36 Burst results for "prosecutor"

Jury selection moving slow in Ahmaud Arbery slaying trial

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 13 hrs ago

Jury selection moving slow in Ahmaud Arbery slaying trial

"It's day two of jury selection in the trial of three white men accused of killing a modern are pre a black man in Georgia in February of twenty twenty prosecutors and defense attorneys spent hours yesterday questioning twenty potential jurors out of six hundred one said he was sick of hearing about the case another wondered if she should fear for her safety if picked and the verdict angers people so far eight potential jurors were dismissed meanwhile the judge urged the lawyers to streamline their approach the defense insists Greg McMichael and son Travis along with neighbor William Ronnie Bryant who video the shooting committed no crimes the McMichael say they believed about Arbor was a burglar prosecutors say he was just jogging through the neighborhood I'm Julie Walker

Greg Mcmichael Georgia William Ronnie Bryant Travis Mcmichael Arbor Julie Walker
Fresh update on "prosecutor" discussed on Stephanie Miller

Stephanie Miller

00:38 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "prosecutor" discussed on Stephanie Miller

"You assume president Trump runs in 2024 He certainly saying that he's going to whether he does or not we don't know If he runs he wins the nomination I don't know that President president Trump it was the first president in the Republican site at least to lose a house to Senate in the presidency in four years Elections are about winning Republican senator Cassidy Bill Cassidy Yes Just with some thoughts on mango Mussolini this morning Some at some point Okay 7 minutes after the hour Jody Hamilton is live in studio with us Charlie bear's coming up and attorney Watergate prosecutor Joe wine banks coming up to talk about all of this Okay Yes that was yes What's the bill casting Correct The Republican Yeah I don't I sometimes don't believe things that you hand me are real That's real Is that a thing The guy Yeah I think been from the officer The food is his.

President Trump President President Trump Cassidy Bill Cassidy Mango Mussolini Jody Hamilton Charlie Bear Joe Wine Senate
Jury selection to start in trial over Ahmaud Arbery's death

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 1 d ago

Jury selection to start in trial over Ahmaud Arbery's death

"Jury selection begins today in the trial of three white men in Georgia charged in the death of a black man jogging in their neighborhood in February of last year hundreds of people were ordered to report for jury duty selection could last two weeks or more father and son Greg and Travis McMichael and their neighbor William Roddy Bryant are charged with murder and other crimes prosecutors say a model every was merely jogging in the defendant's neighborhood just outside the port city of Brunswick defense attorneys insist the three men committed no crimes and thought armory was responsible for break ins Arby's father says he's praying for an impartial jury and a fair trial saying black crime victims too often have been denied justice I'm Julie Walker

Travis Mcmichael William Roddy Bryant Georgia Greg Brunswick Arby Julie Walker
In trial over Arbery death, racial reckoning looms large

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 2 d ago

In trial over Arbery death, racial reckoning looms large

"Jury selection begins Monday in the trial of three white men charged with killing an unarmed black man in Georgia in February of twenty twenty many see the case as a reckoning for the local justice system amada armory was chased and fatally shot after Greg McMichael and his son Travis saw him running in their neighborhood prosecutors say he was just out jogging they chased him in a pickup truck more than two months passed before the McMichael's ended neighbor William Ronnie Bryant who taped the encounter were charged with the murder for many it's not just the white defendants on trial but rather a justice system that allowed them to remain free for weeks after they pursued and killed a black man I'm Julie Walker

Greg Mcmichael William Ronnie Bryant Georgia Travis Mcmichael Julie Walker
Meet Virginia Attorney General Candidate Jason Miyares

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 3 d ago

Meet Virginia Attorney General Candidate Jason Miyares

"But there's a fantastic candidate who's also running for attorney general In the state of Virginia And wouldn't it be wonderful if all three statewide constitutional positions flipped And his name is Jason meares Jason how are you sir It is great to be with you Mark So much for thank you so much for having me on Well it's a pleasure Now tell us about yourself Tell the whole country about yourself because you have a very very interesting background as well Go right ahead Well listen I like to say my former prosecutor in Virginia Beach represent that area in the House of delegates now My story actually doesn't begin in Virginia Beach It begins in a vanna Cuba when a scared 19 year old girl got an airplane and you lost in homeless and not on board next meals get to come from And that was my mother Miriam miara is and so you know I tell my daughters all the time gratitude is one of the most underrated of all human traits I was raised to have such gratitude that I can live in this amazing country So my mother fled communist Cuba in the fall of 1965 leaving the only non democracy in the western hemisphere And almost 50 years of the day that she'd last in the fall of 2015 she was able to go into a voting booth and get a ballot and vote for me to represent her in the oldest democracy in the western hemisphere the Virginia accidental gets And so that's what I call the American miracle And we'll be ever forget that it is a miracle It's a precious thing And one of the things that makes it so precious is the fact that we're a country with a first written constitution and recorded history that empowers the individual rather than empowering government And that is what has created more flourishing of human ingenuity and prosperity than any country in the history of the world And we have to remember that as a people or we're quickly going to go to the way of some of these other

Jason Meares Jason Miriam Miara Cuba Virginia House Of Delegates Virginia Beach Mark
Capitol Police officer charged with obstruction in January 6 Capitol riot

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 4 d ago

Capitol Police officer charged with obstruction in January 6 Capitol riot

"U. S. capitol police officer has been indicted on charges stemming from the January six insurrection Michael A. Riley faces obstruction of justice charges for allegedly helping to hide evidence of a rider's involvement prosecutors accused the officer of tipping off someone who participated in the riot by telling them to remove posts from Facebook that had shown the person inside the capitol during the January sixth attack prosecutors say Riley sent the person the message telling them he was an officer with the capitol police force to quote agrees with your political stance Riley was working January six and responded to a report of a pipe bomb he's been a capitol police officer for about twenty five years Ben

U. S. Capitol Police Michael A. Riley Riley Capitol Police Facebook BEN
Attorney: Cruz to plead guilty to Parkland school massacre

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 d ago

Attorney: Cruz to plead guilty to Parkland school massacre

"The lawyers for accused Florida school shooter Nicolas Cruz said he plans to plead guilty to the twenty eighteen massacre the guilty plea for accused Florida school shooter Nicholas Cruz would set up a penalty phase where the twenty three year old would be fighting against the death penalty in hoping for life without parole attorneys told the judge that cruise plans to plead guilty next Wednesday to seventeen counts of first degree murder in the February twenty eighteen shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school the police will come with no conditions and prosecutors still plan to seek the death penalty that will be decided by a jury but that trial has not yet been scheduled I surely outlier

Florida School Nicolas Cruz Nicholas Cruz Marjory Stoneman Douglas High Cruise
A Boeing test pilot has been indicted in connection with the 737 Max

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 4 d ago

A Boeing test pilot has been indicted in connection with the 737 Max

"Hi Mike Ross you're reporting a Boeing pilot involved in testing the Max jet is indicted in Texas a federal grand jury in Texas has indicted a Boeing pilot who was involved in testing the seven thirty seven Max jetliner later involved in two deadly crashes the indictment accuses mark a Fortner of giving the Federal Aviation Administration false and incomplete information about the automated flight control system found to have played a role in the crashes prosecutors said because of workers allege the deception the system was not mentioned in key FAA documents pilot manuals or pilot training material supplied to airlines the

Boeing Mike Ross Texas Federal Aviation Administratio Mark
Arizona on Trial With Attorney General Mark Brnovich

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:24 min | 6 d ago

Arizona on Trial With Attorney General Mark Brnovich

"And so one thing I respect about you, you're a real person, which I respect a lot because everyone in this business seems to not be, but you're also not like letitia James where you're trying to abuse power? And so I know you have to be careful the way you talk about these things. I just want to say that for our audience. But I want to ask about it because it is a big issue so you sent these two letters out regarding the voter registration list maintenance and the notice of submission to review findings and a request for written response to the Maricopa board. Tell us about these two letters as like we still try to kind of figure out what happened, post 2020. I respect the fact that you mentioned that you're limited. In New York and I always say to folks that, look, I'm not like the clowns in New York. I'm not going to reach a conclusion and then try to find facts or conjecture to support it, which is total of you. Because because at the end of the day, and this goes back to what we were just talking about. When you're the government, when you're a prosecutor, literally there's statutes and ethics that you have to abide by. And unfortunately, sometimes the courts and, you know, they take a different view and you have liberal or democratic EG's or prosecutors doing something versus when we do it. And we can maybe talk about that in a second, but I do want to say so that any prosecutor worth their salt knows not only because the ethical legal limits, you have to be careful what you say because if you say too much in the front end, then either a judge or even a defense attorney in front of the jury's going to say, aha, he did this or she did this and they did this case or charges case this way because they had said this or their bias or their prejudiced or somehow you get in a position where someone's going to try to have you recused or say that there's a conflict. So you have to be really, really careful what you say. So let me just say from the very beginning, our office supported the right to set the Senate to the audit. We literally filed paperwork we filed formal documents in court saying they had the right to do the audit. And the court agreed with us. And when the county was not turning over information, you may recall that we literally sent the county formal notification that if they did not turn over all the documents requested by the Senate, they would lose $700 million of state funding. So what the Senate is doing with how they did the audit what they're doing with the audit. What they did with their settlement county, that's their business. Because I believe once again, separation of powers and there's only certain things, you know, the attorney general prosecutor

Letitia James Maricopa New York Senate
Getting to Know Arizona's Attorney General Mark Brnovich

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:29 min | 6 d ago

Getting to Know Arizona's Attorney General Mark Brnovich

"Kircher with us today is the attorney general of the great state of Arizona, Mark brnovich. Welcome. Thanks, Charlie for having me on. So I can't wait to get into what I call the cartel of the colleges because you have some things that you really want to dive into that your office has been working on about corruption and higher education. Those are my words you can be more precise because you diplomatic? Yeah, that's right. But I don't have to be and I also want to kind of talk about some of the new things your office has released in regards to voter registration material and some other things regarding the Arizona audit and the election. But first, I just want you to introduce yourself to our audience. I think that would be really helpful. Tell us your story how you became, you know, attorney general of Arizona, and also I want to say that attorney general Burnham is running for U.S. Senate, which is a very important Senate race. So please introduce yourself. Well, thank you, Charlie. I always tell folks that if you want to know about me, you probably should know about my background in my history. And so I'm a first generation American, my family fled communism. And when your family has not just studied history but live it lived it, you have this great appreciation for how unique freedom is. And, you know, we know that folks like Ronald Reagan used to talk about freedom is never one more than one generation away from extinction. And, you know, my family live that. And that's why I'm so passionate about the constitution and our liberties. And so much of my career has been spent as I was raised that we have to protect freedom and we have an obligation to give back because this is the greatest country in the world. So, you know, I'm a public school kid. I still live in the same neighborhood. Neighborhood I grew up here in Arizona. I was a gang prosecutor at a law school. In fact, I met my wife there and she's now actually on the federal bench. So, you know, anybody was anything about federal judges. There's an old joke that what's the difference between God and a federal judge? God was wrong once I'm kidding. No, no, no, no. Hey, you're gonna get struck by lightning. Don't be saying that. No, no, God doesn't think he's a federal judge. But anyway, no, she's amazing, but then worked at the AG's office, a bit of federal prosecutor. Served our country in the army reserve. I worked at a think tank called the Goldwater institute where I wrote a lot and wrote briefs on the importance of property rights and individual liberty. And so I had never thought I was going to ever run for any office and I was brought up this real strong sense of that when you're the government, when you can take away people's livelihoods, their life, liberty property. You have to have the most highly qualified, but also the most ethical people in those office and people that understand how much power you have when you're the government.

Arizona Kircher Mark Brnovich Attorney General Burnham Charlie U.S. Senate Ronald Reagan Goldwater Institute AG Army
Mark Levin Calls for Resignation of Loudoun County School Board Members and Other Officials

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 6 d ago

Mark Levin Calls for Resignation of Loudoun County School Board Members and Other Officials

"Com I want to join the parents of loudon county And demand the resignation of the school board And the resignation of the principal at stonebridge high school in the resignation of the superintendent Now how could they not have known what took place in that unisex bathroom When Scott smith's daughter was raped a 9th grader By a quote unquote transgender boy Who went into that bathroom wearing a skirt That's number one Number two I believe the sheriff's office should be apologizing to Scott Smith For the way in my view that he was manhandled That's right I said it Number three the prosecutor in this case a soro stooge Her resignation should be demanded as well She threw the book at mister Smith He didn't hurt his soul He dared to insist that he not be removed from the board meeting An illegal assembly on his part apparently They tried to make a mockery this man The national school board association used him To try to advance their Tyrannical agenda

Stonebridge High School Loudon County Scott Smith Mister Smith National School Board Associat
Reward increased to $2.5M for information in slaying of Seattle federal prosecutor

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | Last week

Reward increased to $2.5M for information in slaying of Seattle federal prosecutor

"Cross your reporting reward money has been increased for information helping solve the killing of a U. S. prosecutor in Seattle rewards now totaling two point five million dollars have been announced for information in the killing of federal prosecutor Thomas C. Wales in Seattle twenty years ago Nicholas brown the new U. S. attorney for the western district of Washington announce the justice department has doubled its reward to two million dollars at a ceremony Monday marking the death of Wales in addition the national association of former U. S. attorneys is offering about five hundred thousand dollars for information helping solve the case Wales was an eighteen year veteran of the U. S. attorney's office he was fatally shot through a basement window of his home on October eleventh two thousand one hi

Thomas C. Wales Nicholas Brown Seattle National Association Of Former Justice Department Wales Washington U.
Kurz to quit as Austrian chancellor amid corruption probe

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | Last week

Kurz to quit as Austrian chancellor amid corruption probe

"Austrian prime minister Sebastian Kurz has announced that he will step down amid supplications of corruption speaking at a news conference cuts announced that he has proposed to Austria's president the foreign minister Alexander Sonnenberg become chancellor what we need now is stable condition so in order to resolve the stalemate I want to make way to prevent chaos and the social stability the move comes as he attempts to defuse the government crisis triggered by the prosecutor's announcement that he is the target of a corruption investigation S. and his associates are accused of using public money to pay for positive reports in the media as well as manipulating polls in order to secure his rise to the leadership of his party in the country however because he said he will become the head of his conservative Austrian people's party's parliamentary group remaining in a key position in the front line I'm Karen Thomas

Sebastian Kurz Alexander Sonnenberg Austria Karen Thomas
Parents guilty in first college admissions scandal trial

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Parents guilty in first college admissions scandal trial

"To wealthy parents were convicted by a jury in the operation varsity blues college admissions cheating scandal in the first of the cases to go to trial a jury found Kamal Abdul Aziz a former Las Vegas casino executive and John Wilson who heads a Massachusetts private equity firm guilty in a case that exposed to scheme to get undeserving applicants into college by falsely portraying them as star athletes prosecutors argued that secretly recorded phone calls between admissions consultant Rick singer and the parents proved that they were in on the scheme both men were convicted of fraud and bribery conspiracy charges the Daniel Mandel as the acting U. S. attorney for the district of Massachusetts even these defendants powerful and privileged people are

Varsity Blues College Kamal Abdul Aziz John Wilson Rick Singer Massachusetts Las Vegas Daniel Mandel
Don't Trust Anyone Who Doesn't Admire Tucker Carlson

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:08 min | Last week

Don't Trust Anyone Who Doesn't Admire Tucker Carlson

"Trust anybody who doesn't admire tucker carlson just flat out if you have if you have somebody in your life who is critical or skeptical of that guy who holds the eight. Pm eastern seven pm central time slot on fox news. Don't trust them. This guy continues to be astoundingly brave and incredibly informative last night for example. A couple of stories that that caught my attention. Did you know that a shooting that was caught on video in chicago a gang shooting in cook county the cook county state's attorney kim fox that doozy you've got a shootout with. Apparently somebody killed all caught on camera and that goofy. Kim fox won't charge anybody because they were quote mutual combatants. So the mayor. Who's no better than she is lori. Lightfoot that's another piece of work she's calling out the state's attorney. Kim fox saying you gotta explain that you got a camera right there. The capture the whole thing police officers on the scene in uniform squad car. The bad guys are out there. Shooting each other and the prosecutor doesn't want to prosecute him mutual combatants. Well that sounds like maybe. Kim fox doesn't think black lives matter just say and that was all explained and shown on tucker show last night he showed the video of the shootout one person killed five taken into custody and later released because that's how the dams role

Kim Fox Cook County Tucker Carlson Fox News Lightfoot Chicago Lori Tucker
Author Matt Palumbo of 'Man Behind the Curtains' Discusses George Soros' Secret Network

The Dan Bongino Show

01:07 min | Last week

Author Matt Palumbo of 'Man Behind the Curtains' Discusses George Soros' Secret Network

"We're talking to Matt Colombo author of a I'm telling you folks who will not be disappointed It's going to be a book of the year Demand behind the curtain by Matt Colombo It's about George Soros's secret network Are you telling me that he's going local Austin races local district attorney races Because his money can make a big difference in the success rate is higher because that makes a lot of sense Yeah but you know the thing is like if presidential elections it's hundreds of millions of billions of dollars to move the needle It takes quite a bit If I'm running in a DA race and a 100,000 people vote in it if you drown a candidate in one or $2 million that is immense success And a lot of these source prosecutors actually are household names You know chase of boudin every week we're seeing open shoplifting in San Francisco That's him That's a source back here Kim Fox who went across to Jesse Smollett He saw us back In fact there was a case last week where there was a gang shooting in public about a dozen people involved She wouldn't cross the committee claiming that it was mutual combat So because both parties wanted to open fire and broad daylight well we can't prosecute that So these are the kind of people he's back

Matt Colombo George Soros Kim Fox Austin Jesse Smollett Boudin San Francisco
Author Matthew Palumbo: George Soros Dropped $500K to Keep Austin Police Defunded

The Dan Bongino Show

01:12 min | Last week

Author Matthew Palumbo: George Soros Dropped $500K to Keep Austin Police Defunded

"Mad what the hell is your sorrow and his interest group money Do we isn't living Austin Texas Why is he getting involved to defeat a measure to hire more police in Austin Why is he going local Well it's not just awesome It's actually everywhere and the longest chapter in the book is actually titled George Soros goes local where I just go through all these prosecutors He's trying to fund And it's sort of like a dual case where one it seems it's just literally seems like they wanted to destroy Law & Order in America and they don't care what the consequences is Obviously someone like George Soros is private security But at the same time the dual purpose and that they're going to push this narrative that cops are racist America's I mean you see this are you against police but go back 300 years in history when they're talking about it if they want to push this narrative that everything this country is rotten from the core And it really just seems like they kind of want to destroy everything and start over And in terms of local politics you know we've been talking about Soros influence groups and his role of presidential elections but thank God Presidential elections He's about 50 50 in a success rate With local election is well over 90% because these are often races And it's been a district attorney races

George Soros Austin America Texas Soros
Judge slams claims that Jan. 6 rioters are treated unfairly

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Judge slams claims that Jan. 6 rioters are treated unfairly

"A Texas man charged in connection with the January capital riot was sentenced to jail time prosecutors weren't recommending a sentence but Matthew was local of San Antonio Texas got forty five days in jail the judge blasted comparisons between the right and the black lives matter protest over racial injustice another federal judge who gave a defended probation suggested the justice department was being too hard on the defendant's when compared to the people arrested during protest after George Floyd's murder judge Tanya chutkan in Texas said the people of the capital we're trying to overthrow the government the circle pleaded guilty and spent twelve minutes inside the capitol in January and posted a selfie on Facebook after the riot with the caption the capital is ours at Donahue Washington

Texas George Floyd Tanya Chutkan San Antonio Matthew Justice Department Facebook Donahue Washington
Islamic State figure charged with supporting terrorist group

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

Islamic State figure charged with supporting terrorist group

"A leading Islamic state media figure has been charged in US federal court in Virginia with conspiring to provide material support to a terrorist organization federal officials say Mohammed Khalifa was captured overseas by the Syrian democratic forces in January twenty nineteen and recently transferred into FBI custody the Saudi born Canadian citizen was a leading figure in the Islamic state of Iraq he's alleged to have fought for ISIS on the battlefield in Syria and also to have played a leading role in translating narrating and advancing the group's online propaganda prosecutors say Khalifa's efforts furthered its worldwide recruitment efforts expanding the reach of videos that quote glorified the horrific murders and indiscriminate cruelty of ISIS if convicted Khalifa faces a maximum penalty of life in prison I'm Ben Thomas

Mohammed Khalifa Federal Court Virginia FBI Saudi Isis Khalifa Syria Iraq United States Ben Thomas
"prosecutor" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:14 min | 2 months ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Sometimes you take what you got you take that hooky and you try to keep it together and get down the. Because they haven't finished designing tesla. And when you get there. The tesla i'm waiting for the tesla. That's what we need are waiting for a revolution in how criminal justice system is done in the united states. But in the meantime there are real people in their real lives that are affecting those people gotta get down the road and so it's a little bit of both you know it's a little bit edge of trying to get this. Messed up down the road But we're doing so with the hope that it's gonna chug. It's last little little bit of gasoline. Is it rolls into the parking. Lot of a tesla dealership. America is beat up. I honestly i am a little bit off the challenge that you face. Because it's it's really some How do you get up in the morning knowing that. This is waiting for you you i have to say. I think it's really interesting to hear. You say that. Because i think that one of the biggest challenges that we face as technicians for movement. And that's what prosecutors are. We're not we don't lead the movement but we are technicians for one of the biggest challenges. We face is that people believe it's impossible know. The system has convinced them that it's impossible you have to be truly extraordinary. Fbi exceptional no. You don't you really. Don't you know there. There was a docu series. That was done about our office called the philly. Da by a couple of local philly filmmakers. Their idea i'd zero editorial control obviously dollars off of it but we allowed it and we allowed it partly. Because i really wanted people to see whether we sunk or we kept swimming and i want them to see. We're just people the notion that you're so excluded from politics that you can't win is untrue by like certainly proves that it is untrue and it is exactly what mainstream politicians wants you to believe. They want you to believe that. They're the only ones with the keys to the kingdom. They're the only ones who can crack the code. Turns out that since most people eight politicians when they have someone who's not a politician in his actually genuine and coming to an election in a creative way. That may actually be a very very strong candidate right while the same is true when it comes to getting inside of a monolithic Scary misguided system like the criminal justice system. It's actually not that hard to change things. You're not gonna succeed in everything but you can be an ordinary person and you can win an election. You can be an ordinary person you can get inside of a monster like this and you can make some real improvements with at and you can also fail and get up the next day. Keep trying you know. That's kind of what i wanted to see. Come out of that. And you know coincidentally separately. I was working on a book. Wa that docu series was being done. That covers something very different. The docu series covers our time in office. The the book actually just talks about the campaign with all kinds of flashbacks to my career and basically the lessons that came out of grownup broke kid and being a public defender and beat up against the judge who basically was satan. You know those stories that just stuck with me. That really formative in how i thought about the whole thing..

tesla America Fbi swimming
"prosecutor" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

02:47 min | 2 months ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"You know in the fact that they're not applying that retroactively people who've already been sentenced to be honest. I think we we have to not as people who are progressive on the left. We have to not do what the left does so well which is to eat our own. We have to after knowledge except that there is a variety of thought within group of people who are trying to be modern. Who are trying to do things that are scientific who are trying to We may not all agree on certain things. And that's okay but it's not okay to be a wolf in sheep's clothing and You know i can think of prosecutor. I'm not gonna name that person who used to be a member of what is essentially the progressive prosecutors club and then when everybody saw with that prosecutors actually doing was uninvited you know there are some people who have to be thrown out. I think the the one of the ways that we can really move forward is to recognize that often law when it comes to justice in the united states is a floor. But it's not the ceiling. Even where the law provides these sort of minimal protections these minimal kind of due process protections often prosecutors have discretion to require more. You know we can make decisions about whether a completely barebones case that is just probable cause but nothing more is good enough to bring our. We want something that that gets us closer to prove beyond a reasonable doubt before we even charging even in a cash bail system. We make decisions about. Whether we're gonna try to simulate something else we might succeed might fail but those are the things that we can try to do and we can also make decisions on things that are categorical. Like there's certain things. I'm just not gonna charge. There are mandatory is. I'm just not going to pursue. Because i think judges should actually have the discretion to do what we elected them to do which is to make decisions about individuals in individual cases rather than have some you know legislator who came up with something political and knows nothing of the field control them and put handcuffs.

united states
"prosecutor" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

05:11 min | 2 months ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Very long time. How do you tell people who have been subjected to that that they should trust police or trust prosecutors. One way that you do it. Is that when you find innocent. People sitting jail after twenty five years. You get them out and we have done that. We started a conviction integrity unit. That at this point has released twenty people from jail on a total of twenty one case is one of them had two cases who should not have been convicted the way they were convicted end. The vast majority of them overwhelmingly are clearly an absolutely without question innocent of the crimes with which they were charged in the first place. Why do you do that well because you should. Because it's what prosecutors are supposed to do at seeking justice but it also is symbolically incredibly important in a city that bombed the itself that you have a prosecutor or prosecutor's office. That's trying to make sure the system is accurate. It is fair to individuals that restores trust it gives them a reason at least to think about reconsidering whether they trust prosecutors. When there's harm that happens on their block the police have to do the same thing you know and there have been some moderate positive steps forward philadelphia. We obviously the da's office have no control over what the police department does. But in in especially in post. George floyd america. We expect something different of our police commissioners and the mayors who put them in that position what we expect is that they are also going to be progressive there going to be about integrity. They're going to be about trying to push back against this. Democrats isn't they're going to a lot of stuff. That has not at all. Ben what was done in philly and was done in other places You know there was a big symbol here. Though ch- change and the symbol was that we took our confederate general statue. The statue of frank rizzo after having been in a prominent location for about twenty two years. We removed it. You know for your listeners. Who may not know frank. Rizzo was a beat cop. Who became chief of police who became the mayor and as mayor. He was just like he was as chief of police. He was one hundred percent about racism and brutality. That's what it was and selling a city's financial future out to the police in the police. Union the removal after years of controversy of the statue of frank. Rizzo the only mayor to have a statue close to city hall which is the locus of power powered..

George floyd frank rizzo police department philadelphia america Rizzo Ben frank city hall
"prosecutor" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

The Ezra Klein Show

04:04 min | 2 months ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on The Ezra Klein Show

"Is it possible to work within the system to change the system. I'm jamil smith. And i write for about identity culture and civil rights and i'm your host for vox. Conversations philadelphia went to college. There then returned years later. It's an accounting where politically speaking. The blue is drowning. The red democrats outnumber republican voters by three to one. Still it was noteworthy. Larry krassner perhaps the most famous of all the progressive prosecutors elected in recent years all but ensured his reelection when he won the democratic primary. This past may crasner was first elected to the office of district attorney in two thousand seventeen and this most recent victory sent a strong signal that philadelphia voters want. His reformist were.

jamil smith red democrats Larry krassner philadelphia crasner office of district
"prosecutor" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

01:47 min | 5 months ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Prosecutors say Anthony Holly Junior's facing aggravated murder, murder and tampering with evidence charges after the shooting death of Michael Bryce. Had in that rallies drive through and sharing Vale police say there's video of the attack. Holly is in jail with a million dollar bond. He'll be back in court on Monday morning. The violence continues. In Jerusalem, an Israeli airstrike on a house in Gaza City killed at least seven Palestinians. Neighbors say the attack came without warning. The death toll in the latest uprising is expected to go up after they recover casualties from another house bombing. Use radio 700 WLW sports like the Reds lost to the Colorado Rockies Final 96. Cincinnati will try again tonight. Of course, Field coverage begins at seven 11th pitch at 6 10. And in MLS soccer Cincinnati FC Cincinnati that is kicks off their season at the new T QL Stadium Sunday at four taking on Inter Miami. The game is on ESPN 15 30. The forecast is coming up. Next is radio 700 WLW News Times 705. No place like a cowboy, please. In the time like a couple of time in the way like the cowboy way, have a gavel I can today. Yeah, way or that whole crowd boys contained that cowboy ground way like the cowboy way. Have a cab. Canady. Yeah. Like to have a big time. Try the new Big Sky Burger at Roy Rogers restaurants. It's a quarter pound burger with Smithfield pulled pork beer battered onion rings American cheese in spicy barbecue sauce on a corn dusted Kaiser bun ain't no way like the cowboy way in a song like a cowboy song. Have a cowboy kind.

Monday morning Gaza City Michael Bryce Anthony Holly Junior Jerusalem Inter Miami T QL Stadium Holly Sunday today Cincinnati Roy Rogers Big Sky Burger tonight Colorado Rockies Final 96 11th pitch Reds Cincinnati FC Cincinnati American at least seven
"prosecutor" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

asymmetrical haircuts

04:19 min | 8 months ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on asymmetrical haircuts

"Concern from certain parties about you know How vigorously he was a defense lawyer politically he was engaged with some of his defendants or whatever it may be but i mean what a great boon to the court have a chief prosecutor who knows how to basically be the best defense lawyer you could possibly be. Which is what kareem khan west for so many people he can utilize those skills and i think really create really novel prosecutorial strategies and then i guess last night i was going to add stuff. He just does not strike me as someone who pose his punches. Who is fiercely independent and that matters because the most important thing that you know has to transpire over the next coming months and years for the prosecutor to be transparent and not pull their punches in the face of political pressures from major powers or whatever it may be too you know not invested and situation and of course janet also asked mark for any anecdote here had of seeing kareem conning court. Yeah the first time. I came across him. I was rather a young. I think he lives in two thousand ten and the special tribunal for lebanon watching proceedings on. We're against a journalist for having released a video from what i remember obstruction of justice types of allegations she was facing he was there. He was arguing. He was the defense lawyer. Somebody told me or asked me what i thought of him and he had he was just commanding on the floor and quite exceptional oratory. He is well known for. And i'll never forget. Somebody told me you know other prosecutors. Fear having to face off against korean khan and judges absolutely love it when he's in the courtroom because of his exceptional ability as a defense lawyer as an advocate and his ability to really express his case strategy and and the laws and the legal arguments that he wants to put forward. So you know personally. And i think that's probably goes for you too and it. Is you know we're interested in the communication side. Has the icy tell it. Story at is the prosecutor Engage with the media. And what stories do they tell about the work. They're doing which i think is so crucial to the court. And i'm really really looking forward to having such an exceptional orator. Speak to these issues. Speak at conferences speak press availabilities and so on and so forth. I think that'll be something really interesting to see with someone who's got such a mastery of the english language and of course also illegal languages that he engaged them so maybe just to finish bentiu said this week that she's already in productive preliminary discussions with con own the handover but what will he be like as a colleague what faces those who are going to be working with him at the office of the prosecutor in the court. Brian mcgonigal's says it'll be hard work. Everyone who has ever worked with cream knows how hard he works and how involved he is in his cases..

Brian mcgonigal janet this week last night mark two thousand english first time korean khan kareem khan west lebanon bentiu ten kareem court
"prosecutor" Discussed on Fallacious Trump

Fallacious Trump

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on Fallacious Trump

"Sixty-eight had a mustache. Yeah, roughly one in ten women wore their hair in a ponytail a roughly one-in-three white women had blond hair and roughly one-in-ten black men had a beard and right also, which is a weird at extra thing off. The fact that they are an interracial couple was like one in a thousand one in a thousand couples are mixed race or interracial California Inc in California a long time. Yes, okay, even though the sixties but no they didn't look that stuff up. Oh, yes. They just like they asked the maths teacher wage. Do you think yeah, would you recommend any came up with these numbers and the prosecutor went? All right, then let's let's put those numbers down in a table and the math teacher testified to the fact that when you are mixing capabilities when you're adding one probability to another basically you multiply them together. Yeah, because you know, if you have if you flip a Fair coin twice the chance of getting heads on the first name is a half the chance of getting heads on two flips in a row as a quarter cuz you multiply 1/2 by 1/2. So what they did is they multiplied all of those those probabilities together and they came up with one in twelve million rough. So that was their their Theory long as basically what they what they had worked out was if you pick a couple at random, there's a one in twelve million chance that they will be an interracial couple. The black man has a beard no mustache. The woman is white with a ponytail and blond hair and they have a yellow car right one in twelve million. So they turned that into that that means there's a one in twelve million chance that we've got the wrong people here cuz like cuz it's so unlikely that any given couple is going to fit all these descriptors. Yeah, that's not how it works. That's not how any of this is just going..

interracial California Inc prosecutor California
"prosecutor" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

You Can't Make This Up

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

"PHILLY GOT HOUSTON. We've got Detroit. I think the idea here. Not only for prosecutorial misconduct but also for the other episodes was to convey a sense that there was a systematic problem here that these are individual cases and each one of these individual cases has its own intrigue. Its own drama. Its own logic. Its own set of characters but put together. It seems to be pervasive throughout the country. And it can happen to a white guy from Michigan or a black guy from Houston or it's part of a a Philadelphia police force. That's just a after all a few miles from University of Pennsylvania Ivy League college so it can happen anywhere and that systemic quality that I think was so important to this whole series but also in terms of spreading it around geographically. This is an all American problem when things that I feel like gets under told in these stories that are unrepresented is the trauma experienced by the wrongfully convicted. You've three men in these. Three episodes can chester in dwayne. Who if you were to meet them today and anything that happened you can sort of look at their lives and say they seem okay but we know that they're not right? We know they're not I mean I. I know that the chest is doing the best. He can have just got up. But it's a hard road back twenty four years in prison and it's one of the reasons that in the case of the the Holman Film. We started that film with shots of the prison and only hearing his disembodied voice from inside of the Cell Block That he's less than a human being. You can't even see him or touch him or or reckon with him and the prison recording will interrupt your phone call at every fifteen minute interval. In order to remind you that you're being listened to the poignant stories of these in this case these three men you know trying to maintain a sense of decency and humanity in. The face of such. Brutality is impressive and it's a testament to the human spirit when in a big themes of your episodes is the lack of accountability for prosecutors in these wrongful convictions. Is there anything that can happen to change that? Or is this something that is just unfixable. Don't think it's unfixable. I think there are statutory fix. I think you know states have to be willing to enact laws that allow you to hold prosecutors to account that allow you to To have him disbarred or even literally charged with crimes and sent sent to jail. There's also the question of whether or not the federal government could play a stronger role of examining some of these bad prosecutors and filing federal charges against them so in a way I think you know. Part of the solution is technical but part of the solution is Has To do with popular will and that's where. I hope these films can play. A role is let people know. Look you know it's important? Of course that we prosecute crimes and we hold the guilty to account and we take people who are dangerous to us off the streets but the same also important we get that right and if people just for the sake of their own reputations or misguided sense the end justifies the means are methodically putting innocent people in prison. They need to be held to account. Well Alex Gibney. I do think that people who watch these three episodes of the innocence files. That are your block of this project will come away with that and I can't thank you enough for talking to me about. This has been a really fascinating conversation. Thank you so much a great pleasure. And that's it for this week's episode. Thank you so much to Alex Gibney and remember. If you want to hear more of my thoughts on the innocence files check out my podcast crime writers on you can find this show on apple podcasts. Stitcher Google play spotify. And wherever else you get your podcasts? Make sure to subscribe rate and review this show. You can't make this up the production of Pineapple Street studios and Net flicks Rebecca Lavoie and thanks for listening..

Alex Gibney Holman Film Houston Detroit University of Pennsylvania Ivy PHILLY apple Philadelphia Rebecca Lavoie Pineapple Street chester Michigan Google spotify
"prosecutor" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

You Can't Make This Up

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

"About what happened. It was it was really chilling. It was chilling him and she was actually put in jail for a period of time. There were cops on the grand jury. I mean the the idea that this would be practice which it turns out it was regular practice in this county in Texas is astonishing checks and balances to be able to manage these things. But not for the poor you know. You can't hire a high powered attorney to help represent you. You don't really know what your rights are and you can't afford to enforce them so you know particularly in. This was the case the Chester Holman case to the system of criminal. Justice preys on the poor. Because you can muscle the poor in ways that you can't do to the rich And of course the poor don't have access to the same legal defense typically as people with money or as the state does or the labs or any of the other access that the state has Dan. Rizzo was the prosecutor in this case and the film uncovers his having committed an egregious brady violation in withholding records that prove that. Brown did make that phone call. That was his alibi for the murder and that proved that he. Did it know that he did it knowingly that he had an email saying I was hoping it would say this but it didn't? This case is the definition of a brady violation and which a prosecutor violated legal duty constitutional duty to turn over documents. That are helpful. To the defense sobriety violations are another thing that I think those of US interested in wrongful conditions have learned a lot about in the last couple of years but this was a bad one bad one because I mean not only I mean when you have evidence that shows that the alleged perp the person that you want to send to to to prison or to send to die is innocent and you withhold that information. I mean where you going. Is that for the notch on the belt. How do you live with yourself at night? And except that you you convince yourself that he's probably a bad guy and he's he's done other bad things so it's okay. I mean how. How do you wrap your head around that that you hide that evidence knowing that it would be proof that he would be innocent? It really is chilling and yet he's completely unrepentant and the police union is outraged. The dwayne Brown is has been exonerated and declared innocent. And that's another thing about the justice system that I find disquieting and something that I learned in terms of making the series. This terrifying certainty. You know this me to feel certain so that you're unwilling to ever check yourself to you know. Imagine if we all behave that way so that if we learned that something we set our did was wrong or inaccurate untruthful and we just refused to admit you know what kind of world would that be. But that's the world too often of the criminal justice system where there's no willingness or no mechanism for reconsideration or doubt and there's no incentive for people to accept that they were wrong. I mean it's so interesting to watch. And in that case when they decided to declare him legally innocent that the preamble to that press conference had to be. A lot of people aren't going to like this. You're not gonNA WANNA hear this but Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah. It's like he didn't do it he just didn't not only did he. Did he do it? That's a number one but the other thing is that means that the person who did do it is still out there warm in some other part of the prison system. But you know you'd like to think it was a moment Larry. Crasner is talking in the film on Chester Homeland. He says yeah. We'd like to think that we WANNA put the guilty people in jail and let the innocent people go free and you also don't want the innocent person to stay in jail ain't right. I mean You because because you don't want innocent people in prison because that means the guilty out there. Continuing commit crimes right right speaking of innocence. Though he still hasn't gotten compensation from the State of Texas out there was a period of time where they thought he was going to get compensation right right and that I think is a huge injustice. So if you're listening in Texas Raise a Ruckus because this man deserves compensation for what he went through. You know at the hands of Of the state moving onto episode nine of the innocence files. The case of Ken White. Emco who by the way does not look a lot like Phil Collins stages doesn't I would agree with that. Detective Olsten asked me who I thought the composite looks like. I told my uncle Phil Collins in one of the lighter moments of this entire series of He is arrested for allegedly raping and robbing a woman in Michigan and he's immediately harassed by the prosecutor who calls him the million dollar man sort of saying to him like you're not going to be able to fight this. How is that for a setup at the very beginning of a case right? I mean again. It just testifies to the the need for that certainty that the idea. They have a narrative and they're going to push that narrative no matter what the cost like I say again in the case of Ken went emco. It's another way of of getting it. Something which they decided he was a bad guy. They had evidence from his girlfriend. Maybe he was a bad guy and so they pushed the bad guy narrative and the hammer at it until the send him down. Linda Davis is the prosecutor that you focus on in this episode. And she doesn't really seem to have a strong sense of how cases should work in terms of how they're actually investigated and worked. She also didn't have much of a sense of of regret about what had happened. See perfectly sanguine about what happened to poor can went EMCO. That also is something. I have a hard time understanding. I have a hard time standing that to as the documentary progress in the innocence project gets involved and there are all these opportunities to test items for DNA. And I guess it was that deposition footage of her talking about what she did and didn't do in this case. It was in a report that there was a seaman found on a of underwear. I didn't question it. I made an assumption that it was Mr White Namco's in it was explained to me by Tom. Austin that the victim had had an affair earlier that night that she had never had that pair of underwear on after it was initially taken off of her by Mr Call and that it could not have possibly been his semen so I did not send it for testing I would have otherwise. Is that true? Do you think I mean I'm curious? If you're just your opinion you direct this portion of directed by Sara Dallin. Who did a lovely job? Yeah it's hard to know in that moment. Is She lying? Is She remembering things in a way that are I? It doesn't make her look particularly good. It makes her look incompetent or a little bit like a liar but but she doesn't seem to to pause too much just rolls right into it. Same thing with the detective. You know it's interesting the part of the this episode that I think I mean. I'm glad that made me uncomfortable. I think it should is that one of the pieces of evidence that Linda's kind of brings into the into focus is having cans. Ex-girlfriend accused him of being a rapist. Because you know some of his sexual proclivities lineup allegedly with details of the crime and there is some discomfort there the idea that they would lean on that lean on the idea of having a woman falsely accused a guy of being a rapist and that's uncomfortable to watch as viewer and I'm wondering if that was uncomfortable to make you know as a documentarian. How that sort of dealt with a good was and and I think it was also a question that Sarah had to reckon with a lot to was. To what extent do you include some of the details? Either of his past behavior or the details of the rape itself which to some extent he really had to in order to be able to get at the facts of the matter but again this is part of building narrative you want to build the narrative of Ken. Y Namco as a kind of a pervert. Who could commit this kind of an act? Why do you think it was important to go to such different parts of the country to tell these stories? And this is your block of a really good question. We debated that a lot. And and you know we've got.

prosecutor Texas Ken White Emco Namco dwayne Brown Linda Davis Chester Holman Phil Collins US attorney Sara Dallin brady Rizzo Dan murder Detective Olsten Chester Homeland Larry Sarah
"prosecutor" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

You Can't Make This Up

09:44 min | 1 year ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

"Be a reason which isn't true. But that's something I think people believe. I love you to talk a little bit about Roger King his personality the way. He was viewed In Philadelphia and in the courtroom Roger King was a very charismatic character. And I know that I mean he had kind of the fire and brimstone approach of a of a of an old time preacher. We actually were able to get footage of him kind of giving a facsimile of a of a jury to execute somebody. You should look at him and saw. But it's gone. That's being fed. You should stand up and look at him and look at him for a despicable human being. That he is a mad dog. He is and say for what you did why you did it. How did what you did? You should die. It's pretty compelling. I mean this guy is really you could see how in the courtroom he would be hugely convincing He was big man and he felt that he had justice on his side and so if he had been the law to get there he was going to do it and he built a rather enviable record of convictions. Now we know and we're beginning to find out through the work of the innocence project that there was a reason he was getting those convictions. Which was because he was neither helping. To falsify evidence coercing witnesses to ally series of other things. They did it inventory. Discover that his convictions. Were were false. So there's something peculiar about Roger King. He was much admired when he died. The the the obituaries of him were you know. A tremendous outpouring of grief and respect but I think underlying that was a person who felt he had the right to take the law into his own hands that he made decisions about when people were good or bad what was right and wrong and didn't let the facts stand in the way of his gut. It's more than just speeches in court and his persona. He's actually interfering with witnesses in a way that you know if you heard about it in different context it would be an insanity but apparently that was done with some regularity will Jerry Jones the woman who testified against Chester. A trial was threatened by that and it was her fear that they were going to do something to her. That led her to change her story and then they sent her literally out of the city. They said it was for her protection. that Chester was gonna come after her otherwise and then only bring her back in order to be able to testify so it was very much coercive process and the police were very much involved with that. Also is a record of Roger King working with certain detectives over and over and over again and they had a kind of routine going on in terms of how they would get witnesses either liar to shave the truth in ways that resemble the narrative that they were building and that was one of the most interesting things to me as documentarian. Which is you you realize that over time bad prosecutors when I say bad I mean. People were corrupt and are not following the letter of the law. They're storytellers and I'm a storyteller but what you understand. Is that in court or along the way to court. You know in terms of gathering the evidence and what you do. Don't turn over to the fence. It's trying to take a story. That's very much in the gray and turning it into a story that's black and white so that everything is clear and certain and that kind of disquieting certainty that the justice system wants to push it's comforting in some ways because I think we as citizens all want to know we got the bad guy. We put the bad guy behind bars. You know mission accomplished but there's a reason there are terms like reasonable. Doubt Shadow of a doubt doubt turns out to be important. And I think we've gone overboard in terms of lionising. A kind of harsh certainty that comes of the need to tell a simple story to a jury in a way that ultimately becomes not the truth but ally right and I think that also given regular citizens who sit on juries their proclivity to want to trust you know. People who display an innate distrust of the government don't get picked for the jury they just don't so and if that same kind of in the system I think that makes people want to believe those stories and also. There's you know obviously during this period a lot of accusations of racism in the system in the city of Philadelphia. That's where Roger King had this peculiar advantage. Because he was black and you know and many of the people he was prosecuting. We're black was assumed that there was no racial intent or motive and so he must have been ferreting out the truth and I think that Roger King and away saw himself as a character who was kind of a finding a way of taking the bad apples. Out of the african-american Daryl and in that way. He became an extremely dangerous character. If you were black defendant going up against him. I mean that that was sort of the era of the you know. Bill cosby proselytizing. Pull your pants up young men. It's really interesting. The the sort of the the time periods and the regions you Look at these. Three episodes as a filmmaker who is known for making music transcended beautiful documentaries. How painful is it for you to have that little sideways iphone video of Chester Home? Getting out of prison in your documentary was interesting the way the prison handled. Chester's release because when he was finally exonerated. The prison move very quickly with lightning speed. Because I think they didn't want a gaggle of cameras there and we only got I think about two or three hours before gesture was going to be released and all of us you know made out like that's out of hell to in separate cars to try to get there at time and my producer who's magnificent on his film. Kevin Huffman got there with his camera and was there when Chester got out. That is to say with his iphone because the camera crews hadn't arrived yet and he got the perfect shot the money shot but they confiscated his phone and erase the footage. But we did get from somebody whose name and identity. I won't reveal that sideways. Look at Chester hugging. Allan talk just after he gets out of the gates. I'm moving on. You know one other character who comes into play in a lot of these wrongful conviction case. I don't want to say a lot. Because we hear the innocence project folks say over and over and over again that they only can do a tiny percentage of cases that come their way they can actually take up for a variety of reasons. The same is true in a newsroom. I work in a newsroom by day. I know that we get. Tips beget from citizens from inmates from all sorts of people. All the time writing. And you can. You can just sort of be. Dale used by stories of people saying I was wrong in one way or the other but an episode eight. We have an instance of journalists getting a tip like this and really working it in the case of Alfred. Dwayne Brown He was convicted for capital murder in the killing of Houston police officer Charles Clarke in another case that went wrong on many levels. Can you just talk about the role of journalism in in the stories that are covered in your episodes? Sure I mean. In Chester's case there was the role of the Philadelphia Inquirer who did that wonderful takeout on tests the lying that we profile in the case of dwayne Brown. You know there was Lisa Lisa Falkenberg. That was not a film. I directed was directed by the Wonderful Andy. Grieve was my longtime editor. So Lisa just found this case and really did believe in it and Doug and Doug and Doug and didn't extraordinary amount of work until she started embarrassing people And the next thing you know defense attorneys start to take over and I think that it can't be said enough. That the role of the press in terms of embarrassing public officials is potent and powerful and at a time when the press is being demonized as enemies of the people you can see in the hands of Lisa. What dogged reporting truth telling can do in terms of writing a wrong? It was really interesting. Because Brown's case he also had an alibi and he called his girlfriend at a time when the murder was committed so he couldn't have done it and yet at the grand jury people. Don't how grand juries work it's the prosecutor and a bunch of citizen. Jurors called in and jurors can ask questions unlike in a courtroom jury trial but the prosecutor allowed this alibi witness to be badgered and harassed by the grand jury that was shocking to me and harassed by the grand jury and and really threatened by the prosecutors so that she was terrified. That issues guy end up going to prison for perjury. And who's GonNa take care of her kid and so they had a way of making her toe the line. I mean it was rough justice in the in the the most terrible sense that was a big get for Andy and his team to be able to get her The girlfriend come forward and talk.

Roger King Chester Lisa Lisa Falkenberg dwayne Brown Philadelphia prosecutor murder Chester Home Jerry Jones Bill cosby Doug perjury Andy editor Kevin Huffman Allan producer Dale
"prosecutor" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

You Can't Make This Up

08:45 min | 1 year ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on You Can't Make This Up

"Rest convict move onto the next. They were doing everything they could to close a case without trying to seek out the actual truth I happen to be a Chazal in the mix of it to Alex gave me. Thank you so much for talking to me. I really appreciate it. So for this project. The innocence files. It takes a look at several aspects of dysfunction in the Criminal Justice System. And your episodes. Look at prosecutorial misconduct. Why this topic for you. I mean I've done a lot of films about power and abuse of power and so to do the story. Prosecutorial misconduct seem right up my alley and it is one of the great sources of injustice in the criminal justice system so wildly enthusiast ticket on. I know a lot about the chester home. In case I actually worked on a podcast that covered the case. And what's really interesting about this case? In episode seven is that you tracked the conviction Integrity Unit reinvestigation and petition process. As it's happening. Can you just talk about that process as you were making this episode? Sure I think that was one of the things that was most engaging for me but also the scariest because we were tracking this case in real time. We didn't know how it's going to end up. We hoped the chester would be released. But we didn't know for sure that it was going to happen and certainly juster had been down this road many times before so to be able to embed to some extent with conviction integrity unit was hugely beneficial. Because this was an eye opener for me. I didn't know that much about the you know. There are a number of them across the country but particularly Philadelphia with the election. Larry crasner attorney. You know he really put in a strong conviction integrity unit and the idea of prosecutors and defense attorneys working together to try to uncover. The truth is really a a novel concept and one which. I was thrilled to try to film in real time. Well it is a rare thing that politics intervenes. In this way you know Larry. Crasner ran on this platform of fixing the criminal justice system in in Philadelphia and that's a real conviction integrity unit. There are other places in the country. We should mention that. Set them up and they don't operate that way you were with this unit and one of the most extraordinary scenes is when they do that right along to sort of recreate the conditions of the night of the Crime. So wherever that COP is pulled over there is probably we were about the pullover. Yeah usually centrally coming back to the seat of the cry. Yeah this would be held here. So we're we're at eight minutes. Essentially I just don't think there's any way chester can have committed the crime and and stopped wearing was in the time period from the crime. In the you. Just talk about what. It was like being with them while they were doing their work. It was so exhilarating in the sense of that is the moment. We sat in on a number of meetings with conviction integrity unit itself that was in the prosecutor's Office Case Patricia. Cummings who is leading the conviction tiger unit in Allen Tober was just homes offense attorney were sitting side by side in the middle of the winter in a car. You know literally tracing what was supposed to have been the getaway route of the car. You know those occupied by the alleged murderer so that was really a fantastic moment. We embellished it later. On with some areas shot after the fact it's drone footage being in the car Or tagging along for that was really something one of the things. That's so interesting about Chester's case the laser focus. The police had on him pretty much. Only him from minute one. But were you surprised? In his case. Just how much evidence? There was contradicting the theory that he could have done it that for some reason. Investigators just chose to not look at well. We try to construct the story as a murder mystery but a murder mystery in reverse that is to say revealing over time. How Chester didn't commit the murder in how somebody else likely did. But I think what really knocked me out was how little evidence there was to convict. Chester at all. You know pretty much. The day after Chester's interrogated the police pursue another lead which was much more compelling but by then they had already committed to ally and committed to forcing a witness to lie and also to writing in something on Chester's own statement which was false so they were already building a case and once they had committed to that lie. That was the big problem that they were no longer open to. Any other evidence That happened and that was maybe the most interesting thing about Chester's case because you get into the whole idea of how that original lie reverberates through the criminal justice system there was a lot of talk in the Philadelphia Inquirer of this process called test. Allying where you know. Witnesses in order to get more. Favorable treatment in their own cases are coerced into lying In order to be able to to get a conviction but then when they recant their considered an unreliable witness will now that they're unreliable. The judge claimed that he or she doesn't know whether to believe in the first time or the second time so in the absence of any definitive other proof they let the original ruling stand while that's terrifying idea. If you think about it because it means that police and prosecutors have an incentive to get witnesses to lie knowing that if they recant later until the truth they will never be believed. What a what a what a terrifying concept this case in particular. You know. It's really hard because this is a subject that comes up a lot and I've said this before and I think about it a lot in that in some sort of broken police. Units or prosecutorial units or segments of the criminal. Justice system is seem like there. Are you know generally good people who are incentivized to do the wrong thing I mean? Where do you land on that? Is it you able in any way to look at this situation in Philadelphia and say oh? This is just the way they did their job. They didn't mean to do harm. You know nobody. Unless you're in the mafia nobody goes out and says themselves you know. My job is to do bad. So that's what I get paid for. And that's what I'm going to do. So in the case of of the police you know. Philadelphia was in the midst of a tremendous murder spree. There was violence all over the city. There were unsolved cases piling up. There was tremendous pressure to get something done to be tough on crime and I think there's a phrase called noble cause corruption which is a police phrase and it refers to dirty cops who believe that in the service of trying to get people they know to be really bad guys like say a killer. They can't get him for the murder of somebody in the neighborhood so what they do. Is They plant some drugs on them when they arrest them for that and they put them down for that but over time it leads to this belief that you know in your gut right that you've got the right person. I mean the originally bring chester in because they had an unbelievable match on the license plate of his car with With the actual PERP and why the same three letters same car so there was a reason for that we sold out. There turned out to be a good reason for it. But at the time you you can understand why cops would pull him in. So they in their gut. They feel okay. We got the right guy so we'll do whatever we need to do. In order to make sure this guy gets put away and no namby-pamby liberal defense attorney is going to get him off and they concoct something to make sure that he's convicted and convicted quickly on very little evidence. I mean there was no physical evidence whatsoever. In the case it was just a two eye-witnesses that was it and then the kind of bold summation by Roger King who was a noted African American prosecutor. Who you know put a lot of black defendants behind bars? And he seemed to have a view that if you're caught you're probably a bad guy and he would use his rhetorical skills to put these people away but that's also tactic. That's used a lot in jury trials year prosecutors even on fictional jury trials on TV. You hear them say it must've been if he's arrested he must have been doing something you know and I do think that is something that citizens because let's face it. A lot of people never have contact with the police in their entire life. That if there was contact with the police there must.

chester Philadelphia murder attorney Larry crasner chester home Integrity Unit prosecutor Philadelphia Inquirer Chazal Alex Roger King Cummings Allen Tober
"prosecutor" Discussed on Scene Of the Crime

Scene Of the Crime

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on Scene Of the Crime

"Two Bulls cking horns. Bitter Court battle waged between the love. Federal Prosecutor Thomas Crane Wales who was considered a pillar of the Seattle community and the defendant. Who has become most well known as the pilot with an alleged deadly grudge. Some say that bitterness was the motive for those shots fired in the dead of night that left Thomas Wales bleeding out in his Seattle home. It's alleged that the lone shooter was the pilot, or if not him he was the maestro of a small conspiracy, his way of exacting revenge against Wales who he believed ruined his life. Or, that's what some people say. It's been nearly twenty years. The pilot has never wavered from proclaiming his innocence despite nearly two decades under the FBI's microscope, no charges have ever been filed against him in the murder of Tom Whales, but what if there was something else at play here? What a federal agents had gotten tunnel vision against the pilot. What if the bad blood story between the prosecutor and And the pilot was just the tip of the iceberg, and the real story lay underneath the cold murky waters of Wales's case files an alleged conspiracy, far more insidious involving a helicopter, the private, the government and a corporation, playing puppet master was the just Tom was didn't want to lose face and wanted to say out of conviction and keep is record intact. You know as a prosecutor. Was it pride? The more we learn about what was going on at that time period, the more curious. I'm caroline surreal with Kim Shepard and this is the scene of the crime..

Thomas Crane Wales prosecutor Seattle Tom Whales Bitter Court Bulls caroline surreal FBI Kim Shepard murder
"prosecutor" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on WJR 760

"The S. on the prosecutor's investigation could reveal this one small part of the puzzle as to how we go on a skate own faced when angel misconduct charges in Japan retired auto executive Robert Lutz told CNBC that he thinks Goans suffered from what lots calls C. E. O. disease the number of times in my career that these people receive nothing but adulation of from the media and from inside their own country never receive any negative feedback we tend to develop his god complex and believe that they are above the law defense secretary mark asper says Iran and its Hezbollah forces may be planning further attacks on American interests in the Middle East we need to stand up here on and that we need them to behave like a normal country that means ending their nuclear program ending their long range ballistic missile program the stopping of hostage taking then of course the malign behaviour where they are inspiring terrorist groups resourcing and directing them all the way from Africa across the Middle East and Afghanistan Iran back forces stormed the U. S. embassy in Baghdad on new year's eve and then backed away environmental crews are at the site of the toxic leak from a closed up metal plating factory a form of chromium leaked on the roof freeway in Madison heights two weeks ago it was a federal EPA Superfund site for a clean up several years ago and then the state was supposed to finish the job Wayne County voters could be facing a series of bills proposals in this new year W. A. R. gene formal reports one request could come from the Detroit Historical Society and the other one from the Charles H. right museum of African American history they're expected to go together and hiring a consultant shortly to explore first time tax proposal that could go before voters this year both cultural institutions of fought for years and trying to keep up with the operating cost but their potential Miller's request comes as voters are also being asked to approve a new tax plan the funding of regional transit a March request by the DIA to renew its ten year regional millage and a fifty million dollar fundraising campaign for the Motown museum Jean thought whatever you J. R. news a stunned meant to be a funny bond boy ours for retiring fire chief backfired on Detroit firefighters they posed in front of a burning vacant house for a photo that was posted and now the fire commissioner said as there could be disciplined handed out one of the most famous cars in the world is up for auction you can buy it the nineteen sixty eight Mustang G. T. driven by Steve McQueen in the movie Bullitt the card was kept in a garage for decades before it suddenly was shown at the twenty eighteen Detroit Auto Show it's owned by a vice president for a PR company the bids will be taken starting today through January twelfth at the me comes auction house in Florida you'll have to have some big box the car could go for about five million dollars once again the Dow Jones industrials and the S. and P. start out the year at record highs I'm Decatur more with.

prosecutor
"prosecutor" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:59 min | 2 years ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"With the prosecutor will believe the law and order in consequence we've got this guy the blog video everybody in the press lamp that the guy he never showed up on time he's always at the gym everybody is laughing it in the day he announced for president I beat it the whole down news paper the whole thing with everybody laughing with this picture of the battle these guys that went out for a walk around on the trail well the York city is suffering all kinds of problems with law enforcement get the hose down the get a bucket thrown at them they don't even do anything you've got the blog deals warning as he started by trashing the cop and a yeah but stop that and business is down in the city look what happened the am about look at Batman I mean this is the classic what bill bond with the Democrats and the blonde B. O. is the guy you know who it is but I don't have a clue I don't know what else he does not have a clue the guy who's running is bad is cool is it I can't even clear all up saying something worse than what I want to say I'm not gonna say other than you've got all the pal but they're already big but everything is about making sure that that that color is the only thing that matters we need diversity we sure but you know what we need a level playing field for everybody and when I was DA everybody got a level playing field I don't care what color you want or what party you're from this is the America or street but the lack does not believe in that the lab will leave that that the people are there to fund the government whatever they want and now these Democrats running for president what they want is they want you to pay for the healthcare for a legal and then pay for your own healthcare they want free college education for a legal but you got to pay for your own I know this is this is beyond you know what at least at least rock Obama you know the guidelines do you but now Bravo bomber would be considered to server that he's on a lot of this book by need these guys are the losers judge Jeanine Pirro I'm glad the book is out radical resistance and revenge imagine and fourteen minds that all of a sudden Elizabeth Warren is sitting in the White House and she's talking about social policy with Nancy Pelosi and Chuck Schumer the country would be remade not in an American image we gotta go judging you know I watch every week and give my best all the folks at fox especially Sean Hannity I love that guy you too and thank you dear listeners and thank you to you bill for what you do the reason the word gets out and god bless America thank you judge thank you I let's continue with more of a line becomes available eight six six six four seven seven three three seven bill coming in the great American live with you every Sunday night Glenn.

prosecutor
"prosecutor" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Prosecutors say it's not enough on the Brady, Fox News. They're pushing for a new sentencing of the white police officer who killed a black teen shot sixteen times in Chicago where FOX's Jeff and also is live. Lisa, Illinois, attorney General, Raul. I'm the lead prosecutor in the Jason Van Dyke case filed a petition to the state supreme court challenging Van Dyke sentence of less than seven years in prison and the two thousand fourteen killing of drugged burglary suspects. Look one McDonald. This is the first step in asking the court to declare that the trial court improperly sentenced Jason Van Dyke than to order. A new sentencing hearing prosecutors had asked for a sentence of up to twenty years the defense on probation. No comment yet from Van Dyke legal team, Lisa. Thanks, Jeff border security talks in congress hit a new wall with just four days left to avoid another partial government shutdown the big sticking point among the conferees at the moment is the number of detention space. For immigration and customs enforcement, otherwise known as ice the Democrats are willing to support while Republicans want to expand the number of detention facilities. Democrats want to reduce the overall number and cap, the number of beds used for interior enforcement. That's for people found to be in the country illegally in places other than the border at sixteen thousand five hundred beds. Fox's John decker at the White House. The president FOX's John Roberts rather at the White House. The president tweeting the Democrats were acting irrationally. Democrats argue a cap on detention beds would force the administration to prioritize deportation for criminals, President Trump holds a rally tonight in El Paso, Texas. He also sit down with FOX's Laura Ingram. That interview airs at ten P M eastern, former Texas congressman better Aurora who hasn't ruled out a run for president plans to hold an anti wall.

Jason Van Dyke Van Dyke Fox Fox News president President Trump FOX Lisa White House Texas Jeff Laura Ingram El Paso Chicago officer McDonald burglary congress prosecutor congressman
"prosecutor" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

Radio Atlantic

07:26 min | 2 years ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on Radio Atlantic

"Enforcement with this idea you become disillusioned. What happens next? How did you end up where you are into your position on all of this? I decided that I didn't go to law school to up black people. And since that's a lot of the work of prosecutors. I wanted to be more thoughtful about ways to transform the criminal legal process, which is how I ended up as a law professor writing about this stuff. And I'm hopeful about this new movement for progressive. Prosecutors this new smart Orne crime. But I'm still concerned that reform is too modest ago that transformation is the ideal and the concerns that I have even about the limited success of progressive. Prosecutors has to do with first of all the the politics that I've already described which is dysfunctional, which will require people to do all. Kinds of compromises and. Yeah, that's what any politician does. That's what any law maker does. But the compromises in these contexts are often significant again for walk ins, it was literally asking the jury to sentenced to death. There's also the Abbas aerial system. And so a lot of folks think well if the prosecutor's job to put people in prison, it's the defense attorney's job to keep people out. And if you have all this concern about people who are getting locked up. You ought to be a defense attorney not a prosecutor. And then the third concern that progressive prosecutors run into is getting buy in from the lawing prosecutors. So I work with these issues with top and with prosecutors and cops are a lot easier to deal with in terms of teaching them because police officers are used to sitting in a classroom and be. Being told what to do prosecutors on the other hand don't like that? And they certainly don't like any inference that they're responsible for some kind of racial injustice or economic or social injustice, which is the result of them. Putting so many people in prison. So it's hard for. I think a lot of lying. Prosecutors even if there's a progressive DA to fall in lie, you know, for police President Obama's commission recommended that they stop thinking of themselves as warriors, but rather think of themselves as guardians. And if you think about it, there's a whole different kind of profile for a person who wanted to be a warrior than a person who wanna be a guardian. And I think the same thing is true for prosecutors. You know, there's a lot of you know, eagle and competitiveness. Among all lawyers. And for prosecutors, you wanna win cases and the way that you rise up in most offices is to put as many people in prison for as long as you can. And so that's the mindset of a lot of people who want to do that job just regular day to day work, and so Larry crasner in Philly. He had to fire a whole bunch of people in his office. If other prosecutors aren't willing to do that. Then again, I'm not sure how successful enterprise is going to be if the only person who wants change is the woman or man on top warriors versus guardians. I like that a lot Emily ask you one question before we close here. Which is you know, you've followed comma Harris's career, you know, a lot about politics. How do you see this issue playing out for Harris, given the current crop of twenty twenty candidates which inevitably will expand you have people on one hand like Tulsi Gabbard and Elizabeth Warren? Orrin Pete budget. Cory booker. You have Joe Biden, you might have Michael Bloomberg. You have centrists, and you have a pretty far left wing of the party. How do you see the dynamics here will there are certainly people like Joe Biden who are have a more reactionary criminal Justice record than comma Harris does at the same time. There are a lot of people who are positioned as liberals who have no record, and it will be easier for them to say the things liberals want here if that's the position they wanna take. They're not going to have to reckon with a record somewhat at odds with that. So that's a challenge for Harris, potentially. So far, I have not heard that kind of reckoning from her she has been kind of sticking with the more traditional prosecutor rhetoric, and and that may reflect her feeling that even in democratic primary. That's the better bet politically that most voters are not going to reject her because. They don't think she was progressive enough when she was DA or attorney general, and she may be right about that political bet, you know, there's a really interesting primary calendar this year, California, her home state is very early. Right. So that time for the first time, so that's like a shakeup that presumably will favor her. And then there are three southern states with significant African American electorates in the democratic primary that are also early on, you know, Harris wants to so up those voters. I it's going to be interesting to see whether they, you know, really go for her whether some of this becomes a sticking point, especially for younger voters, black voters and other Democrats. I think these criminal Justice issues are more significant than they've been in the past. They are definitely animating some part of the switchboard nationally. To Emily's point. If I were advising Harris at the beginning of her career knowing that one day she would run for president. I'm not sure I would tell her to do anything differently on. Now, the concern is because she has been quote unquote, progressive prosecutor, but not progressive enough that that will hurt her with some voters the main voters there, I think our people in the movement for black lives. If you compare that group to the raw swath of the body politic who Harris would need to win. I think that larger group is going to be more central more centrist, and certainly not as many people, call her more white, folks. And so what do we know about the way that why people vote, no democ? Crat candidate ever gets a majority of the white vote, not Hillary Clinton, not Barack Obama not anybody since I think the nineteen sixties. So Harris has gotta get this forty two percent. A white people to vote for her. And they're going to want reassurance. You know, Barack Obama. He took some stains. When he first Rian that I knew he couldn't actually believe he claimed that he was.

prosecutor Harris Barack Obama Joe Biden attorney Emily president Abbas aerial system professor Cory booker Hillary Clinton Orrin Pete Michael Bloomberg Orne Rian Larry crasner Tulsi Gabbard Philly Elizabeth Warren
"prosecutor" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

10:39 min | 2 years ago

"prosecutor" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"The. When comma Harris introduces herself, she's known to say the same thing again. And again, she talks about being a prosecutor, and I got all excited. My said what side become a prosecutor? I am a former prosecutor I have led investigations, and I have prosecuted all types of crime particular violent crimes, it's more than just a line on her resume. It's this vibe she has earlier this year when this video of her grilling supreme court nominee Brett Cavanaugh when a little viral. She had this look on her face eyebrows. Arched chin down lips pursed. Like, I know. He's lying. Are you certainly have not had a conversation. Anyone at that law firm? Has expensive? I would like to know the person you're thinking of because what if you're thinking of someone in you don't wanna tell us. When they talked about the testimony on daily show Trevor Noah laser in on the Senator from California, can you think of any law that gives the government the power to make decisions about the male body. Not. I'm not thinking of any right now Senator. Amanda about my God down Kamala Harris brings men for coming. The Harris being a prosecutor means she's tough. She's the boss. It can be a cordial way to say thank you next. Only have a few seconds left. And I'll just ask you a direct question. Did you watch Dr Ford's testimony? I did not I plan our plans. But today, we're going to talk about what Kamla Harris history as a prosecutor really means. We're going to do that with someone who's usually on the other side of the courtroom. So my name is Lara bass lon-, currently, I'm an Laura Basilan used to be a public defender. No, she trains defense attorneys, and essentially what I've devoted my out of the cassisi to is fighting on behalf of people who are poor and have no voice and quite often, those are people of color. She does this at the university of San Francisco school of law. It's just a few miles down the road from where Kamala Harris got her start at the San Francisco DA's office. I've never crossed paths with her. But like so many people who do the kind of work that I do in California. I'm intimately familiar with her record 'cause we've lived under her regime. Laura says going inside comma Harris's regime is the only way to get beyond her presidential rhetoric. So today, we're going to do just that we'll look at how Harris fought crime on behalf. The state of California, Laura has some real questions about whether comma Harris did it the right way. Stay with us. Come here is doesn't just call herself. A prosecutor she calls herself a progressive prosecutor, Laura Basilan notice it when she picked up Harris's new book the troops. We hold what she saw this phrase. My mouth fell open. Why because she's not one. She's calling herself that I believe because it's become this very trendy buzzy word with a lot of positive political connotations attached to it it signals that you are reform minded it signals that you are forward thinking and she wants those associations. I asked Laura tell me what a progressive prosecutor looks like she gave me a few examples starting with Larry crasner in Philadelphia Larry crasner came in. And he said, I was a former federal public defender in a civil rights attorney, and I'm here to make change, and he proceeded to fire over thirty one old guard DA's were putting in place pretty awful policies in my view. He started instructing his line. Prosecutors not to prosecute certain low level felonies. He's not going to seek the death penalty, which is a big deal in Philadelphia county where most of the people in the state of Pennsylvania who are on death row. Come from. There's also Wesley bell who just took office in Saint Louis, Missouri. Wesley bell. He was elected in the wake of Ferguson. He is very committed to looking into officer involved shootings. He to fired a lot of the old guard. There are many many examples of progressive prosecutors, and we are right now at a time when more and more people are. Running for district attorney and winning on true reform platforms, but come a la- Harris. She's just not in that group. How much do you know about how come Aharon got started? As a prosecutor. She got started as a line prosecutor in that Alameda County district attorney's office, and then she moved onto the San Francisco DA and she worked under a guy named Terence Hallinan who was considered to be a reformer. And then she made this decision to challenge him to run against him, which I think he saw actually as a real betrayal because I think he saw her as a protege. She ran on a platform of this office is in disarray and the conviction rate is really poor. And we need to step up our game who's she ran against a reformer who had like what kind of ideas was he pushing. So he was a former public defender who ran and won as the San Francisco district attorney, and he was considered to be pretty liberal. Now. Of course, we're talking about San Francisco. So this is a community that's quite different than many, many other communities that elected. Strict attorneys across the United States. But yes, he was someone who came from a defense background. I mean, you describe a bunch of things that she did while she was in the prosecutors position where she for instance, she made it so that parents could be prosecuted right for their kids being truant at school. And she refused to look at the Catholic church when she had some evidence against them. What are some other cases that really stood out in your mind? The case that stood out of my mind. Mostly were the wrongful conviction cases where she fought to uphold tainted convictions and not from my perspective as someone who ran an innocence project, and as an innocence advocate. There are other cases that bother me as well, including her real inability to respond in an appropriate way. For example, when there was a big crime lab scandal in San Francisco in twenty ten when she was running the DA's office and six hundred cases had to be dismissed it became clear as these. Cases were being litigated that the higher ups in her office were well aware of the corruption of the lab technician whose work was at issue and did not turn that information over to the defense as they were required to do. A judge got quite angry and issued a long-ruling sternly rebuking Harris. And her response was to challenge that ruling by arguing that the judge's husband was a defense attorney who had spoken publicly about the importance of disclosures in these kinds of situations. Therefore, the judge was conflicted. So simple. She made a personal end. She rather than reflecting on what had gone on. And what the judge had rightly pointed out to be failures and oversights and worse by her office instead took on I think pretty meritless personal attack. This theme of Harris digging in even when there's evidence of prosecutorial misconduct. You can see those were in her career to like take the case of Johnny Baca. He's convicted for murder in state. In the nineties, and basically the state's case turned on the testimony in large part of jailhouse informant. And during the course of litigation one of the lead. Prosecutors in the case actually committed perjury in an effort to secure the conviction which worked and then Johnny Baca proceeded to go alternately federal court to try to get relief. And at that point, it was up to comma Harris as the attorney general to defend that conviction or in her discretion as a prosecutor whose mission is to seek Justice to move to vacate that conviction because it was tainted and she chose the first pass, and she ran straight into a battering ram of three appellate justices on the ninth circuit. And what ended up happening was that they berated the prosecutor that she sent in to defend that conviction, and because the ninth circuit live streams by video it's oral arguments, and because one of the judges was quite famous it went viral by. At least lowly lawyer standards. And so it became very talked about and very embarrassing from. From. So you only relented when this case got a lot of publicity. That's my theory. And I contrast it to the other case involving amend George gauge where there was a lot of misconduct used to secure his conviction. And actually, quite frankly, I think the evidence of his innocence is more compelling than Mockus case. But he didn't have a celebrity judge his video didn't go viral. And I really feel like that may have been the difference. Because in both cases, the judges made it clear that they expected the line prosecutor to go back and talk to higher ups in the office and do the right thing. And in one case, she did Johnny Baca. And in the other case, she didn't George gage told me the story of George H just from the beginning. What happened was that? George gage was a sixty year old electric. He had no criminal record. He entered into a marriage with a woman who had a daughter named Marian and the marriage went wrong, very wrong. Gauge had an extra metal fair had a child. It was. Very acrimonious and Marian and her mom and that moving away following divorce, and there were all kinds of financial issues that were going on as well years later Marian brought forward Allah Gatien's that gauge had sexually abused her. When she lived with him as a kid and because so much time had passed. The only evidence was Marian testimony. So George gage was indicted and tried and the jury hung the first time he was offered a plea deal that would have essentially given him time served because he had been incarcerated he said, no, I am not sexual

prosecutor Kamala Harris San Francisco attorney Johnny Baca Laura Basilan California Kamla Harris San Francisco school of law Harris la- Harris George gage Brett Cavanaugh Trevor Noah Marian Philadelphia county Senator United States