35 Burst results for "pulitzer prize"

Interview With Pulitzer Prize Winning Author, Ronan Farrow

Minnie Questions with Minnie Driver?

02:19 min | 2 weeks ago

Interview With Pulitzer Prize Winning Author, Ronan Farrow

"I go backwards and forwards on the first question of wearing and when will you happiest. Because we're so encouraged to be happy all the time rather than the place that we're headed. I don't think that's a well not to be terribly pedantic right out of the gate but you know what is happiness is what you come very quickly and answering this question rided any way and i also found it. Surprisingly hard to answer by any metric that there are a lot of professional moments of fulfillment that came to mind as the answers. Getting a tape of harvey weinstein trying to entrap a woman. After months and months of trying. To get that those are obviously moments of fulfillment of kind. But then i think was a happy then because those high points were also marked by a lot of stress and can also be frankly kind of scary. I mean i think both on a level that any writer would relate to where. You're in the zone crafting a scene but also you're on a terrifying deadline and stressful. And you're afraid you're going to fail. And there's a lot riding on anything particularly when it's investigative reporting and in ways that are unique to my kind of work which is very combative in some ways and you know there are sometimes private. Investigators hired to follow me around and smear me in various ways so those moments of the film and are often entwined with ryan easy. And i don't know of happiness quite captures what those moments our exclusive. No i agree. It is part of the satisfaction of doing an incredibly hard job. That is dangerous and frightening at times but also incredibly necessary and then that paying off. I think there are ways in which that's a healthy happiness. If you were doing something whatever your profession is that you feel is contributing in positive way to other people's lives. That's a great thing to nurturing yourself. On the other hand that can take a lot of unhealthy forms. Yeah i i know and really respect a lot of great war reporters who famously do get high off of being in conflict zones and during time spent in in some of those types of places you encounter a lot of those people who are in it maybe for all the right reasons but also i think you know if they were to search themselves on a personal level. It's probably not the healthiest thing that they need to be in those high octane places all the time so is that happiness or is that kind of getting a certain kind of high again regardless of how noble the intentions

Harvey Weinstein Ryan
Larry McMurtry, Novelist of the American West, Dies at 84

WBZ Afternoon News

00:35 sec | 3 weeks ago

Larry McMurtry, Novelist of the American West, Dies at 84

"McMurtry has died. Larry McMurtry wrote nearly 50 books, some of which later turned into award winning films, including The Last Picture Show In Terms of Endearment. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Lonesome Dove and a screenplay for Brokeback Mountain earned him an Oscar. Sure I knew how to quit you on CBS is Sunday morning, McMurtry remembered reading the story for the first time. I thought it was the best story I've ever had ever added that addressed the American rest. I thought, why didn't I write it myself? And I thought that it is a great story, and it will go around the world. McMurtry was 84 years old Monica Ricks. CBS News. It's 7

Mcmurtry Larry Mcmurtry Lonesome Dove Pulitzer Prize Brokeback Mountain Oscar CBS Monica Ricks Cbs News
Larry McMurtry, Pulitzer Prize-winning ‘Lonesome Dove’ author, dead at 84

Sean Hannity

00:17 sec | 3 weeks ago

Larry McMurtry, Pulitzer Prize-winning ‘Lonesome Dove’ author, dead at 84

"Dove and other novels about small town Texas has died. Larry McMurtry was 84. He grew up in a small North Texas town to a family of ranchers and went on to write 46 books. Three of his novels were adapted into films. McMurtry went on to win 13 Oscars. The National Weather Service

Larry Mcmurtry North Texas Texas Mcmurtry Oscars National Weather Service
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

Asian, Not Asian

03:26 min | Last month

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Asian, Not Asian

"You feel like there's a way to reach those people because i feel there's gotta be a way you know while you're asking for hope. I'm not good comedian. Like i. I don't think i was surprised to see the flag there because i'd had a very active facebook page in the fall of two thousand twenty with like ninety three thousand people following it and a lot of them were beaten me and i got into so many fights with Really needs and beating means american trump supporters yup And so i already knew that. There was a very strong support for for trump in in vietnam and here in the united states. And they're they're very They're very angry very angry. And they're they're very prone to using you know violent foul language and so of course. It was a disappointment to sue the vietnamese flag lying there but not a surprise and i think that that. Can you know there are a whole bunch of plants lying there. A lot of american flags a lot of you know confederate flags and lot of like flags who symbols. I didn't really understand what which apparently you know. Signs of white supremacy and then there are a lot of other countries lives there too so the vietnamese were not the only non white people there. But i think we like the largest contingent as far as i could. Maybe i'm just looking at the right. Facebook feeds where maybe van loads of vietnamese people are. Very proud and happy win flag. And there's a lot of reasons for that. I think the vietnamese american community was was caught up in trump berber. Just like fifty percent of the country was kind of in all the various noodles that we know about. And that's compounded by lee at least two things one is that You know trump support is sort of inevitably tied up with racism and white supremacy and anti blackness and Unfortunately i think there's a lot of of racists and the vietnamese american community. that's what i heard growing up. You know yep still hear it and oftentimes said beaten amis rather than english right less. It's out there. And then the last thing is that the i think a lot of vietnamese americans who are refugees are deeply patriotic about south vietnam. That's why they wear the military uniforms. That's why they they sing. The national anthem wave the the yellow flag. All the means events. there's a lot of nostalgia for that loss country and the that that war. Which has i think a little similarity to how some americans feel a lot of nostalgia for the confederacy and feel like they. They lost Adjust 'cause and why they can still wave the confederate flag and so there's that to that sense of A sense of of of of defeat and anger and pride and desire to take things back right right. Damn dude do we do. How what do you think. Are we almost done here. Yeah i think we're done. We were supposed to funny game. And then mike brought up over the sad thing at the end so.

vietnam fifty percent south vietnam ninety three thousand people trump Facebook two thousand vietnamese united states facebook one english two things vietnamese american trump berber twenty mike confederate american americans
Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author, Scientist, and Renowned Polymath Jared Diamond Discusses the Derisive Term 'Finlandization'

Kickass News

03:22 min | 2 months ago

Pulitzer Prize-Winning Author, Scientist, and Renowned Polymath Jared Diamond Discusses the Derisive Term 'Finlandization'

"Is the first country that you discuss in the book. Outsiders uses derisive term called finlandisation to describe the nation's relationship with the soviet union. Now russia you confess to being a little bit guilty of this yourself during. I think it was one of your earlier first visits to that country. Why defense take offense at the term finlandisation. And what is it. That non-finn seem to misunderstand. Sure finlandisation is a a nasty word. It's a blaming word that non-finns particularly germans and other europeans and americans applied to finland after world war tooth in world war. Two finland got attacked by the soviet union whose population is about forty times that of finland. The finns fought fiercely. Lots of them got killed. But finland managed to retain its independence but finns learned a lesson from the war against russia. Which is. let's make sure we're not going to get into that mess again. And what we'll do is. We'll talk constantly with the russians at every level from the president downwards so that the russians are not suspicious of us. will they'll know what we're thinking The russians will know that the anoc can be surprised by making an alliance with some other country attacking finland by the back door. Finland's learned learned and they were very careful not to offend the soviet union when the soviet union vade hungry. The finns kept their mouth shot. Okay germans and american set that is that's a lack of courage should speak out against the soviet invasion of hungary and finish. His response was if we speak out. That's gonna have no effect on the soviet union but we learned that we cannot offend the soviet union. Because hundred thousand dollars got killed from making that mistake. That's finlandisation namely a small country being very careful about large country when i first went to finland. I'm embarrassed to say that that one my my best friend in finland who was a veteran of the winter war. I told him so. Why being so careful about russia because if you get into trouble the united states and britain france will protect you. Oh god there's nothing worse i could say. Because the finns had been deserted by all their allies and the finns learned that awesome viable is going to depend upon ourselves. That's finlandisation it worked finland. It's not gonna work for the united states and so there was a sense that they couldn't afford to be brave and speak out against the soviet union as much as others would have liked because they were realistic and they knew that no one else may come to our aid. If we do. Why do we want to get one. Hundred thousand people killed again. Eighty thousand about children driven into exile. No big and be. We're not gonna be stupid again. We can be careful. We will talk constantly with the russians will remain a liberal. Democracy will remain a rich country investing heavily in education. All the we're going to do differently is we're going to talk constantly with the russians. So that they will trust arson and interestingly the united states after the fall of the soviet union sadly in the nineteen nineties while the soviet union was there in a big threat. The united states was talking constantly with the soviet union but with the fall of the soviet union we began to take russia less

Finland Soviet Union Russia Anoc Finn Hungary United States Britain France
Washington Post's Marty Baron says he's retiring next month

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

Washington Post's Marty Baron says he's retiring next month

"Retiring after eight years on the job and a note to staff today, Baron says a leave at the end of next month, capping a 45 year career in journalism. The post 1 10 Pulitzer Prizes under his leadership, and Baron calls the entire experience deeply meaningful. But it's 66. He feels ready to move on Washington Post senior editor Marc Fisher

Baron Pulitzer Prizes The Post Washington Post Marc Fisher
Washington Post's Executive Editor Announces Retirement

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | 2 months ago

Washington Post's Executive Editor Announces Retirement

"Announcement of the retirement of a man who's probably one of the biggest figures in current day journalism. Washington Post executive editor Marty Baron. He is retiring from the Washington Post after eight years on the job. No, no to a staff today. Baron says he'll leave at the end of next month. Caps of 45 year career in journalism, the post 1 10 Pulitzer prizes under his leadership. Baron calls the entire experience deeply meaningful, but it's 66. He feels he's ready to move on. You may remember Baron also edited The Miami Herald and the Boston Globe is working the Globe. Was portrayed by actor Liev Schreiber in the Oscar winning film spotlight about the Catholic Church sex

Marty Baron Washington Post Baron Pulitzer Boston Globe The Miami Herald Liev Schreiber Oscar Catholic Church
Washington Post's Marty Baron to Retire as Executive Editor

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

Washington Post's Marty Baron to Retire as Executive Editor

"Some big news and local journalism. Marty Baron is leaving his post as executive editor of The Washington Post. Baron has been at the helm of the post for eight years and arguably transformed the paper into an even greater power house when he came aboard as executive editor. Staff was about 580 strong. Now it's more than 1000 under his leadership, the post 1 10 Pulitzer Prizes and now has some three million digital subscribers. A million of them signed up just this past year. Baron is sharing the news about US retirement in a morning email to staff he plans to leave at the end of next

Marty Baron Baron The Washington Post United States
David Price on Colonel John Haslet's World

American Revolution Podcast

08:13 min | 3 months ago

David Price on Colonel John Haslet's World

"David price. Thank you for joining me on the american revolution. Podcast thank you very much. It's a pleasure to be here. you're here today. Because britain a new book. About colonel john hazlet. What prompted you to write a book about john has let at. How important is he to the story of the american revolution. Well the genesis of this book. Mike was my first literary effort rescuing the revolution on sung patriot. Heroes in their ten. Crucial days are america's war for independence. John has was one of several individuals who i profiled in that book in a series of graphical vignettes which focused primarily on the contributions that each of these people need to patriot caused during what was perhaps the ten most inspirational days in american history. And perhaps the most pivotal moment in the war for independence. Now why did i choose hizbullah. Well you know. His name kept popping up in various things that i was reading most especially in a hackett fischer's pulitzer prize winning work. Washington's crossing which is the bible for people like me who are historical interpreters or so case graphs historical interpreters. I washington crossing historic park. That's a joke. By the way you have to read that book and you have to have a decent command. Say the material in order to be able to give a tour there under the auspices of a fringe group. So the more read about him. The more i was impressed by what he did. And and the kind of character he displayed in the course of his revolutionary service. So around the time that. I was reading that book and i guess the germ if you will of the seed when he's right. Metaphor here have been planted. The perhaps do something a little more elaborate on has land. And i came across the book by fred walters. John has led a useful one. Which far as i know. That was the only book that about him. It's a self published work came out. I believe in two thousand and five. Mary engaging read. I enjoyed it immensely. But it's written in the form largely not entirely but largely in the form of a historical novel. There's a good deal of well. Frankly fictional material an air imaginary dialogue scenes useful information to improve to be very helpful to me my initial reaction after reading. That was well. Fred has the subject covered pretty well. And i don't need to pursue curl has let any further the more i thought about it. The more i felt it deserved an effort by someone to craft more conventional kind of a non fiction work about curl and his delaware regiment now. I should add parenthetically that since his first book. Fred walters did polish. What i gather is a more conventional work and non fiction account. Biography of the kernel which i believe is entitled. John has lots eric journey. But it was published exclusively in a kindle edition. I decided to go ahead and pursue this idea of trying to write a book. Hamlet just to see you know when i was starting out i was just with the mindset of well. Let's see how this goes and what looks like and it wasn't challenge to produce something. That is a book length. Because as i pointed out in the preface to the book. There's not a lot known about his pre-revolutionary war life. We don't even know exactly when it was born is a someone about whom an agent is to in the preface or introduction. We don't even know exactly what he looks like. Physical descriptions of him but there's no authentic rep visual representation of inviting eighteen artists. Not by anyone. Who was alive when he was only two images that. I'm aware which i discussed under book. Which is the coverage. The stanley arthurs painting a reversal of the image of has lead in the stanley arthurs painting that hangs in the delaware public archives building. But in any case i could push ahead with the project so ultimately when it became was an effort to inter we three things one is the has the biography. One is the story of his seventeen seventy six regimen the first incarnation of delaware regimen with a little bit about the proposed hasler regimen is the reconstituted regimen in non truncated form that was created in seventeen seventy seven after his death and then a last name of courses or general one. It's quitting this whole context of the seventeen seventy six campaign. washington's army the new york and the campaign. Which of course culminates in what we call the ten crucial days campaign from december twenty fifth. Seventeen seventy six through january. Seventeen seventy seven. When has what has killed about princeton. The other thing. I think that was pushing me to do. This was at some point. When i was writing the second book it occurred needed. It would be a neat idea. If i could do a trilogy on the ten crucial days. I'm not aware that any other offer done. So what distinguishes has led from anyone else in terms of his contribution to the patriot. Cause well he created one of the elite regiments and continental army in seventeen. Seventy six as i believe the largest regiment in the army in the early months of that year they started recruiting january by me erupt. Almost eight hundred men. They were full uniformed. And i think they were. Perhaps the only regimen in the army that could make claimed for uniform to fully armed under has let's to of his agitate thomas holland formerly of his britannic majesty's army day molded these this forced into a efficient elite fighting unit. Bouffe or get too much into the details of the door blues. I wanna ask one thing you said. We don't know much about hamlet's prewar life. We do that. He came from northern ireland right and that he settled in kent county delaware. Do we have any information about why he left ireland and why he settled in delaware. Well he may have had personal indoor political reasons leaving ulster when he did his wife died his first wife got about five years before he came to the colonies which he did in seventeen fifty seven or thereabouts. Minor standing as they may have personal issues between him and members of the congregation. Her guests may have had an emotional toll on him. Such that believe she dialed probably died in childbirth so he was left with a young daughter. This may have taken a toll on him and as such impacted his ability to perform his ministerial duties. And that may lead to some ancient. Shall we say between young minister and members of his parish more generally when he came to the colonies. it was in the context of this larger immigration movement. If you will of the scotch-irish from northern ireland to the new world during the early and mid eighteenth century with was because of the harsh economic into the adverse economic conditions under which many of them live in the restrictions rather onerous restrictions have been imposed on him by british policy towards ireland towards the presbyterian church that was regarded as unwelcome adversary adversaries. You will to the established anglican church. So i think there's a plausible logger be made. That was part of. let's motivation. Maybe dominant part of his motivation.

Fred Walters Stanley Arthurs Colonel John Hazlet Hackett Fischer Washington Crossing Historic P Eric Journey David Price John Delaware Delaware Public Archives Build Hasler Britain Army Mike Fred America Washington Thomas Holland Britannic Majesty's Army
Robin Givhan on the US Capitol Siege and Vogues Kamala Harris Cover

The Business of Fashion Podcast

08:03 min | 3 months ago

Robin Givhan on the US Capitol Siege and Vogues Kamala Harris Cover

"To better understand the gravity of the political moment in washington. Dc and how evoke cover became a flashpoint amidst the us political crisis. I spoke to robin kvant. The pulitzer prize winning writer. Who is the senior critic at large writing about politics race and the arts for the washington post and whose own column on the topic was headlined. Vogue got to familiar too fast. I i asked her about the mood. In washington dc. Right now and how it feels. As an american seeing american democracy under threat i start with just A deep sigh. Because i think that for most people. There's just an element of just. There are no words to really express what we're witnessing and you know it's been for a for a significant part of the country. The last four years have been an exhausting emotional emotionally draining time and You know and then add in a pandemic and than to see this. It's just extraordinarily disheartening. And and shocking. And i would also just say i i think there's also an aspect of Sort of sad inevitability Would have seemed like this was predictable and yet we were incapable of south it. Yeah i agree. Everyone kind of you could see this coming with the rhetoric and that president trump has been Spewing out over the last four years using social media as a kind of bullhorn to broadcast this kind of you know hatred and divisive rhetoric. That's from our perspective. Over here in london and i know people other part in other parts of the world you know. We always look to america as his beacon of democracy and to see you know a country that we admire and look up to so much going through this. It's you know we find it. Refined it heartbreaking and really sad as well but you know that point around inevitability. I couldn't agree with you more Later today you know. it's wednesday were recording this It seems as though president trump will be impeached by the house of representatives. What do you think this will signify in this crisis that america's going through right now this political crisis. I think that's a really good question. I i'm not sure You know. I think we've gotten to a point what in at at which every time there's been a sense of okay this is you know the nature like it has to sort of shift at this point shift where the batter And we've kind of been proven wrong so You know an a president who has been. We'll have been impeached twice as a pretty extraordinary thing. But i think we have really clear evidence from last week that there's a certain percentage of the population who will be undeterred and he will be even more exercise and ultimately a it will it has has starting to cease to be about president trump and he has just bad. A you know the the key. That's unlocked this avalanche of darkness. Really because a lot of the the rhetoric that was being spewed out there at the capitol was related to trump fights. You know there were a list of grievances that people had that really had nothing to do with. He was in the white house I think it's bad you know. They've just sort of been given permission to express their grievances in this really violent way. But i do hope that You know i'm wrong and that The vote will will mean something and will mean something that will shift things for the better. I guess some people's perspective could be that this process that congress is going through over the next few days Will be the end of a very dark chapter in. Us history and we have a new administration Starting on january twentieth that seems poised to kind of address some of the critical issues that have surfaced during the current administration's tenure but others are worried. Maybe like you that. Actually this isn't the end of the chapter. It's just opening up and has highlighted that have seventy four million people voted for donald trump. There's at least a portion of those people represented by the groups that showed up at the capital last week. That have been kind of in a way activated by trump. And you know there's you know ten potentially tens of millions of these people depending on which you know opinion. Polls you believe what do you. What do you think of that. I get is the end of a particular chapter. What the next chapter will look like however I is is the question. And i don't think that You know on on january twenty at twelve a one pm you know the sun is magically going to come out and everything's going to be washed away. I think it's going. We're going to have a lot of really difficult difficult work to do. And i think there's going to be a lot of sort of weeding out of some of these pheno terrible elements in our culture and. I don't think that we can really do that until we sort of. Reckon with our history you know for so much of the the rhetoric that's coming from the people who were you know the mob that writing at the capital so much of it to my mind seems to be kind of rooted in american history Of that deals with race and gender issues And what exactly you know freedom and equality need that have never really that we really never really come to terms with and i don't think that we can really move forward productively until we do come to terms of died and you know a lot of people you know the first thing that They will say when people try to go and examine history on and understand what it means for. The president is bat either. Don't wanna go back there. They don't wanna revisit it. They don't want to have that conversation or they simply want to serve you at through these rose colored lenses and sort of glorify it And ignore the the worst

President Trump Robin Kvant Washington United States Pulitzer Prize The Washington Post DC House Of Representatives London White House Donald Trump Congress
The Symbolism Behind The Architecture Of Washington, DC's Capitol Building

Weekend Edition Sunday

04:36 min | 3 months ago

The Symbolism Behind The Architecture Of Washington, DC's Capitol Building

"The U. S. Capitol is the most identifiable building in America. It was designed to be at the top of the hill. It can be seen from nearly any spot in Washington to talk more about the symbolism of this singular building, and these attacks were joined by Pulitzer Prize winning writer Philip Kennecott. He's a senior art and architecture critic at the Washington Post. Welcome. Thanks for having me You write often about the meaning and function of public spaces in America. What was your sense of the space? You know, this building is visible all throughout Washington. It's at the geometric center of the city. It's where the basic grid of streets is measured from and it sits at one of the highest points in the city. So you see it. And you know, a lot of American cities don't have a recognizable skyline. But Washington does. And the most iconic thing on that skyline is the capital with its dome. If it's not quite the most beautiful classical architecture, it's maybe a bit of a hodgepodge. It still is beloved, despite some of it's kind of charming, homely flaws. Tell me what it's like to be inside the building under normal circumstances for people who may not have been there. What is that physical space? Like? What does it sound like? Traditionally the capital's been a pretty open space. You could come to town, see the monuments and go visit your representative. And so we were in it. There's this wonderful sort of buoy echoey, noisy quality. People are moving around all the time. And if that's the aural sense of it visually, that hodgepodge of architecture is even more kind of compelling on the inside of it was built over decades and centuries and inside. You really see that from the changes in just the way the building is laid out the size of the rooms and the the decoration style. What do you make of the profane nature of these attacks? These were Americans, vigilante mobs attacking their own history. Their house. In fact, we heard them repeatedly say this was their house. There are reports people defecated in the quarters. Yeah. You know when you say some things are there some things mine. Part of that is care for the thing. Part of that is stewardship. It's not just that if it's mine, I could do whatever I want with it, And that was the kind of claim of possession that I found so appalling, so sickening in what was going on there when they said it was ours, they basically said, it's ours to destroy. Daughters to preserve not ours to pass down, not ours, to imbue with meeting and symbol in value and worth ours to do with as we wish I find it repellent. This is not only shocked America in the world because of what they did. But you know, many people feel that this building is really important. It is hurt their hearts. Why do you think that is I think it's because we take it seriously for what it does. You know, it's a monument or memorial is basically something you go and you were trained to have a set of thoughts and you try and think about the thing that's memorialized there. But this is a building that functions it daily in acts what we Do in a democracy. And so it's when you attack it. You're not just attacking a simple you're attacking the function of the process of democracy. You know, I was really struck by a story that came out after after Congress voted tow certify the election and after that terrible day on Wednesday when the crowds poured through there One of the representatives, Young guy name and Kim. I think it was, you know, After all of this, he grabbed a trash bag and started collecting trash. Just cleaning up the space and Maybe that seems a little hokey. But if you live in Washington, you really do feel kind of proprietary sense because these buildings are always there. And because they're so big and the city is so low, you always being watched by them, you know, In a sense they cast the kind of protective embrace and to see them to filed is just particularly disturbing. You are someone who thinks about buildings and their meaning. And I'm wondering after this attack has the meaning of the building changed. No, I don't think so. I think the history has gotten longer at a very ugly chapter has been added, and I hope we always remember that chapter and maybe we need a plaque. Maybe we need something that says through this particular door came these people on the state so that we have that memory and so that they can't be allowed to change. The appalling nature of what they did by slowly saying over time. Well, it wasn't really is bad as it seems, it wasn't really insurrection. It was just a little bit of a mob or maybe just a bit of a riot or a bit of bad behavior. We can't let that become the

U. S. Capitol Philip Kennecott Washington America Pulitzer Prize Washington Post Congress KIM
The Tale of Manti Teo

ESPN Daily

02:11 min | 3 months ago

The Tale of Manti Teo

"So donned the newest back story. Your investigative docu series for espn focuses on the tail of man. Tie tayo who is on the one hand this college football phenomenon. Who led notre dame to an undefeated regular season back in twenty twelve true but he is more infamously remembered sports fans for being catfish te. It was reported confirmed that tao's girlfriend. His then girlfriend who he claimed had died of cancer was actually not a real person and so don this is just one of the strangest sports stories. All the last decade i would contend ever actually so what made you wanna revisit. The story of mankind tail for backstory. Because all these years later there's so many questions that have lingered don van natta is a pulitzer prize winning reporter and host of the espn docu series. Back story. remember. We all bought into this incredible fable. And that's the word for it. It was a story that was too good to be true. Tale elected to come back for his senior season. Not only will he leave. That program has one of its greatest defensive players but also as one of its most beloved the media swooned over it as fans we all loved it and then we found out it was completely false. Notre dame says tale has told them he's been the victim of a hoax perpetrated by others. What do you make of this with raises questions about why the media fell for the story. Were there warnings at anti had during that autumn that maybe he set aside. I would argue. Pablo that all these years later. We still have these questions about whether anti was complicit or not. What did manton know. And when did he know it. And so for me. And for the backstory team. The whole conceit of the series. Go back on sports stories. You think you know we felt. There was a lot of room to run here and do reporting and try to answer some of these lingering questions all these years later

Espn Don Van Natta TAO Pulitzer Prize Football Cancer Notre Dame Pablo Manton
Episode 88: Prisons, Punishment, Policing--and Guns

Red, Blue, and Brady: Season One

05:28 min | 4 months ago

Episode 88: Prisons, Punishment, Policing--and Guns

"And and I must confess that I myself didn't know much more than that and it turned out that the the Journey of writing that book really changed my life fundamentally change because that story about what had happened in that prison was so much more than a civil rights story, which it also was but it was a it was a window on to talk so much about the journey that this country had taken since nineteen seventy one a journey from a heady moment of civil rights law. Jim ISM that we could do things really differently and more humanely in this country and you know treat people even those who are serving time Behind Bars better and yet somehow we had taken this really Draconian turn after about seventy one and began to lock up everybody and treat every social problem via the justice system. And so the writing of that book became a kind of a journey of figuring out how did we end up with mass incarceration today and so in that sucks really changed my life when I figured out what that story was about which which in some took thirteen years to do because no one knew about Attica because it turned out the state officials didn't want us to talk about it. A lot of really terrible things that happen there that they would have preferred remained remain covered up and I'll have a link to your book, of course obviously in description of this podcast cuz I do think yep. One should go it immediately, you know, pause the podcast Now read it come back if you haven't because what what struck me in many places was almost the unfortunate timelessness of it and and what I mean by that is there are portions where you're reading about, you know, it might being fed for less than a dollar a day while participating in forced prison labor, you know fundamentally not being able even to wear clothes that are appropriate for for the weather and you think well this has Gotta Be You know something from the eighteen-hundreds this has gotta be a historical deep memory and then you start reading about how you know, it only happened a few decades ago and then it continues to happen this way today and I think I think one of the the hardest things to get your head around with you when you learn more about Attica is that not only is it in our in our lifetime and meaning that it only happened, you know five decades ago. It'll be wage. Via the anniversary next year, but but it is also a story about real people and people some of whom are still alive by the grace of God incidentally Thursday and by people whose children still suffer the trauma of what their parents went through and that's not just the folks that were inside who were imprisoned. That's also true of the guards inside of that was true of so many people who were scared by this this event and the event was nothing less than an uprising for basic Factory basic human rights, you know people were simply asking to be treated as human beings while they served their time and that cry for basic human rights rather than having been addressed as we know has been utterly ignored and in fact if we look in this moment right now and we look at the covid-19 birth. In the way people have been treated or how many elderly people are behind bars now or how many children are behind bars or frankly. Just how many people are now Behind Bars, you know up 800% from what they were even in nineteen seventy one. We understand that something went terribly wrong that rather than get the message from Attica that people no matter what they may have done and no matter what might have brought them to prison. They are still human beings somehow rather than that being the message we took from that moment. We got it. So wrong and come to find jobs doing this book that one of the key reasons when we got it so wrong was because we were lied to actively we were told that the prisoners were the animals behind bars that they were the ones that had caused this event to go so terribly terribly wrong and it turns out that that's not at all what had happened. It turns out that the horrible violence down. Ended this prison protest was at the hot was was all down to law enforcement. And that is as you say why it also resonates today cuz this is a story not just about prisons. This is a story about police shooting. This is a story of a hundred and twenty eight people unarmed people incidentally people who had no guns guards and prisoners alike in that in that yard who were gunned down in 15 minutes a hundred and twenty eight people shot six and seven times and not a single member of law enforcement who was in that yard that day doing that was ever held accountable. And so that's why as you say this story still Rings true and if you read it it it just it's a little hard to not kind of, you know, it takes a minute to process it

Attica Jim Ism
Bob Dylan Sells His Entire Catalog of Songs to Universal Music

Business Wars Daily

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Bob Dylan Sells His Entire Catalog of Songs to Universal Music

"Dylan sold his entire back catalogue of music to universal music group earlier. This month price wasn't made public but estimates range from three to four hundred million dollars. The catalog contains about six hundred songs composed over sixty years over the years. Dillon has sold more than one hundred. Twenty five million records and at seventy nine years old. He's still performing globally for the last several decades until the pandemic he performed more than one hundred concerts per year. Not surprisingly the ceo made su nami sized waves the new york times called it a blockbuster deal and said it may be the largest sale. In history of a single songwriters music dylan status is unlike that of any other musician in the twenty first century in two thousand eight. He won a pulitzer prize for quote his profound impact on popular music in american culture marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power in two thousand sixteen. He won the nobel prize in literature for quote having created new poetic expressions within the great american song tradition at the time. The nobels permanent secretary. The late sarah donahue's compared dylan to greek poets. Homer and sappho dylan is also the recipient of numerous grammy awards and the presidential medal of freedom. Moreover dylan is seen not just as a cultural icon but also as one who has kept the copyrights to his songs even while allowing many other musicians to cover them. He's also allowed his music to be used for some surprising commercial undertakings like twenty nineteen super bowl budweiser ad in two thousand four. Victoria's secret out. According to the wall street journal copyrights to the compositions themselves are distinct from recording and performing rights among the songs in the catalog at universal acquired or some that have gone down in history indeed changed history like blowing in the wind like a rolling stone and yes the times they are a and

Dylan Su Nami Universal Music Group Sarah Donahue Dillon Sappho Dylan Pulitzer Prize The New York Times Grammy Awards Homer The Wall Street Journal Victoria
Radiation used to treat benign conditions up to the 1960s has led to illness and death

The Science Show

04:53 min | 4 months ago

Radiation used to treat benign conditions up to the 1960s has led to illness and death

"Element because it does not have as it should. This is a sideshow today. We have news about space weather. That may make the prospect of life in some of those earth like planets unlikely tale about trees. And how we couldn't wait to get rid of them and boy in iraq who amid the bombing and terror was inspired by omni to become a doctor but he wants more is madame curie which for i find it easier to observe talking. I measure uranium and i discover less radiations than i do in. It's all the always more powerful than the element exactly the same test six times. I get identical results. My instinct is that there is another element that skewing the results. You think you've found an undiscovered element. If you're laughing at me then i'm not laughing at you as exciting pinprick of radium gathered from four tons of pitchman. The most beautiful thing you've ever seen smash beautiful thing. I've ever see from the film radioactive now showing marie curie who won lasting fame and an early death her dedication and here doctor says he is not from the university of technology. Sydney reflects on some personal implications of that story as a young teenager going through a pile of old family photos with my mother. I came across a photo of myself as a small child. Cute murad the photo showed me wearing a close fitting skullcap buttoned under the chin. An old fashioned bathing cup. When i ask my mother about it. She told me she'd made matching cups for all my clothes because lost some here after some medical treatment will actually she conceded when pressed are gone bold and stayed bald for a long time. Wash nothing to worry about. I was assured. So i didn't not thin anyway. Mom was off hand about it. I'd had skin problems. She said moore richardson. I suspect to talk about the problem rather than the treatment itself. The skin problem was ringworm of the scalp. A common enough childhood complaint but it could be nasty and like headlights in primary schools. Today it was a sort of thing. Scrupulous parents weren't happy to own up to win the ring. Mom didn't clear up. The local doctor's advice was to travel from our country town to sydney for treatment in a special facility at a big city hospital. Mom was vague about the details of the treatment. What she recalled from the sessions. While is that they'd rub some kind of cream on my head and then they'd turn a ray on it for a while. This was done several times. She couldn't exactly remember how many but by the time the treatments were finished. My head was completely bald at the time. I didn't push for more. It couldn't have been a major matter if mama so inclined to dismiss it. And i hadn't really thought about it over the years or at least not until recently many decades later when i was diagnosed with stage three muscle invasive cancer of the bladder and in the ensuing panic we began to rummage around in the family. History for possible reasons. Why no history. Nothing obvious but then the image of my small bald self came to mind by a strange coincidence not long before i'd heard an interview on abc. We've pulitzer prize winner. Deborah balloon about her book. The poisonous handbook achieve lee shocking. Mix of science toxicology history and to crime the book tells her poisoning motors tended to be perfect crimes in the early twentieth century until detective work in chemistry and toxicology established forensic science as a tool in the arsenal of the crime. Stoppers of the day among the poisons detailed in bloom's book along with us nick cyanide mercury carbon monoxide and thallium. I was surprised to find a lengthy section about radium. Deborah blum's droll reference to the early enthusiasm for radium stuck in my mind and so did a story. My specialist told me during a pre surgery briefing about the british town of huddersfield. In industrial west yorkshire. Many hundreds of factory workers in the area had died of cancer of the bladder in the twentieth century as a direct result of long term exposure to various toxic chemicals and dyes. I learned later. That warnings had been ignored by both industry and government and research findings suppressed

Madame Curie Cute Murad Moore Richardson Omni University Of Technology Muscle Invasive Cancer Iraq Sydney Deborah Balloon Nick Cyanide Deborah Blum ABC LEE Huddersfield West Yorkshire Cancer
A Big Publishing Plot Twist: Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster for $2.2 Billion

Business Wars Daily

05:09 min | 4 months ago

A Big Publishing Plot Twist: Penguin Random House to Buy Simon & Schuster for $2.2 Billion

"Biggest news to hit the publishing industry this year. Possibly several years happened last wednesday. And we're betting that you missed it after all. You were probably contemplating cooking a turkey for two and planning zoom thanksgiving dinners with relatives right so just in case here. It is again the parent company of penguin random house's buying simon and schuster for two billion dollars penguin random house or pr h has already america's largest book publisher according to the new york times. Should the acquisition go through and there are some caveats which will get to pr. H will be. The industry's first mega publisher. The times claims. Let's delve into this just a little bit as we've talked about here before simon and shuster is among the oldest of today's big five publishing houses and one of the most distinguished dick simon and schuster founded the company in nineteen twenty four. The partners first product was hardly a literary masterpiece. It was a book of crossword puzzles. And according to simon and schuster's corporate historian it was a runaway bestseller today. Almost one hundred years. After the lowly crossword puzzle got the entrepreneurial venture off the ground simon and schuster or s operates in a different stratosphere. Today it is america's third largest publisher over the years it's published scads of famous even legendary authors including ernest hemingway and f scott fitzgerald also political figures from both sides of the aisle including jimmy carter hillary clinton and donald trump and contemporary authors. Like bob woodward stephen king and anti prue as well as judy blume s prints and authors have won fifty seven pulitzer prizes and innumerable other literary awards including several caldecott medals one of the highest honors given to children's books the company now sells about two thousand titles annually all told s and s takes in close to nine hundred million dollars a year but early this year. Parent company viacom. Cbs decided to go all in on streaming video in sports looking to cut close to a billion dollars in operating expenses ceo. Bob bakish announced that s wasn't what he called a core asset hence the sale in march the rumored price for us and s was one point two billion dollars a bidding. Were hike the final price to two point. Two billion dollars among other contenders america's second largest publisher harpercollins also vivendi. A french company. That owns a stake in. American publisher has yet and rupert murdoch's news corp clearly penguin random house's parent german media giant bertelsmann was willing to pay top dollar for s and s one reason in addition to the competition between publishers for blockbuster bestsellers the big five face. A formidable rival in certain amazon and when it comes to fighting off amazon size matters since two thousand nine amazon has been a publisher. Not just the world's largest both retailer today. It has sixteen imprints that publish everything from thrillers. To romance novels it signs. Top selling authors like dean koontz patricia. Cornwell taking them and their millions of sales away from traditional publishers in two thousand seventeen amazon published more than twelve hundred titles according to the wall street journal if those numbers have grown in the last three years amazon could well already rival simon and schuster for the volume of new works. It's producing what makes amazon such a tough competitor is a book publisher of course is it status as a bookseller. Moreover it has a number of marketing weapons that traditional publishers. Do not such as the ability to easily promote low priced e books to millions of amazon prime members and kindle owners. The wall street journal reports that along with oodles of cash to lure away big name authors as the largest american publisher penguin. Random house has the clout and logistical network to compete successfully with amazon. The merged company would have annual revenues of three billion dollars according to book industry bible publishers. Weekly but we should note here. The acquisition faces obstacles worthy of an epic novel authors and agents represented by the authors guild. Say such a deal will make it even harder for new authors and so called mid list writers to get published meaning. If you haven't written a blockbuster or a solid backlist title your chances to get published and your earnings could shrink. Pr h says. Simon and schuster will remain editorially independent and both publishing houses say they remain devoted to readers and writers still publishers weekly reports that by blending s. npr h german-owned. Bertelsmann would own about one third of the us book market. That's the number that could trigger antitrust. Investigators to closely scrutinize the deal. According to the new york times but those market share numbers are in dispute in both directions. The authors guild which causes tie up says a combined. Pr h. s. would wind up publishing half of all trade books in the us. Meaning not textbooks penguin. Random house's leadership argues not true and says future market share would be less than twenty percent and that an antitrust investigation is unlikely what happens next will likely hinge on which of these numbers comes closest to reality

Penguin Random House Schuster Amazon Dick Simon Simon F Scott Fitzgerald United States Bob Bakish News Corp Random House Shuster Judy Blume Bob Woodward Dean Koontz Patricia
Laurie Garrett on COVID-19 in the USA

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

06:23 min | 4 months ago

Laurie Garrett on COVID-19 in the USA

"Joining us now. Is laurie garrett. She is a health policy analyst and pulitzer prize winning science writer. Who has been a real voice of reason for us over the course of this crisis laurie. It's really nice to see you. Thank you for being here so you and a lot of other public health experts. They called this back in the summer when the white house decided they were going to take away from. Cdc and have the trump administration. Have hhs collect this data in instead. It really does seem to have been born out in the months since how big a problem is this. How much better off would we be. If we had real data we could count on well. First of all rich we really all agreed to of gratitude to charles pillar who has doggedly covered this story for science magazine for the last three months performed brilliantly and one of them really important things that he has surrey. Thank all of a sudden you are coming on my television for which i apologize talks. And he and he and one of the things that he revealed was that deborah burks was really behind this. She wanted more control of the data she didn't trust. Cdc and claim that the data was sloppy by moving it into hhs they actually then barbed out to private companies. One was a private firm called telegraphing. Biggest client they never had and the other was pailin tier which of course not much later went public on the stock market tear was engaged to sort of massage and analyze the data on the result was of course at the hospitals. Were thoroughly confused. Who are we supposed to send data. To what form are we supposed to fill out. How do we do this. What computers are we supposed to us and for a long time in the summer right after this all started we really had almost no data related to rely upon at all Eventually the federal government started really pushing hospitals around. And said you're gonna lose your medicare contracts. We're gonna take your medicaid and medicare patients and throw them at another hospital if you don't start reporting data to us. Whoa alright swallow hospital start flooding data in. But what's the reliability of the relevance of it. What does it really mean. now. Here's where the the crux of the problem is if your job is to decide how much. Ppe needs to go to arkansas. Or how how much dexsa. Methadone needs to go to south dakota if your job is managing the national stockpile and determining whether or not reading to crisis level of shortages of protective gear for nurses for example. You need to know what's the hospitalization rate. What are the trends. look like. What's the use rate. Well you don't have any such data to rely on right now. It's just a total mess. There's no It's a mess at all levels if the federal numbers don't jive with the state numbers the state the numbers don't jive with the county numbers. The private hospital sector is reporting a different way than the public hospital sector. I mean this is just chaos lawrence this problem or how fixable is. This is a problem. I know that it was a relief to a lot of people to see the list of names who have been advising the incoming president on cova thus far and we've heard sort of reassuring and science based public statements from them during the transition thus far but when they dig in and start to do this work is this a. Is this something that can be is. Is this something that can be undone. Will they have to build this from the ground up. The cdc essentially be put back in charge of this in a way that will just sort of quickly rationalize the state and make it useful again. Will rachel raw. Really anxious to see who biden is going to name as the next. Cdc director and also the next hhs director net will go a long way to helping to answer your question. What we don't really know because the transition team is only just had a few days of access to get inside the cdc. We don't really know what the state of these kinds of programs is now inside in other words. Is it all still in their computers. Are there still personnel. There could reactivate the cdc's tracking system or was it utterly dismantled. And we don't really know the answer to that question right now laura after. Get your reaction to the news tonight. Dr scott atlas has resigned from the white house. I personally was not shy about talking about the fact that i was alarmed to see him in the position that he was in the white house given his stated public views on the virus. What's your reaction to the fact that he's now resigned. It's great. I think that he had a very negative impact on affairs inside the white house. And on our national response and i'm not sure he's going to be welcome back at stanford the stanford faculty have voted to denounce him condoleeza rice his faucet. The hoover institute is indicated some dissatisfaction with his performance. The what's interesting to me is the timing. why now. why did he put out a statement today. Dated for tomorrow and i just wonder if it's in any way connected to the fact that andrews nel who was really the architect of this whole herd immunity approach for sweden Was pushed aside this weekend in sweden. As that country's death toll and case numbers have soared. And there's a strong belief in many sectors of the swedish government that listening to end. Anders was a mistake and also conversely that boris johnson finally rejected of the sort of heard immunity approach that many of his advisor to add been advocating and about three weeks ago started tough lockdowns and since they've been on three weeks of lockdown. They've seen their case load plummet by third

HHS Laurie Garrett Trump Administration CDC Charles Pillar Deborah Burks White House Science Magazine Pulitzer Laurie Surrey Will Rachel Raw Federal Government Cova South Dakota Medicare Dr Scott Atlas Arkansas
A Mothers Controversial Confession

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

04:33 min | 5 months ago

A Mothers Controversial Confession

"I want you to brace yourselves. Because you're about to hear one mothers really controversial confession. She revealed it in a very provocative new york times article and in it she boldly proclaimed. I love my husband. More than i love my children. I yell at waldman. A mother of four also says her children are not the center of her universe and that is the key reason she says she and her husband have a very passionate sex life. She is a mother who says she loves her husband more than her kids and she is swinging from the chandeliers boy. Did she strike a nerve. How do you measure your passion for your children and your husband. I think this is a woman who clearly did not want to have children. And i think that she's doing a disservice to her children to her husband and two herself and especially the family unit as a whole. I thought that her point of view was sort of silly. You can't actually the type of law that exists between two grown adults and that bond between mother and child the way she puts her husband on a pedestal. It's dangerous because she loses him her whole world from what she said. It might say hurtful to our kids someday and she shouldn't have had children how she fill about having kids. I think i l. It's Has an obsessive relationship with her husband. I think i l really needs to reclaim a sense of south. I questioned i yell. It's security in her marriage. I thought i l article was goofy. My children are. I my husband and i come second. It makes me think you know what are her. Children chopped liver go okay. So i'm here with a group of mothers who have a lot to say about this. The woman who sparked controversy. I yell at walmart is here. I yell at is a harvard trained lawyer. Turn stay at home. Mother turned writer. Who has been married to pulitzer prize winning author michael shape on for twelve years and they have four children. So let me Read the passage. That has everybody up in arms. She says i have four children. But i'm not in love with any of them. I am in love with my husband if a good mother is one who loves her child more than anyone else in the world then. I'm not a good mother. I am in fact a bad mother. I love my husband more than my children. I yell it. You knew that you were going out on a limb did not want it. Well i did. I didn't quite know that star jones is gonna take off after me on the view. I didn't know i'd be sitting here next to you. I didn't know that i'd be facing down a group of angry mothers. But i did. You know i had been experiencing this again and again. Mom's groups i i. I'm like a lot of you. I spent a long time just to stay at home. Mom now. I work part time but i have four kids. I spend most of my day with my children. And i have felt for a long time very different. The most of the moms. Start the article talking about your mommy group and you noticed in the conversation. All the mother's talking about they're not having sex. Yeah absolutely i. The the interesting thing was i was talking to a mom and he was telling me about how she was trying to have a second kid. But it wasn't going very well. And i said you should try one of those electronic fertility monitors. Because they tell you when you ovulate like right that day and a great then. I won't have to have all that unnecessary sex. There's a reason that everyone is so angry. This is striking a chord. This is a real issue. Okay tear brown. Why do you say i yell at is doing a disservice to her family. Why well believe that children are such a gift. And i think that there is a healthy balance that can be formed with the family. Not necessarily putting one above the other per se. I think that's a really good point. And i think so. Many women today have become so focused on their children. They've developed these romantic entanglements with their children's lives and the husbands are secondary. They're left out and the romantic focus is on the children. I mean you guys know. Valentine's day at your kids schools. What happens on valentine's day. All the moms come in with you know. Perfect frosted pink cupcakes that they've made with their kids. What's valentine's day is valentine's day to make cupcakes with your children. Know valdez. Supposed to be a day about romantic love.

Michael Shape Waldman New York Times Pulitzer Prize Walmart Harvard Jones Brown Valentine Valdez
Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 5 months ago

Washington DC Environmental Film Festival presents virtual fall showcase

"Well, the DC environmental film fest had to scrap its in Person festival in the spring. So it's presenting a virtual fall showcase. It's from November 12 through the 18th. We like to showcase the art of filmmaking. The other side of it, too, is we like to use these films as springboards for additional conversation about the important issues Programming director Brad for Order is excited to show entangled by David Abel. David brings a journalistic approach to all of his projects. He's a Pulitzer Prize winner for the Boston Low, But this particular film focuses on conservation efforts for the North Atlantic right Whale and the short documentary Union Town. By Frazier Jones. It's following grassroots organizers in union found Alabama fighting industrial polluters there, and Fraser does a great job of telling that story in a short period of time.

David Abel Brad Pulitzer Prize Frazier Jones David Boston Alabama Fraser
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Philly Blunt: The Podcast That Celebrates Philly

The Philly Blunt: The Podcast That Celebrates Philly

05:58 min | 7 months ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Philly Blunt: The Podcast That Celebrates Philly

"She's a Pulitzer Prize winning journalists and only the seventh architecture journalists to win the actual word mega joins us to talk about Penn's landing development tax breaks for developers whether or not philly will see the same exodus to the burbs at a New York City experiencing the effect of working from home has had on center city and maybe the future. Center city her mellowing out on her not so much love for the mural arts program and her hatred of large video screens around town. She shares with us our favorite takeout celebrity crush. It's a fun good interview over get to tell your friends family co workers everyone you know about the fully blunt because really that's the most effective way to spread the word and follow us on social media. Put Her facebook instagram all as philly blunt and We hope you enjoyed this interview with Pulitzer Prize winning journalist. Inga Saffron. ladies and Gentlemen, and welcome to philly blunt my name's Johnny. Good. Times. I'm reef the call Me Greg, and we are very excited to be here with the one and only architecture critic from the Philadelphia Inquirer. please. Welcome English Saffron. Pulitzer Prize winner to. Twitter on the show. Yeah. Thank you for inviting me. Glad to have you on I, know we tried to set it up last week, and then you had written a piece about the sixers looking at a waterfront and I got the impression that that story blew up massively and you kind of had to run back to get another story ready for the Sunday paper. What was you surprised by the reaction to that first article about the sixers trying to build at the waterfront? were got a huge reaction if if you know social media is a measure and the comments or any measure but no surprise because Sports Penn's landing urban planning. Tax Breaks. It's got it all perfect storm. Were you I know you were initially pretty skeptical of the idea. Did you get a was there negative feedback from the sixers wants she wrote that initial piece and they were they kind of screw you think they were kind of scrambling. Once the reaction was so harsh against against that initial bee's. I wasn't the lead author on the initial piece I just SORTA. You can probably tell what I contributed. 'cause it's all the the Geeky urban planning staff in the middle..

Pulitzer Prize sixers philly Sports Penn New York City facebook Twitter Inga Saffron. Greg Philadelphia Inquirer.
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"For a Pulitzer Prize for her writing I can do anything because god loves me and I'm amazed at it we salute presidential medal of freedom winner Angelo cumulus media San Francisco celebrates women's history month separately tailored for real estate from an expert joining us now is Paul passed through lock senior meteorologist and chief U. S. long range forecaster at accu weather Paul welcome to real estate today all it's always great to be back here we are delighted you're here so Paul now that we're all most in the spring market just a few days away hopefully we're going to get a break from the tough weather so how are we looking in the spring of twenty twenty well I think most areas are getting a break from the tough winter like weather most of the nation is warmed up nicely here in March and I think that will continue to be the case going through most of March that's awesome so Paul looking around the country in terms of buying selling or owning a home what should we expect if we're in the southern states along the Atlantic and the Gulf coasts well here's the thing I think the Gulf water temperatures really never cooled off in the winter because we really don't have much of a winner and I think that's going to fuel the fire for some pretty bad thunderstorms here in March and then some significant rainfall that could cause some flooding as we go through the early part of spring when you talk about rainfall are we talking about rain storms or are we talking about devastating events well I can see some extreme events but the persistence of rainfall is going to cause some problems around refers to watch out if you live around streams or rivers you may have to deal with some flooding in the basement that is really great advice now Paul taking a look at the mid west how's the nation's heartland doing this spring well we're not doing too bad actually warmed up a little bit more than we expected they've seen less snowfall than expected as well so things are looking pretty good we think planning is going to be a lot better than it was last year so plantations farms should do much better excellent and when you look at the western part of the United States man they had a really tough ball and in some cases a tough winter too so what's the spring looking like yeah well looks like one is kind of making a return again in parts of the Rockies in the north west especially but even some rainfall which has been absent most of the second half of the winter in southern California looks like they're going to get some rain and then it should dry out and that's when things start to get interesting here possibly an early fire season start out for parts of California and the southwest that's a big one to watch you really have to keep your eyes on that absolutely absolutely and finally Paul going up to New England now after an initial smack by a big snowstorm really early in the season yep there really hasn't been a lot of monster storms the house knowing I'm looking now it looks to me that we're going to go into this spring season up there on the mild side ground not too bad so you know any projects that you're expecting to do around the house I go for it wasn't that's wonderful the folks of course this is Paul passed a lock and I encourage you to go to accu weather dot com and read his articles about.

Pulitzer Prize
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

The Al Franken Podcast

14:24 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

"David Farren whole as a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist For The Washington Post he won. The bolts are Because of his really painstaking thorough reporting on trump's foundation which turns out was kind of a scam and Has now been shut down by the state of New York so Thank you David for joining us. Hey great to be here and thank you for all the reporting you've done on on trump's finances and Just curiously let me ask you. What corrupt schemes of trump's are you currently investigating the big priority for this year is to find out how much money the federal government is paying trump's businesses? We that it is. We know that it's a lot of you know we've found four hundred seventy one thousand dollars in payments already. And but I think we've only seen tip of the iceberg mar-a-lago. This is Scotland. This is all these things right. Yeah well we've just looked at one government agency so far which is the secret service to follow him wherever he goes and then there's sort of captive customers for him. He gets the choose whatever he wants to charge them and the service can pay. Whatever it's charged so we are looking at what he charges them to come with him. Tomorrow law go to come with into Bedminster. He's an ren things at Bedminster when he's not even there So yeah I think there's more than just the secret service but that's the part that we're looking at first so this is obviously His His golf courses or resorts. Or whatever these are and The Secret Service has to stay there. for security reasons and he can pretty much was he charged him as he charged above What normal people pay? Not The normal people go to any of these well the ones we've looked at so far bedminster and mar-a-lago and they both have a few guest rooms. They're not really hotels but they have a few rooms and they don't publish the rates they don't even if you're a member you have to call and get the rate for tonight. So they don't they don't say what regular people pay The only rip. That's a great Great out right but the but the good thing for us is that last year. Eric trump president son actually gave a really definitive answer about what his Co. is is company was charging the government he says when government officials come with my father to our properties which are just you know he says I. He said it was free and then he wasn't. He's not totally free. We just charge them the cost of housekeeping. So just the cost of cleaning their rooms by the way everyone If you go to a hotel Tip Your housekeeper yes You know please. So that'd be like a ten dollar charge. A figure he gave was fifty bucks and we've talked to a sort of hotel industry experts about you. Know what does it cost? Just a cleanroom and it's like for a luxury hotel. It's like fifty to seventy bucks so that's about. I see because they pay the housekeeper scores. And you get and how many of them are are legal or well. How the ones at mar-a-lago are all They're all guests. Workers Imports guestworkers their legal. But they're not okay. Well that's good. Yeah with for him. But the thing is we haven't found a single instance and I've I've been looking for any instance at all where I can see that Eric actually did what he said where the trump were actually charged the government fifty bucks. We've found rates four hundred dollars. Five hundred and sixty dollars six hundred fifty dollars a nine man. Whoa WHOA WHOA. Whoa WHOA are you saying that Eric may have been misleading people? I don't want to prejudge it. Maybe there's some examples out there that I haven't found yet. I'm just saying that every single example that I found any history of that and your research of them be misleading. Let's go back to the first thing. Which is the that you did. Which is the trump foundation and There are some pretty hilarious stories there. You're probably better telling these than I am well just to give a couple So the trump foundation was this little charity. That trump is set up in the eighties. Donald Trump and set up in the eighties and basically it for the last. You know five or ten years before he ran for office. It had been giving away other people's money for some reason. Other people gave him money which he then gave away under the name of the Donald Trump Foundation. So people thought they were getting his money but it wasn't and the the weird thing about it one of the weird things about it was what he bought with this charities money including A couple of different very large portraits of himself So he would go to this charity auctions at mar-a-lago people would bring a painting of him. I think figuring we will. He's you know he's got to buy it would blow to him if a painting of him goes unsold in his house so he bought one painting for ten thousand dollars. You but one painting for twenty thousand dollars which scrape that's fine. There's an auction for charity. But then he used his charities money to pay for it so the foundation pays for his portrait's exactly and Basically there's no justification for that all right. No one of the basic rules about charity is it even if your name is on the charity. It's not your money. It's the charity is a separate pot of money that's meant for the public good and Foundation Foundation. Let's tax exempt. Yeah so you can't use it to buy decorations for your house. You can't use it to buy anything for yourself So we wanted to know okay. Well now that these paintings wait a minute. Wait a minute decorations. He's I know that he's hung. The portrait's have been hung at Some of the hotels maybe Ed mar-a-lago and one zero So they're all that's the G. Seven g seven exactly so they could see the portrait so yeah they had said they wouldn't tell us where it was but one of our readers founded on the wallet at Durrell Decorating The sports bar there. So that's pretty much. The definition of what? You should not do with charities. Assets wasn't wasn't barral actually doing a service which was storing it. Right that was that was the The argument with trump campaign was well. Yeah looks bad. It looks like the trump charity did a favor for the trump business by buying art for the businesses walls. But you have it all wrong really. The business is doing the charity a favor by storing its art collection for free our journalist. We gotta check these things out. It's like man. I call it a tax expert and said you know. Does this hold water could you? And the GUY said you know. It's it's not easy to make an irs auditor laugh. But this would do it. I actually had an auditor once audit me and Tom. Davis via the corporation This is the weirdest thing he was there for in my business. Manager's Office for a week I don't know why I'm telling the story but here's the thing. He sees a receipt for dinner that I had with Lorne Michaels and Paul McCartney and Tom in London and he said You had dinner with Paul McCartney and I said yes and he goes okay arts over. Isn't that funny? I was fine. It's good all right. Okay keep going. I thought that was a good story so that was one of the many things in the end. The trump the New York attorney general sued the trump foundation for that and a variety of other things. He used this charity to help his political campaign. He used it to pay off legal debts for his businesses and they sued the trump foundation. Saying that none of that stuff is what you're supposed to do with charities money and so the end. The trump foundation gets dissolved and trump had to pay two million dollar. Fine personally give an example of the legal debt that the foundation paid because he legally owed some money. And what was that about though the one case? There's a charity golf tournament at one of trump's golf courses in New York and they have this prize hit a whole hit a hole in one. When a million dollars okay. They're out there and with some whole a guy. One of the contestants from New York Hits a hole in one hour a big deal to take his picture. You know he's back in the clubhouse buying drinks that says you know these GonNa want a million dollars and they sort of tapped him on the shoulder and say actually if you read the fine print of the win a million dollars sweepstakes it says that the ball has to travel a certain number of yards before it goes in the hole for be eligible and trump's course just happened to have set it up so that the t the whole were not far enough apart that that we not exceed that limit so yes even hit the hole in one. You don't win the Homeland Prize because you hit it far enough. It was just The Pin was just far enough Close enough that you couldn't they couldn't win so food and They settled or something and the trump foundation paid for their exactly but he he sued the trump golf course because obviously the trump golf course is the one at fault and the trump golf course settled with the guy but then the trump foundation again in legal legally separate tax exempt charity with nothing to do with this Gulf hole in one thing. They trump foundation patient. Okay so this is just sleaze. Sleaze sleaze there's a couple of stories there they really like one one. You got into this because He he did this thing when He was feuding with Fox. Instead of doing the Fox debate he did this Vanderbilt zone and said he was giving like a million dollars. Sir. Several million dollars to vets right. Yeah a million dollars out of his own pocket. That's right and million dollars out of his own pocket and you just wanted to. You were curious right. We wanted to. I mean that's a claim that matters because both that shows you. Trump cares about veterans. And it shows you is really rich like those are two key parts of his appeal in two thousand sixteen so we want to just check and make sure that he did the thing that he said he did. And I thought this is like a simple story. We'll call it and they'll say yeah of course but he gave this money to this charity. You can call them in check but of course it was not like that. Instead we got was a call from Corey. Lewandowski was trump's campaign manager. Then great guy. Great thank you. I'm sort of set me off on on this path by telling me. Susie lied to wonder wonderfully life-changing line. And so he said well. I can tell you for sure that Donald Trump is giving away that million dollars to veterans. But I can't tell you who he gave it to our win..

Donald Trump trump trump foundation Eric trump Donald Trump Foundation Bedminster golf New York Foundation Foundation Pulitzer Prize federal government David Farren Scotland Ed mar-a-lago auditor Fox Corey Susie Paul McCartney
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

The Al Franken Podcast

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Al Franken Podcast

"In just a minute. It's going to be a great one. You know those of you listen to the podcast by definition you. You are You know that we often have a great guests who are doing great things For example Maria trae Sukumar the founder and president of Voto Latino Did a wonderful show on immigration and voter suppression an after hearing her interview. A listener gave Voto Latino one hundred thousand dollars because voter. Latino is in the trenches Registering Latinos across America to vote and and Fighting Republican efforts to suppress The Latino vote. Now I'm not asking you for one hundred thousand dollars unless you've you've got that kind of money but please consider giving to this unbelievably great organization at www dot voto Latino dot org. That's Voto Latino Dot Org and by the way they didn't pay for this. I just wanted to do this and That way you don't have to do backslash Al David Farren whole as a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist For The Washington Post he won. The bolts are.

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I think it's the mules he's yeah hello this is great well you're free to grow Faye was and today he's he's pretty much exclusively known as the composer of the rankings he but he was a really highly regarded jazz musician who was a fine jazz pianist this is kind of a very programmatic pieces you noticed it's like it's the mules if the animals something around the canyon for better or for worse when people talk about music on the Grand Canyon that's what they think of I have to tell you we have never played the Grand Canyon sweet and thirty six years of the Clinton music why not well in part because it's symphonic work and we are really chamber music I think at one time or another we thought wouldn't it be kind of fun to kind of arrange one or two movements to do it but there's just so much other stuff that we that's taken a priority really no we've had Pulitzer Prize winning composer is joining us and commissioning new works of music inspired by the Grand Canyon having our native American composer precious projects students from the Navajo and Hopi nations writing new music so you know it's it's a fun piece and maybe someday will transmit of it okay well let's listen to another thing that is on your agenda this is one of many that the Grand Canyon music festival has commissioned over the years this is called the guardians of the Grand Canyon composed by Brent Michael it's got the same idea behind it sounds like to me which is that you know it's it's peaceful and yet it's so grand that you never.

Faye Grand Canyon Pulitzer Prize Brent Michael Clinton thirty six years
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

How'd It Happen Podcast

12:25 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on How'd It Happen Podcast

"Okay. And the. Pulitzer prize winning that. How does that change your life? What is what is that? What's it feel like what's the process, actually? Is it something that you submit for consideration or is it something that's found by them? I I'm sure it's all on their website, but it'd be nice for people to understand. It's a submission thing, and I have to say, I we were so lucky the journal sentinel had won a Pulitzer prize the year before, and we were so lucky that they had really built up a, a team of people who, who knew what it took to do the application and to do the, the right kind of story that the year that we won. We had a lot of digital components to our story. And we told it in a lot of different ways online, you know, Mark, and I worked very closely with there were five of us who want and, you know, the other three did a lot of the video and photography, and such a big team on those well and that year they had added to the. Rules, kind of. Not a category. But a, a suggestion that you try and tell the story in unique ways and use digital and, and we really did that well, so I think that helped us so you, you really have to have a can't credit, the management, George Stanley, the editor of journal sentinel, and all of the people who work with him on this. You have to have that kind of team to, to turn. We had a really good story that we, you know, we Mark, and I said, from the beginning, if, if, if we can't take this story somewhere, it's our fault because all the elements were there, but then we needed that team around us to take it to the next level to be cliche. Did you ever worry about whether you'd be able to get it there, Mark? And I realized very early on that the story had that potential and we made a pact not to talk about it. And so we just did not talk about it. So it was actually funny. What happens is. We knew that they submitted it for the Pulitzer. And we we just talk about it, and so someone in we agreed. We tell each other when we heard anything. So one of the other reporters came up to me they get announced in April in one of the other reporters came up to me, I don't maybe in March and said, so how you feeling you know heard you're on the shortlist was, like, what are you talking about? He's like you know what I'm talking about. I don't know what you're talking about. We're not talking about it, and he told me that there were rumors in the industry that, you know, we were. In the top kind of stories that were being considered in our category. And I went told Mark and I like she, we had an agreement that we tell each other. And he was kinda mad at me because we just didn't wanna talk about it. So then the, the day they were announced, you know, we knew that we had a shot, and I walked in that morning and I had an interview to do, but I saw I, so I did my interview, and it was driving Mark crazy. I mean he couldn't even sit there any longer and he I got off my injuries like let's get out here. And so we just laughed and we went, we actually went to a used bookstore downtown and looked at DNA books, so marred mired in it at that point. And then we went and had lunch and already writing the book at the palm, we had, we had an agent at that point. I think, but we, we had contract with the agent, but we hadn't won the Pulitzer. The giant was pretty happy after it happened. But. We came walking back into the building. And we saw a local TV reporter sitting in the lobby, and then we were really nervous than we thought all something. But what you're fables are turned. Well, yeah, and I hate to even admit this. But what you're really nervous about is that you're going to be a finalist. You know, and that 'cause they have a tradition in the journal sentinel newsroom. You have to stand up in front of the whole news room, and everybody watches for it to come across the wire, and, you know what you don't want is to be standing there and here you're finalist, and you have to act happy and you are happy, but, you know, you're hoping you win. So so draft day, almost. Yeah. Right. So we, it was funny. We walked back into the newsroom and Raquel Rutledge who had won the Pulitzer fabulous reporter who won the Pulitzer the year before. Kind of called us over, and she pulled up Brown bag out of her desk drawer with some kind of alcohol bottle of alcohol in it and said here, take a drink and then go up there. Switch shot. And we went walking up there. And what would you say your member? I don't even remember. I mean you know, then we won and. You know, it was just a blur. It ended up it. We, it was such a blur in, you're, you're just walking around the newsroom and slowly everyone's getting back to do in. There's champagne and everyone's getting back to doing the work. They have to do that day. And you're just kind of walking around, like I don't even know what to do. And because it's like winning the Oscar. Right. I mean in. I don't know. I never won the Oscar. Okay. Okay, magin that you want the Oscar for bridges of Madison. Laugh at someone someone got in touch with me, sometimes it, what happens to your ear, inbox your emails, flooded. Your we ended up like the New York Times called us and we didn't see it and we didn't call him back. I mean it was just chaos. But someone after that day called me up and said like, okay, you know you won the Nobel, but you still don't know. And I said, I said, well, I didn't win the Nobel. I won the Pulitzer and he said, Nobel poets are. What's the difference? I'm mad at you. So a lot of ways. So what happens is after you win. There is a like an award ceremony at the law library at Columbia college in New York. And there were a couple interesting things about that. But to me, the most interesting, you walk in, you know all the editors go with you, and you walk in, and they're all these steps you walk up, and then there's this grand lobby and you walk over new when you win. You get like a little Tiffany kind of paperweight, that's engraved with, you know, your information and even more valuable to me. You get a book of all the previous Pulitzer winners that was. I thought really neat. But as I was walking across this long, large fancy lobby, I realized this isn't even about us. It was a first of all, you realize it's not it's it was about Milwaukee, and it was about Wisconsin. You know, everybody shared with us, winning the pulsar. So you kind of realized that, that, it's, it's not just yours, it's ever, but then walking cross this lobby, I realized it's a lunch. It's not a very fancy ceremony and it's, it's about the editors you realize these editors show up hopefully often, and they're showing off their latest reporters. Right. And so they all know each other and you don't know anybody 'cause you've never been there before the only ones they continue to go all the time. It's their sort of. Yeah. It's their thing like this is, you know, they're the ones who like they're bringing their latest winners. So and, you know, the big lake Wall Street Journal was like up in front. New York Times it's the whole that also placement another. So we so there's a little reception and then there's a launch, and, you know, Mark, and I stood and, and the rest of our team. But Mark, and I happened to Stanton. Whether we're pretty tied at the hip at that point. And. Who are you gonna talk to all the editors are talking to each other? And so we ended up talking to the poet who won that year and the nonfiction. I remember this book the history of cancer book, I'm blanking on the name of it. I'll think anyway, can't come up with it. It's a great book. We both brought books and got him sign it. But we ended up kind of just standing and talking to them because you don't know anybody. So it was really interesting from that in, and it was funny. I walked up to there's a, a high up editor at the Wall Street Journal, who's from Green Bay, where I'm from his name's Paul zhigo. And sure, yeah, I saw him over at the Wall Street Journal table. I went to high school with his sister. So I walked up, thinking, oh to say hi to him. And I walked up to the table, and they all looked up at me. Like, what are you doing over at our table? Right. 'cause they're the Wall Street Journal. And I said, oh, Well, Paul, I just want to say hi went ice school, Julie. And then he stood up. He was real nice. But it was really funny walking to the table. So you said when we were first getting started that you always wanted to do something. Big was this. It. Well that it was maybe one of it. Yeah. Okay. So now, you know, I've left the turtle sentinel, and I'm running them walkie institute, which is a nonprofit started in two thousand seven by John burns who ran the private equity group, ebonite Bank, and then spun it out into Mason wells, which has been very successful private equity firm rusher. It's the biggest in Wisconsin, and, you know, I've known John for longtime actually will tell you a secret that won't be a secret anymore once tell to you, but John was the person who gave me my Pulitzer tip. So he's and delare in my John. Yeah. Right. He was on the board of the Medical College. And the what the reason we were talking that day he was, you know, kind of berating me about all the great things going on there. And, you know, and I just wasn't sure if he slipped and told me something he wasn't supposed to or he was trying to tell it to me, but it doesn't matter turned out. Yeah. So can I ask just before? Before we get more into the mock institute. So you. You win. You Mark win. You're right, the book, you're sort of, at the top of can I say something? Yeah. That book that I was trying to remember, the name of, oh, yes. The emperor of all maladies. There you go. Get it on Amazon. But the one you really wanna buy one in a billion. Yes. Of course. The story of knickebocker Don McMahon. That's also on him. Exactly. The so you're sort of at the top. Whether you still about Oscar whatever Pulitzer Nobel. And that. Yeah. Six one. And then and then you leave journalism. Yeah. How come? Well, the journal sentinel was a fabulous place and still is in some ways, but we got bought by going at, and I just have to tell you that the day they all walked into, you know, I was a business reporter. I mean, I covered this stuff all the time, like I talked to a lot of CEO's about walking into a company and what you do when the day they walked into the newsroom, I just thought is a work for me. And it was partly because, you know, they're not real focused on business news. The kind of business news. I like they're focused on maybe a softer type of business news than I like so I, you know, I mean I that's not to say the journal sentinel, isn't still doing some good business news. But I just felt like I was going to be frustrated there. And John had started the Milwaukee institute in two thousand seven. He started it as a he had a cluster of cloud. As it were. And they were doing high-performance computing and offering services helping companies in academics around.

Pulitzer Mark Wall Street Journal editor Pulitzer prize reporter Oscar John burns New York Times Wisconsin Paul zhigo Pulitzer Nobel George Stanley Raquel Rutledge Milwaukee Don McMahon New York Amazon
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"You know, I'm not interested in writing actually political things incorrectly, but I want to change people the way they interact with each other. And the way they see reality and the way they see our history, the book includes a side by side translation of every poem in Spanish. The other poem we'd love you to read from his depopulation blues, which talks about the broader obligations. We have people around the world even if there happened to be of a different nationality country. Oh, absolutely. But also many people don't realize this, but we actually had a depopulation order that was concocted by Kissinger and Nixon. And so we are actually people color, especially in danger of being depopulated here in this country as well as in other countries. And I know it feels really shocking, but they can research this evil can be brilliant though. Speaking of depopulation. Of people. It will find a way we are not fools completely to be seduced by it. For Nixon Carter Reagan, perhaps all the others knew we were counting on them to be as human as we are, but why eight hundred thousand Rwandans died while we watched a televised presidential sex scandal might have told us something that politicians who smiled at us and kissed our babies, blue eyes shining with triumph. Well, knew we were falling into our graves kicked by them as they counted our votes. Why do you think we tell so many stories about ourselves about America that don't always match up with the ugly realities because we can't face the reality. It's a terrible history and until we face it, we can go nowhere. We can expect to grow. You have a Pulitzer prize. Kendrick, Lamar is a young musician. First rapper to win a Pulitzer prize ever this past year, and I want to play for you something from one of his songs and a video that echoes your work. Take a look. Chips like. Humming. If God got us, we're going to be all right. Have you have you heard him quote you before the now? You've never seen that now and he's big. He's not Alice Walker big, but he's big, I'm happy for him. What do you think about the way he's using your work? All's my life I had to fight well, I think he's understanding that is the truth of it, especially for poor people and for people who call her in this country, we've had to fight all of our lives and it's a good thing that we can talk to each other across generations prizes are a funny thing. I don't imagine you focus on them, but there are people who criticize the Nobel Pulitzer for handing them out to musicians. Do you think it should only go to traditional novelists and poets or musicians as well? I, I'm not crazy about prizes. No, so whoever wants them should have them and people who could do without them should do without them. Did it change your status because there's your work that stands on its own, and then there's the. Reach of your work. And so I wonder whether the prize is in the prestige that you've amassed did make a difference in the reach. I mean, we talk about the color purple to think that there was too talented people who happen to be black women, Oprah and Whoopi who'd never been cast in a film before they adapted your film. Does that part of it matter to you? That did. That was very good. And I was very happy about that. But I'm just saying that the real joy comes from doing the work in hasn't really come from the prize. That's something I think that's inspiring about you. And it comes through very much sitting across the table from you. It is obvious to observe, but I will observe it that that's something that you and the president do not have in common. He tends to brag a lot, but he does claim to be smart and educated. This is the only quoting of the president we're going to do, but I'll play you one clip of President Trump..

Pulitzer prize Alice Walker Kendrick Nixon Carter Reagan president President Trump America Kissinger Oprah Whoopi Lamar
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"And the way they see reality and the way they see our history, you have a Pulitzer prize. Kendrick, Lamar is a young musician. First rapper to win a Pulitzer prize ever this past year and I wanna play for you something from one of his songs and video that echoes your work. Take a look. Night. Chips like. Have you heard him quote you before, but now you've never seen that? No, and he's big. He's not Alice Walker, big big. I'm happy for him. What do you think about the way he's using your work? All's my life I had to fight well, I think he's understanding that that is the truth of it, especially for poor people and for people to call in this country. We've had to fight all of our lives and it's a good thing that we can talk to each other cross generations prizes are funny thing. I don't imagine you focus on them, but there are people who criticize Nobel Pulitzer for handing them out to musicians. Do you think it should only go to traditional novelists and poets or musicians as well? I, I'm not crazy about prizes, you know? So whoever wants them should have them and people who could do without them should do without them. And we talk about the color purple to think that there was too talented people who happen to be black women, Oprah and Whoopi who'd never been cast film before they adapted your film. Does that part of it matter to you? That did. That was very good. And I was very happy about that. But I'm just saying that the real joy comes from doing the work doesn't really come from the price. That's something I think that's inspiring about you. And it comes through very much sitting across the table from you. It is obvious to observe, but I will observe it that that's something that you and the president do not have in common. He tends to brag a lot, but he does claim to be smart and educated. This is the only quoting of the president we're gonna do play you. One clip of President Trump. I went to an Ivy league school. I'm very highly educated. I know words I had the best. Words, what does it tell you that it's important to him to be perceived as so smart. It tells me that he knows he probably is not, and he has an inferiority complex and that's very sad, but it's even sadder that we elected him to lead. We definitely need a very different kind of leader. And in fact, we actually need to lead ourselves and until we do, we probably won't get very far. You're saying fury already. I mean, there's a feeling of inferiority or lack of self. Affirmation love. Does that in your view, make people more more dangerous when they come in contact with power money? Yes, because there's always in the, there's always the feeling of need to measure up, you know? And I mean, even see that between him and Barack Obama, I think n. b. there was just so blatant that Donald Trump envied Iraq Obama his even though he started out with much more than Barack, oh, of course. That's part of the problem that he had everything in Barack as a black man was supposed to have nothing and said, look, what happened is all of the things that this. Isn't isn't in this very hard to take. But the answer is not to make us all suffer is to go and improve yourself. Alice Walker for me, it's an honor to have you here, so I really appreciate you coming by. Thank you. Thank you. Hey, it's Chris from MSNBC every day. I come to the office and we make television show every day. I think to myself, there's so much more I want to talk about. And so this is our podcast it's called, why is this happening? And the whole idea behind it is to get to the root of the things that we see out every day. They're driven by big ideas each week. I sit down with the person uniquely suited to explain why this is happening. New episodes of Weiss. This happening every Tuesday. Listen for free wherever you get your podcasts..

Alice Walker President Trump Pulitzer prize Barack Obama Nobel Pulitzer president Ivy league school MSNBC Weiss Oprah Lamar Chris Whoopi
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

03:07 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WGTK

"Robert deniro deserves a pulitzer prize because of his two word the first word was an f word the second word was trump so it's brilliant writing putting those two words together only genius could have thought of that what yeah she says this this is her tweet i can't stop thinking about that swift incisive editorial last night to monosyllables underscoring the presidency's baseline indecency she spelled indecency wrong by the way with a violation of decency the satire of norms i'd say robert deniro deserved a pulitzer prize for it if he didn't deserve a tony you crazy i understand she doesn't really want to award him the pulitzer but still what is brilliant about expressing this particular sentiment let's go to net in augusta georgia ned you're on the medved show i'm michael will the economy might be roaring but i believe it would be in similar shape under any other republican president and likely even better without the drag of trump's chaos policy or a decision or something that has been a full out disaster so i am i on okay sorry so he has laid waste a crucial norms he has not and will not provide his tax returns he has not and will not put his business interests in a blind trust he has been a gusher of lies both trivial and serious laying waste to an expectation of basic truth telling okay look what you keep coming back to is personal conduct personal standards personal behavior you don't like it i get it what i'm talking about here is policy and the direction of the country and decisions that actually impact the way americans live not talking about future impact on our civilization we'll be right back the most important retirement event of the year is almost here and you're invited and you know what absolutely free the.

Robert deniro pulitzer prize georgia president augusta medved michael
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

The Bobby Bones Show

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Bobby Bones Show

"Coming out right that and i'm gonna come out in the middle of the show and do that and who's listening right now nobody is like it's going to be at the show stop it i'm not thinking pulitzer prize for most people there who cares it's also just me yeah because there are some things are going to have them people be like when i come out it'll be like we've been watching him hostal show the whole time ears my inner ear monitors and i gotta writer app to this you better get on it like this just throw in like nursery rhymes but just different nursery rhyme so it'll be like hickory dick john block the plex funny because hickory degree doc was what was in my head right started singing maybe i should i thought you're gonna marry had a little lamb but that's good i'll be hardcore with that one mary lamb it's new hardcore yeah legit but it's like nobody's gonna clap special guests they finish up there saw you me glue amazing i can't miss that well yeah i gotta write the route that so how do nursery good about it now that like i know the b what are some other nursery rhyme bitsy spider lunchbox no dizzy busy spot on the water spout year down a lot of him want yeah they all empty come on give me a hard on humpty dumpty yeah yep humpty dumpty he had a great fall yeah humpty dumpty.

pulitzer prize writer
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

The Daily Zeitgeist

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Daily Zeitgeist

"Yeah this by the way this is a pulitzer prize winning book and they're rumors over the weekend that he was addicted to opioids or that he said nobody was there for me when i was dictated to opioids and that's why he was hospitalized or you know head to cut that tower short which would mean that he doesn't get like i guess he had insurance for the rest of the tour in case something happened which you know it was sort of a medical condition that cut the tour short so he got a bunch of his money back but now that company who paid for that is basically saying if it was a drug thing you don't you don't get it well insurance companies that really known for being i will always side with connie over the insure we're always looking for his yeah and also who knows way keven knows what he's saying yeah and then we just wanna do check in with there was a special election in arizona last night janae to go arizona is deep red country started a little bit yes it's changing so i guess in this district it mean politically you go there and you're like oh everybody wanted to have plastic surgery but like the science wasn't here yet about face i'll tell jokes cities kooky town people khimki tone wasn't there yet review of the medical board and everything so yet this district that was up for grabs yesterday went between debbie lesko and this other woman herald tipper nitty in so debbie lesko one and she is now just said oh i'm going to be joining the freedom caucus which shouldn't be a surprise because this district is just deep trump country like he won the district by twenty one points they love joe are pile there like this was never going to be won by the democrat so everyone's saying look if the democrat somehow in holy shit but really what.

pulitzer prize connie keven arizona debbie lesko joe
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Las Culturistas

Las Culturistas

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Las Culturistas

"It is we didn't win a pulitzer prize honey but it went to kendrick it went to yes i'm of ours i'm of our powell's at new york magazine look am i am i salty that we didn't win yes is it going to be hard to see the pulitzer panel now when we go hang out with them on the weekends yes it's going to be very difficult for they'll be like greg how could you how could you have given alice monroe an award and not us i'm just saying we we wrote a sterling piece on antony for vulture and it was we were told roundly rejected we were told it could win a pulitzer and to be rejected is very hopeful it's it's a comment on really them i it's not about us it's about that look at speaking of award shows oh my god we missed guys man i were supposed to go to the shorty awards we couldn't make it because we had we had this emergency come up but we were supposed to go and we missed all this crazy stuff happening like fucking the queer eye guys working red carpet as we could have interacted with them we had a red carpet slot we were supposed to go i'm sorry that til carpet it's he'll carpet and then we missed this whole adam pally non okay yeah apparently adam pally read the shorty awards for filth and was like fired mid presentations escorted off to bring the girls in on this but also we just want to say we are preparing to go to the shorty awards because we had full intend to go until a conflict happened conflict happen we have nothing to wear and we are also too little cinderella faggots cinderella faggot cinderella faggot title of your book we didn't have anything new to where to where to the ball so listen what we're saying is we not hang send us stuff but we're saying like let's have a conversation about you sending us like i dunno bonobos something somebody because guy tell you something it's hard out there on instagram when you see how some of these comedians are looking and they're putting forward lurks and then brings me to our gases as episode on my.

powell new york magazine greg alice monroe pulitzer prize kendrick adam pally
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"It's just some my experiences a physician so i've had some real moments in in medicine itself i know said the big one was the black hole principle so pulitzer prize for that or nobel prize or something you're journalists to we were talking last hour about evil and and i'm convinced it exists it's out there why do you think it's there so incident of experiences we can't even get to the grips just how amazing maria and just experiencing lots of things in the is is what we would call easil you know so it's it's learning from that and i think at this point in in humanity.

pulitzer prize maria nobel prize
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Is she windsor pulitzer prize and bingo she used to sit right next to me by the way i come in one morning in her entire desk is literally empty i mean the cubicle is stripped bare i mean it is an empty desk empty drawers no pictures everything has gone and that's when we discovered that janet made up the whole thing that there was never any jimmy she made it up and at that point everyone on that squad got called in all their stories were reviewed i'd done a story about a guy who sold guns two teenagers i literally had to pull his record and come in and show showa tome and say look right here he's been arrested for this and that was disbanded and uh several of my fellow members were suggested that they find jobs elsewhere and i ended up being assigned to what was called the federal report page which no longer exist but i had the wonderful job which i hated every day for three years which was covering osha m shah all the alphabet agencies and the federal government and i'm a people person and i'm not really big on reading thousand page documents about minor safety you know and so it was bad fit i switched over to the magazine because it it's the washington post that was looked down on the magazine was kind of a stepchild nobody cared about and i scored the first interview with arthur walker arthur walker was brother john walker john walker in 1980 six was the equivalent of the rosen birds he was the first major american spy since two rosenberg and he got his brother his best friend jerry whitworth and michael walker his son and they sold secrets to be got caught eighty six he'd been solemn since sixty nine to the soviets more than eighteen years of of betraying his country so i got permission.

pulitzer prize janet federal government washington post arthur walker john walker rosenberg jerry whitworth jimmy michael walker eighteen years three years
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Welcome to the site central show why each episode presents an indepth look at issues from the field of psychology and mental health with host gay powered and co host vincent m wales the laura wanted welcome to this week's episode of the sykes central show podcast my name is game howard in with me as always is vincent m wales and we are snow here talking to pulitzer prize finalised pete earley pete thank you for talking to us last week and welcome back this week thanks for being here with us again pete i understand that you recently co authored a book with jesse close is that correct a trite what i wanted to do it after i hook admit three months with the homeless and i couldn't get a publisher interrupted so i start my blog and then i thought you know right now memoir to really hot and everybody's reading memoirs and you've got to remember there about sixty five percent of all books are bought by women men tend to read a nonfiction and read for information women read for both entertainment and and i are her jesse speak in chicago and i thought wow you know why why don't i help her and let's do a book about her life and that would be a way than the tell the broader mental health story and uh so yeah we had a great time we did a book she has an amazing story in the thing that i like about jesse story this not only mental health and she has some incredible stories that she tells about when she was in the manic stage and how uh her five husband all 'luctor when choose mannix age because she owes you wanted to do is have sex and party and everything else and then when she was in the depressed age in the closet crime they didn't want anything to do with her but it also is a wonderful coal currying story were you see how alcoholism and drugs really prey on people with mental illness and the combination and how people look down on her because they just figured she was using drugs all the time and you know it's uh i i think so in many ways drug addiction.

sykes howard vincent m wales publisher chicago pulitzer prize jesse mannix sixty five percent three months
"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"pulitzer prize" Discussed on Citation Needed

"And the winner of the pulitzer prize for outstanding work in journalism goes to show sieve pulitzer thank you thank you eight years in a row what an incredible honor i want to thank the judges my family and my staff because they're all the same people good luck next year everybody hey folks just want to take a moment here in the middle of the show to thank our patrons oil will you will you will you make this show possible and without you we couldn't do what we do i need charts and graphs now many of you have inquired win is ally going to do is joan baneh ramsey episode and the answer is never heat where is my blonde wig no never never never never but as of this recording we are just three hundred and fifty dollars away from reaching our goal of a live show and well it will not be about john grenade ramsey we promise to tell ally that it will be no sorry john drivers them have you seen my fingernails samples they're in the filing cabinet today so if you want to see us live consider pledging as little as a dollar an episode of patriotic dot com slash citation pod to help make that happen or even going to let the patrons choose the location again that's patriarch dot com slash citation bod because we're pretty sure he'll wear a cost you where is my stage blood.

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