39 Burst results for "puerto rican"

Fresh update on "puerto rican" discussed on The Joe Pags Show

The Joe Pags Show

01:12 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "puerto rican" discussed on The Joe Pags Show

"Great to have you welcome to the program. Thanks. It is the Joe Pags show eight, eight, nine, four, one, eight, nine, four, one, seven, two, four, seven, joepags, dot com. We're about ten eleven minutes away from Michael Ramsey's part two of my special series with him later on in the program, it'll be judged Janine pierrot of course from Fox News Channel She's got a brand new book out today. Don't lie to me. We've got that for you as well. Let me go to the phones a couple of different topics. Cindy McCain is endorsing Biden and a lot of the responses that I'm seeing online right now are that well, she's a democrat. Why wouldn't she said they? They're not surprise which is interesting I dunno Cindy McCain again she's a great looking lady her husband fought and was captured in. Vietnam which which had to be horrific and I think their daughter is fine. I know problems with with Meghan McCain. So I have no hatred no dislike or disdain for the family. But if you get into the into the political fray, suggest you tell us the real reason the real reason you're endorsing Joe Biden, is not the Atlantic article. Let's let's not. Let's not be silly here. LET'S NOT BE SILLY When the president was disinvited from the funeral of John John McCain, when the President John McCain butted heads a lot when John McCain was the one vote that stopped the affordable care act which was not affordable and doesn't get very good care when he when he could've stopped that and repealed it like promising his campaign and he didn't that showed me a personal thing between the McCain's and Donald Trump. So just be honest I'm fine with you being against Donald Trump if you give good reason. And if you're not giving the region, you're using the Atlantic article. I think that's an excuse and my buying it ended eight nine for one pack joepags, DOT COM, and Eliza Milano Llano. decided that she would call the police. I actually tweeted nobody nobody's doing much with it but I tweeted hairless Milano when you call the police, did you scream defend the police through a megaphone? She has responded. On three and a few years she used to. Respond she might have even I live if this blotchy locked. Alone. But, I, think it's appropriate pertinent nothing that she should answer I demanded an answer. Let me go to the phone lines are GONNA be Debbie Minneapolis. Debbie what's going on. Hi. Hi Thank you for taking my call and my only comment about Cindy. McCain is who cares number one nobody is we're not surprised just who McCain's czar and number two listen Milano under gated community and defend the police in her laughable life just kind of. This she's just the poster child for do what I say out of like. They're all democrats when when you say de-fund the police, you should say to yourself if I do this. If I get behind this, I can't call the police ever you must. If you're smart person like I'll say, i. am against the NFL kneeling laying down and sitting down and do the black neighborhoods off. So I if I watched the NFL Sunday FBI hypocrite. So I don't watch it three and a half years I mean you've got to make a decision. Stand. Yeah but you just said if you're an intelligent person. The Democratic Party. So I leave it up to you joe, you be the judge I. Thank you. I appreciate that she's right. I said of your intelligent rational person that's gonNA exclude a whole lot of the other side just going to say it is edit eight, nine, four, one package joepags dot com go to Joanne in Massachusetts, join what's going on. Hi. Hi Joe. How are you? Tonight? Well. Here in Weymouth Massachusetts, I live outside of Boston I'm Irish. Italian and I question Alyssa Milano, she seems to be with China frozen I'm sorry. I don't know that turbines should know that tell was that wasn't. I thought you were Italian Joe. Said, we're GonNa then I know what that is but what did you say Oh, my sugar that's Jewish see I grew up in. South Florida. Stop saying. Okay I gotta go. Up report. 'cause you're on the button? I thought it meant the same thing as a similar warning Spanish. What I mean? I do. So it just there's an extra letter or to at the end of it. So it's exactly the same name. The same thing now is it literally just that the w award for Hooker, or is it worse than that in Spanish? And I was just seems worse spat word Yeah. Worse than Spanish she she just she just added this to it, which makes it Italian right? Now Iran. Arab. Arab I think it is. It's not A. Didn't. So you know I. Think it is. I don't know. Why take the chance right? And by the way I, love you out there in Boston. I that I thought she said that but then I thought she said Michigan, which is a Jewish word but then I thought that I heard the first part of it anyway. I don't WanNa call her then. Call somebody who is clueless? Somebody his. It had people in the way in the web chat by the way. are going on and her yes. Of course you heard it. Because, you guys got the entire thing on the radio were able to stop it. Okay now now, Gary, bridge writing what it means of Gary I know what are you listening on delay shut up? Because now he's Puerto Rican from New York Nestle has got both sides of it. Now he's at the Italian and the Spanish side we get we make this topic Kerry. We could do this topic for a while Sir I just thought it was saying that she kept saying. He kept saying it. How do you say? Dirty. Hooker in every language on earth not Sunday that segment. Kind of fun ugly. Show. Me Get in trouble for the eight nine for one pags. joepags is delay built back up we good. Hopefully. We're about to find out, it's gotta be Larry in Montana Hi Larry What's going on. I'm sitting on my desk living the dream Johnny Herbert Join Johnny. Johnny here could. John. Tiny can we get coming causing insomnia. Trying. To get let's do it again and learn what's going on. Hi. Well. About this. Lonzo thing. Just. Forget about her. Well. See you know all these deputies they know that. She wants to deepen the police and all that. But look what they did. I had to give them Kudos They are not partisan Oh you WanNa us. But we're still going to protect you. I mean I have to give it out there told law enforcement. You I'd give it up to the law enforcement to he's going to visit the phone lines and hang up on all. You Get up and phone get off we're done we don't the phone calls right now. Listen. We're done with the phone calls. Got Melissa Milano. He called me Johnny Lady from Boston before calling a listen Milano dirty w word. In several languages I think. I'm done saying we don't the phone calls for now. You can go and take a break. Okay. See Ya. Because the ones that you make it through must have been worse than that well. If. You're on the phone lines I did hang up on your ass because I don't know what you're going to say. It's one of those days. So only get the mob Boston, and then we'll let him take.

John John Mccain Cindy Mccain Meghan Mccain Boston Joe Biden Joe Pags Alyssa Milano Eliza Milano Llano. Hooker Milano Donald Trump Melissa Milano Michael Ramsey Fox News JOE Atlantic Article Debbie Minneapolis Gary I Janine Pierrot Vietnam
Trump announces billions in funding for Puerto Rico

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 3 d ago

Trump announces billions in funding for Puerto Rico

"It's been three years since Hurricane Maria ravaged Puerto Rico and they are still rebuilding. Now, as we hear from correspondent Andy Field, the Trump administration announcing new FEMA aid Six weeks before the election of Puerto Ricans cannot cast electoral college vote, the president made it clear that his billions to help restore Puerto Rico's electric grid and pharmaceutical industry could help him politically. By contrast, Biden's Devastated the Allen to Puerto Rico. It's not clear how the president thinks Joe Biden hurt Puerto Rico, but Mr Trump needs citizens helped in a state where they can affect the Electoral College, Florida.

Puerto Rico Puerto Ricans Joe Biden Donald Trump Mr Trump Hurricane Maria President Trump Andy Field Fema Florida
Fresh update on "puerto rican" discussed on Mark Levin

Mark Levin

00:36 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "puerto rican" discussed on Mark Levin

"You can't really speak up and Latino vote. Quote unquote. You have a Cuban American vote in South Florida. Puerto Rican goat in central Florida. Even there, you can not, you know you can. You can not Look at the airport. We can go to central Florida that say the same thing as a Puerto Rican boat in New York or Hartford, Philadelphia. It does look like Trump has a very strong lead with Cuban Americans in South Florida. I think the group the swing group is that Puerto Rican vote in Central Florida, which has its really swing it voted for Jabez governor. I voted for Obama is president and it looks like they really contributed to Rick Scott's Our victory in 2018. That is really the sweet spot right there. That's called the I four corridor that area between Tampa and Orlando. Heavily put a re compresses. They're very different from the Puerto Rican vote in New York and Philadelphia. Mike Gonzalez, the book is the plot to change America. Identity politics Dividing the land of the free You Go Pick it up right now, Mike really appreciate your time. Thank very much found already. We will be back here tomorrow with much, much more content. As we move ever closer to President Trump's Supreme Court pick will bring you all the latest. You're listening to the bench hero show. The beacon of freedom. 1071. W L I r Basin 77 WNBC New York News Now ah, somber Milestone. Nine Lisa let Sarah Fox News. The number of dead in the U. S from a covert 19 as top 200,000 by far the highest in the world. Old. But White House press secretary Kayleigh Mcenany says the White House response to the pandemic has saved lot. The fact that you've seen the fatality rates that has fallen 85% since April, and the fact that only 1.5% of emergency room visits are now people sick with Cove. It is a real testament to the hard work done by the task force in President Trump. Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden has been highly critical of the administration's response, saying the president tried to downplay the virus and that cost American lives. Rankling continues in the Senate over a vote on a nominee to replace the vacancy on the Supreme Court created by the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Republicans appear to have the votes to confirm the nominee. We have an obligation under the Constitution should we choose to take advantage of it? With a president of the same party of the Senate to advance the nomination and will certainly do that this year. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, scolding Republicans for reversing course after not taking up a high court nominee by President Obama in 2016. Why should the American people Trust. The Republican senators to do anything they say when they are proving right now. That their speeches mean nothing. A moment the shoe was on the other foot. President Trump said earlier today he will announce his pick on Saturday. Facebook says it's taken down a small network of fake accounts and pages that originated in China. And it says, focused on disrupting US political activity. Facebook says the U. S focused activity was just a sliver of the accounts overall activity and gained almost no. Following Wall Street at the close of Tao up 140 points. Then, as that gained 1 80 for the S and P. Plus.

President Trump President Obama Florida South Florida Supreme Court New York Central Florida Facebook Senate Mike Gonzalez Philadelphia China Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg White House Joe Biden New York News Rick Scott American People Trust
Bad Bunny and Alejandro Fernandez lend star power to Biden's White House bid

WIOD Programming

00:15 sec | 2 weeks ago

Bad Bunny and Alejandro Fernandez lend star power to Biden's White House bid

"Joe Biden, hoping a Puerto Rican rap star is going to help them win over Latino voters. Both the Biden and Trump campaign's are launching Competing at videos featuring the popular rapper Bad Bunny. The Biden campaign claims it has permission to use those songs. Trump Campaign had no comment. The Pinellas County

Joe Biden Trump Campaign Pinellas County
Fresh update on "puerto rican" discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

00:07 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "puerto rican" discussed on The Takeaway

"With you on the take away. I'm tan Xena Vega. We just heard about some of the long term mental health effects that Hurricane Maria has had on many Puerto Ricans. And as our last guest mentioned, Maria's impact on schools is still highly visible. In the three years since Maria devastated the island. Hundreds of public schools have closed and many of the closures are the result of budget cuts, as well as the departure of hundreds of thousands of residents to the mainland United States. Siri's of earthquakes earlier this year, further damage schools for more than 10,000 students on the island and now the pandemic represents the latest challenge for education in Puerto Rico on Lee around 54% of the island's households have Internet access and executive order issued by Governor Wanda Vasquez earlier this month delayed the start of in person learning until further notice. Last week, the Trump Administration announced the $2 billion FEMA grant intended to restore damaged public school buildings and facilities in Puerto Rico. But the grant is just a fraction of the $11 billion that Puerto Rico's former education secretary Estimated was needed to repair the island schools in 2019 for more I'm joined by Tatiana Diaz Ramos, a reporter for a sensor that video these movies theater people in San Juan. At the end of thanks for joining me. Over the conditions like in Puerto Rico school system prior to the pandemic. Well prize of the pandemic. There were a lot of affected schools more than 300 schools affected by the earthquakes going on in the beginning of the year, especially for schools in the South area of Port Rico. Prior to that there hasn't been like a lot of maintenance for the schools and for the infrastructure. It was actually very poor since a long time, so that obviously I kind of made everything worse when the earthquakes actually happened. Our schools that weren't actually maintained a lot. So that pervaded everything. What is thie educational experience that Vienna look like in different parts of the island. Right now, we understand that in the southern part of the island where the earthquakes hit Pretty severely not too long ago that those schools are having a lot of trouble coming back. Is that reflected throughout the island or yes, Andi, especially for those. They're municipalities in the south. That actually have no schools right now that are safe to go and have people in there because the infrastructure Was very affected by the earthquakes. So definitely you have kids in certain cities that won't be able to go back even if the governor of Puerto Rico Actually has AH new executive order allowing for students to go party schools. They would have to probably go Teo take classes in trailers or install Tents are open spaces, for example, that would be like a temporary option for them. At the end of that something about open air learning if you will, and outside learning that we've been debating here in New York, and the climate here is not as hospitable if you will, as it's not as warm as it is in Puerto Rico. Why is it taking so long for The governor or the Department of Education on the island to make that call for outside learning. Well, frankly, that's the question that many people are having right now. Why is it taking so long to actually like, really have a plan for these students specially in the South area and The only thing that has been proposed until now It's basically identifying spaces just in case if the executive order actually changes and they can go back to in person teaching But that's their like, you know, not a riel plan that has been like outlined for everybody to know or discuss. But you know what about Internet access? We mentioned in the introduction that about half of the island's homes have access to the Internet. You can't do distance learning. If you don't have Internet access, what is thie, Puerto Rican government doing to ensure that if students cannot attend in person learning that they can at least do it from home? Is there a plan to increase Internet access across the island? Unfortunately, it's an issue that has been brought to the department and the secretary of education in Puerto Rico. But the whole process for acquiring equipment for students they actually took much more time that there was supposed to The contract for the acquisition of these equipment was signed around April but still nowadays after actually the beginning of the semester. On ly about 30% of the students have received their computer or their tablets to actually try and get into online classes. Another thing is that another claim that parents and teachers have also brought to the secretary is that why what they really want Teo give them some computer or a tablet when they don't even have access Swinton. So there has been an issue also. But the secretary hasn't been able to actually offer Another kind of choice for those families that don't have access to Internet. You have the situation of parents that not only have one kid in the public school system, sometimes they have to Or maybe three, and the only option for them to connect to the Internet is through their parents from so basically, they have to make a choice every day. Of who is the student that will be able to take all my classes that day because there's only 11 device to get connected. Another thing is that, for example, you have students that live in very distant or rural area, especially In the center of the other things, for example, and definitely the signal there and the Internet. There is not the same as a student, for example, that lives in somewhere where they can also, maybe find other places. Maybe near home, where the connects is some kind of free WiFi or something too. Try and get into online classes also But you know what about the federal relief package that we mentioned? The Trump Administration announced $2 billion FEMA grant that was intended to restore damaged buildings. Facilities in Puerto Rico. Can any of that money be used right now to remedy the issue? Well, I believe first thing is that dead negotiation to actually have access to that money under the 428 section of the Stafford Act that agreement we're supposed to be ready at least. A year ago. So it took until now, too, actually. Have the authorization to taxes that money. I don't know how longer it's going to take to actually see at least one project of actually see infrastructure being recovered our renewed right now the FEMA representative over here in Puerto Rico. I said that this money is going to help to actually accelerate the projects because before they had to be negotiating each projects individually and every time the estimated cost change well, they had to once again present their proposal for that project. So hopefully with this agreement, everything's goingto pace up a little, a little more. We really have to see if that's gonna happen. Especially now, with the.

Puerto Rico Secretary Executive Fema Puerto Ricans Port Rico Trump Administration Maria Puerto Rican Hurricane Maria United States Xena Vega Department Of Education San Juan Andi Tatiana Diaz Ramos
"puerto rican" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

06:41 min | 2 weeks ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

"Today I chat with Von Diaz her debut book coconuts and collards is part cookbook and part memoir about growing up Latina in the deep south. Von How're you? Doing well thanks I love your book coconuts and collards. So. You went back to Puerto Rico when you were was a teenager I guess. In spent the summer there could you just tell us a little bit about that? It was it was a trip you do not want to make. But you ended up kind of changing your life think. Sure. So I had the tremendous privilege as a kid that my parents really wanted me to remain connected to Puerto Rico. I was also incredibly close to my grandmother, my cousin and other family that I had there, and so we went back and forth to Puerto Rico fairly frequently but one summer when I was a preteen. I family was going through some hardships. My parents had just gotten divorced and we were we were pretty strapped for cash, and so my mom sent me to Puerto Rico to spend the summer with my grandmother and so I went back that summer I went back at least one subsequent summer and and spent just a really complicated but simultaneously magical time reconnecting with the island where I was born but where I hadn't grown up, you know so I grew up in Atlanta I consider myself a pretty typical southern kid. In a lot of ways and there was a lot about Puerto Rico, really foreign to me. But a lot that felt kind of was in my bones there are things that I understood and connected with I didn't quite understand and I had this amazing opportunity to go and I'm spend this time with with my loved ones my grandmother in particular who helped me whether I realize it or not at the time helped me and even assault massage negotiate these challenging questions that I had about my own identity at the time. So. Just paint the picture us Where does she live what it looked like? What was the kitchen like It was very different than I. Assume Atlanta Right. He. Absolutely, it was very different than Atlanta. So my grandmother lived in an area of what Orico called Alta Mesa which is I would say a neighborhood kind of a suburb outside of just outside of San Juan near reopen that s and it was a fairly typical suburb. My Grandmother's house was really magical to me because of how different it was then the homes that I lived in in in the south. So it was a fairly typical Puerto Rican house probably similar to something you might see in Miami. So almost entirely concrete with no glass windows these sort of metal shutters. Instead of windows bars on top of the metal shutters and the windows, and then what we call the. Rico. Marquette now, which is a a front porch or front patio, and that does Marquette Seena that says what I call my grandmother was a really beautiful magical botanical garden. It was completely surrounded by these kind of geometric pattern iron grates. The front door was triple padlocked with heavy chain because theft and robbery is super common in Puerto Rico and the floors were Hain of you know off white speckled tile in Messina and throughout the house and it was the kind of. House where you know air seemed to flow through it all the time and she had this super tiny kitchen was probably if I had the gas. I don't know maybe I'm six feet by ten feet and it was just kind of a little a little galley kitchen had everything that you needed. But nothing in excess because there really wasn't space. And you talk about a breakfast she asks you what you want for breakfast. Then you weren't Hungary and she made you essentially grilled cheese sandwiches. Yeah. So in in my book, coconuts in collars dedicate the first chapter to her seen her kitchen and my grandmother was in a really an incredible cook shoes an incredible home cook and seemed really adept at cooking just about anything. So there is a morning that is still really vivid in my mind where I woke up groggy from not being able to sleep. Well, my grandmother's room was the only room in the entire house that had air conditioning and so. My bedroom was this little tiny space with only one window and I had this just kind of rusty box fan at my feet that would blow hot air across my body all night and but it was a Saturday and I could already hear my grandmother who was off work that day kind of getting things ready in the kitchen and I could smell the superstrong coffee that she made for herself every morning and also cigarette smoke from the Benson hedges cigarettes that she smoked. I remember getting up and kind of grumpy shuffling out into the kitchen and there she was in her hair in rollers and she was in her late Saturday morning cleaning the house clothes and always with a big smile on her face and asked me what I wanted to eat, and then she suggested this incredibly decadent breakfast that she didn't make all the time but for special occasions. And it was a sandwich, they began a you. and he'll is ground beef that is season typically with so Frito and usually with like assess owner another war, some of their series of spices like cumin. Oregano and that's Sauteed and used as a filling for empanadas like that. and my grandmother used to put that in to a sandwich, and so she you know would take white bread and put it in a sandwich press and then or mound on this delicious Savory Gutty Oh and then put a a slice of American cheese on it another slice of of buttered bread and then would press the sandwich and so it was This like Puerto Rican like pocket kind of Sandwich and it was so full of you know like this cream melted cheese and this saucy begun your that when she would pull the press up like all of this deliciousness kind of erupted out of the edges and had caramelized around the corners and and that was the breakfast she made me..

Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Atlanta Rico Von Diaz Benson hedges Marquette Marquette Seena Frito Hungary assault San Juan Alta Mesa Miami Orico Messina theft robbery
Fresh update on "puerto rican" discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:39 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "puerto rican" discussed on The Takeaway

"Puerto Rico after years of the island, enduring environmental, economic and political crises, talking with Karen Martinez from the Center for the Study and Treatment of Fear and Anxiety at the University of Puerto Rico One ongoing crisis in Puerto Rico is the murder of women and the rates of femicide have on Ly continued to rise since Hurricane Maria So I asked Karen what we know about intimate partner violence and violence against women since the storm, As always, the problem is having the data to actually, you know, be able to know how much it has increased. Just this week, we had two instances of partners, killing a woman and then committing suicide. And that you know to events in one week is definitely a red flag. Eso. We do know it's really difficult for women to talk about domestic violence and abuse. So right now, when they're at home, they're not necessarily having the social contacts. So you know, going to the places where they're going to see them more difficult for them to be able to talk to someone and get help. So we don't necessarily have the data to know how much it has increased. But at least clinically we are seeing women talking about, you know their partner staring more violence, and we have seen very severe cases where it's you know, ends up in a tragedy, so we need to have a plan on how we are going to address that. Karen. This is a crisis for Puerto Ricans for Puerto Rican Children for Port Rican women. And even for Puerto Rican men. I mean, where do you see there Being in any you mentioned community resource is coming together, but There needs to be more There's there needs to be a government plan on how to address it. And I know a federal government or Puerto Rican government. Puerto Rican government, you know, at least as a start, you know, you know the local government and all the different entities that have been working with this problem of violence in women. They have been pleading for a national plan to be established on how we're going to work on this. And it you nose hasn't been done even under one of them was even under one. Damascus. Yes. So, you know, Right now we're in a state where you know the elections are very near. One of us cases not going up for reelection. So we're right now. In this state where nothing really has happened at the state government level s o, you know, usually things start. You know, in a new government things start happening in January. We cannot wait until January. 2 have thiss plans. So there's a lot of non for profits and women group and other associations like the Psychology Association, the Social Workers Association. We are trying to get people to, you know in the government. To notice this problem and we need to do something, but it's just been really hard to get the attention on this problem in the middle of a pandemic. Karen Martinez is the chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Puerto Rico and director of.

Puerto Rican Government University Of Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Karen Martinez Partner Puerto Ricans Port Rican Hurricane Maria LY Anxiety Murder Social Workers Association Damascus Psychology Association Department Of Psychiatry Director
A Conversation With Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey

Latino Rebels Radio

04:32 min | Last month

A Conversation With Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey

"Ed Markey thank you so much for being on Latino rebels radio. Well, thanks for having me on polio. This is a great honor for me. You know can I just tell you this story before we start I actually met you very briefly at the Kelly's roast beef and you're actually they're ordering Kelly's roast beef in your congressman at the time and I said Hello I just that was just the first time I met you so so so here we are getting your on my show. You're in the middle of a contested race at I never thought that this this primary has become sort of a national story senator and I wanted to talk to you about. I. Think. A community that gets ignored a lot in in Massachusetts is the Latino community. And can you talk to me about your history with the Latino community I in Massachusetts and I don't think a lot of people know this. But I've I've talked to a lot of your supporters who are Latino elected officials who have told me about some of your roots can you just start with that? Yeah. Well, thank you for. The question and I actually eight, some stuff from Kelly's roast beefs afternoon. So you so you you know you you're on to me I love it. I love it. Yeah. Yeah. I I have confirmed that you are a fan of Kelly's. Are Continuing the tradition. So that's funny. Continue Center. So well, thank you. Well, you know I can begin with the work done for. Puerto Rico. In the wake of the of the of the hurricanes earthquakes that continues to ravage the island I worked very hard. To make sure that the trump administration is made accountable I actually flew down to Puerto Rico with Elizabeth Warren to play an oversight role in ensuring that that they knew that destroying paper towels at the citizens of Puerto Rico was not going to be acceptable. So I I did that and then I had multiple summits. With the Puerto Rican community, in Massachusetts, so I could hear their concerns and continued to reflect that in my oversight responsibility has been, and by the way those meetings took place in Boston those meetings took place in Springfield, those meetings took place in holyoke. Those meetings to place in Worcester. So I try to listen to the concerns and in addition I will say that listening to concerns I voted against promise the I know that I can I tell you one thing about that part. So you know I I am a Puerto Rican journalist I I'm I'm in Massachusetts I've been in Massachusetts since the nineties when you said that I think a lot of people miss that point in the debate that you said that because Pro Mesa? Is Not a popular legislation in Puerto. Rico. But also in the Puerto Rican community in Massachusetts and I do want to talk about other communities in Massachusetts outside of the Puerto Rican community but but let's stick on Pro Mesa why did you not vote for promise? You went against your party I mean it was it was a bipartisan legislation President, Obama, signed it. But why did you? Why did you feel that you were against promise of back then and and then talk about how that has changed you know it seems like you're right. I think history has made it very clear that that was the correct boat and by the way. My opponents casts the the opposite vote on that. Issue my feeling was that that we had to absolutely anticipate that it could lead to a hollowing out of educational services, a public safety services services in general who we know now the University of. Puerto Rico is in trouble because of that vote and so I, listened to those who came in and lobbied me on the issue on both sides. And it was there was a divided view on it, but I came to the very clear conclusion that. Big Mistake. To vote for progressives. So I voted no and I think history has worn out especially post. cameras, and the hurricanes that there is an absolute crisis going on in of Puerto Rico. Even as this belt tightening from this something essential control board continues to ham auditory citizens. So I feel very good about that though I think my no vote. has been vindicated historically.

Puerto Rico Massachusetts Kelly Puerto Rican Puerto Ed Markey Rico Polio Barack Obama Senator Congressman Elizabeth Warren Holyoke Worcester Springfield University Of Boston President Trump
Jos Ralat, Taco Editor

Latino USA

03:58 min | Last month

Jos Ralat, Taco Editor

"Roulette. Welcome to let you know USA. Thanks for having me to be like the one and only standing official dot co editor of the United States of America. That's a big deal. Congratulations. Thank you. It's an honor fed I don't. Take lightly because I. I have the responsibility of. Not just. For reading about the food but. priding about the people and I think that's really the most. Critical part of the job but before we continue. People might be saying, wait what's going on and so you're very open about the fact that you stutter that is something that happens and so we might as well just say, Hey, it happens in your cool with. Saying Yeah and and moving on, right? Yes. I am thank you. Yes. It's part of my life and it's never stopped me from doing things like. Live TV or radio segments I. Love that. I. GotTa Say I really do I completely loved that. So. What you may not know is that I've been Taco fanatic since probably before you were even born, I'm Mexican I grew up with this stuff. You know I mean, my mom made dot goes by our leader. Mehta goes you're Puerto Rican you were growing up with this stuff. So what's the story as to why this Puerto Rican dude ends up falling in? Love with TACO's growing up in the states I knew about duck was generally speaking at A. Fast Food Product but. As a Mexican food item. was in. Brooklyn from. A. China and I don't know. Who I fell in love. With I. The woman. or The food. So before we get to talking about that goes which again we talk about forever. One of the things that stood out to us is from the beginning of your book. And this is where you refer to something you call the alita principal. And having just mastered Jose, you'll be proud of me finally having just mastered my I will lead us the you like I finally figured it out. I'm just like Oh my God I can't believe it. I unlocked it. What is this thing about the alita principle when it applies to Dacas? So, whenever people? Talk about Mexican food eventually the conversation. Pros around to. Well. My Willett I made the best Mexican. Food she made best diesels. Hurling. was, the best or her? Malia was the best. and. For them. That's as far as Mexican food goes. Nothing else. Counts as Mexican. which is unfortunate because. Mesko is a large country with micro regions. And Different, cuisines. It's not that. Simple. We shouldn't box it in. Boxing it in. His misguided at. Best and racist that worst Could also. Be. Maybe so and so's grandmother wasn't

United States Jose Mesko Malia Boxing Taco America Mehta Brooklyn Official Principal Editor A. China Hurling.
"puerto rican" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

11:54 min | Last month

"puerto rican" Discussed on Latino USA

"Have to learn more about the three cans in the USA. Sometimes, we forget about their needs, what are the living conditions of our population in the USA? From food media, it's Latino USA by Medina Jose, today Puerto Ricans and the spread of covid nineteen. Since the start of the coronavirus outbreak, it's been reported that low-income Black and brown communities have been hit hardest by the pandemic. On this show, we've covered how immigrants and Latinos are getting sick and dying at some of the highest rates in the country. As the crisis continues so does the necessary reporting? A large scale investigation released in June focused on the Puerto Rican diaspora here in the United States. The results are sobering. Detailed analysis found that Puerto Rican communities in the mainland live in parts of the country that also happened to be the most vulnerable for the spread of Covid. Nineteen. The Puerto. Rico based sent throat. More investigative or CPI mapped out the Puerto. Rican population in the US. And analyzed how that overlapped with the spread of covid across the country. The investigation determined that Puerto Ricans in the US live in counties that have the highest possibility of cove infection and death. This piece included reporting from New York New Jersey in Florida a four person team contributed to the story and two of those reporters join us today Manasseh Golan ominous worked on data analysis and crunch the numbers for this piece welcomed on Murphy. Interviewed Puerto Ricans in the states. Montagne corral. Thank you so much for your work and welcome to Latino USA. Thank you many know Hosa, thank you for having us and you so much. So look there have been a lot of stories that in particular Latino Latina journalists we've just been really obsessing over when this pandemic has been developing and I'm just wondering at what point did you just say? Hold on a second. There's a story about Puerto Ricans, right here. Do you remember when that happened for the both of you? Monday. Solid start with you. This investigation with started after we published our first Saudi last April, we identified that the passengers arriving in to the island not in Puerto Rico came from areas of greatest contagion by cut on how biters like New York floaty on. New Jersey does estates has the largest population in United States. Therefore, we decided to analysis if the pottery cans leaving in USA have been disproportionately affected by the coronavirus corral, you're based here in the United States you're based in New York. Based in Puerto Rico I'm wondering because you ended up being the one who is doing the interviews here on the mainland do you remember when you just went like Whoa I'm seeing this right in front of my eyes. This is a story about Puerto Ricans. I wasn't surprised because as a person living in New York I kinda got to see firsthand how most of the people that were outside where people who had to be because they were essential workers and the So when Manasseh told me people from Puerto Rico in the US are being mostly affected by cove. Nineteen It didn't. It didn't surprise me not at all. I'm not Puerto Rican but. I have. Been hearing this story many Puerto Rican girlfriends, professional women. Who just tell me? Oh. My God, this person died, and then this person died and then this person died, and in fact, in your reporting, you tell the story of a man, his name is William Sanchez by the guys he's fifty seven years old and he manages four apartment buildings for the elderly or the disabled in the Bronx how many people did he tell you have died from the four apartment buildings that he manages? In the buildings that he manages around sixteen people have died. He contracted the virus and he himself was extremely worried for himself and for his wife he told me he didn't see his wife for about two weeks while he quarantined. And I remember when I asked him about his experience. He started telling me how he was hallucinating that he felt extreme pain and that he thought he was going to. And he told me that at that moment. He started to write his will. And he said I didn't think it was my time to be doing this into start doing this but I felt it was going to be very real. It was going to be the outcome and I had to be prepared for the worst. So we is from the Bronx. The Bronx is a heavily Puerto Rican borough in New York City and I'm wondering what me Jude decide to zero in on counties in New York City, in New Jersey and in Florida in particular and what makes those areas especially dangerous for Puerto Ricans we decided to concentrate on the five hundred, ninety, four count is because they. Have a higher but the population, our investigation found the were dip Puerto Rican people are leaving. There is a high number. A high rate of conditons is very important to specify that it doesn't mean that the report dot Com people are more infected with a vital, but they're possibility of contagion increase because they leave were there is a high rate of contaminants and We also correlative eight deputy population with the Social Brunette Ability Index. And we found that Brunette ability factors are very present. Your poverty being considered a racer minority deem limitations with the English high unemployment. These factors increase the possibility of becoming infected from the US. You know there is a concept of just poverty, but then when you get more specific about different kinds of poverty. We're talking about here in terms of Urban Poverty Puerto, Ricans, and especially poverty in high density locations. And, you know in many ways, the story of the pandemic is all about geography. You know it can basically determine what your experience with this pandemic has been like. So I'm wondering, can you talk about this notion of urban poverty and geographic location? The spread of the virus and how this coincides with the Puerto Rican community specifically. You. ECORSE. Mainly, in spaces with more population were people have less access to basis services. That's it. Many people live in overcrowded in is so difficult to maintain the the social distance because they're leaving together. Then leaving insane houses they leave in maybe your on Call Your Grandmother, your, son, your sister, the song of your sister you can't avoid contact with the people so that increase the possibility of contagion. Could I'll I'm I'm wondering you began to see patterns of what was happening with these communities. Well, what was the patterns that you were seeing in terms of the failure of local governments and local institutions to really address this problem to be prepared to deal with the way the virus was attacking the Puerto Rican community in specific. The other people that I interviewed her name was August on sale and she is a mother of three children and he told me that it was just Hard for her to be in the area and it was also kind of saddening to her to see that there weren't enough efforts for people in the region to have p. p. e. face mass hand sanitizer. See that she didn't see that type of help in her. Milagros told you to. That she's been having to do everything from now from school to virtual medical treatments to making sure that her kids don't get depressed. And when they tell her that, they want to go back to their normal routines. Now she has to explain that it's just not going to happen right now our our. Our level replies are typing Indian the. Program, quiet. Okay Get any awkward. Calia Point K.. Normal. So, did you see any things that you began to hear over and over again particularly with Puerto Ricans confronting this virus? Yeah. This has to do with preexisting conditions before Kobe did this was something someone told me nonetheless being he's from the South Bronx he runs a community center there and he was just telling me that A lot of people in the South Bronx were already going through problems that I guess Kobe's exacerbated he mentioned, for example, the factor of unemployment he said in this community, a lot of people were already unemployed and Kobe hit those who did have office jobs just lost them and the ones left working right now in this community are essential workers. People who were also not very fluent in English. Would tell me that a lot of the resources that were being given out were in. English. And they might have to do a little extra effort to look for resources in Spanish and depending on where you live. They might not even exist. They were telling me how they were seeing difficulties in this in different sectors. For example, migos concern she was telling me that although she can speak English, she was talking with other moms and. They don't master English as well. So when classes went online, it was much harder for them to help their children with homework all the classes were in English and while they relied on the school and the teacher before now it's just it's just a little harder for them to actually help their children. You also spoke to someone named Mike Wreath Rivera, who lives in Newark new. Jersey. WHO's a plumber originally from Puerto Rico.

Puerto Ricans Puerto Rico United States Puerto Rican Puerto Bronx Covid New York New Jersey USA. Manasseh Golan New York New Jersey Montagne corral Rico Medina Jose Florida New York City William Sanchez
A Democracy at Risk

In The Thick

04:30 min | Last month

A Democracy at Risk

"Welcome to the this is a podcast about politics race and culture from a PC perspective I Medina wholesome and I'm. And today we have to Itt all-stars, call you their homes in quarantine. Yes. Yes. From Winston Salem North Carolina is Tina Vazquez but she's a senior reporter with prism and a twenty twenty I to be wells fellow with type investigations. Welcome back. Tina. High for happy ache and joining us from Atlanta Georgia is the fabulous Russia. Brown Co founder of black voters matter what's up? I'm so happy to be back. All is well and we're so. We're so happy to have you back to. so it's been. Intense that's kind of. An understatement in China. Living here has been intense in this country from the pandemic to racist police violence I mean even this Sunday, there was a five point one earthquake in North Carolina where you Live apparently the largest and over a century. Right. Here in Harlem trees fell down last week because of the storm. So this is just a very first question to ask you how you doing. So Tino, we're going to start with you how you feeling I am tired all the time like I can't complain really too much everything is. Fine but I'm very tired. Okay. Yeah. Short and sweet the TASHA. Who would be a podcast in itself I told you I. Felt. New podcast. How feeling? Is. What. I am I'm having actually every human emotion you can have, and I'm having an all at the same downtime. I'm angry, sad, scared frustrated hopeful fired up every motion human emotion. You can have I'm having and this moment of few weeks ago I myself actually tested positive for covert Nineteen Latasha. It. was the most nerve wrecking name Sweetie. It so I'm here for you sweetie. Oh you understand. Thank you so much and I'm so glad that you are will I had a mild case of but I think more than anything. It's the worry because you don't know how it's going to respond to Matty and then I'm worried about people being around me and being around my family. So I am just petitioning for a twenty two over I was just like a lot of talk to about this. Talk to the manager I need to recite twenty. She's a woman by the way. Exactly I know. So listen. I know first of all, thank you for sharing that. Latasha and. My heart goes out to you for anyone has to go through that especially in this time but we do want to discuss the twenty twenty election. It's less than eighty five days away. As if we're not on edge enough this year and honestly I'm going to come in as the Puerto Rican reporter. I have news to share with everyone in the world. What are we just had a primary election on Sunday complete Shicho. Alison show up two pressings. There's calls of. Delaying. It and moving into next Sunday and it's just it is complete. Chaos down in my home island colony, and I'm very worried now that this is just a prelude to what's going to happen in the united. States on election day November but we want to talk about the power of voters of color and the issues of voting rights. The backdrop of this election season is the coronavirus pandemic. There are now five million confirmed covid nineteen cases in this country, and the number of those infected has doubled since the end of June and then we still have to mention. Joe Biden's comments last. Thursday during a joint. National Association of Black Journalists and a BJ and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists which was an h j of what he said. What you all know. But most people don't know unlike the African American community with notable exceptions. The Latino community is incredibly diverse community. With incredibly different attitudes about different things. This completely overlooks sees issues of race identity ideology, intersectional communities, I honestly think that this kind of statement, the trump campaign's like bring it on because it's just GonNa be used to divide and conquer Democratic voters.

Tina Vazquez North Carolina National Association Of Black National Association Of Hispan Medina Winston Salem Joe Biden Matty Harlem Russia Brown Co Tino Atlanta China Puerto Rican Founder Alison Shicho Reporter
Puerto Ricans angry over botched primary election

BBC Newshour

00:29 sec | Last month

Puerto Ricans angry over botched primary election

"Puerto Rico partially suspended its primary voting after a ballot shortage left many residents unable to cast their vote. Island officials have called on the president of the U. S. Territories Elections Commission to resign. The commission said that primaries for voting centers that had not received balance by Sunday afternoon are expected to be rescheduled. While voting would continue elsewhere. The president of Puerto Rico's two main political parties agree that the remaining primary should be held on August 16th. Others say the entire primary should be scrapped and held at another date.

Puerto Rico U. S. Territories Elections Co President Trump
Addressing Health Disparities in Puerto Rico

Here & Now

03:39 min | Last month

Addressing Health Disparities in Puerto Rico

"Of the continental US, the covert 19 pandemic is happening as the push for social justice continues. Natasha Alford is a journalist for the Gri Oh, and Pulitzer Center grantee. And she traveled to Puerto Rico shortly after the island's political protests in 2019 to understand another uprising taking place on the land What she calls the Afro Latino revolution. She joins us now. Welcome to hearing now. Thank you so much for having me, Tanya. Yes. And Natasha. What? Through lines? Are you saying between the Afro Puerto Rican community and what's happening in other parts of the country in the protests for racial justice? How does PR's history and culture Play out in the construction of race and racial experiences. Yes. Oh, there's so much to unpack there. But you know, the first thing I'll say is after the death of George Floyd, we immediately saw protest. We saw vigils and we saw memorials in honor of his life right in Puerto Rico, So obviously there was something that really resonated with people there. And specifically in Afro Puerto Rican communities. Now often times when people think of Afro Puerto Rican Sze, they may associate them with just one community. One town one neighborhood. I'll give you an example. Louisa has a really high proportion of residents who identify as Afro Puerto Rican. But the reality is that there are black people everywhere in Puerto Rico. It's just his divers as the United States. And so we saw that what was happening in the continental US was really resonating. It's resonating because there are similarities. What have you found in terms of health disparities without for Latinos and other types of disparities? Do they mirror what we see in the continental United States? Yes, I think that there are parallels, and it makes sense, right? Because well, you think about the history of Puerto Rico. There was slavery there as well. Right? Even though our societies may be different, you know, we think of the continental US we think of segregation and Jim Crow. Ah, lot of people just don't know the history of Puerto Rico and and slavery and the aftermath of how it played out. They often assume that Puerto Rico is a Nyland of racial harmony that it is a racial utopia. The phrase La Grande Familia, Kenya. Is about being one Puerto Rican family. But a lot of people will tell you that that's actually not the case. And so with health disparities, one thing that researchers have found is that darker skinned Puerto Rican Sze report poorer health outcomes. And some of the reasons for that are social treatment. The communities in which they live in are sometimes poorer exposure to social stressors. There's ah great research paper that was written that came out of the University of Puerto Rico by Jose Caravaggio, Quito and S. R Boudreau and they talked about Changing the way that we measure those disparities by changing the language we use. So we often think of black and white in the United States, but they did a study where they asked people to list the shade of their skin tone. When they did that they actually got more information that showed what those health disparities were, and the key was using local language and understanding of race rather than trying to impose the continental US is language when it comes to race. Of course,

Puerto Rico Afro Puerto Rican Sze Afro Puerto Rican University Of Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Sze United States Natasha Alford George Floyd Pulitzer Center Tanya Kenya Louisa Jose Caravaggio R Boudreau Jim Crow
Changing Planes and Plans with Jen Ruiz

Cafe con Pam Podcast

03:52 min | Last month

Changing Planes and Plans with Jen Ruiz

"Jan. welcome together on Prem. How are you? I'm good. How are you is So you are currently in Puerto Rico I. Am okay I'm in Sunny San Diego we are I guess coasts. So you're I'm the Atlantic. Ocean Yes but we both are blessed with beautiful weather I know I. Love Puerto Rican put her because one of my favorite places in the world I love Puerto Rico when I went outside Omega I was from the Caribbean in a past life. I felt home. I'm so happy to hear that I'm so happy to hear that I want more people to come and if they have been before to revisit and if they. Haven't come for the first time because Puerto Rico really is an amazing place and gets a little bit of a bad rep with everything that's happened in the last few years but it just is so resilient and it's such a beautiful island with a lot of natural attractions and you know metropolitan bustling area and a lot of history and culture, and it's just amazing. So I'm so happy to hear that you enjoy it as well for sure in the food I like food. I've had to work really hard to not gain weight while I've been here. Yeah. Go every day. You know it's good for the soul but not necessarily for the hearts up out of moderation I. Suggest let's explore your stories to tell us what's your background with your heritage. So I am Puerto Rican, I was born here on the island I moved when I was six, my family was looking for better opportunities like so many others in that generation I think from the island they just now have their children have started returning to the island and it's a nice thing to see because there is still remaining. Anybody. Who left still has a lot of pride and still loves to share and see things from the island and you know just a sensible Rudo really within everybody here, and so I moved when I was six I grew up in Philadelphia and then I ended up going to college in Miami which became like a second home for me I. Really Love South Florida I went to law school in Baltimore and then I was like, what was I thinking I should've just stayed in south Florida. So mmediately to law school at right back and I was living there for many years I guess ten years. Between School and coming back. Loved it was the one place that was very just like you said, just felt very like home like the people there. I could relate to them like they had delicious food that I liked eating every radio station and play to get the on. Just, a really natural fit and loved it and I still do and I still consider south Florida to be a second home but it's also very nice for me to have this opportunity to come back nappy areas Puerto Rico rather than just like from family visits and family trips and things like that. But on my own and really get an appreciation for the island how was it for you to grow up in Philadelphia interesting? I guess it's changed a lot over the last few years that I haven't been there. Right a lot of gentrification and things like that. I felt like it was a little rough when I was there like I rent to a really prestigious school. It's like the second oldest high school in the country I was a public school. Yeah and so we didn't refer to ourselves by the graduating year I class of two, thousand and five. I was the two hundred sixty. Four th graduating class, and so it was wonderful and there's a sense of community with that but you were definitely seen and targeted as the smart kids and so we were in a little bit of a rough neighborhood. So there were definitely like there was a point we had to have police escorts to take us to the bus and it was like a four hour bus ride to and from where I live to the school. So it was intense but I feel. Like it taught me a lot of street smarts I can feel confident now in big cities and settings where I'm by myself and feel like I'm able to navigate a foreign setting. So maybe I didn't really see it then but I felt like Philadelphia was really good training for being able to travel and see the world and feel confident that I have the ability to stay safe in these settings.

Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Philadelphia South Florida Sunny San Diego Caribbean Miami Baltimore
Changing Planes and Plans with Jen Ruiz

Cafe con Pam Podcast

03:56 min | Last month

Changing Planes and Plans with Jen Ruiz

"Jenin I talk about her life in Puerto Rico growing up in Philadelphia what it was like to go to law school. Then what a became not practicing law as she started solo traveling and we of course talked about what inspired her to travel, which was being thirty and not being married and having children and wanting that resonated with me as when she talked about letting things be when letting things happen and unfold as they are supposed to when you're a planner and I, think this is one of the things when we get into this topic in the interview that is going to resonate with you as we live through pandemic Jen. Also, shares with us about self publishing becoming a travel blogger and I talk about Australia at the trip that I was going to take to Australia that ended up obviously not taking because that was going to happen between March and April and and that was right when all the things went down. So of course, I didn't make to Ustralia but I did make it to speak at that conference. So I can still call myself an international speaker because I got to speak honest age in Australia while I was in San Diego huckle is that but a winner I'll leave that for another story I will let you enjoy conversation with Jen druce. Jan. welcome together on Prem. How are you? I'm good. How are you is So you are currently in Puerto Rico I. Am okay I'm in Sunny San Diego we are I guess coasts. So you're I'm the Atlantic. Ocean Yes but we both are blessed with beautiful weather I know I. Love Puerto Rican put her because one of my favorite places in the world I love Puerto Rico when I went outside Omega I was from the Caribbean in a past life. I felt home. I'm so happy to hear that I'm so happy to hear that I want more people to come and if they have been before to revisit and if they. Haven't come for the first time because Puerto Rico really is an amazing place and gets a little bit of a bad rep with everything that's happened in the last few years but it just is so resilient and it's such a beautiful island with a lot of natural attractions and you know metropolitan bustling area and a lot of history and culture, and it's just amazing. So I'm so happy to hear that you enjoy it as well for sure in the food I like food. I've had to work really hard to not gain weight while I've been here. Yeah. Go every day. You know it's good for the soul but not necessarily for the hearts up out of moderation I. Suggest let's explore your stories to tell us what's your background with your heritage. So I am Puerto Rican, I was born here on the island I moved when I was six, my family was looking for better opportunities like so many others in that generation I think from the island they just now have their children have started returning to the island and it's a nice thing to see because there is still remaining. Anybody. Who left still has a lot of pride and still loves to share and see things from the island and you know just a sensible Rudo really within everybody here, and so I moved when I was six I grew up in Philadelphia and then I ended up going to college in Miami which became like a second home for me I. Really Love South Florida I went to law school in Baltimore and then I was like, what was I thinking I should've just stayed in south Florida. So mmediately to law school at right back and I was living there for many years I guess ten years. Between School and coming back. Loved it was the one place that was very just like you said, just felt very like home like the people there. I could relate to them like they had delicious food that I liked eating every radio station and play to get the on. Just, a really natural fit and loved it and I still do and I still consider south Florida to be a second home but it's also very nice for me to have this opportunity to come back nappy areas Puerto Rico rather than just like from family visits and family trips and things like that. But on my own and really get an appreciation for the island

Puerto Rico Puerto Rican Australia Ustralia Philadelphia South Florida Jenin San Diego Sunny San Diego Jen Druce Caribbean Miami Baltimore
How Buscabullas Raquel Berrios Wrote Her Way Back Home In Regresa

Latina to Latina

04:51 min | 2 months ago

How Buscabullas Raquel Berrios Wrote Her Way Back Home In Regresa

"That's nominaux by. And that dreamy voice belongs to use half of the INDIE pop duo. The other half is her partner Co, parent Louis value. The couple started making music together while living in New York, but after Hurricanes Maria hit Puerto Rico. It decided it was time to go back home that return in the very meaning of home inspired their new first album. That could SA. I am not a native Spanish speaker, so I had never heard the word was skull Ya and so I loved it and I love the definition being a troublemaker. Are you by nature a troublemaker? I mean I would say no. But I do like i. kind of like what it implies in a way I do think that I'm always curious. I don't know I feel like I. Do have may be a troublemaker sort of nature when it comes to maybe making music like I like to take two worlds that are not supposed to come together and bring them together like to create and work with tension, so maybe in a way. That's why I was very much drawn to the name. Growing up in Puerto Rico. What kind of music was on her? On my Dad's side, a lot of so three. Oh Music Rock. He loved rocks and on my mother's side. My mom was more like an MTV head like. She just loved Madonna Prince Chardonnay. She was like more like mainstream. So I think that she will was more to English meet like English spoken music, and Spanish music, so we heard a lot of that, and that's mostly what Puerto Ricans here like we you know. Our airwaves are all like top forty American music, so we grew up with a lot of American music on the radio. But also like. And a lot of the Puerto Rican music was really has always been really important for my dad and my dad really taught me to love the music that was from my home country. Sucre up on the island. What's the turning point where you decide? You want to move to New York. Well I mean I studied architecture and design, and it was working at an office, and then I felt that really that may be. Our design wasn't really what I wanted to do. Like a wanted to be creative. And, so, I got I got into Rhode Island. School of design for my master's degree and I decided to textiles, and so I kind of knew that I might ticket to get into new. York was to actually go to maybe a school where I could get a job in new. York because I always dreamt about going to New York I mean my. My mother was born in the Bronx, and my parents were flight attendant, so I saw them come back and forth, and you know. New York has such a powerful presence in movies in the media. always felt like as a creative person that I wanted to go to New York and see like like I wanted to kind of find myself creatively there. How did you meet Lewis? Lewison I met at a friend's Party I. Mean I feel when you're Puerto? Rican your Puerto Rican near New York. You're bound to just be in party you'll. You'll probably meet anybody if you're around the same age I had the sort of like Make Ban with my friends Ban The way you putting it in quotation marks. Because I think it was sort of like mostly like a band that we never really kind of record anything we had songs, but it was mostly to pass the time and have fun like it was a timer. Like single just writing about like you know like just being single in the city, and it was kind of like a silly kind of project, but we were kind of playing our songs and. We used to do like weird like Spanish covers of pop songs, and we were doing a cover of bed romance of Lady Gaga in Spanish. and. I didn't know how to finish the song. I didn't know the cords Lewis comes in. I know the course of that song. And then he came in, and we finished a song from there on I knew he made music that he had like a whole history with bands. He had actually come to New York to make music end. Just like that we connected. We started hanging out jamming and. I showed some demos that I had with with the beginnings of what was boost cowboy Dan was super excited about it and immediately we. We hit it up and we started making music and we fell in love. But which came first the music or the Romance I have said a music came I for sure I. Main I'm seven years older than Louis so in a way I kind of felt a little bit like I. Don't really know if this is GonNa be a good thing. Again felt a little bit nervous, but I'm like, but I have a lot of fun with this person and he's super talented, so the music did come first.

New York Puerto Rico Lewis Puerto Ricans Puerto Rican Louis Partner Lady Gaga MTV Bronx Rhode Island School Of Design
Police officer strikes woman during dispute at Miami airport

Here & Now

03:39 min | 2 months ago

Police officer strikes woman during dispute at Miami airport

"In Florida a Miami Dade police officer has been relieved of duty after video emerged of him hitting a black woman at the Miami International Airport yesterday. Body Cam footage shows the woman arguing with the officer before she moved just inches away from his face, and it escalates from. You just heard the officer hitting the woman. She then falls to the ground as more police. Rush into the frame, the Miami Dade Police Director Alfredo Ramirez says he was shocked and angered by the video and has asked the Miami Dade State Attorney to investigate the use of force Miami Herald reporter. David Ovalles has been covering this and David, the body cam footage begins after the woman and the police officer appear to have already been in something of a dispute. Do? We know how this started. Yes, so the woman is twenty one year old pairs, Anderson she was at the airport and had missed a flight, so she was according to the police yelling at the ticket agent. They call. The police tried to calm her down according to them, you see her yelling at the police officer taunting him about one point. He kind of steps back. Back a little bit, and then she steps into his face, and then he claims it was a head bud, and then he just you know delivers a slap. That is very visceral when you watch it, it is for sure and when you see the video, and from what you can tell from your reporting a in reference to the officer saying that she had headbutted him. Is there any indication that that had happened in? What are you hearing about whether? It would have been an appropriate response to hit her like that. I wouldn't say it's a head, but but certainly one could argue that perception, but as for whether it's inappropriate use of force. It's it's Kinda hard to tell I mean in Florida. The stand your ground law allows anybody not just police officers, no duty to retreat so whether it would be a criminal charge that's going to be debatable. Certainly administrative you talk to police, officers and I've had more than a few reach out to me and say that's absolutely how they're taught. They call it a diversionary strike. Now there's the other element in that. She wasn't wearing a mask and so there's this whole Cova vid angle as well so it's messy. It's not. optically, it looks really really bad but I think there's going to be a lot more nuance to a case like this. Then a few of the other use of force cases we've seen in south Florida in the last couple of weeks. Right and look tensions between black people and white officers has been at the center of so many of these cases that we've been. been talking about. But how are people reacting to this incident? Given the both the woman and the officer are black well. That's one of the sort of grey areas that POPs up in Miami more than than other places because we are such diverse community, white officers here are in the minority. Most are Hispanic and there's a pretty good amount of black officers here to. In this case, the officer Tony Rodriguez is a black Puerto Rican officer, so there is a sort of added element of that you know I. Think a case like this also underscores what a lot of block officers are feeling in terms of tension and conflict block officers really know too well what it's like to grow up black, but also feel very conflicted because they're devoted to their jobs, and they feel like they're being singled out as quote, unquote sellouts, and so it also underscores. A lot of the dynamics in these really precarious times.

Officer Miami Dade Police Miami International Airport Miami Dade Florida Miami Miami Dade State Miami Herald Anderson Alfredo Ramirez David Ovalles Tony Rodriguez Reporter Director Attorney
The Distraction of Technology & How To Live In The Moment

Optimal Living Daily

04:08 min | 3 months ago

The Distraction of Technology & How To Live In The Moment

"Olinda by Josie Michelle Davis of Josie. Michele Davis DOT COM. Hiking through the rain forest can be a magical thing. The lush greenery all around the far off sounds of bird. You've only ever seen in a zoo chatting with one another the light ray on your face, and the deep smell of Mossy rocks. Was Not so magical is getting stuck in a downpour under a lean to with a woman named Linda who insists on calling everyone. She's ever met and loudly talking to them about how her arthritis is putting a bit of a damper on her dating life. I don't mind rain for few minutes million and stood together under the lean to watching the rainfall with only the steady beats of drops falling around us. Love the sound of rain, probably because I'm fairly privileged, Weicker, whose only really bad experiences with rain were when it put a bit of a damper on our families day at Epcot and I had to buy children's large sweatpants because my jeans got soaked through seriously, though why does it always rain on Epcot Day I mostly fine rainstorms charming in even calming, and was perfectly happy to stand with. My husband's arms wrapped around me watching the rain until it slowed. And then Linda came I'll standing on the edge of the lean to looking down the hill, when a middle aged woman came towards me, waving frantically and yelling. I found. You is still attempted to hide behind frank, which doesn't work so well since I'm a nearly six foot tall shreve ago, the woman quickly realized that me and my husband were not the date that she had lost on the mountain, but decided it was best to hang out with US under the shelter, anyway. I did what I always do. Awkward social situations an promptly pretended I'm deaf mute and have no way of communicating with other humans so I might as well just face the opposite direction and watch the rain. Some are and hope you don't insist on talking to me. Linda was not hindered by us, not budding up to her, though even though we were thousands of feet up the side of a mountain, she somehow had the teeny tiniest bit of reception on her cell phone, which made it possible for her to voice to text. Leave rambling voicemails and call everyone she's ever met. We heard all about her date that presumably had abandoned her and left her for dead in a Puerto Rican rainforest. We heard about how she was aggressively trying to get a CO worker to spend more time with her. Despite this woman spurring her advances, her words by the way, and we heard her lament about how tough dating is when you have arthritis in your hands. It was awkward to say the least after five minutes that felt more like an hour. We decided to venture into the pouring rain and hike as swiftly as we could down the mountain in fear that Linda might catch up to us, and we would be forced to listen to more phone calls and dictated text messages. I couldn't help but think how incredible it is that you would hike through the rainforest in still be unable to put your phone down and enjoy what's around you, but if I'm totally honest with myself, I do that, too sure. I don't make phone calls unless absolutely necessary. Why can't doctors just text you anyway? And I certainly am not going to voice to text in public when my hands are perfectly free. I mean come on guys. Why even bother texting at that point, but I'm sure way more often than I realize I'm standing somewhere amazing and beautiful. Too Busy scrolling through Instagram to even notice. I'm not someone who thinks technology is evil, quite the opposite in fact I have no desire to get rid of my iphone or live in some remote cabin without Internet I think all of that stuff is awesome. Actually I believe instagram has truly pushed me creatively. I love that I can check out an e book or Audio Book for my library and read it right on my phone. Heck without the Internet and aim I wouldn't have had half my boyfriend's. The real question is am I able to disconnect when real life calls am I able to put down my phone and enjoy the sound of rain in the actual rainforest when his right there in front of me. I really hope so, but maybe Linda was there to remind me to pay attention and not miss out on what's happening. So thanks Linda I really. We'll try to be more present this year, and also we'll try my best to avoid arthritis by whatever means necessary.

Linda I United States Michele Davis Olinda Josie Michelle Davis Instagram Weicker Frank
The Distraction of Technology & How To Live In The Moment

Optimal Living Daily

03:37 min | 3 months ago

The Distraction of Technology & How To Live In The Moment

"Olinda by Josie Michelle Davis of Josie. Michele Davis DOT COM. Hiking through the rain forest can be a magical thing. The lush greenery all around the far off sounds of bird. You've only ever seen in a zoo chatting with one another the light ray on your face, and the deep smell of Mossy rocks. Was Not so magical is getting stuck in a downpour under a lean to with a woman named Linda who insists on calling everyone. She's ever met and loudly talking to them about how her arthritis is putting a bit of a damper on her dating life. I don't mind rain for few minutes million and stood together under the lean to watching the rainfall with only the steady beats of drops falling around us. Love the sound of rain, probably because I'm fairly privileged, Weicker, whose only really bad experiences with rain were when it put a bit of a damper on our families day at Epcot and I had to buy children's large sweatpants because my jeans got soaked through seriously, though why does it always rain on Epcot Day I mostly fine rainstorms charming in even calming, and was perfectly happy to stand with. My husband's arms wrapped around me watching the rain until it slowed. And then Linda came I'll standing on the edge of the lean to looking down the hill, when a middle aged woman came towards me, waving frantically and yelling. I found. You is still attempted to hide behind frank, which doesn't work so well since I'm a nearly six foot tall shreve ago, the woman quickly realized that me and my husband were not the date that she had lost on the mountain, but decided it was best to hang out with US under the shelter, anyway. I did what I always do. Awkward social situations an promptly pretended I'm deaf mute and have no way of communicating with other humans so I might as well just face the opposite direction and watch the rain. Some are and hope you don't insist on talking to me. Linda was not hindered by us, not budding up to her, though even though we were thousands of feet up the side of a mountain, she somehow had the teeny tiniest bit of reception on her cell phone, which made it possible for her to voice to text. Leave rambling voicemails and call everyone she's ever met. We heard all about her date that presumably had abandoned her and left her for dead in a Puerto Rican rainforest. We heard about how she was aggressively trying to get a CO worker to spend more time with her. Despite this woman spurring her advances, her words by the way, and we heard her lament about how tough dating is when you have arthritis in your hands. It was awkward to say the least after five minutes that felt more like an hour. We decided to venture into the pouring rain and hike as swiftly as we could down the mountain in fear that Linda might catch up to us, and we would be forced to listen to more phone calls and dictated text messages. I couldn't help but think how incredible it is that you would hike through the rainforest in still be unable to put your phone down and enjoy what's around you, but if I'm totally honest with myself, I do that, too sure. I don't make phone calls unless absolutely necessary. Why can't doctors just text you anyway? And I certainly am not going to voice to text in public when my hands are perfectly free. I mean come on guys. Why even bother texting at that point, but I'm sure way more often than I realize I'm standing somewhere amazing and beautiful. Too Busy scrolling through Instagram to even notice. I'm not someone who thinks technology is evil, quite the opposite in fact I have no desire to get rid of my iphone or live in some remote cabin without Internet I think all of that stuff is awesome. Actually I believe instagram has truly pushed me creatively. I love that I can check out an e book or Audio Book for my library and read it right on my phone.

Linda United States Michele Davis Olinda Josie Michelle Davis Instagram Weicker Frank
Bon Appetit Editor-in-Chief Adam Rapoport Resigns After Backlash Over Treatment of People of Color

Morning Edition

01:32 min | 3 months ago

Bon Appetit Editor-in-Chief Adam Rapoport Resigns After Backlash Over Treatment of People of Color

"Editor in chief of bona petite magazine Adam Rapoport has resigned the move comes hours after a photograph resurfaced showing Rappaport in brown face some kind of cost you market places now the sado is here with more what is this photo on where to come from it's a photo of Rappaport and his wife apparently first posted on Instagram in twenty thirteen they're dressed in costumes that traffic in stereo types of Puerto Ricans the photo angered the staff of the magazine leading a number of them to criticize Rappaport publicly he resigned hours later saying an Instagram post that he would quote reflect on the work that I need to do as a human being now there's this photo that had circulated before but people are also saying there's a workplace culture problem and one of his allegations of discrimination yes so part of the context here is that our port had put out a blog post on the bone Appetit websites supporting black lives matter protests around the country encouraged readers to donate to organizations supporting racial justice and broadly speaking David there's currently a reckoning happening inside media organizations over their own blind spots when it comes to race people of color both in how they're represented in coverage and in newsrooms and given this there was blowback to Rappaport's posted sparked a number of accusations that the magazine under his leadership has treated women of color poorly ever claims of pay disparities and some staffers not getting paid for appearing in online videos on like their white counterparts in those videos are very popular on YouTube there were calls for Rappaport to resign and he did so within

Adam Rapoport Rappaport Puerto Ricans David Youtube Editor In Chief Brown Instagram Bone Appetit
"puerto rican" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

04:25 min | 3 months ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on Latino USA

"Because I felt that the government, the local government was not telling the story. We need to hear in order to understand what we were GONNA phase during the spend. I started reaching out to scientists. It Mia has been reporting on this story from early on. She's a Co. founder of the local media outlet, moving nest, and she's focused on the efforts of the scientific community in Puerto Rico and its diaspora to fight the virus. It mea welcome to let the USA thank you. Thank you for having me Matia so any. Take me back to the moment when you remember first hearing about covid nineteen on the island. So, the first cases reported to go with co ED nineteen were tourists in late February, and the first case that tested positive that I heard about was on Italian tourists who arrived aboard a cruise ship called Costa looming. Also, there was some concern we had hospitals that had suffered damage after the earthquakes are hospitals were not overwhelmed then, but there was the concern that they could become overwhelmed if the system did not do something to prevent the virus from spreading, so that is why. Why I talked to Dr Geneva Dome. Song who is Vice President of research at the Ponce Health Sciences University because she has led the efforts from her research team to bring relieve after hurricanes, and then the twenty twenty earthquakes, so she's been through at all these hospitals they were in the process of fixing the damage that it occur due to the earthquakes when the pandemic struck in construction had to be halted, and this limited the number of ICU units, intensive care units available so. When describe the situation on the island? It really does sound like one thing after another and a lack of preparedness at every. So in the case of this pandemic, what was the Puerto? Rican government's response? Who All my? They were very slow to start. It felt surreal because at the same time as the whole world was facing covid nineteen, our public health department was in denial and health secretary the time even said that the virus was not gonNA reach us because there are no direct flights from China to Puerto Rico so seeing how the government was being so. So inactive I really started reaching out to Puerto Rican. Scientists and one of the scientists is Dr Daniel Ramos. He's neuroscientist who runs a lab out of Yale. University show when I hear. These are guitar you of Healthy Puerto Rico saying that something that's becoming a pandemic will never make it to Puerto Rico. I become really concerned because that means that they're not only on prepared, but completely oblivious to the dangers that are in the horizon. At this point, it's late. February and By now there is a sense that there is a deadly pandemic that it is again worldwide. And it's already at the doorstep of Puerto Rico. In the local health department doesn't seem to be preparing for it, I mean. It does begin to sound like a recipe for disaster. Yes, yes, it does and it. They'd back at that time, and that is why Dr Denise. Thumbs down, started crunching the numbers with her team and making statistical models to try and predict the impact of the virus in Puerto Rico because until then money are we really did not know what was going on, and this was done extremely quickly in less than twenty four hours, so we very early. Early on identified that there was the potential for this to spread according to the on ramps. At that time, there was a grim projection that between fifteen thousand to sixty thousand people will die if nothing was done, and you have to understand Matia this projections take into account a lot of factors, so that is why the projections are so wide ranging, but even fifteen thousand people for an island with a population of three million.

Healthy Puerto Rico Puerto Rico Dr Daniel Ramos Puerto Rican Co. founder Costa Dr Geneva Dome Dr Denise Ponce Health Sciences Universi ED USA Vice President of research secretary Yale China
White Privilege In The Wellness Industry

Diet Starts Tomorrow

05:29 min | 3 months ago

White Privilege In The Wellness Industry

"Hello, and welcome to Die Starts Tomorrow I'M SAMMY? Lean! And with everything that's been going on in the world this week. We want us to use our platform today to have an uncomfortable but berry important discussion we wanted to discuss white privilege in the wellness and fitness industry something you've heard US touch on before in past conversations, but have never quite delved into the full extent are today is someone who is very special to US Dana Samuel. Who Works at batches as our community manager and has been vocal in wanting to happen over? With, US about this for this episode, we wanted to hear firsthand experiences and give her the space to have a discussion about race in the wellness industry. Welcome, Dana. Hi thanks. A. Coming. So. We were thinking in the beginning of the episode. Maybe just first introduce yourself. Who Are you? Tell us how you how you came to Betcha. And just give it. Give everyone your background. Yeah so again. My Name's Dana I'm the community manager I also run the ones happy hour account. Came to bachelor as a friend, introduce me the company would we were in college and I checked every single week for new positions at applied as soon as I saw community manager obviously kill the interview, and here I am A. Member you dead yeah. Let's she. She's the one. Home, but yeah I've been with or year my general background quick life story I am a biracial woman. Half Black Half Puerto Rican, I grew up in predominantly white situations though I live in. A general area where there's a high population of Jewish people I went to summer camp at the Jewish community center. My High School I went to private Catholic high school so very commonly predominantly white areas and I feel like that's sort of in. All that's going on. I have a lot of white friends. Because of those situations growing up, and it's just sort of really brought my attention how? You know people who are in the black community are reacting all. That's going on what they're doing on and off social media how they're handling just with either with me or with other of or with other black friends or family, or what have you how they're handling? You know checking in on those people making sure that they're able to do something meaningful to help the cause so just before we get into the wellness piece of the conversation since you are. Passionate about wellness we're just wanted to. How are you feeling in general? At this time. Very. Tired in, not just like. Oh, I've been doing stuff all day. I'm tired type of way. It's something in a way I've never really experienced before I think that. I've been fortunate enough not to say that you know this is a bad thing if people experience it or that. I haven't had periods of extreme sadness before, but I don't think I've ever really suffered from. Depression on a deep level, but I imagine that some of the things that I'm feeling are connected to the. It's like constantly feeling fatigued and unmotivated, and even though even with works today I obviously. Am You know doing all that? I tell us if you were to to work. It's like really. Like tiptoe around that element. Not yet not yet. I know that I could. I could tell you if that was the case, but I'm not at that point, but definitely. Unmotivated in the sense of even. Working with editorial, they've asked me if I would want to write certain things, Mike. I I just feel like it would take me a full day to even write a short article, and that's something that's very unlike the I'm very fascinated. Typing in general coming up ideas, you know well. We're in things, but. Just feeling very very challenged in doing everyday things in regards to that, and then having to this sort of internal battle of staying informed which obviously I want to do, and obviously I've been doing but. It's it's hard seeing the same things over and over and over seeing all these you know, all these protests have gone left because of interference or people who were taking things out of context, urges seeing all these devastating videos of. Black Yoke, getting her or abuse, or whatever the case might be or people exploiting the bad things that are happening amongst the black community, making jokes out of it or making stupid Internet challenges, item it and it's. It's hard to to keep exposing myself to that every day, but I know it's something that. I have to percents because I can't. I can't rely. On others to keep me keep me knowledgeable in the way that I I. I need to be for myself.

United States Dana Samuel High School Depression Mike
Boston's Puerto Rican Veterans Memorial Vandalized

Jay Talking

00:53 sec | 4 months ago

Boston's Puerto Rican Veterans Memorial Vandalized

"Porter Rican veterans memorial in the south and has been vandalized WBZ Suzanne saws all reports point it hurts ed Flynn is a Boston city councilor and a veteran he came to the memorial to see the damage is large and currently the Morial area was probably intentionally kept over here and beat Porto Rican flag was taken down and thrown on the ground Lynn said this is especially disappointing because of Memorial Day observed with Porto Rican veterans overseas I've seen the service and sacrifice of those veterans police are investigating and Boston property management came to repair the memorial in time for tomorrow's Memorial Day ceremony here at Porter Rican veterans square in the south and Suzanne saws will WBZ Boston news

Lynn Porter Rican Ed Flynn Boston Suzanne Saws
"puerto rican" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

Spanish Aquí Presents

03:12 min | 4 months ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

"I'm Outta Gardener. I don't know if I had I had come pulled ahead. Kale garlic Dothan There carrot so painted altogether. I'm with little thought. So that's what I have the first podcast making me very hungry. I know starving. I guess in here waiting for me when I lived in la every Sunday. I used to cook for my for my crew. You know like the about about twelve people would show up ballet the their mighty Gopal Bang. Do you know whatever are you gonNA is is so is basically saying is that you're gonNA start like a like a cooking thing like you're going to start doing recipes and Yup follow follow for more recipes. Yeah actually going to be doing it in a couple of weeks. Believe enough that maybe you read Spanish I keep I wanNA teach people the proper way of making a proper. Oh anyway the good way. But there's a proper way 'cause I love I went on the record. I don't I don't I don't I don't you know it's it's it's US okay. Is Myra is us all of us at all? I don't like say Puerto Rican because I don't drink milk bill Moore but by being consumed with your arena of NSF. Bring everybody together. We understand yes either. Even now's GonNa take other than than like cooking you know You know being out out the snow. The bears What other stuff have you been doing? You know to to keep busier. What did you learn you right now? Would you know now? We gotta wear masks. And I don't have my bass up here but Luna la I've been doing too many I've been walking like banks. Anybody okay everybody seriously. Oh you go to the Louise's starting to vigilante. I've like a mutant. No one wants to rob banks. You might I go I go. I go by the name of while. Mosca short when he used to be. You take legitimate. That's not too soon life you can do..

Myra Gopal Bang US Mosca bill Moore rob banks Puerto Rican Louise
"puerto rican" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

Spanish Aquí Presents

01:47 min | 4 months ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

"'cause you don't we could we? We Compost Weaving Cycle Nice. Little Wha what golden dead night. I don't know about Nasdaq but yeah you know so. It didn't leave a mess. I can't win. The travel boom in the bag looked to go but now like I say I'm GonNa have to put the big end that should out said A. It's been snowing. There are no because I feel like you have posted something of a in the snow. Got It though the few days ago. Really E- for today. Monday is now. Wild was a little bit but when we were driving out like five minutes away from here going up it was all over the place I go I. I'm just a witness for the for mother. Nature's right yeah there for the ride. But but you know I. I've been like I've been here kilo. You know a family of Friends. You know Count on the constant every day You know I got I got I gotta just give a shoutout man. You know. There's so many people out there or the EMT doctor medical people driving the fifteen dollars or less hourly workers enough food and stuff you know in a mother but my eighty years old go to work every day. What is new to the heart surgeon?.

"puerto rican" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

Spanish Aquí Presents

03:37 min | 4 months ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on Spanish Aquí Presents

"Shaming you lion here. Yeah Yeah I need 'cause we were really concerned about you because all we have is how you look you know every time records so unfortunately. Now that's all we have to go for and we actually were offline. The three of us were like about how you might be in trouble or something because you guys couldn't see how pretty I still exactly. Yeah now everything's coming to focus in really happy that you lookin' happy you look very happy. Thank you so happy so happy you guys. I like really excited about our guest today So we had him at one of our live shows and it was probably one of our most sold out. Live shows that They had to turn away people from the weightless outside. Unfortunately and it was one of the funnest Improv sets. I think we've ever done. Yeah we thought about it. We talk about it all the time we get interviews legendary down. It's it's our soundbite whenever people ask us out the best experience during the so yeah. It's legendary with like a legit legend soul. I say we bring him in. Are you guys ready to bring on Puerto Rican? Bobby on no though hockey. So you'll are in your Vermont right now out. There is good one. I love were fake birth. I know that yeah. How's it going over there with you? Know what I mean. Women the Middle Woods we have. We have to say I feel safer when you have. What's around okay? Who questioned matter? I'm wait great question this morning this morning at four thirty in the morning but oh she started wining On your man you gotta go out now. Usually good like a going out at night between seven and eight. But she's wearing four thirty so I go. Yeah and I go to let her out the back but she doesn't to the back she goes downstairs or go. Oh my gosh you've gotta go so I go. I hope with door. I see the garbage cans. It's on the side. She runs out as she starts barking. And Shit and I go. Oh Shit okay. We got at the institute. I mean a bad situation. So she goes and she barnes she come back in. I go back in and I'd just like stay behind the door. You know safely behind. It's like ten minutes. I'm like I must be grabbed and they're very determined right now. So you know I give a minute nasty. The BED announced step back up. And they're there that opened the door real fast full of Shit. Motherfucker looked at me and.

Bobby Puerto Rican Middle Woods Vermont hockey
Essential Workers

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:03 min | 5 months ago

Essential Workers

"Everyone Card if this is the indicator from planet money. Minerva allers is a security guard at a hospital in Manhattan New York. She says the emergency room. There unsurprisingly has been full of cove nineteen patients and that working. There can be heartbreaking and also kind of scary. I was telling someone the other day I said the site. This invisible cloak of darkness like we now work at night so is dark it. But now it's just like this heaviness in the air nervous fifty-three she's Puerto Rican works night shifts. And she commutes to the hospital in Manhattan from her house in the Bronx and she's well aware that working in New York City Hospital. Right now elevates the risk that she herself will catch covered nineteen our but that every the you know I haven't eighty seven year old mom in my house that had lung cancer and now she suffered copd. I get scared every day that I'm gonNA come in and make her sick members job involves keeping the other people who work in the hospital safe and as a security guard. She sometimes has to try to calm someone down if they're being rude or aggressive in doing that when the aggressive person might also have a highly contagious disease means her work is just unavoidably more dangerous now and what. I mean by dangerous because sometimes people have covert and they're compliant. Sometimes they just not so now you have this person. That's me combative. And you have to figure out a safe way of dealing with that now. Tens of millions of workers throughout the country have been forced to work from home to help slow the spread of the virus and tens of millions. More have lost their jobs in now suffering unemployment. But there's also the other class of workers workers like Minerva who've kept on working even when they have to leave their homes to do their jobs even when their jobs bring a higher risk of catching the virus because their jobs have been deemed essential jobs by their state or local governments on. Today's show we look at. Who does these essential jobs and we discuss what the rest of us

Minerva Allers New York City Hospital Manhattan New York Manhattan Bronx
Climate change isn't just shifting how the world feels, it's changing how it sounds

Climate Cast

04:16 min | 5 months ago

Climate change isn't just shifting how the world feels, it's changing how it sounds

"His climate change changing the sounds. We hear nature. I'm NPR chief meteorologist. Paul Hutler here with climate cast. Close Your eyes and listen to a spring day in Minnesota. That's the sound of nature coming alive again. We know many animals are adapting to climate change. Some are shifting range or habitat but changing environments may also be changing the sounds. Animals make science journalist and author. Emily anthems wrote about the changes for the New York Times. Emily welcome to climate cast. Thank you for having me. Why did you want to write about animal? Sounds and climate change precisely because it was such an unexpected effect of climate change. I came across a paper that outlined how climate change might alter the way. The whole planet sounds and that was in effect. I had not read about or thought about. Here's a sewn from your piece I love. Let's hear the King Penguin. Emily King Penguins can actually change their calls based on win conditions. Is that right and they do. If you've ever seen a documentary about penguins you may know they nest in these big large colonies and when one in the meeting pair goes off to get food and they come back. They have to find their mate in their chick and they do that through. Acoustic cues and if the wind is really strong it's hard for them to find and hear their partners but scientists have learned that they can adjust to these conditions by issuing more calls and they also draw their calls out. And what did you learn about the cookie? Frogs of Puerto Rico So researchers had known for several decades that these frogs vary by altitude. So if you start at the bottom of mountain where it's warmer. The frogs are relatively small. But as you go up the mountain of the frogs get bigger and their calls change along the way so the small frogs at the base of the mountain of these sort of tiny little squeaky calls and as the frogs get bigger and you travel up the mountain of the calls get sort of lower and deeper and slower but scientists have now found that as the temperature and weather conditions change halfway up the mountain. The frogs are now smaller than they used to be. Which means that they're calls are Sort of faster and squeak year. We know that the oceans are absorbing a great deal of the carbon that we're putting into the atmosphere and that makes our oceans more acidic but emily. I didn't know that shrimp snapped but found some Australian research on that. Yeah so to be clear. Not all species of shrimp Snap but there are some species known for really loud snaps that they make when they quickly closed their large claws. Scientists have found that as oceans. Get MORE ACIDIC. These snapping sound seemed to be getting quieter and quieter emily. Some people might be listening and thinking. Why do changes in how animals sound matter? What's the case for that one? Is that a lot of species. Use Acoustic cues to find mates and so one concern with the Puerto Rican frogs. We talked about. Is that if you have a call? That's changing but the animals say inner ear doesn't change then you could eventually get to a scenario where there's a mismatch there and animals can't hear potential mates calling. In the case of the shrimp larva alike fish larva used. These sounds to help themselves navigate and to find suitable habitats after they hatch in the instance of the penguins if they have to call longer and more frequently and louder in inclement weather than that takes energy. And it's already precarious to survive in the wild. If you have to put a lot more energy into trying to produce sounds that can be heard That can be costly from survival. Perspective Science Journalist and author. Emily Anthony's thanks for sharing some sounds of climate change on climate casts today. Of course thanks for having me.

Emily Emily King Emily Anthony Puerto Rico Chief Meteorologist Paul Hutler NPR Minnesota New York Times
"puerto rican" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

04:39 min | 5 months ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on Latino USA

"Its language. Its food religion and music but in the twenty ten senses over seventy five percent of Puerto Ricans identified as white. Of course there are many factors that have led to this like anti blackness and color ISM in Latin America like for example the notion of Mahad Lhasa which means to better the race which means to be more white but having an inaccurate count of racial demographics can hurt communities and even then you can't force population to change how they identify. That choice is very personal in order to understand the nuances of this issue. We reached out to journalists. Natasha S. Alford who's done a lot of reporting on the Afro Puerto Rican community. She's done stories at range from beauty. Police racially profiling black residents on the island. And most recently Natasha wrote about Afro Puerto Ricans being counted in the census for the New York. Times before we get to our story about Puerto Rico in the senses. I wanted to share something that Natasha told me about that. Regards this feeling of invincibility. It's a major theme that you're GonNa hear about today and this personal story came out as we our conversation in early March. Natasha attended a conference in New York City produced by the National Association of Black Journalists. She's an active member of the organization and attended the conference as a panelist. Here's Natasha so I go to this conference. I speak about wellness and mental health. And you know there are lots of thank you hugs and then I leave after I would say about an hour and a half I left with a feeling of that was time. Well spent but definitely ready to rest because I had been on the road for two weeks and there was starting to be a lot more news about corona virus. Then I got a notification saying that someone at that conference tested positive for corona virus. They asked everyone to take care of themselves. Which for me means something very different because I also live with Lupus that means that my immune system is already compromised. Take every day for it. I then was cast into the sea of confusion and anxiety because I didn't know if I had been exposed to the virus. Do we have any news we do? I've just got the news today that I am negative. Yes I know right WEAP- just a huge like thank you got you. Don't text the family and friends and everything but still a sense of sadness because there is someone who's still struggling right now but wow just this feeling of not being able to breathe just holding my breath for a week and that's the reason why we were not in the studio together of because add to be extra cautious and safe during this time. So while you've been in this self-isolation quarantine. Have you thought about any intersection that you see between your life experience right now and the reporting that you've just done from Puerto Rico and the Census and people fighting to be identified as Afro Puerto Rican? There is one hundred percent a sense of being seen in a way that I have never been seen before I think We call Lupus an invisible illness right because if you look at someone like me you know. I'm in my thirties Pretty active people may not believe that it's real and similarly this project of telling Afro Latin Stories actually started in college because I was looking for myself. I didn't see a representation of women who look like me the sense that you had to choose between black quote unquote and Latino as if they were completely separate always persisted. I remember you know going to a game sign yet hours. Eleven and I was one of few girls bear. My mother is Puerto Rican and she's a olive. She's actually or color money. And I thought that every image in the magazine made it seem as though that version of Latina. That was so much more beautiful and there was just nothing. I could do to change that but the older I got. I saw this shifts that we were being seen You know I was seeing Ahmadullah negative for example.

Afro Puerto Rican Natasha S. Alford Afro Puerto Rican community Afro Puerto Ricans Puerto Ricans Puerto Rico Lupus Afro Latin Stories National Association of Black Latin America Mahad Lhasa Natasha New York City Ahmadullah New York
"puerto rican" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

02:53 min | 6 months ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on Short Wave

"Here's one thing we know for sure. In general older people are the most vulnerable to the dangerous complications of the corona virus. And what part of the US has the most older Americans per capita the US territory of Puerto Rico? Puerto Rico is especially vulnerable because their healthcare system still hasn't fully recovered from Hurricane Maria in twenty seventeen followed by a recent string of deadly earthquakes. Tonight new six takes you inside the medical crisis in Puerto Rico tomorrow on top of matters Mooney mohair PhD scientists Rican argues. There's a huge communication problem. There's not as much information in Spanish. And it's not always timely. Recently the White House put out some guidelines for for the country on on social distancing and it took the government a couple of days to translate it into Spanish and there were journey another journalist who were requesting. Where is the Spanish language information for this and it took them awhile? A lot of three can speak English. But according to US census data the overwhelming majority a fourth Ricans. Who Speak Spanish in their homes. Say they do not speak English very well. And some don't speak English at all and in a situation like a pandemic having accurate and evidence base science based Information Abou- preventive measures about how to take care of your health. It can actually be a matter of life or death. Monaco's trying to fix that. She works for a nonprofit called. Cnc Poor three go a network of scientists and supporters. Trying to get the right information out about the corona virus in part of that is doing lots of interviews and you know early in the morning you got to warm up that voice because I am in California and there's a three hour difference in Puerto Rico. Yeah I've been waking up at five in the morning a lot more than I usually do. Your what do you got? Let me hear your vocal exercises. I don't have any you need to tell me. Give me a couple of red. Leather Yellow Leathers red-letter yellow. You gotTA say fast. Red Leather Yellow Leather Red Leather Yellow. Other red blood or yellow today on the show how one group of scientists educators and community members are trying to bring accurate scientific information to Americans in Puerto Rico. And why it's not just about language it's about culture.

Puerto Rico US Hurricane Maria White House Mooney Monaco TA California
"puerto rican" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Or discounted tuition to students from Puerto Rico whose home institutions were closed. One of the first students to take them up on the offer was Rosa Marie Palerme. She enrolled at Saint Thomas university in Miami. And late September, twenty seventeen and moved into her dorm room just a few days later calling from no signal in the water. No light sweating so much because of the humidity coming here was like a big relief as part of our coverage of the one year anniversary of hurricane, Maria, the world's Caroline Bieler checked in with Palerme and some of her classmates. When I interviewed Palamyn her Spartan Miami dorm room last fall. She already missed Puerto Rico and knew she wanted to go back though. No one that is might be year two years, but I wanna go back. I love my little island turns out. She didn't have to wait years, just three months. Her school in San Juan reopened in January, and the cheerful redhead decided to leave Saint Thomas university. Obviously, it was an opportunity and I was very grateful for Thomas and everything they did. But as soon as I saw window to come back home that, yes, I need my island, my family, my friends, she left Miami the day after false semester ended. The soon as I got off the plane started crying. I was like, oh, finally, the heat. My. I was so happy polara moved back in with her parents, brother and two dachshunds Lupe and Stella. I net when I visited the families, modern black and white apartment in San Juan weeks ago. Started classes at Sacred Heart university in San Juan. Last winter as the campus was rebuilt around her, it's still being repaired. Now you see a lot of construction. They're fixing a lot of areas of the university, making better. The light would go on and off they was, something's got the water because they were fixing something. So it's always something getting fixed, getting better. The same could be said for her neighborhood, which is a few blocks from the beach in a trendy part of San Juan. It takes me two favorite park. I used to come here to read because there will on trees. So there was a lot of shade. Many of the trees died during the hurricane, weaving, the park exposed to the sun, but it's cool to see it slowly coming back. On a busy commercial street there empty storefronts with for these signs in the windows. All these places left up to eighteen. That's why it's release, but Palerme spots of brand new restaurant among them. This used to be also for these this is I haven't seen this. This is new. Another sign of recovery in the neighborhood. The red white and blue, Puerto Rican flags fluttering everywhere you look. But he goes that were rising again. That's what everybody keeps saying to Kane after hurricane Maria, dozens of private schools and state college and university systems in Florida, New York, and Connecticut gave tuition breaks to Puerto Rican students. Demographers warned. This could help add to Puerto Rico's exodus hurting the odds that the island would rise. Again, some tuition discounts ended last spring, but many still continue including at Saint Thomas university more than half of last year. Students are staying on including Louis Oculus. He has a much less optimistic view of Puerto Rico. Then Palerme does. I went back only for two weeks on the summer and the things put the legal, the not good while he was home. Car got stolen. And that's what I said. You know what? I'm not gonna stay here. Like I don't feel safe in the island and my family. Everybody's like if you make it better for you just stayed. That's why I'm saying over here. Less is a sophomore studying business, and even with the discounts he's getting, he's still expects to pay twice as much for school here as he would in Puerto Rico. He works up to sixty hours a week as mechanic, help pay tuition. I have to work harder. I'll work harder. I will, but I know at the end it's all going to be worth it. Estimates of how many Puerto Ricans left the island after hurricane Maria vary widely between two hundred and four hundred thousand. There's no count of how many students who transferred to schools on the mainland have stayed, but it's clear off. Euless isn't the only one Victoria and Gulu graduated from

Puerto Rico San Juan Saint Thomas university Rosa Marie Palerme Sacred Heart university Miami Louis Oculus hurricane Maria Puerto Ricans Maria Caroline Bieler Thomas Euless Palerme New York Florida Victoria Kane Connecticut
"puerto rican" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Revolt was in the air and Oscar wanted to be part of it He got a job working as a community organizer he was setting up protests and, sit ins about the war and. Also around issues like housing and education and he was good at it Was just. To of guy he's just all over the place you know he was leading this exciting Felix remembers Oscar, as being kind of neighborhood hero He had long hair The mosque is he had the green army jacket and he looks you. Straight in the, ice he, pierces. You you know listens that's the main thing he listens Felix was a member, of the Latin dragons a. Local Chicago Latino gang and he found himself drawn to the protests. That Oscar was organizing Oscar would include the dragons by having them work security at. Their protests respected us he. Never got that from And that was quite telling me about his character you. Know, as Oscars activism deepened a. Newfound sense of pride in being Puerto Rican began to stirring him his brother Jose explains it this way in Puerto Rico. We live at, colonial situation, but. Everybody around you was Puerto Rican your doctors your policemen everybody was here you, came and you d see. Anyone that in any way reminded of who you were that we. Came to be Puerto Ricans because we were ostracize we we finding grounded out humanity. What little we knew about Our Puerto Rican nece. Maintain our humanity and some quick background for those that don't know Puerto Rico has. Been a territory of the United States since eighteen ninety eight Puerto Ricans are US citizens but can't vote. In federal elections and they have no voting representation in congress and congress has complete control of Puerto Rico's affairs and that control was something that Oscar was thinking about a lot he'd come to decide that the country had fought for in Vietnam. Wasn't really his country at all Puerto Rico was. His country, and the US was his colonizer he became involved in founding an alternative school in Chicago focused. On Puerto Rican history they met in the basement of. A church with no money, and just about a dozen or so, students and, this is, important because several of the people that we spoke to for this episode including, Oscar told us that learning Puerto Rican history is what would eventually lead them to take. Up, arms against the United States. When they were school kids Back in Puerto Rico they said they didn't really learn Puerto Rican history they'd.

Puerto Ricans Puerto Rico Oscar Puerto Rican Felix United States Chicago congress Vietnam Jose
"puerto rican" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on KCBS All News

"For hundreds of puerto rican families living in us hotels since hurricane maria destroyed their homes last september a judge says they can stay in those rooms for three more weeks here's correspondent david bagnall the judge's decision just forces fema to continue the tsa program transitional shelter assistance which pays for puerto ricans displaced by hurricane maria to stay at hotel rooms fema has been paying for the better part of eight months and they had reached an agreement with the governor of puerto rico that no further money was needed to fund the program and the governor didn't ask for an extension the trump administration is expected to appeal a judge's ruling that says illegal immigrants seeking asylum in the us must be allowed to go free until their hearings cbs news legal analyst thing rosenbaum the purpose here is to dissuade people from seeking asylum mistake i know that there's no chance of parole until they're hearing and if they know they're going to be detained in a prison secretary of state mike pompeo is headed for new talks with north korea while the president says nuclear talks are going well here's cbs's steven portnoy at the white house despite reports that the intelligence community is skeptical of north korea's intentions worried kim jong un will hide aspects of his nuclear program the president tweets it is going well he adds all of asia is thrilled only the opposition party which includes the fake news is complaining he ends with this claim quote if not for me we would now be at war with north korea there's a wild card for workers tried to rescue twelve boys and their soccer coach from a flooded cave northern thailand it's rain cbs's ben tracy is in chung ride province hollywood that complicate efforts to actually move the boys out of the cave but it doesn't allow the rescuers to get in there to keep giving them food to give the medicine to get supplies in there so this is a real issue if those rains comes and we are hearing from some of the rescuers that they may have to celebrate their timetable if they want to take the chance and actually tried to get the boys out now researchers are just out with a warning to working women here cbs's larry miller the canadian study finds the risk of type two diabetes higher in women who work at least forty five hours a week the findings in the journal b m j diabetes research and care found they had a sixty three percent higher risk compared to women who work between thirty five and forty hours the author suggests working longer hours could lead to stress and hormonal changes linked to insulin resistance with wimbledon well underway the men's tennis tour is hired a company to determine possible threats to players and social media the women's tour reportedly is considering the same the dow is up twenty eight this is cbs news to prevent and relieve muscle cramps in your legs and feet use theraworx relief get theraworx relief today at select walgreens cvs and rite aid pharmacies or theraworxrelief dot com.

hurricane maria puerto rican sixty three percent forty five hours eight months forty hours
"puerto rican" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on The Takeaway

"This process for them to essentially declare bankruptcy and then also set up an oversight board there's a eight member panel seven members of whom are or were appointed by congress chosen by president obama at the time and and congress and then one member who is a representative of the government and they oversee the puerto rican government's fiscal decisions and budgetary decisions right now and that has been very controversial and it's been controversial because the picks are can you tell us a little bit about who's on this promise aboard yeah it's there are a number of reasons and a number of the people on the board were affiliated with some of the government institutions the agencies as well as the banks that sold and promoted and created a lot of the debt in the first place so many people in puerto rico think that they have conflicts of interest in that there are a lot of questions about whether some of that debt was issued was constitutional for them to issue it their suspicions that some might have been issued illegally none of that has been proven and there's a lot of wrangling in the courts over that and there's some investigations into that but there's certainly a lot of doubt similar to what happened in the us in the during the financial crisis where there was a lot of feeling that there were deals done that may not be a legal that may not have crossed the line but certainly were more in the interest of the banks and the the people issuing them then the people who actually ended up paying for them so there's a lot of debate both about the people on the board as well as the policies that they're taking i'm here with jane secene and we're talking about the puerto rican debt crisis jane let's turn back for a minute to the people the puerto rican people are hurting because of the situation and we open the segment talking about sandra obata tells a little bit about sandra and then we'll listen to cut santa is a retiree she's i mid seventies had lived outside of the country for many years or husband had a job with an airline came back when she was.

congress obama representative puerto rican government puerto rico us jane secene sandra obata santa president
"puerto rican" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on KCRW

"Without power and nobody knows for sure how many people have left for the mainland permanently but estimates do put it somewhere between one and two percent of the priest warm population marketplaces and your as more now on what puerto ricans who chose to remain and help rebuild might be up against the puerto rico department of education is surveying kids from third grade on up and their teachers try to determine which areas need councillors and social workers most charles than at her santiago teaches puerto rican law and politics at the university of connecticut he's from puerto rico has family on the island he was there last week their conversations send around the impact not haruna a reliable electricity and then the stress that their parents are experiencing because of lack of work or lack of learn conditions he says depression is palpable especially in lower income communities i witness a lot of serb violent behavior by parents passages burnt out the puerto rico electric power authority was defaulting on bond payments even before the hurricane the governor recover ruscio has suggested privatising it kate long runs a research service reporter rico bondholders she thinks finding of buyers going to be tough he have a car in the eu any change the oil raging don't be friends drive into a you know into ditches and then you said will forget i'm just going to sell it that's basically what they've done with the power company when rick is estimated that before the storm with somewhere between seventy five and two hundred billion dollars former treasury secretary larry summers says funds holding puerto rican debt faced taking a serious loss as for the puerto rican government they've got to work orrick record or very and for only a year very volker bergander new her or more or from the mainland but many puerto ricans were done waiting the puerto rican government says it estimates another two hundred thousand residents will move from the island to the mainland before 2018 ends i mean either for marketplace sms with the broward what the latest version of the marketplace edison research national economic pole day it's installment of her six i thank lots of interesting stuff in there that will get on the air.

puerto ricans santiago puerto rican law puerto rico depression reporter eu rick larry summers puerto rican government broward puerto rico department of educ university of connecticut volker bergander two hundred billion dollars two percent
"puerto rican" Discussed on The Friend Zone

The Friend Zone

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on The Friend Zone

"I was extremely taken aback to see her exaggeratedly portraying every puerto rican stereotype and telling me she's one hundred percent puerto rican it was strange to me for the most part it was strange to me but for the most part i decided i just hold my tongue in that check her don't get me wrong concerts began to rise after the older daughter communism and that was high and that's when i was highly upset with her fowler her father and tell her she was black she responded i'm not black but dominican in puerto rican oh oh no this getting where now don't get me wrong i've been called in legal before and every now and then i use the word to my issue she called me in a discriminatory way i'm sorry best funny because it's funny like she up your colleague she allegedly the black myself by look if somebody gobert now left anywhere zero s it took every ounce of my power lots of customs this child i caught her father to deal with her the low girls are eleven intain emma says are three into the reasons this concern is getting harder to ignore is because mustn't a door they're older sisters and watch everything they do whom we give every other week at feel bad for these confuse children and i was the psychology major so she said i am with us i a psychology major some curious why people behave statutes way and this she said thank you for the feedback uh so thank you for the fee brian thank you for giving us the additional contacts 'cause i was a little like will likely are you consciousness these girls are quick betray willie interact with a whole lot but now that you have to cause your kid us see with the problem is the dad nieces here i am.

emma puerto rican willie one hundred percent
"puerto rican" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Were actually on working for the people of puerto rican door to door if they need any medical are any food we we also gave them knowledge on what to do with water because a lot of people started getting sick because of the contaminated water i didn't see people working on a lecture city i didn't i didn't see young people working on the roads or anything like that we kinda tough electing started that that movement over there razali you will be vital work the nurses milk nurse sociation other nursing groups are out there she give cwa was there yeah we are operating engineers are plumbers electricians labour's like i said it was on volunteers from allow unions not together for that and one of the concern conditions are like schools and hospitals there on the hospitals were okay the the they were used for homes by we went to a lot of schools but the classroom were used you could say as apartment for people who have lost their homes there was no way for them to stay in it so we want there to to give the medical attention and they they had food but not a lot so they would serve the children first than the would eat afterwards on but yeah all those schools that i wanted to they were not schooled anymore there were temporary shelters for people i lost all of their belongings he just remind people were ballot two months out since the maria hit more than half of the island still without power yes that's gotta take a huge toll your people's speech mental health jill mind to local health took he took more about that the people.

cwa puerto rican two months milk
"puerto rican" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

The Axe Files with David Axelrod

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on The Axe Files with David Axelrod

"Part of the impetus for his victory was he got strong support in the poor reconcluded get strong support in the puerto rican community because the puerto rican community has a rich history of of of how would i say acknowledgement acceptance embracing of our african culture that makes part of who we are right roberto clemente is our hero he's puerto rican he's also black right so you know herro washington was and if you go to new york city brian you go to manhattan on one side of harlem its batteries are low and the other is black carlo remain well we we we have we ever isn't going to others as chicago unlike a lot of other cities at that time had a very well established mexican community and puerto rican community gets those communities were not uh they were aligned politically those uh those uh mexican communities tended to be much more associated with a machine candidates white machine candidates puerto rican community went with herald they did and he won by a you know relatively hero murdered if you remember uh uh from the primary to the general election the one vote that's that that opened up that is about twenty percent of the puerto ricans voted uh for her washington in the primary bright any went to sixty five seventy percent you didn't see that kind of swing among white voters are among african african americans were with them in the prayer right right right so you saw this week but just very quickly so when those precent kept his neck on my door.

puerto rican community roberto clemente herro washington harlem chicago puerto ricans african americans new york manhattan sixty five seventy percent twenty percent
"puerto rican" Discussed on Code Switch

Code Switch

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"puerto rican" Discussed on Code Switch

"By put he came kane's years ago this not to the right is the ugly these nero the peanut this mural that puerto rican five it's to left it's super along it used to be a puerto rican in us flag they put he can flag started him it blended into the us flag the then mayor at the time came down amid this a campaign political issue i mean huge think got the news to say that the puerto ricans were trying to dominate the us and so the kids were heartbroken they just painted over the us flag it's now a hundred percent the puerto rican flag but think about that narrative you know in the jones exit you come it to be us you think you're us edison you have kids or not in the neighborhoods work here trying to integrate trying to become part of the community in culture and you're being shut down thing you're trying to overtake the us or dominate like how are you as a kid growing up supposed to feel an american is the first where the comes to my mind domestic get for an from nighter here nor their the forced to choose side it's lemon sophia be better lars they found win over to pick up and currently a to mirror manly a college now julio college's in a tree lined severed right next to hold the a it's a women's college one of the seven sisters founded decades before puerto rican scott american citizenship and i'm here in a grand old room in a grand old building with cathedral ceiling was talking to sophia xito leafs it's the part of that east coast los university student with her fly winter boots clear hipster glasses and a sensible yet stylish pop i have to admit this seen is in stark contrast to my tore through holy up with nelson and nelson and sophia are different in so many ways sophia grew up in but though he caught and went to private school their nelson grew up in the states.

us puerto ricans lars nelson sophia kane puerto rican jones shut down east coast los university hundred percent