26 Burst results for "pulmonary embolism"

Fauci: There is not "a lot of definitive evidence" that coronavirus can transmit through airborne spread, but it should not be ruled out

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

05:11 min | Last month

Fauci: There is not "a lot of definitive evidence" that coronavirus can transmit through airborne spread, but it should not be ruled out

"CROWBARS cases are increasing and at least thirty six states this week Texas set a new record high for the number of new cases in a single day today, topping ten thousand cases for the first time at ten, thousand and twenty eight Arizona set a new grim record high for the number of coronavirus deaths in a single day today at one hundred seventeen. Some states reversing their policy. On allowing indoor dining in restaurants today, Dr, Anthony Fauci said this. When you talk about heiress, ill or airborne? There have been demonstrations viruses. That can actually stay in the air for much longer enhance. Get caught up in the circulation system of given room. There isn't a lot of definitive evidence about what the impact of the Aristotle Ization is on covert expression. However, we have some good examples back with SARS which is a similar virus where they were clear cut examples of spread by Aerosol. Juror discussion now is Dr. Peter says. He is the dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and the CO director of the Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development Doctor. Thank you very much for joining us tonight, and just in reaction to what Dr Fauci was just saying in the whole question of indoor dining in restaurants, one of the simple messages is being outside is better than being inside. Yeah that's right now. We know that droplet contact is a major out of transmission meaning that somebody has this virus and what we know about this viruses, that's it's president. High amounts in the Upper Airways speaking, or you cough. You released a lot of virus, and then gets on surfaces or land on people's face. We've known about that for a long time, but a lot of us have suspected that it does something more which is lingers in the atmosphere as well. Well and it turns out not allowed to respiratory viruses. Actually do this easels, does it chicken pox? Virus does and this one almost certainly does this as well, and that's one of the reasons why this is so highly transmissible that high amount of virus, the upper airway and the fact that those particles are released, and so many of those people are without symptoms. So this is what makes it so hard to do. The contact tracing into really manage these epidemics. I? WanNa. Get your view of something. We discussed last night on this program. And that is the the possibility that the real range of possible symptoms is almost unlimited because of the fact that the. Although we think of it as a respiratory of problem, there's also a vascular problem because of the way it seems to get into the bloodstream and those New York Times. Reporter indicating that you could walk into a doctor with just symptoms of feeling, generally bad, and and that could be worthy of Corona virus testing. That's right. There's a huge number of different presentations gastrointestinal presentations prison, presenting coughing and early on in this epidemic we were always told about cough and fever, and that certainly does occur, but the big worrisome one now is the fact that we know this virus binds to certain receptors on the cells, lining blood vessels, and this is causing blood clots warm, so you're seeing pulmonary embolism. You're seeing strokes. You're seeing heart attacks, and that's happening because this virus induces blood clots in the coronary artery, and so one of the big concerns now is, we're people with sudden deaths at. At home people maybe in the early stages of this illness, and this is one of the reasons why so terrifying when the President says ninety nine percent of the cases are harmless, is just not true, and we need to step up our game in the US in terms of interrupting community transmission, the number of cases is going up and up and up forty thousand last week than fifty thousand. Now it's going to be over sixty thousand towards the end of this week with no end in sight so with this epidemic tragically a spiraling out of control right now. and Dr, who does the way you described that? Possibility of sudden death at home would also be a one of the reasons why the death count is, so it is understated in our statistical analysis of it so far. Yeah absolutely, and we're trying to tease out exactly. All of the ramifications we know for instance uncertain about a sudden deaths from covid nineteen. The other thing that happens is when covert night team strikes that community. The people don't take care of themselves. They're reluctant to go to the doctor with symptoms because they're worried of our contracting Cova Nineteen, so we think that may be a component of it as well l., but it's a lethal combination in so many undiagnosed cases, so we're. We're going to get her better handle lot in the coming months, but for now this is a serious and deadly infection.

Texas Children Anthony Fauci President Trump Dr. Peter Texas Arizona New York Times Aristotle Ization Cova Vaccine Development Doctor Cough Pulmonary Embolism Wanna Baylor College Of Medicine United States Reporter Hospital Center National School Of Tropical Me Director
Dangerous blood clots pose a perplexing coronavirus threat

Tom and Curley

00:14 sec | 2 months ago

Dangerous blood clots pose a perplexing coronavirus threat

"Studies indicate about thirty percent of patients hospitalized with over nineteen developed blood clots sometimes leading to life threatening conditions like pulmonary embolism and stroke Dr Karen the realist as respiratory problems are still more

Pulmonary Embolism Dr Karen
Doctors warn of potentially deadly blood clots in COVID-19 patients

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:27 sec | 2 months ago

Doctors warn of potentially deadly blood clots in COVID-19 patients

"There is growing concern about the connection between corona virus and the blood clots in patients CBS's Dr Tara no rule that says doctors are taking steps to protect patients were learning that this is such a big part of covert nineteen the clotting that using blood thinners has the potential to really impact so many lives from some of these really life threatening complications like stroke and pulmonary embolism some studies indicate about thirty percent of hospitalized code nineteen patients develop

CBS Dr Tara
Doctors warn of potentially deadly blood clots in COVID-19 patients

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Doctors warn of potentially deadly blood clots in COVID-19 patients

"B. S. with now growing concern about connections between corona virus and blood clots in patients CBS is medical correspondent Dr Tara Maroulis says doctors are taking steps to learning that this is such a big part of covert nineteen the clotting that using blood thinners has the potential to really impact so many lives from some of these really life threatening complications like stroke and pulmonary embolism some studies are indicating about thirty percent thirty percent of hospitalized covert nineteen patients develop blood

B. S. Dr Tara Maroulis
A coronavirus-related disease is now hitting children

Charlie Brennan

06:30 min | 3 months ago

A coronavirus-related disease is now hitting children

"About new development or new word of element I guess I should say it's an inflammation that seems to be linked to covert nineteen in particular doctor they call it pediatric multi system inflammatory syndrome what should our listeners know about this well this is something new and we're really just trying to learn as much as we can as fast as we can about it but a number of children have been identified both in in Europe and in the U. S. who have a very severe illness with a lot of information sometimes the hard is infected sometimes other organs are infected they they can be very sick they require care in an intensive care unit and it seems to have some link to code that although not all of the patients have been positive for coverage so the the symptoms that these kids are experiencing the if they're unusual and that's what's making them stand out and then the possible link to cove it is a secondary issue well I think both things are important we want to understand the nature of the illness itself and of course if it's if it's related to cope with that would be very important to how concerned should our parents in listening audience be well I think they have to keep in mind two things one this is serious mysterious illness but the other is that it it appears to be quite rare at this point we're talking about only probably about a hundred cases or so that have been accumulated from around the world so it does look like it's it's pretty common I need pretty uncommon and for the most part it seems that code in children is a very very mild illness but these did this new condition that you're seen in these one hundred cases it's similar to Kawasaki disease but it is not and I guess that's my point is that this is something unusual that has scented itself at this time so you're trying to see if it has anything to do with cove it yes it has some relationship to what we call callous sake disease we had some relationship to toxic shock syndrome but it seems to be somewhat distinctive really a little different from either of those so we are trying to get a handle on on just what it is by cooling experience around the world and seeing what are the common features among the cases no Dr we are very concerned about code nineteen as a respiratory syndrome or also learning that it seems to affect organs and there's something going on through the internet called cove it tower or something like that where you know people are taking a look at images of disfigured toes as a result of covert nineteen can all that possibly be true yes I think it can be I think this is a virus that has the number affects on the body effect to number of systems early the losses yeah hi causes a severe pneumonia and the and the bad cases but we've learned that it can also affect the kidneys it can affect the heart it seems to cause the tendency to form blood clots sometimes the very sick patients will have blood clots the long that complicate their course and in the case of coded to that may I code the code that may reflect some inflammation of blood vessels in the extremities such as the toes and fingers Dr Mandeep Mehra of Harvard Medical School it was quoted in The Seattle Times and also the Washington post that cove it begins as a respiratory virus and kills as a cardio cardio vascular virus and that's why we're seeing people with cove it with low oxygen levels yet inexplicably conscious still but then suffering from maybe stroke or pulmonary embolism toxic shock damage blood vessels and and skin rashes and is that what we're seeing more and more that it's affecting the cardiovascular system more than we initially thought yes I think that's fair to say I think when we started seeing Kobe cases we thought it was primarily in the bone yard and section of the law but it's clear that these other organs are frequently involved and and especially the bad cases and really contribute to fatal outcomes and in some cases well we've been talking to for almost two months right now about covert nineteen but on Monday in St Louis city and St Louis county some businesses are going to open up malls for example dine in restaurants June first we hear the state's gonna open up casinos all right you're a professor at the wash University school of medicine what are your thoughts about these developments well I do think that the virus is declining in the Saint Louis area not nearly as fast as soon as we would like it to but I think there are a lot of promising signs that we're on the downhill side of things but it's not gone by any means and so we have to be very careful as we start re opening we have to move slowly we have to watch what the outcomes are and be prepared to change course if necessary importantly people have to keep in mind their own risk profile and if a person is elderly specially over sixty five war has serious underlying medical conditions then they need to be particularly careful they probably should not be the ones going out to restaurants or are doing a lot of shopping and and things like that what are your thoughts on schools re opening in the fall you know I think that's a very difficult issue at this point I don't think it's the right time to make a decision R. right now I think we have to see what the course I think it is as we start to open up if things continue to go down it might be possible to cautiously opened schools but if things go the wrong direction we may the right decision making to keep him close I think it is too early right now very important issue in a very

Doctors Tally Up the Ways Coronavirus Attacks the Body

WSJ What's News

06:05 min | 3 months ago

Doctors Tally Up the Ways Coronavirus Attacks the Body

"If you can remember all the way back to the beginning of the krona virus outbreak you might recall hearing that patients who catch it show flu like symptoms of Fever. Cough and fatigue well our knowledge of virus and how it affects. The body has come a long way since then joining me now to talk about what medical professionals are now learning about. Kobe is Wall Street Journal. Senior writer Betsy McKay Betsy. We heard a lot early on about the corona virus being a respiratory infection. But that's not the case for everyone. Doctors report that the virus impacts more than just the respiratory system and you spoke to several medical providers who treated corona virus patients. What did they tell you about the other systems of the body that this can impact? What they said is that this virus really is looking like more than a respiratory infection. It's affecting all parts of the body and some really unexpected ones. I said you know. There are more complications that they're seeing with covert nineteen and they see with other other viral infections basically. They've learned that. The damaged goes far beyond the lungs. It can affect the brain kidneys heart the vascular system the digestive system. So you know. Patients sometimes are having sudden strokes. They develop pulmonary embolisms or blood. Clots in the lung. Some have heart. Attacks symptoms kidney failure. So it's a pretty wide range of complications. Can any of those factors help explain why younger people who seemingly without any underlying health issues have in some cases experienced severe cases of this virus helps partly explain? It doesn't fully explain it but it does show that you know you can develop these complications. And it's not necessarily tied to having an underlying condition or having a weaker immune system which is what puts older people at risk or being younger and having an underlying condition. They're clearly some kind of independent things going on in the body that don't affect everybody. I mean I think it's still a mystery as to why most people like eighty percent of people don't really develop complications like this but twenty percent to can you talk a bit more about the inflammatory response that the virus produces in the body and how that's presented challenges to treating it in some cases. Yeah I'm so. Some people develop a really powerful inflammatory response. You know anybody who gets a virus is going to have some inflammation so when a when a virus enters your body the immune system cells kind of Russian to kill infected cells. They also release. These molecules called cytokines and the whole idea is to try to sort of isolated and protect the body from the infected tissue. But you know you're you're inflammatory. Response can kind of Overdo it developed. What's called the site of kind storm? So once you get this inflammation in your body start to damage you know instead of protecting you. It starts damaging the body itself. So it can you know starve. The body of Oxygen. Because if your lungs are inflamed you can't take oxygen into the lungs and that deprives other organs in your body so so there's some pretty severe consequences of extreme inflammation and that seems to be driving a lot of these problems and what about the preponderance of clotting this also seems to be one of those mysteries associated with the corona virus. Yeah that has been a really interesting discovery. And it's you know. One of the most worrisome complications because it seems to be behind a lot of these complications so anytime that you have kind of a level of hyperinflation your body is more more prone to clotting. That's that's one of the consequences of it and what doctors are seeing is blood clots forming. I mean they form the lungs and that prevents oxygen from getting in. You know the blood then kind of just goes through the lungs without taking oxygen that can deprive the heart of oxygen. You can also get blood clots in the heart you know. They've even found blood clots in the toes causing this famous now famous and very strange complication called Cova Toe. Which essentially is blood? Clots forming down in the small very small blood vessels in the in the foot and the tow and causing this amazing swelling. So it even affects the kidneys so this clothing is really really strange. It seems to be a feature of the more severe in nineteen so we've talked a lot about the various mysteries that krona viruses still posing and we know doctors and scientists are working to answer a lot of questions. What are some of the biggest ones they still have at this point? Well I would say there are a lot of a lot of big ones. They don't really understand who developed severe disease and why although there are certain groups at risk and older people are risk because their immune systems are weaker people with underlying conditions like heart disease diabetes are also at greater risk because their bodies are just again in week position but but nobody really understands yet. Why sometimes rarely but it does happen. You know perfectly healthy. Young people can very severely ill among us will develop a very strong powerful inflammatory response. That will cause all of these problems. They still don't understand. How many of these complications are caused by inflammation? I say direct attack of the virus itself so there are a lot of questions that scientists are still are trying to figure out and you know. This virus was just identified at the beginning of this year. So that's it's less than five months. Old have been studied for less than five months so the scientists and doctors. We talked to said you know. There's just a lot of work to be done.

Inflammation Betsy Mckay Betsy Cough Wall Street Journal Writer Kobe Cova Toe
"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on Surgery 101

Surgery 101

04:26 min | 10 months ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on Surgery 101

"You remember when anti coagulating with Warford patients will become hyper coachable at first due to inactivity of protein CNS so bridge must be used an ion must be drawn frequently as an outpatient and there are many drug food interactions with war friend for the lack of those reasons. The dough acts are becoming more popular as an outpatient therapy although they are more expensive and unprovoked clock is one that has no risk factors that seem to have caused it whereas provoked clot is one that has risk factors associated with it in either case three months of anti coagulation is indicated that minimum however indefinite or long-term anti coagulation may be necessary for unprovoked Klotz is also especially true for nations with multiple reoccurrences INFO patient develops a pe in the presence of adequate anti coagulation IVC filter may be placed there are patients that are at higher risk of developing a clot which could explain the unprovoked club and they may require additional screening this would be dude to a hyper coagulant state caused by certain disease I we look at patient history and family history suggesting a hyper coagulant state in patients who have been unprovoked clot we screen them for thromboembolic disorders that could contribute the most common is factor five light deficient Z. which is one of the body cannot breakdown factor five appro coagulant there is no routine screening for this however for a patient with an revolt clot genetic testing or functional coagulation tests where you test for the defective protein are accurate at diagnosis protein Z. and protein s are natural anticoagulant factors in the body they are usually inhibited by Warford in the early parts of its administration and Kenley skin necrosis do to a hyper coaxial ball state similarly if a patient has a protein C or as deficiency it can is a hyper coachable state leading to a DVD or p you can diagnose a patient by measuring the level of these proteins in the blood how do we prevent DVD or P in surgical patients the best treatment for DVD N. p. e. is to prevent them this is accomplished by walking however almost bedridden patients in the hospital may not be ready to walk or spend very little time walking and so we use mechanical prophylaxis with sequential compare Russian devices or S. C. D.'s and we encourage ambulation as CDs are great for patients who are expected to be up and walking in twenty four to forty eight hours after surgery it is thought that as these allow for decrease venous pooling in increased fiber lices by massaging the muscles increasing the flow back to the heart for patients who are still bed bound we can use chemo prophylaxis with daily doses of heparin or another anticoagulant happen works by augmenting the actions of anti thrombin three which breaks down `thrombin this intern carries an increased bleeding ask therefore is contrary indicating patients with inactive bleak there two doses of Heparin we should be familiar with a prophylactic dose and a therapeutic dose most patients will be on prophylactic dose however those who have had are caught in the past or in the president should be on a therapeutic dose another side effect of Heparin is Heparin induced thrombosis Sido Pena Syndrome or hits which is rare but commonly tested. as you can see a DVD can lead to a p. e. which has significant morbidity and mortality associated especially for surgical patients. So how do we priest the risk post operative patients should start ambulance as soon as possible and while they're in bed they should have sequential compression devices around their calves once there is no concern for bleeding. DVD Chemo Prophylaxis should be started.

Warford forty eight hours three months
Dog the Bounty Hunter Reveals Serious Health Condition and Breaks Down in Tears Remembering Beth

Joe Gallagher

00:21 sec | 11 months ago

Dog the Bounty Hunter Reveals Serious Health Condition and Breaks Down in Tears Remembering Beth

"Dog the bounty hunter has a life threatening illness reality TV star Dwayne Chapman confirm his diagnosis on an upcoming episode of the Dr oz show he says he has a pulmonary embolism which is a blood clot in the lung he found out a week and a half ago after being taken to the hospital with chest pains his wife Beth Chapman died less than three months ago from complications due to

Dwayne Chapman Beth Chapman Three Months
Frida Kahlo's Bus Accident

This Day in History Class

04:07 min | 11 months ago

Frida Kahlo's Bus Accident

"Was September Seventeenth Nineteen Twenty five Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Hello was involved in a bus accident that she survived with major injuries. The accident changed the course of her life and deeply affected her artwork. Mark Free Board Goya on Mexico in Nineteen O seven. Her mother was relatively conventional in her worldview while while her father supported her curiosity Freda was super close to her father but she was more distant from her mother who dealt with depression and when she was young she had polio which affected her right leg and gave her a limp she also developed an interest in art and began. Dan Sketching in nineteen twenty two free to begin attending the National Preparatory School in Mexico City. Her goal was to study medicine at a university there she encountered progressive thought and people in the literary community she became known as a Prankster and she wore indigenous jewelry including it was at this school where she met artist Diego Rivera but on September Seventeenth nineteen twenty five she was headed back back home from school on a bus with her boyfriend Alejandro Gomez audience when the bus ran into a trolley car. Several people were killed immediately. The accident and more died later from their injuries obvious only had minor injuries but a piece of iron went through fritos pelvis and back that had to be pulled out of her body. Her shoulder was dislocated. Her collarbone was broken. Her right leg was broken in eleven places and her spine was also broken in several places she had surgery and stayed in the hospital for a month then spent several months at home in bed over the course of her life. She underwent as many as thirty five operations. Though she aimed to become a medical illustrator she was in a lot of pain and decided to drop out of school while she was in recovery. She spent a lot of time painting. Her mother even bought her easel that helped her paint in bed. She used an overhead mirror to paint self-portraits. During this time her relationship with audience ended but photographer Tina Mobility introduced her to a community of people involved in art in leftist politics. She soon became reacquainted with Diego. Rivera NC joined the young Communist League which Rivera founded in nineteen twenty nine Carlo Married Rivera when she was twenty two years old and he was forty two but their marriage was rocky. They both had affairs many of Carlos with other women free to diego separated divorced and remarried carried. She also had a miscarriage and several pregnancies that were medically terminated but throughout their turbulent relationship they continued their artistic mystic practice and continued to express their political views. Fritos self-portraits viscerally depict her pain. Her Art is known for being dark emotional national and symbolic she made most of her artwork in the nineteen thirties and nineteen forties but she didn't get her first solo show and Mexico until nineteen fifty three that was years after her first ever Solo Exhibition in New York City in nineteen thirty eight she had to be in bed on the opening night of her exhibition in Mexico City so she went to the show in an ambulance in state. They're in a bed that was set up for her. A few months. After after this fritos right leg had to be amputated because it was infected with gangrene she died on July thirteenth nineteen fifty four officially Ashley of Pulmonary embolism though there has been speculation that she died by suicide there is now a museum and Custos Tool Rita's home goal kind.

Diego Rivera National Preparatory School Tina Mobility Mexico City Mexico Frida Kahlo Carlo Married Rivera Rivera Pulmonary Embolism Freda Custos Tool Rita Dan Sketching Goya New York City Alejandro Gomez Fritos Carlos NC Communist League Twenty Two Years
More evidence links broken heart syndrome to cancer

Heart Talk

02:30 min | 1 year ago

More evidence links broken heart syndrome to cancer

"A new study has found that one in six people with broken heart syndrome had cancer and that these patients in particular were more likely to die within five years we've talked about broken heart syndrome and I think a lot of us including myself were like wow this is actually a real thing what are you seeing as the connection with this and cancer yeah I didn't know this study into saw this report that you listed here my feeling on I don't know I've never I've had a lot of patience Brock broken heart syndrome and I haven't had any that haven't had a diagnosis of cancer afterwards much like a pulmonary embolism can be associated with cancer there there can be an association without being overwhelming association meaning that most of the patients are not gonna end up having a diagnosis of cancer they just have these very high stress hormone levels that can lead to a broken heart syndrome I don't know to me just looking at this it's not enough to recommend screening for cancer outside the normal guidelines for cancer screening and somebody and whatever age group this patient belongs to okay and for those that are new to what open a broken heart syndrome is this was after dramatic offense and the hormones get released in one half spread so typically although some there can be a double presentation typical presentation is a middle aged woman who comes and with a little bit of chest discomfort and abnormal EKG abnormal blood work and a heart that's not pumping well and that when you evaluate that person for a heart attack they don't have any blockages in their arteries and there's a typical look to this on imaging studies like an echo cardiogram and it's been found that this is induced by these really high stress hormone levels and somebody's receptors to those stress hormones in that high of a level usually unless the person dies at presentation which is extremely uncommon most of these patients fully recover but we do it in it is induced by some sort of emotional or traumatic of that it's it's so interesting the different parts of the hard in the symptoms and you could have a patient has a you know genetic risk factor or a lifestyle problem and now you have somebody that just went through a horrible thing in there your heart is hurting in the jester stressed out I really just need someone to kind of talk to to to get them through this right just need time and dealing with the stress

Heart Syndrome Brock Five Years
"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

The Peter Attia Drive

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on The Peter Attia Drive

"Were the fat was accidentally injected and so there's a lot of recommendations about how to avoid this and using smaller volumes injecting it more superficially but it's still very popular I mean despite the risks women still want this. What are the stated risks of a fat embolism from this procedure in other words? If you walk into a responsible doctor's office or someone walks into your office says what's my risk of this. What percent would you it would probably be one in one thousand would be the risk? Maybe maybe even higher and I guess this is a great fatal fat embolism. There's probably cases where it's happening and it's not fatal like like a regular pulmonary embolism and we don't catch it. It's interesting. This is a great discussion about the symmetry of risk. You might listen to this and one thousand is not that bad but are was telling you earlier. Today I mean I had to keep my phone on during this interview because I have a patient who I sent into the emergency room to rule out of pulmonary embolism and we're talking about this this morning and you know the patient was saying well. I've got this pain in in my calf and I've been flying Allott and you know it was sort of thinking I I wonder if I do feel a little short of breath. You know it's hard to say so like listening to the patient story. I think the probability that they have a pulmonary embolism is actually quite low but it's not zero and it I just to make the math easy. Let's assume there's a one percent chance you have a pulmonary embolism or a point one percent chance of pulmonary embolism if they consider the cost of doing something versus the cost of doing doing nothing and then the cost of being wrong in both of those situations so the cost of being wrong if you don't go in to the E._R.. You just stay where you are. You don't go anywhere meaning wrong meaning. You have a pulmonary embolism but you don't do anything about it. That cost is infinitely greater though far less likely than the cost of you going into the E._R.. Not having a pulmonary embolism so there's a cost to that cost you time costs money. It's a pain in the ASS..

pulmonary embolism fat embolism Allott ASS one percent
"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

02:54 min | 1 year ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"This is CBS news. Would you risk your career or your life to go up against a big company, if they were doing something wrong, meet people who did whistle blower, on CBS Friday? We have cloudy skies, and it's seventy six degrees here at two oh, three. I'm Mark Willis, NewsRadio ten eighty KRLD and one of the top stories revolving for you today it involves the weather. Most of North Texas is now under a severe thunderstorm watch until eight o'clock this evening. I'll have more on the story. Coming up point. One of the other top stories thirties, have confirmed better deputy has died after being bound with significant injuries to his head. He in downtown board worth Friday night. Fort Worth PD officers called out originally, just before nine thirty to a reported shooting involving a Tarrant county sheriff's deputy on Taylor street. Now, the Tarrant county medical examiner confirming Saturday that the deputy died as a result of a poll where he injured his head during a medical emergency. And the sheriff's department parking lot sheriff Bill way. Born said the deputy was able to recover somewhat from that long enough to get into his car where he passed away, medical examiners, believe that he had a pulmonary embolism and some blood clots had ended his light another North Texas. Police department is mourning the loss of one of their own on Friday. The north Richland hills police department announced the passing of officer Caleb rainy, rainy was twenty five years old and had only been with the department for the past two years during his time on the force he earned two combinations. And a certificate of recognition for his effort and dedication serving the citizens of north Richland hills. Rainy was also nominated worke of the year. Back in two thousand eighteen opposite Rainey's cause of death has been released, but officials say he had been ill. Recently funeral arrangements are pending Nikki Haley, NewsRadio ten eighty KRLD. Let's get an update on traffic and weather together in the eighty traffic center. Here's personal rights in Arlington and accident westbound thirty at three sixty s blocking the ramp to get on three sixty and the backup is too great southwest Parkway, roadwork on southbound seventy five Royal causing big delays only two right lanes getting through, and that's causing traffic, tobacco to mid park delays up to at least thirty minutes in that area. And in mesquite traffic on northbound six hundred five eighty is congested. The backup is almost two Galloway. I'm Priscilla rice on your twenty four hour traffic leader. Thank you, Carol d whether center, lightning, very, heavy rain, moving right now, into southern wise county, and it's moving slowly to the east at about ten miles an hour. Seventy storms could be impacting Dallas Fort Worth later on. We were under a severe thunderstorm. Watch until eight o'clock tonight, well thought.

Tarrant county North Texas Richland hills Fort Worth CBS Rainey pulmonary embolism Nikki Haley Galloway Mark Willis mesquite Arlington Bill Priscilla rice Carol d officer Caleb seventy six degrees
"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

05:50 min | 1 year ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Right answer, Dale. Very good. Dale your next question is true or false. Okay. A pulmonary embolism is a ruptured heart valve to or false. A pulmonary embolism is a ruptured heart valve. Do do pulmonary edema. Right. I think pulmonary is the lungs. Yes. Dale, you are great. You're right. It is. It's a blocked artery in the lung. The Dallas warehousing you listen to stain young show. I think in Dallas are you probably listening. Carol d our flagship station, and it just makes you smarter. All right. You are two for to. All right. Third question. People with diabetes Melodist are unable to produce. What substance people who have diabetes Melodist type one or unable to produce? What substance? That's correct. More insulin. Yeah. Okay. Dale this wants a little harder. No, he can handle it. He's really smart. This is true or false. Romeo is a rare blood clotting disorder true or false head tra- chromium is a rare blood clotting disorder. Is a blood clotting disease. Is it true or false? You're fall is it not. Fifty. No, call on a Franco say false. Because Dale is for for four great hatred chromium conditioner, which the colored part of the I is multicolored fifth and final for all the money for all the marbles good. This is it. It's all riding on this one human growth hormone is produced by which gland in the body multiple choice. The thyroid the Terry the adrenal or the pa- Neil. Human growth hormone thyroid pituitary adrenal Pernille. Are you there del are you thinking, let's this is a tough one. Talk it out talk it out. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Zoo googly. Human growth hormone hgh. Say for Neil. No. Terry, terry. But you know, we got the P just the wrong were try. You know, what you're so good? I mean, I that was a really hard one. We're going to send you both. We're gonna send you at the age multivitamin young vitamin line and the lifeline stem cell cream. We're gonna send them both out to you, Dale. Thank you so much for plane and keep listening there on KRLD in Dallas. And for those of you who wanna play you can call eight four four well one hundred that's eight four four well one hundred. You know? I just I don't know. I got a sweet spot for for retirees that listen to the show wanna call in. And generally, they do really well. Yeah, they do sell. Yeah. Absolutely. You know, I was gonna ask you guys just curiosity. What has been growing at any point in time in your life, the favorite type of shoe for you to wear like if you didn't have to wear a particular shoe for work. What do you find the most comfortable shoe? Trying to think I go through them kind of fast. Like you said you do. I mean it I probably boots. I mean, that's that's still where your boobs. Yeah. Yeah. But timber really too because they don't go out. I don't go right ahead. And they don't go out of style. So yeah, that's true. But it wasn't on my feet so much had where talion loafers solve the time because they're light and easy to slip on you bought those Italian loafers, and they were great until you horn to work like yet. No. These good. My feet are killing me. They don't stand up today. You know, I like wearing high heels high heels don't really like me though. No. I mean, I like them because it made me feel tall. And and I feel like I stand up taller, but. But yeah, definitely you too. It's not really the best thing for my back and hips. I never cease to be amazed that women can just walk around so easily and heels I mean, it's just amazing to me. I mean, I would fall and break my ankles. I don't know I've seen some cross dressers or I don't know what do you call them? Now, there's a name for him transgenders that walk in heels better than I do. And I'm like, how do you do that? How do you walk in those high high heels, and so well, I don't know. Yeah. I wanted to ask Dr Robin. I forgot to ask him. If there was like a correlation. And maybe you guys know two foot length and foot problems like do people with shorter feet have more foot problems. I think it depends upon the arch the arch gives the three dimensional picture to the feet. I think a lot of us when we go to buy shoes or look at us. We're thinking two dimensional instead of three dimensional since think the arches everything because if you ever really high arch or really low arch it changes, everything or the instep. You know, I got the high on top high bottom so shoes sometimes they're really hard because they kit across the top of my foot. And I I'm not the only one that has this. I mean, I hear people have this problem all the time. Yeah..

Dale pulmonary embolism growth hormone Dallas pulmonary edema heart valve Neil Dr Robin Terry Carol Romeo Franco two foot
"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

Izzy and Spain

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on Izzy and Spain

"Different level than i and i remember when i had my pulmonary embolism on blood thinners for you know for like i think at least six months after that and i was very you know they're those are serious medications whichever one that you're on and they're generally recommended for at least six months after pulmonary embolism and again i don't know what her the civic medical situation is or what doctors recommended that she does but i will say that i felt you know they there are a lot of warnings that come with taking blood thinners and you know if you for example i would think if you know the tennis ball came close to you quickly certainly bruce from that and sometimes those kinds of impacts could be could be very scary or could be a medical issue so you know i just look at what she's doing she has to be fearless at a certain level about it she still wears the compression compression leggings when she comes into press after her matches as well so i i don't know how she does that and again you know after ten months after having a baby you know i i played basketball you've probably until about four months pregnant just pick up games and stuff like that because you really not for my for my first i wasn't showing it wasn't didn't seem like real danger to me at all and so i had always been active and then after having my first baby i would say it took me at least a year to start to feel like i wanted to be active again really in the same way or that could be active again in the same way so to see how mean she physically is starting to look very much like she did before she was pregnant well i think we're all rooting for her because it's such an amazing story right even making it this far she had trouble just walking out to get the mail after after the birth because of all the conflicts is just incredible i love talking to you jane and i hope you're enjoying wimbledon and have some strawberries and cream and maybe a couple of other english treats for us we'll you from here yes absolutely always could to talk to you too sarah jane mcmanus on the shell pennzoil performance i still gotta get out there and visit her i gotta go see that great london gordon she lives in coming up steph curry draws a line in the sand and some more interesting news coming out of st louis it's all next pain and fitz on espn radio spain and fitz and steph curry is done the first little bit of talk and although i wouldn't stay he's picking too many fights but he talked to usa today and they asked him about the new contenders in the west the new look lakers and lebron and.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on 710 WOR

"I went to a friend of mine a medical doctor i only should've best of the best okay when it comes to medical doctors i've the best medical doctors in any event i went to my friend steven bernstein is a rheumatologist and i said steve i want you to be my primary care physician cause rheumatologist can look down the long view and see if anything is smoldering in your body and inflammation problems with the immune system and central they really have a handle on and this guy teaches rheumatology at nyu i mean this guy is unbelievable i had them and we work together i make recommendations to him he makes recommendations to me i should steve i want you to check inflammation in my heart and i was surprised it was a little bit elevated i was surprised it's a party a blood test you should get it like once or twice a year it's called hfs crp hse are p reflects inflammation in your heart normal hse rpi is one or lush studies show many studies f h s crp's a little elevated like two and your blood test you're actively clogging the arteries in your heart and if s crp is more elevated like three then you're in trouble because not only are you developing cholesterol waxy plaque buildup in your arteries to your heart but the plaque is inflamed and it can rupture and cause a heart attack or stroke so when you're hse are is over three you have a two hundred percent higher risk of dying from a stroke or heart attack have a two hundred percent higher risk having a pulmonary embolism or.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on 710 WOR

"That for prevention and happen here is they will actually reduce significantly reduce risk of blood clots and then we have we call them the ultimate nice and plus you can add to that big i like him i hadn't take to the to the a nice and plus three times a day it'll be three dollars a month and now they dilate blood vessels to get blood flowing through blocked arteries but also the plus part george is what we call net kind as it's an enzyme that dissolves blood clots and of course sometimes you get the buckeyes constantly veins your legs deepvein thrombosis blood clots in your lungs pulmonary embolism which jillian you can get some like to your brain get a traumatic stroke get closer coronary arteries strongbox current coronary artery disease and this all happens because it'll maitree essential fatty as deficiency so you got to do both you take proper supplements according to body weight and in this case trees and then of course you need to take something like our ultimate plus for the natto chinese to i again i just preferential because i fly so much and circulating with his netto connie enzyme i'm in a dissolves any new book if you get a pulmonary embolism how serious is that what you mean life threatening you can certainly kill you and depending on how big the blood clot is and where it's located a small one it can cause some aggravated and coughing and they they'll do a mri or cat scan they can actually see it gets an edina in that area but if it so this is a big one and a whole over the lungs involved then you're really deep trouble and you could.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Didn't they didn't stop with needle biopsy that admits us coppee they did video assisted gossipy that didn't meet justinus competed another needle biopsy i'll showing small cell cancer now they really didn't need to go into a media stoskopf because you had a pet scan before that showed the cancer already traveled to the lymph nodes so why do they do all these procedures when they have the tissue and they have a scan they know the extent of cancer why well at this time you can speculate on that she was fine until june two thousand sixteen when she had weasing she had a cough shortness of breath went to the hospital she was diagnosed with this cancer showed a small cell cancer and she started chemotherapy and radiation and then the treatment was so intense that you wanted to heart failure and she had a heart attack and she had blood clots can you imagine that so she had a collapse the lung and caused the need to put in a chest tube then shed chemo and standard radiation caused her to go into heart failure shed a heart attack she had blood clots he's placed on blood thinners shed cardiac stents plays at a defibrillator placed his fine fine until that cancer and all those procedures and then shed all those complications and she decided to stop the treatment and she had no treatment for several months and no pet scan though staging nothing and while she came to us for reevaluation because she didn't like the direction of her care and then after all that complications they put her in rehab and i talk about this a lot because i don't understand it really a person has cancer that's growing and they put the person in rehab where they get no treatment for their cancer well what do they expect happens to the cancer unreal can do rehab on cancer so why not work with her and treated the same time i think that would make more sense the less scan several months ago she had the less pet scan three and a half months ago is a lot of symptoms shortness of breath she's an ex smoker she was bleeding on blood thinners should a blood clot and pulmonary embolism and blood clots so the number two killers in cancer patients so through oy serious business.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Quite a long time let's see because representatives will cost ski had not been sworn in yet she was replacing representative fan fans ler sexual assault and then you had couple of representatives that were out sick and specifically you had representative sponholtz and i'm not gonna pick on her i'm just gonna state information that that i have received she was having medical issues and when she flew back home she was doing her thing and they rushed her they being the speaker encouraged her the majority the majority we'll say that the majority encouraged her to come back for a vote not just that would there were several other votes not just the budget but there were several of the votes and it just so happens she came down she did their votes and everything and then she was hospitalized again pulmonary embolism i think is what we're talking about pretty serious stuff but the encouraged her to come down probably before she was ready they held off medically ready they they waited until they had the right number of folks to do the right thing and i guess when you're in the majority you can do that but you're still an obstructionist granted a win win conservatives are i'm i'm just gonna say republicans and i i'm torn on how to say this because i some republicans are not conservatives some conservatives while most of them are we know the rhinos we know who they are we know who the the the the the folks that flipped to the dark side or the darker side but they're not helping the process they're slowing it down on purpose the speakers doing it things were held up in rules judiciary got pretty testy in the senate side when they rolled the chair on s jr one and a couple of other bills to i think it would just be one thirty seven.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"That that i have received she was having medical issues when she flew back home she was doing her thing and they rushed her they being the speaker encouraged her the majority the cardi we'll say that the majority encouraged her to come back for a vote not just that vote with there were several other votes not just the budget but there were several other votes and it just so happens she came down she did their votes and everything and then she was hospitalized again pulmonary embolism i think is what we're talking about pretty serious stuff but the encourage her to come down probably before she was ready they held off medically ready they they waited until they had the right number of folks to do the right thing and i guess when you're in the majority you can do that but you're still an obstructionist granted when when conservatives are i'm i'm just going to say republicans and i i'm torn on how to say this because i some republicans are not conservatives some conservatives while most of moral we know the rhinos we know who they are yeah we know who the the the the the folks that flipped to the dark side or the darker side but they're not helping the process they're they're slowing it down on purpose the speakers doing it things were held up in rules judiciary got pretty testy in the senate side when they rolled the chair on s jr one and a couple of other bills to i think it was just be one thirty seven i don't remember off the top of my head the one that was to undo or or under the majority of espy ninety one which we here in the valley.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on WJR 760

"Bartered with tv ads in magazine ads about these anticoagulant who is the best recipients of those and who should be concerned about them and how effective are they so bunch of really good questions guy i'll tackle the last one i there really effective so we have now in the past decade a whole bunch of new anti coagulant anti coagulant drugs that inhibit or impair our body's ability to make a class we obviously can't get rid of it because then we bleed to death so who would benefit from a drug like this someone who has an increased propensity to form a clot someone is at increased risk for forming klotz and chief among them top among them are people who've had klotz so a common clotting problem is as you mentioned for by and that is a term that refers to blood clot is formed in a vein usually in the leg it can lead to symptoms of swelling or discomfort and i can kill you just as quickly as a piece of cholesterol breaking absolutely it doesn't get the press that heart attacks do but people die of blood clots in the veins frequently in this country and we heard referred to that as a pulmonary embolism so if a blood clot forms in vein in your leg it can break loose it's kind of like jelly when it first forms and it isn't firmly attached to the side of the vein and if it breaks loose and travels with the blood in the bloodstream it goes directly to the heart and then gets lodged in the lungs if it's a big minute blocks a big artery in the lungs it can kill you instantly and that's called a pulmonary embolism so the blood clot preventing drugs are used the anticoagulants are used in someone who has a blood clot in the vein to prevent it from getting any bigger and to prevent it from traveling it's actually a preventive therapy you've already got the clock we gotta stop it right the drug that's getting the most attention in your field dr brooke.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Treatment and recovery for instance trauma patients who survive on the show tend to go home allots who cner than they would in real life so hospitals are heather you tell people this is not crazy anatomy a we did have sex in the bridegroom come on stage of the game in a way of like gosh oh anna simmons eddie what they get that israel life i want my people do 'em and speaking of the medical care serena williams almost died after giving child giving birth because she suffered a series of complications including a pulmonary embolism she said quote if it were if it weren't for their professional care i wouldn't be here today on his thankful for the doctors that got her through that absolute all right black panthers reward of rewriting the record books topping star wars the last jedi i for the second highest fourday domestic opening of all time with two hundred in forty two million oh my gosh you think you're gonna make another one oh my gosh in order could make that we've already movies yell that's awesome it is awesome and speaking of black panther the airport in atlanta actually a tweeted this out the bags are packed hashtag will conduct forever and then along with it was a photo for a while conjugate gate that they put up in the air brittan uh so that's the latest sir and you can find more mitag one of some one dot com bruce that they've ever dirt alert updates at the top of every hour plus get extended dirt alerts at 820 twelve twenty.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Know we we i you know it's this is why there is such a push for socialized medicine which i don't agree with but i think other govern other governments said look we can't force people to pay the bills be can't not run a test when you have somebody sick lining your emergency where we can't let the die so you have to run tests ers have to take care of you we have to intervene then we just have to figure out how to get the money afterwards and so you know i don't know what it what we need to do we need to take it out of peoples you don't future paychecks do what you know how how do we do this and then you know some of these tests exams are very expensive you're you're evola q chest pain you want to go into the emergency room because you have a pulmonary embolism a blood cuts of the lungs that is going to be a multi thousands tens of thousands of dollars of workup the average person can't afford that they don't have that kind of money the tank twenty five dollars a month won't cut it that hospital leads to stay open it's expensive to keep a hospital open and running so then after a while government dollars than so this is why you know countries just end up going to a socialist systems and look based on your taxes now these are the services that are city or state or country are gonna offer but in terms of doctors getting paid more to run more tests no okay the incentive for the doctor right which is something i have no problem admitting the incentive for us to run the test and to not decline you the test is the fear of getting suit the aren't you're seeing your chest hurts were going to run an ekg we're going to make sure your heart is fine because we're tired of seeing people get sued from his in heart attacks you have headaches that don't go away we're going to one order marai we're not making money on that mri we're not getting free gulf games for ordering that mri like a lot of people think but what we are doing this particular selves and protecting you go look we're making sure this outbreak tumor.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on Money Radio 1200AM

Money Radio 1200AM

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on Money Radio 1200AM

"I can't think of any contraindications unless you're allergic to it yeah the ever see they buy allergic youtube other than maybe some gastrointestinal symptoms the that sometimes occur i have not uh so what else you recommends so vitamin d r i put my new cancer patients on tuesday twice a day more grassroots poseima monitored zinc and copper levels every month and those are the help of lung cancer but it also targets blue yeah let's right absolutely it's critical polish tweak after diagnose your risk of blood clot is a fivepoint sixfold higher so it's essential to monitor how think your blood is d dahmer levels five brenner jen levels are test that i monitor every month and these doing the blood this constantly jetstar they very deeply don't do that that's something that should be done we'll i gave it a lot easier cancers like mile in oman and my loma and lymphoma leukemia actually maybe a threefold higher risk of carding initially in those camps his press cancer released a fourfold higher risk and others kind of inbetween that four to thirty fold increased risk now that goes gradually to match but if you get chemotherapy to get radiation that pickens your blood increases your risk further for having a heart attack or stroke colombo phlebitis with a pulmonary embolism that can kill you know i don't know if i shared the story with you but i had this problem that patient with me who i came for advice i think it is wife's recommendation and he refused to do what i recommended in a month later he was dead from a heart attack and i'm not to my knowledge have a patient with a heart attack or stroke with cancer but it's very common in patients.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Legacy of fondue both in puerto rico right now and that's good news even though the reason we're telling you the story today is sad funny bows died this weekend of a sudden pulmonary embolism he was 52 years old his company vano anc was one of the companies that helped restore some of the cell service in puerto rico right after the hurricane andrew beard is vano anc's chief operating officer vaughan who boasts i understand came from a very wellknown respected failing the tech scene here in boston and beyond uh his father founded the audio equipment company bows but a doctor vanni buzzes son did his own thing became an entrepreneur in his right can you tell us about what he did uh creating value inc borrowing quiz created because servevolley saw the need to improve connectivity throughout worlds and honor saw ways of improving at yummy just weeks before he he passed away uh vital inc is company and he helped bring back cell service puerto rico that have been damaged by hurricane maria tell us what he actually did men what it what what was the plan basically what we did was to take our telecommunications equipment which check her essentially very small base stations sit to require very little electricity and are small and lightweight and um brought them down to puerto rico and people could net to the network out of tune service from very quickly and easily so we're talking about puerto rico with dr of other communities as well run yeah absolutely am internationala were were also during a lot in africa and some very significant finance in rwanda we've been working with the the government there and and the carriers air to extend coverage using our model and this equipment and um in in india were during the saints how deductibles are tick hewlett the need for people to be able to communicate like what was his philosophy so that's a abroad question um i think that communication is both an end in itself and a means to melt obviously in at puerto rico people were ecstatic to get service back because they had service dan lost it absurd they had come to rely on a very heavily but it goes beyond that because uh communication is now the primary means for doing a number of things in places where infrastructure doesn't support good transportation for example it might be the primary means for obtaining education banking services are now deliver wirelessly.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

WSRQ Talk Radio

02:48 min | 2 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

"With the pay elegant pleat who fear hideyuki duties team which spd half of our favorite colombian inflation would have been the people who sit iran a computer whatever job you have as i mentioned just sitting enough on your phone tilted down with your body instead of straight up tilted down how much does that affect people if he does one thief coffee is looking at three four fly we've fouls in goal although people in trump me other ways but all credit with people fleeing their kids in class anti new single was described kurgan eat program well people that their computers are lower who cares with try offers any got his uh his day without around at least people at risk and we certainly seen cases where people have developed blunt club and on cases pulmonary embolism so the signs are there obvious signs clearly when you look in you see your feet swelling you know some things happening at that point are there are other signs that are happening or is that why they call it the silent killer well believe me go the silent killer is that i have a heart for people to get a blood clot in the leg wound have any signs and symptoms and they often didn't have any signs and symptoms until a suddenly collapsed reckless amazing guy from the pulmonary embolism could be klay repeal through battle has deep vein thrombosis one would expect you to get pain in my life flooding in the leg congestion as a vein in the leg lake food delivered a neighbor off the case you didn't get any the signs then fly cold withdrawing collapsed iran in the books that adriana sent to me cop killer blood clots it there was a case study i think that the woman or the man when in four symptoms like congestion the doctor prescribed antibiotics it was actually plots that were happening and she ended up dying cardinal murphy who quite that where you're gonna die later flew home if somebody uh going through a golkar away from a cool with low history of crumble olympic gold from about the travel than the things that they flee won't with may be vase from us could incrase can leukemia and you have to be christ along with that point m consider although fat pig priebke whether they travel.

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"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"pulmonary embolism" Discussed on Down the Hatch - The Swallowing Podcast

"The fbi get is one course that's it and now make sure you don't mess up in recommended packed with wrong i showed that's a shocking statistic and and one that should you get our attention recall us to action because if you look across on you know i've spent my career dealing with the mainland elderly population but also with the with younger patients with neurological dysfunction display jin swallowing difficulties and you know to to us are like the heart attacks on the pulmonary embolism so we learn about when we're interns and you know so you you learn when you're in intern in your on call for the first time at night you kind really fast wanted him up to speed on the things that are going to kill you patience you're the one in the hospital owning the call pager or the code pagers learn about heart attacks you learn about um you can learn about pulmonary embolism and things that you learn how to resuscitate some one but it turns out when you're dealing with a predominantly outpatient population of patients and managing down you know the the the big red flag of what's going to get them in trouble with swallowing this notion yet we we pay little attention to it except in the literature when we go back through medicare medicaid and pair systems and look at swallowing there's plenty of studies a look at the but the actual called action and what we do for screening coffin swallow and of and the integrity of that system is is a is very poor we also don't teach are practitioners to ask the rate history questions to elicit the knowledge that may be there's something going on with patients so it's it's an issue and one that i am i think we're going to have to change the way that we teach the physical exam and what's important particularly in different age populations.

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