extinctions in the past. But instead, a C P. So. That's, that's what, what do you hear a whistle in the background, well, actually twenty alarm, which is the sound of a flying saucer landing it is trying to break into your house. It's like it's my cellphone telling me you better be awake by now. Yeah. You don't wanna miss in. It is three in the morning where you are right down three fourteen. So the story I had the lead in with you about what happened in South America. Have you been following that story? Yes. Tens of millions of people left in the dark power was out for fourteen hours. They're not sure exactly what happened. I'm going to tell you what my guesses some nation is experimenting with hacking and shutting down power grids. That's my guess, fully agree. You think so? Absolutely, yes. Yep. It's safest thing the succumb and that is another unfortunate part of all of this scenario, the hacking possibilities of just shutting down the power grid by getting into it. The. Given the honour two months ago by the FBI to attend a conference Downey's down by Raleigh one hundred and fifty agents whose primary task is related to cyber security issues and. I'm actually feeling a little bit optimism and times in the past you and I have talked and it's been like is anybody doing anything? And we were both and no right. Well, FBI and others. I got another one, I could tell you about later, the taken seriously. In fact, the deputy director of the FBI, and she said to the audience, if we do not do our job read fortunes, book, because you're going to find out how your families are going to be living today. After did you wake them off, maybe help hopefully through us, but was you that did this? But did they finally say we've heard about William force chin? We've read his books, this is real stuff. I don't want to wrap you researched myself and say it was made it was it's been a lot of people. It's george. How many people do you reach, you know, if your program and we've been talking about for years? Doc, Dr Peter Paul Ryan, and the commission, a couple members of congress who encompass things like Mark meadows, will you got Peter prior on our program, and well, he's been on Friday. The subject, and I mean, that guy's the godfather, how close are we the legislation, first of all about being this done? Finally finally, finally. The former president. Put out some executive order related to see 'em me that was to use. Another acronym. Hewer bs. All right. The current President Trump put out, I think you and I even talked about it. Back in March. He put out a really powerful executive water ordering various branches of government to respond within ninety to one hundred twenty days to start setting up initial plans. So I mean they're not actually out there, heart, adding it, yet and doing the things that are necessary, but I do know somebody in the administration, and it's the president is eighteen is very seriously. The problem is. Gridlock on everything on everything, and the snake chasing its tail while the real stuff that needs to be taking care of is being ignored, and this is one of the biggest, they need to look at what happened in South America last weekend in say, this could be us. Here's our wakeup call. Thank God we didn't get hit. But we need to fix this and fix this right now because this is real well now whether somebody hack them or something else happened who knows at this point. But the, the, the part is it went down. It looks like a hack. Let's go to American territory, put the Rico is American territory, and it's been almost two years. There's still parts of Puerto Rico without electricity because of the hurricanes. Yes. And the bureaucrat bureaucratic stupidity. Blundering arrogance remember, the mayor of San Juan denouncing the president. And you know, you're not helping us while stacked up behind her. Remember where hundreds of FEMA boxes. They got most of the grid backup. It's been mostly army project, engineering department and then went back down again. I mean if you're gonna live in a hurricane zone, build to deal with gains Puerto Rico got wiped out there's still not fully functional you fortune with us. His latest book is called forty eight hours. She's got the several others, that are all very important on this subject, William, let's start with EMP. First of all, explain what that is, and how it can be dangerous to the grid. Well, let's go to EMP one zero one, you got okay, electro, magnetic pulse. It is produced by detonating a relatively low yield nuclear weapon. You don't need some megabomb something around fifty to one hundred K, which is small horrible as it is. I mean Hiroshima was about twelve to fifteen K detonate that children fifty miles above York's atmosphere. Electrostatic discharge cascades, down to the earth surface from the detonation of the bomb intensifying, traveling that just be the light hits. The earth's surface and all of the hundreds of millions of miles of wiring out there. Instantly. Get hit with an electrical overload. It blows the grid offline it overloads, particularly your high transmission lines aluminum towers with those big lines, Sean, they are literally exploding off the pylons were without power estimates from within the industry. In a DOJ report. Excuse me deal report indicate eighty percent of a power grid would still be off line after five years. Here's how many people could die after that. I conference some years ago of people who work in the industry. I mean, experts on this issue, and there was a team there that was running down, what happens to us. And the estimated casualty rate in America would be close onto ninety percent percent of the whole in just so folks, no you don't die from the direct neom p you die from the answer. Larry things that happen without having electric city. Well, let's go to what I would call, you know, maslow's hierarchy, and needs in the EMP instantly, your water supply is gone. Any major city you lose your pumping facilities. You've lost that scouter your, your banking system is down. Everything is down within sanitation is down the stores. The food stores are down. I was just looking something up the other day on that, that, you know, your major markets all have heavy duty backup generators built into them. Because if they lose if they totally totally lose power after X amount of time.

president FBI executive William Purdue University Nashville Mr. force George South America Ecorse Puerto Rico Dr Peter Paul Ryan publisher FEMA Hussein Bill DOJ
Purdue University, Fort Wayne And Indiana discussed on WBBM Programming

WBBM Programming

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Purdue University, Fort Wayne And Indiana discussed on WBBM Programming

"Purdue University, we'll continue to freeze tuition costs for insight, resonance, Purdue University will not increase tuition for Indiana residents on its west. Lafayette main campus for the seventh and eighth consecutive years through the twenty twenty twenty twenty one academic year base undergraduate tuition and fees for those. The students on the main campus will remain below ten thousand dollars produces tuition and fees at its northwest and Fort Wayne campuses will increase up

Purdue University Fort Wayne Indiana Ten Thousand Dollars
"purdue university" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

11:58 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"For Purdue University. Specializing in military history and the history of technology. He is a faculty, fellow and professor of history at mantra college near Asheville North Carolina, and he has gotten interested in a number of doomsday scenarios. Now he does right? In addition to other books, these that we've been talking about are works of fiction to be sure, but they're fiction based on scientific fact. Yes, it would be possible to cripple this country even if you were a third rate power. Like let's say the North Koreans have both a fair missile program and also nuclear weapons. Three placed over this country strategically from. Say okay ships freighters. Let's say off Atlantic coast of civic coast of the Gulf of Mexico, and that could be deadly to this country. Maybe to ninety percent of our population might die within a year. And now in this new book, forty-eight hours. He's talking about something that nature might do to us in the form of our own sun with a one two punch and things called coronal mass ejections, coronal, proton ejections, suffice it to say as we take some more calls for you. Bill that for those who just joined us. We're talking here about things that we know the sun can do. And if it did it in the right order back to back, that would be curtains for most life on this planet. Correct. And game or as the term E L E, which you correctly point out with us in a movie about twenty years ago actually pretty good one sudden impact deep impact deep impact. Yeah, it stands for extinction level of that. So, again, we're not we're not talking here about just a science fiction here. We're talking about things that could actually happen. And indeed have in the past. There was an event from the sun that shorter that much of the world's brand new delivery system and, and railroad system back in eighteen fifty nine. Fortunately, at the time, we didn't depend that much on it. And things were repaired, the wires were put back up, and, and the rail lines replaced, the we went about our business today. We are so dependent on things. Electron EQ that we would not be so fortunate. Here's a call from David in Creston, Iowa. Hello, david. Thanks for taking my call. Sure. I kind of court that may sound stupid, a lot of people, but why requires savior, I like for mankind. Rovner dive eggs for a more regaining say, but, you know, there's nothing we're going to be really do about it except maybe dislike suffering go onto when we tip what we got, you know, the one where I, I would I would have to say this, David, I mean, and I don't mean to be callous here. But how about if I just walk over to your house? Let's say about thanksgiving and I shoot all of your kids and your grandkids because they're all going to die anyway. God that before. But obviously you see my point, we want to live as long as well as we can. I mean, this is not the kind of thing that you would just roll over and play dead about. I mean obviously humanity would do what it could to survive, right? Wouldn't play. I mean we're not play dead, but that they got religion. You know, you're there another life after this word for that. That's fine enough. But I'm in no hurry to see that other life. I'd like to keep this one going for awhile. I mean. Well, it depicts the Polk. I know this is like, David I again, I doubt I could be philosophical Bill as, as, as David was my instinct would be no. We survive we survive in the here and now. I started with a family rather late. I was forty two and my daughter was born. Yeah. And you know it's true. Seventy people have cynically, the ages the moment you hold your new own everything changes. Absolutely. How you look at life, your purpose? What the future is it all changes? So. Yeah, I mean, I've led a good life. My daughter just got married. She's got a great job at Yellowstone twenty-five. I want my girl to have her fifty to seventy five hundred years. Yeah, and I'll do anything possible to make sure of it. And in fact, in the introduction to one second after I actually did. Right. I hope thirty years from now he will have forgotten about me four she was a crank. And that means my daughter is reached middle age and family around and things worked out. Okay. The most important in my life, and not not to be Armageddon this year or apocalyptic. But of course you know, Yellowstone could blow one of these days, we've already talked about. I'm sure you have. All right. Very good. Eight six six five zero JIMBO. Here's all if who calls in from Maryville, Missouri on the Jim Bohannon show. Hello olive. And thank you for having manner show. Sure. Listen to you every chance I get and you are eligible and has so many different guests on so many different subjects. It's amazing. Thank you. Thank you. On the subject tonight. I guess a little pilot go, I know I several years ago, I was hearing all this, and it seemed that nobody was talking about it that at least they're starting to talk about grids. I think we have about twenty major day something like that in the United States, and they're so unprotected. And it's this information said that we were building protection for other countries, but we weren't doing anything for only, and it would take on time to get that going. But then it also talked about the. The natural decides to with the sun. And I think it was eighteen fifty eight. They said that they think fifty nine yeah. Nine. There wasn't much for to destroy things. We didn't have much electron accents. The Senate happened again. And I'm not sure exactly that you're something around the nineteen hundreds there, nineteen five or something. I guess you could probably address that I'm sure that there have been a maybe nothing quite as severe as eighteen fifty nine you tell me have there been similar events. Regional the intensity of CME increases close, you get to the magnetic pole, therefore, Canada and parts of Russia. More susceptible it was one that impact the Canada in the nineteen twenties didn't draw much notice. There was another one that took Quebec down for a couple of days, but realize these are regional abets, which means they can call their friends and Vermont, or whatever and say, hey, you got any extra transformers weeding here? Now when you're dealing with a global event there, ain't no extra supplies. Yeah. All right. One eight six six five zero jimbo's. Go to Steve and jeered North Carolina. Hello, steve. Hey, JIMBO, enjoying this conversation. Thank you. The question I have I frame that whale because I'm very interested in the answer because I've heard I've heard you before different shows the ninety percent. Frightening in the first year. And, and I agree with you. I'm, I'm not sure if that's coming mostly from star basing or from humans mankind, killing mankind. But second part of my question is. Camper survive, which would be like twenty five twenty eight million whatever. Toplessness. How, how does exa by because men live without electricity. Full, many thousands of years, quite fat, you know, without electron for electric cars or anything. Would the Bassett necessity? So for water and over from the elements, of course, there was a higher death rate. And, and again, we didn't have so many. So I as I recall from the your, your first book on the issue of EMP one, second after a lot of it was starvation. Some of it was weather related. Right. I'm gonna say question, because I would like to try and explain some people go ninety percent. This guy's crazy. It's like a maslow's hierarchy of needs. But rather than, you know, math low in terms of oxygen water and such, but it does come down to. You've lost your pure water supply immediately. Second. You've lost your sanitation within a matter of days. You're cities around inhabitable and about let's that week to ten days, you're gonna start having massive outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, gastrointestinal, your average community has a food supply of between twenty to twenty five days on hand and a lot of that is job within four or five days all those freezers in your supermarket. Soup, and they're dangerous after a week or two. So there's your primary causes than other causes, our medical fair percentage of people are on light, sustaining medications such as diabetes heart regulation painkillers for cancer, things like that, all of that Scott, your nursing homes, turn into nightmares, and then you have command and control breakdown civil disorder starts to take over and with that you have a collapse. What happens to the remaining ten percent, a year later, they're in enclaves or like in my little village ri- live here in North Carolina there in primarily rural areas where they can adapt and survive. Yeah, I it, it suffice it to say it spells it out of the book, but it's, it's, it's pretty scary and quite plausible. Unfortunately. I tended to talk some years ago in which it was pointed out that about eighty percent of the grid would still be off-line after five years silence. In a room three or four hundred experts on this, and then one wag spoke up, and it was chilling you said, well, if ninety percent of his die, but we still have twenty percent of our electric city. We'll have a surplus electric seeing things will be okay. Again. Okay. No laughter on that one was. We'll come back at Edward, we'll talk some more. I if Bill can stay with a little bit more. We get more people when I've talked to you, sir. Okay. Absolutely absolutely. All right. Stay more calls to come for Bill forced in and again forty eight hours. It's like I said, it's a great read too great read. But then when you put it down, you realize that can happen. That's kind of scary more to come back in a moment for those fortunate enough to help the person who.

David I North Carolina Bill jimbo Purdue University Mexico Asheville professor of history Canada Steve Senate Creston United States Maryville Iowa Jim Bohannon Yellowstone Polk
"purdue university" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"purdue university" Discussed on KOMO

"A speech at Purdue University potential presidential candidate Howard Schultz, the former Starbucks CEO talked about issues ranging from healthcare immigration and education, come sewer marrow tells us he stopped short of making any. Official announcement in front of a row of American flags. Shield started off by saying I'm considering a run because members of both parties are not yet. Doing the job. They were elected to do. But says he is still quote seriously considering it in response to critics about how an independent run by him would lead to President Trump's reelection. I can assure you, no one wants Donald Trump fired more than I Schultz called for changes in immigration, healthcare, gun control and education reform. See Romero, KOMO news. Komo news time four thirty-six house. Democrats took their first step toward obtaining, President Trump's personal tax returns convening a hearing today to examine legislative proposals and laws dictating the process to acquire the documents. Here's an exchange between democratic congresswoman, Linda Sanchez and tax expert. Dr Joseph Thorndike, Dr Thorndike you previously mentioned that you would like to see the release of tax returns. Codified. Are you worried that this tradition because it is just a tradition right now is being routed, I am concerned that it may in fact, be completely broken. And I think that we can't count on traditions. If again, if we believe that this sort of transparency is important, and I do then we can't really depend on a tradition to get the job done GOP. Congressman Darren lahood has a different take. I look at the legitimate purpose and the legal purpose on this. And I do not see it. And I go back to what a number of my colleagues said on weaponising, the tax code and setting a precedent. That's never been done. And we should all be concerned about that. With more on this. We say Hello to ABC's alley Rogan. She joins us from Capitol Hill. Alley. Thanks for your time. This apparently in this one respect with Democrats. I believe are trying to do is get a law passed forcing presidential candidates to release their tax returns. Correct. That is correct. That is one of the options that they are trying to put in place, obviously that would apply for every president in after President Trump. But they're also today exploring the authority that exists for only a couple of people, including the chairman of the House Ways and means committee. That's the comedian the house it writes tax law. He has the ability to request. Presidential tax returns. It is something that's been in the wasp since nineteen twenty four it has been rarely invoked because president usually disclosed their tax returns voluntarily. And so today, we're hearing from a bunch of experts who are saying largely that it is in the public interest for a chairman of the ways and means chairman to exercises authority, if it is in the public interest, and if it is necessary, and in this case, they're saying that the criteria in both cases is met. So we heard some pushback from a Republican congressman Darren lahood, look, obviously, if this were to become law that impacts not only Republicans, but Democrats or Republicans saying they're not for full disclosure moving forward on the issue of tax returns. Or is the pushback only as a relates to President Trump? Well, it's interesting that you mentioned that because I actually think there is some hesitancy on the part of the moderate Democrats too. Codify this into our because as you just said, it would cut both ways. Although I think they would also say that you know, Democrats wouldn't nominee someone who was reluctant to release their tax returns. But it would cut both ways. This is the experts are saying this is a nonpartisan thing. I think in the context of the criticism that I've heard so far in this committee from Republicans. It sounds like it has a lot more to do with President Trump. Specifically ABC's alley Rogan. Joining us from Capitol Hill alley thanks so much. Thank you. It's four forty and time to guess the KOMO afternoon. Sound bite your chance to win. Oh, a special little trip on us. Listen carefully. Here's today. Soundbite. I don't think that we lose elections by addressing climate change. I don't think we ever have..

President Trump alley Rogan Republicans Howard Schultz Komo president chairman ABC Congressman Darren lahood Dr Joseph Thorndike Starbucks Linda Sanchez Purdue University potential Official CEO Romero GOP
"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Death of a Purdue University. Student was a suicide according to police in west Lafayette, investigators say the young woman from California jumped from a top floor window of an off campus apartment complex, the Vigo county. Sheriff has suspended special deputy Danny to news, pending the outcome of the bribery case being handled by the Marion county prosecutor to news is a former Vigo county school superintendent it was in that role that he's. Being accused of corruption in Indianapolis, ten point walks. The neighborhoods original gangsters used their old gang connections to back off the bad guys. Chris Davis reports ten point wants to see if that works in Chicago when the ten points of Gary and Andy went to Chicago last week. They took IMP with them to talk about building. Trust. Adt may take some time to build the kind of trust the pinpoint has with IMP Reverend Charles Harrison, Chris Davis, Ninety-three WABC mobile news. I'm Stanley around the level and the go on Twitter at ninety three WIBC and WIBC dot com. Now, here's the forecast from the American standard cooling weather center. More thunderstorms tonight a slight risk for severe storms damaging win the main threat low of sixty partly sunny Wednesday afternoon, sixty eight for the high forty eight Thursday morning sunshine in sixty eight Thursday afternoon when posting on most job sites. You get candidates. I'm the sales directing his sales sales director you're looking for. But when you posted indeed. Dot com. You get the candidates just right for you. I'm in sales director with an MBA over ten years experience. Who's also fluent.

Chris Davis sales director Vigo county Vigo county school Chicago Danny Purdue University west Lafayette Marion county bribery Twitter Indianapolis WABC superintendent Charles Harrison California prosecutor Gary Andy ten years
"purdue university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

07:02 min | 2 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"You're listening to KNX in-depth with Mike Simpson. I'm Charles Feldman. Reminder that coming up on the show as we move through it here. This anonymous op Ed in the New York Times just published senior administration officials saying they're working to frustrate some of the president's misguided impulses working against him part of the resistance right now, though is the partying over for frat houses in the wake of pledge deaths reported in the news, most US fraternities have decided to ban hard alcohol under a rule recently adopted by the inter fraternity conference joining us now Jetson harass president and CEO of the North American inter fraternity conference and senior college student Seth Goodwin who serves as president of Purdue university's inter fraternity council Jetson, let's start with you. So what is this all about no booze at fraternities? Well, this is a part of four steps as that on our national organizations on your win. And part of our first step was working with students doing research and looking at word factors are causing the highest risk to our students gas and the overwhelming research in feedback. We've done over the last twelve months of really looking at this issue. It became clear that we had to immediately begin banning and removing high grain alcohol from our experience people know what it's hard alcohol, which really any alcoholic beverages over fifteen percent. All of the deaths that people have been hearing about new members dying in hazing incidents and most of our hostile transports can be directly connected to that. And so the research shows it the incident show it, but most importantly when you actually sit down with student leaders, and we say, what's the one thing we can make a difference on immediately. This was the number one recommendation. And so that's why when sixty six international fraternities met last week and decided on this recommendation, it was near unanimous support. Okay. So no, whiskey novado notes akilah. But but beer is. Okay. How does this get how does this enforce though? You know, you don't have police going around to the frat houses and checking in on them. Right. Well, actually, you know, the national organizations have their own standards those standards have to reflect this policy to have twelve months to fully implement. But in reality, most groups are going to be doing this. Seth can talk to you a little bit about at Purdue University. The inter fraternity council made up of. Student leaders did this years ago. So it's a combination of working with our campus partners with our national organization, and we do involve often local authorities in in the risk management policies for each particular college down over at Purdue does this really work or do people just kind of drink on the sly. Anyway, I think he kind kinda hit on that. When you just mentioned, I think involving all the stakeholders is pretty important in terms of making sure it desert, but here Purdue I thought they transition from my freshman sophomore year is when the hard alcohol really got removed from the chapter facilities. And now, it's part of the culture the new students that arriving on campus and then sophomore juniors that's all they do is not having hard alcohol at the functions are the parties. So now, it's just a new culture. It's a new normal, and it seemed to work pretty well for us. So far. What else gets cut down on? When we talk about hard alcohol being removed. Johnson was was talking about the deaths that have happened in certain hazing incident. Sell hospital transports sexual assaults is a is a big focus on college campuses right now. Yeah. Ultimately, it it's a prediction for the rest because oftentimes a lot of the students entering school. Maybe they have drink before. But they haven't drink to the degree that some universities do or they don't have to expose them to it. So once they are here districting that hard alcohol right away is not safe, and it can lead to all of those things. So if they are coming into a culture where it should be here or wine like our rule here. Is there anything under fifteen percent? So there's a lot of options that you can choose from. But ultimately, reduces that dramatically and like incidents also side of the fraternities like a rash. And all that there's been a number decreasing in that as well. So a lot of schools are in states that have now legalized recreational use of marijuana does does that apply to this sort of thinking about a ban on hard. Al. Alcohol. Does that apply to a ban on smoking weed is well this those two items weren't connected in any way to this particular decision. Really what we were looking at is. What do we do to make the largest impact in? And how do we do that as quick as possible? And you know, one of the things is is kind of alluding to is fraternities are part of a bigger ecosystem of campus culture. And you know, I'll be going back to my home school to watch the football game in a week. And that's tailgate culture is apart engrained in the culture. So what we're trying to do is have fraternities lethal way. What's the safest position? We can put our members and our guests. We're oh. So I've been today. I'm at the Texas Austin, I was at the state capital working with state legislatures on how do we strengthen hazy laws to make sure that our crimes and penalties are enforced properly. How do we give students the opportunity for a good? Samaritan amnestying beauty when they have to call for help when they wanna talk about. The problems. So we're really looking at this from a ball tie pronged approach and our big push. Here is not just with fraternities and sororities, but it's about campus culture because we're operating a bigger ecosystem. And you do think the frats will follow what she put down because if it's a matter of following the law. I mean, a lot of underage kids get alcohol and frat parties and the law is that you shouldn't drink when you're underage. Yes. I mean, you got you got a couple of things here if we are shooting for a perfect strategy to work with college students we are going to fail. What we're trying to do is to say, okay. You got the law. You got the reality of all college students as it comes to drinking. And we're trying to start meeting them where they all are and get us to the safest position not just for fraternities. But for the entire campus. So hey, it's I'm not gonna lie. It's not perfect. But this is our best strategy. And I think having sat on the line talking about what they've done. It Purdue is a testament to this actually works in the field. All right. That's just horse presidency yell North American inter fraternity conference and. We also heard from Steph route one serves as president of produce inter fraternity council when KNX in-depth continues, the ongoing supreme court confirmation hearings when you're on the road in southern California. The traffic looks bad when you're above the ROY still looks bad KNX ten seventy s I am this guy will.

Purdue university inter fraternity council president and CEO North American inter fraternit Seth Goodwin KNX president Charles Feldman New York Times US Mike Simpson Jetson president of produce marijuana California Johnson football
"purdue university" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"The trump administration is changing direction and allowing colleges to lee race out of admissions and enrollment decisions now some universities is to say that they intend to continue their diversity efforts whatever that means here's the problem with this whole affirmative action discussion what is affirmative action i've been asking this for decades i've always been interpreted to mean that you are taken some positive steps to make sure that you a fair to everybody and that fairness should lead to a diverse school population community company etc i graduated from college in nineteen sixty seven i went to work for the federal government later on i went to purdue university i graduated from purdue university in nineteen seventy nine hundred seventy one i had a three point four great point average out of four not bragging just illustrate i don't know if purdue had a quota system first of all let me make this clear affirmative action is not quotas that's a lot of people go wrong they are not synonymous and if you look at a lot of organizations today that headed by black people head about black women they didn't get that because of a quota system they didn't get there because somebody said we'll beat the let so many of them ended up no formats drags the result of what you pursue you know that the liberals head's going to explode by enforcing that loud i'm herman cain.

purdue university herman cain
"purdue university" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Affirmative action the trump administration is changing direction and allowing colleges to lee race out of admissions and enrollment decisions now some universities is to say that they intend to continue their diversity efforts whatever that means here's the here's the problem with this whole affirmative action discussion what is affirmative action i've been asking this for decades i've always been interpreted to mean that you are taken some positive steps to make sure that you a fair to everybody and that fairness should lead to a diverse school population community company excetera i graduated from college in nineteen sixty seven i would have work for the federal government later on i went to purdue university i graduated from purdue university in nineteen seventy nine hundred seventy one i had a three point four great point average out of four not bragging just illustrate i don't know if purdue had a quota system first of all let me make this clear affirmative action is not quotas that's where a lot of people go wrong they are not synonymous and if you look at a lot of organizations today that head about black people head about black women they didn't get that because of a quota system they didn't get there because somebody said we'll be let so many of them ended up no both formats drives the results of what you pursue you know that the liberals are going to explode by forcing i'm.

purdue university
"purdue university" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"Talk about something right now that i i mentioned eight years ago eight years ago and i remember when i talked about what i'm about to share with you there was an extremely strong hostile reaction on clark stinks so here i go again eight years ago i told you about a study at princeton that found that once you achieved a certain level of income there was no additional satisfaction or happiness beyond that number inflationadjusted that number is roughly eighty five thousand a year there's a new study at purdue university and think i mentioned the one eight years ago was done at princeton a new study at purdue took information from gallup there was a survey of one point seven million people and they found that the happiness you have little bit different methodology of one hundred and five thousand your happiness starts to decline but up to that point you will have generally more happiness because a lot of people feel extreme pressure from bills obligations expenses.

princeton purdue university clark eight years one eight years
"purdue university" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"By that's how you could join us in the conversation easy right here on the town of donji don't hang on a second hang on a second was are viral video sandra can't put here were people talking about on social media act todd jeffries atx and at dawn prior were getting viral with todd and be seen this yes it's the viral video it's on my facebook page todd jeffries this was on tucker carlson show where he's interviewing this professor from our princeton who wants to eliminate the word man the word man okay is offensive routed what what's over the words that they're trying to avoid there another way man is associated with adult men and as opposed to just humanity or humans so um they're trying to avoid the word man as we can eliminate bad word then things would be much better and people will be less offended mood what if you live in manchester for monarchs offensive well they would might have to change the name of the city if people agree with purdue university and purdue university found that things need to be updated and they updated they're writing guide to take out these words that apparently are offending certain groups of people of cases just to make sure you understand your something offends somebody and if you've never met the person and only right you have to change it should doesn't that mean that a small group of super unhappy people get to confer with the rest of the same thing well perhaps stir ahead of their time maybe this is something that is funding a small group but the group's going to get larger and times are changing and our language is dynamic webster keeps out new words in the dictionary so our language needs to change and a term that used to be nonoffensive like man made in male man and now needs to be changed she she wants to get rid of that we're because she can't get one i'm done under amount you're out you're amount about thanks that was it but a good run our at a good round i have nothing else say about anything can deal with bill koch actually guys like the world is upside down above our body it's bizarre world isn't it all right five one two eight three six zero five nada backup forgot.

donji todd jeffries professor princeton manchester purdue university bill koch facebook tucker carlson
"purdue university" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WJR 760

"You're hearing the frank beckmann show news talk seven sixty wjr i welcome back england the program may young man when he was in high school with on our show and in last week had did i say young man i'm sorry i apologize that's uh i can't use that i've got to avoid that that's uh that's sexist it's a masculine marker and its sexist according to purdue university where you're the story purdue wants to uh kids on campus to stop using the word man uh because i'm not kidding you it's uh is sexist and it is now considered offensive to use the word man in any way whether you're talking about a mankind uh whatever mailman uh you name it that's uh that's offensive now according to purdue university but the young man on the other end our line uh he'd get mad of icee he was a young woman is grant strobl from grosse pointe and say he is now the uh the national ahead of uh an organization that uh that really encourages young people to get involved uh in in making sure that college campuses are free for everyone to speak and that young people have those kinds of freedoms that are guaranteed in the constitution as it we really should need that a grant as national chair the young americans for freedom uh spoke i believe on was it tuesday or thursday you spoke at sepak grant it was on thursday thursday thursday uh well congratulations on that had to be quite a thrill yeah yeah certainly was a good time who is a great two into speyrer young people to you to stand off for what they believe in on their campuses and uh and how are you receive what what was it like i've gotta assume very warmly by that crowd which is very conservative yeah yeah i i was very welcome by it you don't have first ii whose definitely a largest credit ever spoken to sell uh use is definitely nerveracking by a thai i did feel always why we're received that they've particularly into a i some of my stories hata types into a what you just disgusted with mad which is kind of funny because you think the left with the enjoy using the word because it can be used uh.

purdue university grosse pointe frank beckmann
"purdue university" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"Feet if you're nine months pregnant on an airplane you got to rob your rugged blind with charities but meanwhile i do do the mumbojumbo don't think it's related to any one religion i'm sick of the whole damn thing by so this one it's a purdue university oncegreat university a new deem at purdue university something generate left wing fanatic is thou going after the engineering department to de center western civilization this idiot wants to now the you see i told you before that the main damage done to our universities and our society were in the social sciences because they're not real sciences any one could say there are social this social that you could study any of these subjects and get any any great they want to give you this no definitive value in any of it you can make stuff up so now they're going after engineering where phrases such as diversity and different perspectives and racial gaps and unfairness and unequal outcomes are now replacing the day early vocabulary of calculations that were once part and parcel of engineering daily calculations in engineering departments used to talk about horsepower microchip power size ratios aerodynamic lift and drag now the engineering departments of focusing on representation hurt feelings microaggressions in the in the profession of.

purdue university oncegreat un purdue university nine months
"purdue university" Discussed on The Basketball Analogy

The Basketball Analogy

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"purdue university" Discussed on The Basketball Analogy

"You got it how yet you excoup that perfectly that's kind of odd live my life i mean i just thing that's my motto and other i live bind a quarter mile at a time but i get it versus there was no she which she was all it was awesome so as to how long total are you going to be in the bay area and and how long total you going to be like in transit i will be in the bay area for approximately twenty two hours and i will be in transit if you include the drive to and from chicago i will be in transit a fifteen hours while coal that is a with a rough ratio not not to go jaden in ask you to give too much personal information but where you were from where you driving to chicago um i live in west lafayette indiana uh home of purdue university um so it's about three hours southeast of chicago so uh with traffic tonight though it could end up being five hours for all i now um but you i'm too that's where i'm at china to brad miller and robbie home the pacers that right unfortunately ah did you get do we have any hope like do we have any chances like now asshole you guys the hope okay do what it's such a bush to be a patriots fan so close it now year olds not happening this is the rough parties that you'd like i think we all know what's about to happen with paul george right look he's not we don't have too many of these stories where we get these rumors and then it ends up like the guy decides to stay get him outta here we don't know so yeah like ideally retreat him get get you know a nice little returned because he's such a good player but then there you might get into the whole like well we don't know if we resign um so we want to give up that much in and now you you would've taking you know nutty not a demarcus cousins package like uh like the king that it up with but you're probably going to get something a little bit better the matt and then you have to start like rebuilding and yellow birds out and all the stuff and uh what i'm saying is.

chicago west lafayette china pacers bush paul george jaden indiana purdue brad miller robbie patriots twenty two hours fifteen hours three hours five hours