30 Burst results for "project scientist"

The Doomsday Clocks Historic Wake-Up Call With Rachel Bronson

Big Brains

05:11 min | 8 months ago

The Doomsday Clocks Historic Wake-Up Call With Rachel Bronson

"Forty five. The united states detonated two atomic bombs over hiroshima and nagasaki. It is harnessing of the basic power. The universe shortly after a group of manhattan project scientists at the university of chicago who helped build the atomic bomb but protested using against people started the bulletin of the atomic scientists. Huge choice is peace or total destruction. the atomic is yeah. They wanted to urge fellow scientists to help shape national and international policy to mitigate the risk of the nuclear technology that they themselves had helped create and they wanted to help the public understand the dangers of nuclear weapons. To the future of humanity world would not be the same. i remember anthony blind from hindu scripture. The by gerrad gita. Now i am become death. Despoil worlds are another in designing the cover of its magazine. The bulletin created something striking o'clock running out of time. It started as artistic piece created by chicago based marta lanes door. She was very to manhattan project. Scientists issues gender stood the scientists concerns about this new technology and the need for public engagement and they had asked her to create some sort of design that would engage the public on. How serious the threat of this new technology. And she said it seven minutes to midnight every year since then. The bulletin set the hands of its metaphorical clock in relation to how close to doomsday. We might be last year. The group moved it to a mere one hundred seconds to midnight. And at the time we got a lot of chiding like it's twenty twenty how come it so close. Do you really believe it's this close and then sure enough. We saw the massive wildfires right outta the gate in in australia. That got repeated in california this year but obviously covid and the inability of the global community to deal effectively with covid is was to us a clear indication of our inability to deal with existential threats. Known some ways you can make an argument that it should have been even closer to midnight this year because you had your existing threats then you had that real life pandemic which is continuing to affect us. How can we didn't go further to midnight. Yeah so in some ways You know we don't want to double count right and so a lot of the warning signs. Were what moved to one hundred seconds to midnight but it is a very dangerous in environment. And we'd we do want to acknowledge that hundred seconds to midnight is dangerous. We do see some bright spots and some opportunities so those bright spots helped us from moving forward but we weren't prepared to move it back. It may be tempting to look at the clock this year and take some hope from the fact that it didn't move closer to but remember it's still the closest to midnight that we have ever been and this year the bolton highlighted new threat one that they said is a threat multiplier to all the other problems that we face with the world health organization called a massive info democ he really grappling with what our trusted new sources. And how do you find them. And how do we share the so. We're all overwhelmed with data and information. But it's very optimistic. When it comes to share it information or what you and i know and so that becomes very disorienting and it becomes Quite dangerous right. It sets up the ability for authoritarian leaders to create their own information and different sites secrete. Their own information will get into the surprising. Ways that this info democ touches every threat factor to the doomsday clock but will start with the issue that was really the canary in the coal. Mine of this info dynamic climate change. The scientists have been warning us for decades and yet they're the ones who have experienced a lot of these issues in terms of misinformation and disinformation. I that denying climate science the marginalization of them the using of science which is kind of about uncertainty and evolution to dismiss what scientists have to say. All of. this was the global warming. And that it's a lot of it's a hoax hoax. Moneymaking industry okay. Climate change is not science. it's religion it pulls the rug out from under scientists and expert exactly the time when such expertise is actually needed and within the context of the us there could be real differences among republicans. Democrats or what you think about market versus regulation. Those are really really important questions that we should be debating fiercely right now that we can when it's being defined as climate change yes or no we can't even have the kind of real political conversations that we should be having

Gerrad Gita Marta Lanes Manhattan Nagasaki Hiroshima University Of Chicago The Bulletin Anthony Chicago United States Australia California Bolton World Health Organization
What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:49 min | 11 months ago

What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

"Next week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of atomic bombs being dropped on japan. It's one of the most controversial decisions in us. History research resulted in the weapons of mass. Destruction took place at several locations but chicago became one of the main science centers. I spoke with writer. Terry mcclellan mcandrew about the work done in the state and the reasons chicago was a manhattan project site while there were several reasons wine wise. It was the home of arthur holly compton who was a physicist who was already working on some of this chicago is also seen as centrally located in the country. So that other manhattan project. Scientists around the country could excess it fairly readily also the university of chicago approved of being a manhattan project site and supported it. This work going on people unaware of it in a very busy location in a major city. It seems dangerous it does doesn't it It was a secret project and secrecy was something that was drilled into everyone's minds who worked on the manhattan project there have been some oral histories taking of people who worked on the project. And one was of william. J nicholson who helped. Create the pile as it was called. That was what became the nuclear reactor that developed the first self sustaining nuclear reaction at the university of chicago and he talks about this need for secrecy and how it was drilled into all of staff there there were known agents of the german government in and around the university of chicago and we were told that and that We were not to reveal anything of what you do. Don't take up with strangers If you're having a sandwich someplace or beer or whatever Watch out that people who may engage you in conversation. would be damaging to the war effort and that the they may actually be the enemy so one huge question that comes up about this manhattan project site at the university of chicago in the in. The middle of this metropolitan side is where danger. Was there a danger to the university chicago illinois even the mid west region and the physicists. I spoke to said in essence no the nuclear reactor that the scientists were developing at the chicago at chicago was very low powered in comparison to what we see today at most. It could have powered a two hundred watt lightbulb therefore it was not putting out the kind of radiation that one of our nuclear directors today could could do in there for the harm was not significant. Now there was some danger to the people who were in the room where that nuclear reactor was working one of the dangers. Although the scientists in charge had done innumerable calculations to make sure the danger was very small. There was still a worried that the nuclear reactor could get out of control and they took protection against that and they had what they called the suicide squad two to three men who stood atop the nuclear reactor with the cadman solution. So that in case it did run away and start to melt down. They would pour this over the pile and hopefully it would stop but as one. Scientists told me the suicide squad would not live to tell about it. The first nuclear reaction took place there and it was momentous you know especially when you think about it in terms of what would come later but at the time from what i read in your story to those folks sorta matter of fact it was a big deal but their reaction was a bit anti-climactic. They basically broke out a bottle of chianti and also signed the basket that the bottle of chianti was in and that was pretty much it. The physicists i talked to said that the lead scientists on the reactor enrico fermi was so sure he had done endless calculations he carried his slide rule around with him for those who don't know what a slide rule is. That was your pre computer calculator in the days and he cared around with him. He did endless calculations to make sure he knew what was going to happen with this nuclear reactor and so it went exactly as planned and in essence while it was an enormous event. It changed our lives. It changed science and international relations forever. The scientists there. Just pretty much congratulated. Each other broke out a bottle

Chicago Terry Mcclellan University Of Chicago Arthur Holly Compton J Nicholson German Government Mcandrew Manhattan Japan Mass William Cadman Illinois Enrico Fermi
Solar Orbiter’s first images show the sun is covered in tiny ‘campfire’ flares

Rush Limbaugh

00:35 sec | 1 year ago

Solar Orbiter’s first images show the sun is covered in tiny ‘campfire’ flares

"A solar probe, launched from Cape Canaveral in February, is already sending back the close pictures of the sun ever taken. Images snap 48 million miles from the sudden surface capture small solar flares named campfires. Many of these particular features have not been observed. Before at this scale these air clearly just the first test images, so it's too early to draw any scientific conclusions. Daniel Mueller is project scientist for the mission. That's joint venture with NASA and the European Space Agency. Solar Orbiter has less than six months into its seven year long mission. Studying our closest

Cape Canaveral Daniel Mueller European Space Agency Project Scientist Nasa
"project scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Being filled voice reports that some of what its scene is so strange researchers initially thought their instruments were broken the Parker solar probe was built to withstand the searing temperatures around the sun it blasted off in August of twenty eighteen flybys of Venus help it adjust its orbit so that it gradually gets closer and closer to the sun so far it's one close by three times coming about fifteen million miles from the sun that's a lot closer than the nearest planet mercury the Suns already looking very different from what we've seen before Justin Casper is an astrophysicist at the university of Michigan he says that one of the biggest findings is something that could explain a long standing mystery why the sun's atmosphere is so much hotter than its surface in apparent violation of like I don't know the second law of thermodynamics he says it's just weird like if you were walking away from a camp fire and instead of getting colder the air got hotter we have to identify some way that energy leaves the solemn travels out into space and then gets the positive he says that Parker solar probe might have just found out how that happens close to the sun there are strange features in a plasma called the solar wind charged particles they're constantly streaming out into space we'd see suddenly spy you can follow where in just a couple seconds the solar wind would start flowing three hundred thousand miles an hour faster these spikes would only last a few seconds or minutes but the nearly double the speed of the solar wind in there so violent they actually flip the direction of the magnetic field in the solar wind around the magnetic field kind of reverses itself and then straightens out again Nikki fox's director of NASA's Helio physics division and was pretty easily the project scientist for the Parker solar pro it's kind of like twisting.

Suns Justin Casper Nikki fox director NASA project scientist university of Michigan Parker solar Parker
"project scientist" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"The speed of the solar wind and they're so violent they actually flip the direction of the magnetic field in the solar wind around the magnetic field kind of reverses itself and then straightens out again Nikki fox's director of NASA's Helio physics division and was previously the project scientist for the Parker solar probe it's kind of like twisting like a rubber hose it wants to continually straight itself again and so whatever is causing these features as it is straightening out it's giving out energy she says all of this could explain it what's heating up the sun's atmosphere and so to see these so the smoking gun full main questions of of heating an acceleration of the solar wind was just a an incredible thing these results are reported in the journal nature along with plenty of others for example the solar wind rotates around the sun far faster than expected and although the solar system can be a dusty place it looks like the sun vaporizes or pushes out nearby dust we've actually found a dust free read to and close to the sun and that was fast predicted back in nineteen twenty nine the Parkers solar probe was named after you Jean Parker a superstar in studies of the son who first proposed the existence of the solar wind back in the nineteen fifties it's the first NASA mission named after a living person Parker who's now ninety two years old got to see the rocket launch that carried the probe into space fox visited him at his home in Chicago earlier this year I showed him a lot of the early science data and he was very excited and very moved the probes next approach the sun will come in January its closest approach will be in twenty twenty five when it will come within four million miles of the sun's surface no greenfield voice NPR news.

Nikki fox director NASA project scientist Jean Parker Chicago Parkers NPR ninety two years
"project scientist" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"No Greenville bush reports that some of what its scene is so strange researchers initially thought their instruments were broken the Parker solar probe was built to withstand the searing temperatures around the sun it blasted off in August of twenty eighteen flybys of Venus help it adjust its orbit so that it gradually gets closer and closer to the sun so far it's one close by three times coming about fifteen million miles from the sun that's a lot closer than the nearest planet mercury the sun is already looking very different from what we've seen before Justin Casper is an astrophysicist at the university of Michigan he says that one of the biggest findings is something that could explain a long standing mystery why the sun's atmosphere is so much hotter than its surface in apparent violation of like I don't know the second law of thermodynamics he says it's just weird like if you were walking away from a camp fire and instead of getting colder the air got hotter we have to identify some way that energy leaves the sun travels out into space and then gets deposited he says the Parker solar probe might have just found out how that happens close to the sun there are strange features in a plasma called the solar wind charged particles they're constantly streaming out into space we'd see suddenly spike can flow where in just a couple seconds the solar wind would start flowing three hundred thousand miles an hour faster these spikes would only last a few seconds or minutes but the nearly double the speed of the solar wind and they're so violent they actually flip the direction of the magnetic field in the solar wind around the magnetic field kind of reverses itself and then straightens out again Nikki fox's director of NASA's Helio physics division and was previously the project scientist for the Parker solar probe it's kind of like twisting.

Justin Casper Nikki fox director NASA project scientist Greenville bush university of Michigan Parker
"project scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"A demonstration of possibly you know and habitation making your own oxygen it's a it's a technology demonstration thinking about the future of of humans to Mars so preparing for that's of course if we were to send humans to Mars we would need oxygen both to breed but also particularly for the fuel to get those astronauts home and so weird demonstrating that technology on the surface of Mars with this mission and excited to see us do that on the surface of Mars what kind of fuel would you make and of the CO two as they would be oxygen oxygen based fuel such as I DO Zener or something I'm just I'm I'm not I think that's it that's a pretty good guess if you have any thoughts about that yes of the oxygen and of course you in order to to burn things you need an accident and so oxygen is a really powerful Occident so we would combine the oxygen with some other your source of such as and so for the the rocket that go to Mars they typically burn either hot liquid hydrogen or kerosene the that's the reduced form of the fuel and then you need them and oxygen to burn so in order to to get the people off the surface you have to have some reduced form of fuel but making the oxygen would be a really great step to be able to get them off the ground we're gonna like this very closely and thank you for giving us a heads up on on this mission Mitchell three March twenty twenty program scientist with NASA Katie stack Morgan deputy project scientist for the Mars twenty twenty mission thank you both for taking time to be with us today where to take a break and we come back you're welcome we're gonna talk about using land in making a climate change you know maybe from worse to better there's a way to turn around climate change of we using the soil we're gonna talk about after this break stay with I never.

project scientist Mitchell scientist NASA Katie
Researchers Are Trying To Find A Solution To Cut Concrete's Carbon Emissions

The World

01:46 min | 2 years ago

Researchers Are Trying To Find A Solution To Cut Concrete's Carbon Emissions

"This sounds of summer that time of year when the roads are closed to the sidewalks blocked and the Jack hammers it's being busted report concrete is key to all the just look around the roads we drive to bridges across the buildings we live and work in all of it concrete the world uses more than ten billion tons of the stuff every year it's the foundation of our modern society and that presents a big problem engineered car of salt because cement the key ingredient in concrete is a huge source of carbon dioxide the chief driver climate change a breeze upon the cement you produce a pound of CO two science is a professor of civil engineering and materials science at the university of California Los Angeles is sitting in a loud lab room at UCLA and he says those numbers add up the international energy agency estimates that cement production accounts for about seven percent of the world's total CO two emissions so it's a really big number and one that is only expected to get bigger as the world's population grows cling at exactly what we need to continue society as being on top so what to do well it's hard to imagine the world just gonna stop using concrete that's why I signed and his colleagues are out to make a new type of concrete all together making carbon dioxide part of their formula first the small version project scientist gave cells own is part of science team at UCLA he opens a door into a room humming with lab equipment these are gas owner the bottles zero two and yes it's four six the cylinders of carbon dioxide are here to help

Jack Ucla Project Scientist Professor Of Civil Engineering University Of California Los A Ten Billion Tons Seven Percent
Plotting Antarctic Ice

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Plotting Antarctic Ice

"Three hundred trillion green photons of light were sent to the ground as set to began. It's mission to monitor senator earth's changing ice. This is innovation now. Bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future. It was a sleepless night for the computer. <unk> programmers tasked with analyzing the first photon cloud from is set to but nasr's ice cloud and land elevation satellite to demonstrator that both the satellite and the sole instrument on board were working together as designed by timing how long it takes aches individual photons to leave the satellite reflect off the surface and returned to the receiver telescopes on the satellite nasa can precisely measure surface surface heights below within a few hours of receiving the first plots of the antarctic ice sheet. The deputy project scientist was texting screen shots of that height data to the rest of the team and i sat to had successfully demonstrated its ability to provide the precise measurements researchers searchers will need to monitor even small changes in earth's ice sheets glaciers and sea ice overtime for innovation somewhere. I'm jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the national institute of aerospace through collaboration with nasa.

Nasa Senator Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac Project Scientist
NASA ScienceCast 298: Watch the History of our Solar System Fly By with MU69

NASA ScienceCasts

04:08 min | 2 years ago

NASA ScienceCast 298: Watch the History of our Solar System Fly By with MU69

"Watch the history of our solar system fly by which avenue sixty nine presented by science that massive scientists have unlocked lots of clues about the earliest forms of life on earth by studying fossils found across our planet in similar fashion we're now learning more about the earliest formation of our solar system from a different kind of fall so the kuyper hyper belt object or k b o known as twenty fourteen immu sixty nine travel back in time to the solar systems the very beginning their two objects were formed vet eventually came together in a body resembling a flattened bowling pin when looking at these objects from the city of earth which is four billion miles there six point four billion kilometers away avenue sixty nine looks like a point of light even when using the powerful hubble space telescope scope but thanks to the new horizon spacecraft this is what it looked like on new year's day twenty nineteen from approximately forty one hundred miles or sixty six hundred kilometers away about seven minutes before the spacecraft the closest approach new horizons is a grand piano sized spacecraft was launched back in two thousand six with undertaking exploring the kuyper belt that donut shape disc of space that begins jess biondi orbit of neptune tune dwarf planet pluto and its largest moon share on reside in the kuyper belt as do over one hundred thousand kb owes avenue sixty nine was discovered by the new horizons team endless found to be located in the neighborhood of new horizons trajectory win the space craft reached the kuyper belt in twenty fifteen its location led to its selection as a fly by target new horizons project scientist how weaver of the johns hopkins applied physics lab notes three wondrous impressions about this twenty two mile or thirty five kilometers long primeval object first this is the most primitive object ever encountered by a spacecraft by that i mean the least changed since the time the solar system formation second the shape of you sixty nine the body is giving us new insights into how planets formed scientific hypotheses change as new horizons delivers new data until we saw up close we didn't know for sure if avenue sixty nine was a single object or two distinct pieces now we know it's actually composed of two distinct piece is a large flat loeb at a smaller rounder lobe that have merged urged into one entity this fusion gives us clues regarding the initial steps that were taken to form a planet third the fly by showed immu sixty nine to red color read her even then pluto and we believe that this may come from organic material the same material that may have contributed to be origin of life on earth fossils of once living beings on earth conveyed vital clues about the past in space katie owes can also so convey fall so like clues about four point five billion years worth of solar system history sciences are pouring over the information they've received so far in the data transmissions from b m news sixty nine fly by will continue through the late summer of twenty twenty in the meantime new horizons is traveling farther into the kuyper belt at about thirty one thousand five hundred miles or fifty one thousand kilometers per hour the spacecraft is now observing additional

Fifty One Thousand Kilometers Sixty Six Hundred Kilometers Four Billion Kilometers One Hundred Thousand Kb Thirty Five Kilometers Five Billion Years Seven Minutes
Three landers from three nations head to Mars in 2020

SPACE NEWS POD

03:42 min | 2 years ago

Three landers from three nations head to Mars in 2020

"In twenty twenty three Rovers one from the US want from Europe and one from China will leave earth and depart for the red planet of Mars to look for past in present life. And these Rovers are just going to go to Mars. They have in their mission directorate to bring back samples from the red planet to earth, which is going to be one of the most influential. Botches in landings in science experiments of human history. Parts of Mars directly from the regular of Mars will be returned to the planet earth. So scientists on earth with really sophisticated instruments can study, what's in the ground on Mars. So the Rovers will be sent up in twenty twenty in the land, though do science, and the cash, the, the samples for a return mission for Mars and are from Mars and the return to earth in twenty twenty eight if America in Europe come together and make the mission as success, but a project scientists on the east Rover Exo Mars that will land in twenty twenty one along with the American Chinese Rovers might be worth reconsidering, which samples would actually be the. The best valuable to send back to the scientists waiting on earth. And the scientists said Mars twenty twenty will acquire samples from the surface, where I n ising radiation is likely to have damaged any organic molecules, it is. Excellent Mars with its two meter depth drill in advance organics detection, instrumentation MoMA that has the best chance to make an import discovery regarding the possibility. The Mars may have harbored life in its distant past, if this proves to be the case, perhaps, we may need to rethink where they, we should not think of bringing back. Well selected subsurface samples rather than those collected by Mars twenty twenty in the bars twenty twenty Rover which is a NASA Rover. It has the ability to cash the samples that against, but Exo Mars does not have that capability for a return mission leader on and he goes on to say that requires a complicated. Yup. That weighs allot it would have been impossible to combine our present very capable payload with a sample caching system on the same Rover. In fact, Nasr's twenty twenty Rover his Pete a dear price to include the caching system, and that's compared to curiosities analytical firepower. So what they gave up an analytics and studying the actual surface of the planet Mars. They gained a caching system. So instead of doing the science on Mars itself, what they're doing is putting it away for a little while and they're using that space to harbor though samples, then they're going to return them to earth on the March twenty twenty Rover. And then George Vago goes on to say the point I am trying to make is that bringing back the right samples will make all the difference in this regard, Exo Mars will be super important are the samples collected at depth more interesting and better preserved. We think probably yes, in once we will have investigated this, perhaps it will be time to rethink what samples to bring back to

Mars Twenty Twenty Rovers Twenty Twenty Rover Europe American Chinese Rovers United States George Vago Moma China Nasa Nasr Pete America Two Meter
"project scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on Science Friday

"Got past Pluto? Good question. So our original mission goals, where to visit both Pluto, and the Kuyper belt as a whole. And so we always planned to try to go by other objects and we were lucky to use the Hubble space telescope to find sixty sixty-nine. And now it'll be a little harder to find another object. So I think I mean sixty nine was still part of our original goals, but anything after this will be icing on the cake. What about one of our favorite subjects on science Fridays talking about the mysterious impossible planet nine? Is it out there? I mean could could maybe you guys find it with, you know, good question. Yeah. Good question. We are not going in the right direction, where we think this very large very, very, very distant object is so we're not really in a position with new horizons to try to find this object. We'll just have an extra momentary. I know you're at a planetary science conference, any cool news there quickly, share with. Yeah, I am at a very nice interdisciplinary meeting, and they're bringing together, people who study our solar system, like we are with new horizons. And they're also bringing together, people who use big telescopes on earth, or space based telescopes to study other solar systems. So they're looking at exit planets. They're looking at planetary systems that are just now in the process of forming. And so we're trying to put all those results together. And in fact, some people are calling this kind of a golden era for learning about planetary formation. We'll check back with Dr Actor singer. singer when when some more news. Thanks for taking time today. Kelsey singer pleasure. You're welcome Kelsey tenure deputy project scientist for Nasr's new horizons mission. We're gonna take a break, and after that hundreds of high school students are bringing big ideas Tway world class student. Science fair. We'll talk about we'll have a couple of folks from Intel's international science and engineering, fair. Find out what's going on there. So stay with us. We'll be right back after the break. WNYC studios is supported.

WNYC studios Kelsey Intel Dr Actor Nasr project scientist
Climate intelligence has to come before climate tech

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:43 min | 2 years ago

Climate intelligence has to come before climate tech

"Does marketplace podcast is brought to you by the university of Florida Warrington college of business transform your future with an MBA from one of America's top ten universities. Learn more at Warrington dot ufl dot EDU slash MBA. And by the Michigan economic Development Corporation Evan. Lyle of rush enterprises is a big fan of Michigan as he put it the future mobility is going to be decided right here in this state. Visit planet dot com to find out why that's P L A N E T M dot com. The first step in adapting to climate change is information from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Ali would. This week. We're kicking off our new series. How we survive about the technology of adapting to a changing climate and the first step in adapting is understanding the scope of the problem that is a huge effort involving huge private companies like Microsoft and Google IBM plus startups doing climate risk modeling, but measuring information on the scale of the entire globe is really the job of for lunch. Nasa. Eucalypt supersonic. Earlier this month NASA launched its third orbiting carbon observatory or Osceola three it's a hundred million dollars worth of sensitive measurement instruments attached to the international space station. It monitors carbon dioxide on earth, and how that's impacting weather and climate patterns its tagline is watching the planet breathe and one measure of the planet's health plants and Marie L. During is the project scientist for Osceola three. So this has been important because plants pay a really big role in the natural carbon cycle, the uptake a lot of carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere while they're growing, and it goes back in when the leaves fall off indicate so knowing how well the plants are doing their jobs is essential in trying to figure out what's happening with warming. And Osceola three just one part of NASA has annual one point nine billion dollar mission to focus on the earth mostly related to climate. The agency is studying water sea level, natural hazards, the carbon cycle and air, basically, the whole SHA. Bang. Jim graph is deputy director for earth. Science at NASA Jet Propulsion laboratories NASA has a critical role. It's not our role to make policy. It is our role though to provide that when you're making policy that data that you're using is accurate though. It's one thing to start collecting data. It's another thing to keep the machinery working instruments are up there for a long period of time and the instruments where out so we have to have the commitment to make sure that we can replace them with comparable or better instruments as they go forward and to get the best possible data the mission needs to run for years. A lot of what's happening on this earth is not a snapshot. We can't not understand the trends unless we're able to make the measurements over a long period of time back to Anne Marie L during and her plants she says right now when we try to make predictions thirty years out there are several diverging scenarios if plants continue to take up carbon dioxide humans or meeting. And kind of damp in the growth rate that'll end up with one scenario if the plants and the ocean, don't take up as much of the human emissions, our growth rates could increase and will reach a different point in twenty fifty than we would have otherwise. And in order to find that out we need sustained funding for NASA's earth missions and lots of other efforts are going to need money to not just public but also private so tomorrow on the show. We'll hear from investors who believed that adapting to climate change is both necessary for survival and good business. And now for some related links one of the big questions about climate intelligence is absolutely the role of artificial intelligence. If you episode you'll hear from Microsoft about its efforts to apply to modeling and understanding the scope of climate change, and there's a very timely story in the New York Times from Sunday about various artificial intelligence efforts that are being applied to climate adaptation and to recovery from extreme weather events. Also on our website marketplace, tech dot org. There's a link to a story about how in the UK the university of Sheffield help create a connected sewer control system. Look some add up. Tation tech is down and dirty people. That uses a I to detect and manage rising water during extreme weather and flooding, and then it can automate weekly open and close various gates to keep sewers from overflowing. The UK's national environmental agency said that country will have to spend a billion pounds a year on flood management. If it's going to avoid the worst effects of climate change, and that whole neighborhoods might have to relocate because of flooding that's gotten worse in recent years in other climate news this week Ireland became the second country in the world to declare a national climate emergency. Last week. The UK has done the same and New Zealand may follow in the UK that means reducing carbon emissions by eighty percent by twenty fifty. It's less clear what that means in Ireland. But getting back to our point about the money one assumes that funding should be involved. I'm Ali would. And that's marketplace tech. This is APN.

Nasa UK Osceola ALI Microsoft University Of Florida Warringt Nasa Jet Propulsion Michigan Rush Enterprises America Evan Ireland Anne Marie L Jim Graph
What Happened at America's Secret Atomic City?

BrainStuff

08:30 min | 2 years ago

What Happened at America's Secret Atomic City?

"Putin. Today's episode was brought to you by the new Capital One saver card with which you can earn four percent cashback on dining and entertainment. That means four percent on checking out that new restaurant everyone's talking about and four percent on watching your team win at home. You'll also earn two percent cashback at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in what's in your wallet? Welcome to brain stuff. Production of iheartradio. Hey, brain stuff loin Vogel bomb here in September of nineteen forty two US army, Lieutenant General Leslie groves commander of the Manhattan project. Those secret US crash effort to develop the atomic bomb faced a critical decision. The project needed to produce uranium-235 an isotope of uranium who's unstable nucleus could be easily split trigger efficient chain-reaction and release enormous amount of destructive energy, but that would require a massive complex manufacturing process involving tens of thousands of workers which needed to be kept secret to thwart interference from spies and saboteurs. But the question was where those priscilla's possibly be hidden U S officials had already identified potential sites in several parts of the country, but all of them had drawbacks Shasta dam in California. For example, was too close to the Pacific coast and this Volna rebel air attack in several locations in Washington state would have required construction of long power lines to provide the massive amounts of electro. Needed for the work site in Illinois near Chicago was also out officials didn't want to be close to a big population centers since the potential health risks of the work were not clear, and it would have been easier for enemy Asians to blend in around a city. So instead groves quickly settled upon fifty two thousand acre. That's twenty one thousand Hector site in rural eastern, Tennessee later expanded slightly not only would it be inconspicuous to anyone outside of the sparsely populated area. But it was also close to hydroelectric plants operated by the Tennessee valley authority, which could supply the enormous amounts of electrically that the plans would require it was the perfect place to build both the Clinton engineer works, which would be the atomic complex and secret city to house the workers the government decided to call the secret city oakridge because it sounded quote, sufficiently bucolic and general according to an article in a nineteen sixty nine government review of the project, not long after choosing the area, the US government quietly started moving small farmers who had land on the site paying them compensation, but not telling them why then came trainloads full of construction equipment and building materials construction crews quickly erected the buildings that would comprise the nondescript we named campus as well as. Thousands of houses for scientists and workers. Many of the homes were be one flat tops, a designed fashion from prefabricated panels and roofing to save construction time building the secret industrial facilities and housing for workers cost around one point three two billion dollars. That's about eighteen point five billion in today's money that amounted to sixty percent of the Manhattan, project's total budget over the next few years oakridge grew into a community of seventy five thousand people. We spoke with de Ray Smith, a retired historian for the UAE twelve national security complex who also is the historian for these city of Oak Ridge and a columnist for the Oak Ridge or a local newspaper Smith explained people came from all over the world. Many of the scientists were Hungarians a lot came out of Germany and Great Britain. He explains that others were recruited for the Clinton engineering works by big US companies working on the Manhattan project who scoured campuses if US colleges and universities for bright students with needed science and technical skills. For example, a young chemist named Bill Wilcox who was approached by an Eastman Kodak recruiter in nineteen forty-three later recalled that he was only told that the job was some sort of secret war work. He said I asked where I'd be working. He wouldn't say it was secret. I asked what sort of work. I'd be doing. He wouldn't say it was secret Wilcox eventually ended up at the Clinton engineer works. According to Smith, those who turned down jobs might end up being drafted into a special engineering detachment of the US army. And sent to Tennessee anyway. Those atomic workers arrived at a place shrouded in secrecy, locals knew something mysterious was going on at the site. But only those who are part of the mission were allowed inside past. The guarded gates on the access roads, the atomic facilities themselves were surrounded by digital security. The work itself was highly compartmentalized. So that most people knew only about the small portion of the effort that they themselves were working on. And only a select few new. The overarching mission was to help make the atomic bomb access to buildings other than the one you were working in was highly restricted to keep information from getting out oakridge became a self contained community with most everything that its workers needed secret city had stores movie houses, a high school a Bank, a three hundred bed hospital, tennis and handball courts and even its own Symphony Orchestra led by a Manhattan project. Scientists people who live there tended victory gardens raised families, and led what was pretty much normal American existence. That is except for the secrecy that surrounded them in their work. A billboard reminded workers. Let's keep our traps shut. They knew they had to be cautious. Not to say anything about their jobs to anyone even their own spouses, a young scientists told one of the first reporters tried about the subject when Louis Feldstein would sit around the dinner table, and the strain was terrible. But it was all in the difficult effort of producing uranium-235. There's only a tiny amount of the stuff zero point seven percent in uranium or most of which is uranium two thirty eight which doesn't fit in as easily and above such as little boy. The one dropped on Hiroshima required. One hundred and forty one pounds. That's sixty four kilograms of uranium-235. You have to separate a lot of material to get that much to thirty five to solve that problem. The Clinton engineer works y twelve plant used special devices called Cal trans which utilized the electromagnetic separation process developed by Nobel winning physicist Ernest Lawrence, the university of California, Berkeley, the Cal trans used heat and powerful magnets to separate the two isotopes and then to collect just the uranium-235 isotope because it's so much lighter in weight together. Enough uranium-235 for the projects purposes, the y twelve facility employed twenty two thousand workers to run one thousand one hundred fifty two Kalua trans literally around the clock. Meanwhile, another part of the works. The x ten graphite reactor. Used neutrons emitted from uranium-235 to convert uranium two, thirty eight into an isotope of a different element. Plutonium two thirty nine another easily fissionable material suitable for making Tomek bombs as myth explains after x ten demonstrated that the process could work the actual plutonium used to make Fatman the bomb dropped on Nagasaki was produced in the b reactor at the Hanford engineer works near Richmond, Washington. Finally on August. Sixth nineteen Forty-five the world witnessed the results of the secret cities. Labor's when the United States dropped an atomic bomb containing uranium-235 produced there on the Japanese city of Hiroshima the Knoxville, Tennessee, new sentinels front page headline proudly proclaimed atomic super bomb made it oakridge strikes Japan that wasn't completely correct though, the uranium-235 came from Tennessee parts, the bomb were made it three different plants. So that none of them would have the complete design the destruction at Hiroshima and Nagasaki was horrific, and it was a or perhaps the turning point of the war. After the war. The various parts of the once secret, Tennessee, atomic complex were split up part eventually was reborn as the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which helped pioneer the field of nuclear medicine present isotopes for use intriguing cancer and as diagnostic tools in addition to doing cutting edge research areas ranging from nanotechnology to wireless, charging of electric vehicles and other portion became the twelve national security complex, which produced components for tens of thousands of thermonuclear weapons in the us arsenal during the Cold War and leader helped disassemble US and former Soviet nuclear weapons third part is now the site of the east Tennessee technology park, though, there's no evidence that German or Japanese spies ever managed to infiltrate the Clinton engineer works. A Soviet spy named George co Ville did manage to get a job there. And apparently passed along information about the atomic work to the Soviets in two thousand seven he was honored posthumously with a hero of the Russian federation medal. The nation's highest honor I Russian President

United States Manhattan Engineer Tennessee Oakridge Hiroshima Ray Smith Bill Wilcox Clinton Nagasaki Capital One Tennessee Valley Authority Washington Us Army Lieutenant General Leslie Grov Putin. Oak Ridge Illinois Pacific Eastman Kodak
The Supermoon explained

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

06:10 min | 2 years ago

The Supermoon explained

"As well as offering a change of seasons the much acre Knox's also brought with a circle superman that happened just four hours after the moment of equinox. The closest since March and the two thousand and it will be another eleven years twenty thirty before the two events will gain be less than a day apart. Well, just think of that we now closer to twenty thirty what want to the thousand a by the way, this was also the third and final superman for twenty nine chain. The term ship moon was invented back in nineteen seventy nine by an astrology not on astronomy for those unfamiliar with the difference between the two and astronomers a person to study space in the cosmos, using the scientific method to learn about the universe and astrologer is a person uses inaccurate positions. Constellations planets and other celestial bodies at different times in order to tell people about the character would have predict the future has never ever ever ever ever ever. Been any scientific evidence. Supporting any of the claims made by strategy and its success depends exclusively on the Gulf ability of people now back to the science on average the moon orbits about three hundred eighty four thousand four hundred kilometers from earth. But the moon's orbit around the earth isn't a perfect circle. It's slightly elliptical. Meaning one part of the orbit will be closer to the earth. Bet. Three hundred fifty seven thousand kilometers is parody. And the other part of the oil, but will be further away around four hundred and six thousand kilometres apogee, the differences about five percent closer or further away on average the exact distances of perishing apogee, also very other factors such as whether the lunar orbits long axes pointed towards the sun. Also, the moon's Ogle extremes a greatest between November and February when the earth, oh, but places the planet and its moon close into the sun, you say earth orbit itself is also elliptical by that two percent. And they will the sun's gravitational influence is greatest during these months, technically. These would be Jane full moons but trend to its east terms like what use the description of super moon to describe any Newell full moon with a ninety degrees of parody syncing opportunity. Nassar's now adopted this term as a means of educating the public about astronomy twenty nineteen will be an excellent year to look to the sky and enjoy the spectacular view of earth's nearest neighbor. The moon fifty years ago, we witnessed one of humankind's most, remarkable achievements. When we first step foot on the dusty surface of the moon. All for man. By ugly. As NASA continue celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo program. The year is opening with a number of opportunities to marvel at earth's original satellite, three super moons, and a total lunar eclipse in the span of three months. So what is it that makes a super moon super start with size? The moon orbits around the earth in a slightly oval shape at its furthest point away from us known as the apogee it's about two hundred fifty thousand miles or four hundred thousand kilometers from earth when it's closest to us. It's parody. The moon is about two hundred twenty thousand miles or three hundred fifty thousand kilometers away when the moon is full at or near its parody. It is considered a super moon and can appear up to fourteen percent larger and thirty percent brighter than it apogee. Those distances however are changing as the moon is slowly. Shifting away from earth how slowly approximately two inches or five centimeters annually a billion years from now the moon will take about thirty one and a half days to orbit the earth. Instead of today's twenty seven point three days. In the meantime, this year's first superman of the year occurred on January twenty first and also featured a total eclipse, the second occurred on February nineteenth and sky watchers. Another chance on March twenty first well, super moons. Total lunar eclipses are marvels to behold. A question rises fifty years after humankind's first steps on the moon. Does it hold anymore secrets for NASA? Scientists Noah petro project, scientists for the lunar reconnaissance orbiter or El aro at nestles Goddard Space Flight center says there are many unanswered questions about the moon. For example, we are still attempting to understand how the moon evolved to its current state. The moon has occupied space near earth for its entire four and a half billion year history. Keeping record of the impacts that have scarred on its surface over time. This record of anxious impacts is largely erased from the earth due to win water in plate tectonics analysis of Apollo samples shows that there was a period of intense impact cratering on the moon early in the history of the solar system and therefore on the earlier as well observations from L our show now in its ninth year of orbiting the moon or helping us piece together this history people say shoulda moons, especially big in brunt compare to regular full moons, but will a can be around fourteen percent lodge and thirty percent broader, you really wouldn't notice the difference unless someone told you and even then any size difference perceptions. You do have will be more likely GTO imagination in reality, you'd really need proper non-legal equipment to Mitch the difference. And remember the full moon always looks lodge and Bryant when it's near the horizon and a fake none as men allusion. The other important point member is. That Superman's not all that uncommon. They usually current groups of three roughly about every thirteen months in eighteen days. In other words, roughly every fourteenth full moon will be superman now one consequence of superman that should be noticeable involves ocean tides many factors influence title heights at a given location that they usually highest something that a spring tides during full moons or new moons when the earth sun and moon are all aligned so a parody moon being big plus than average should result in a slightly higher high tide.

Nasa Superman Goddard Space Flight Center Fifty Years Three Hundred Eighty Four Thou Three Hundred Fifty Seven Thou Three Hundred Fifty Thousand K Four Hundred Thousand Kilomete Six Thousand Kilometres Twenty Nine Chain Supermoon
Photons of Light

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Photons of Light

"The three hundred trillion green photons of light were sent to the ground as ice set to began. It's mission to monitor earth's changing ice. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. It was a sleepless night for the computer programmers tasked with analyzing the first photon cloud from is set to but Nasr's ice, cloud and land elevations satellite to demonstrated that both the satellite and the sole instrument on board were working together as designed by timing. How long it takes individual photons to leave the satellite reflect off the surface and return to the receiver telescope on the satellite. Nasa can precisely measure surface heights below within a few hours of receiving the first plots of the ant Arctic ice sheet, the deputy project. Scientist was texting screen. Shots of that height data to the rest of the team. And I sat to had successfully demonstrated its ability to provide the precise measurements, researchers will need to monitor even small changes in ice sheets. Glaciers and sea ice over time for enervating. Now. I'm Jennifer police innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA.

Nasa Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac Scientist Enervating
"project scientist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:40 min | 2 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Associated administrator for NASA's science mission. Directorate officially declaring opportunities remarkable fifteen year long mission to be over the Mars Rover had gone silent since getting caught in a dust storm last summer on Tuesday night, the space agency made one last temped to contact the Rover sending it Billie holiday's rendition of Albi seeing you but opportunity did not answer. Mega Kurth Baker senior science reporter with five thirty eight is here to talk about sort of a sad occasion. Hi, maggie. Hi that almost made me cry a little bit. I got a little misty myself. Is it was almost like a death in the family wasn't not. Yeah. I mean, these Rovers are so personable. I mean, they kind of feel like they have faces a little bit that people get attached to them. You know, they have Twitter president says everybody really loves these things. And this one was scrappy and tough. It was only supposed to last for ninety days when it landed in two thousand four and instead it ran for five thousand three hundred fifty two days, and it took a planet wide dust storm to take it down. So that's that's what happened it could not recover from the dust storm. Yeah. It had gotten stuck in a previous store. I'm a few years ago that it did recover from. But this one went on a lot longer and the Rover was powered by solar power. So it's solar panels got covered up with dust. And after a certain point it didn't have enough energy to kind of keep itself alive long enough for the dust to clear, and because they had sent it what more than eight hundred. Commands. Yeah. Yeah. Over over the course of the past few months, and it just it didn't ever contact us back. Let's talk about some of the highlights of opportunities time on Mars. We we checked in with apple Mars Rover deputy project scientist, Abigail framing this week and asked her to share her favorite memory of the mission. It's really hard for me to pick a favorite memory from this mission. Because I have so many over the past fifteen years one of them that really sticks out in my mind, though, was in two thousand and ten when we first pulled up to the rim of endeavour crater endeavour crater is this big twenty two kilometers diameter impact crater and we've been seeing it in the distance for months before we got there. Pulling up to this crater was basically the start of new mission in the rim of the crater. We encountered new kinds of rocks much older rocks than we'd seen before. And it was so cool to think that after so. Many years. The exploration was just as fresh and exciting as it was the day. We landed Maggie do you have some of your favorite highlights? I think one thing that I thought was really exciting to me was the fact that this Rover actually held the record for longest distance driven by a wheeled vehicle off of planet earth. It went twenty eight miles in its time on Mars, which doesn't really seem like a lot. But when you think about everything that sort of had to happen for this little guy to be there and to have the power to drive those miles like that's a lot of effort and a lot of work, and it's twenty eight miles that is very important to our understanding of Martian history. And also of what the water systems on Mars had once been the longtime ago, you know, this this Rover picked up a lot of evidence for ancient water on Mars. It found signs of hematite which is a mineral that forms and water at that endeavour crater that was mentioned it was finding like these white veins of gypsum that suggests that water was kind of coming up to the ground tiny fractures at one point. And it found claim minerals that would have been formed in a kind of water that had like a neutral ph. So that's kind of talking about something not too acidic to basic water that's akin to what you'd find in a drinkable lake here on earth. You know, this was a really important little Rover. And it found us a lot of interesting information about what Mars used to be like stretched at its three month tour to five thousand days, and we currently have other explorer still there right there, right? We have we have curiosity is up there little bit more Jerry rigged and aging than she used to be. But she's there. There's a non-mobile Lander. Also, and there are two new Rovers that are set to be launched in twenty twenty and both of those have been designed using knowledge and skills that we've sort of picked up from building these Rovers like opportunity and curiosity and spirit that have lasted far longer than they were expected to. So probably these new twenty twenty Rovers well, as well, let's move onto some other interesting week is so filled with interesting news. There's some good news and some bad news out of Greenland. What's the bad news? I well. I mean, the bad news is that Greenland is melting a lot. There's been several studies over the past year that kind of came out showing big amounts of melt in that ice sheet. I think there was one from December that was showing melting five times faster over the last twenty years that had been in pre industrial times, you know, they're using ice cores to kind of look all the way back three hundred fifty years ago. But one of the things that was coming out this week is the Greenland government sort of starting to talk about how to make the most of a bad situation. So as these glaciers as this ice sheet is starting to melt what's coming out of it is sand and gravel, and that's kind of flowing down towards the sea. And one of the things that they're starting to realize is that those are things that they can collect and that they can sell and ironically what they would be selling it for is. So that other places with rising sea levels from glacier melt can build up the land. And. It's a very. Very very fun. Little little shell game that we have going on here. Just move the sand from one place to another right because of climate change in both cases. Maybe you could get your own bottle of glacier Sam that was. Yes. So all these entrepreneurial opportunity. Thank you Maggie Maggie. Chris Baker senior science writer with a five thirty eight. Now, it's time to check in on the state of science..

Rovers endeavour crater Maggie Maggie Greenland Kurth Baker NASA administrator Billie holiday Twitter Directorate Chris Baker reporter Albi apple president project scientist
"project scientist" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on KCRW

"Nasa has said goodbye to the beloved opportunity Rover and on this Valentine's Day, we're going to pay tribute to him since he was pretty much the perfect boyfriend reliable committed communicative he helped us be better by teaching us more about our universe. Well opportunity I landed on Mars in two thousand four it was supposed to be a brief romance a flirtation really just three months, but it lasted fifteen years every Freeman is deputy project scientist at J P L. Hi, hi, thanks so much for having me. Great to have you will do you miss him already? Also is he definitely a he. I mean, usually referred to the river is she? Oh, but it's a robot. So you can say he or she. Okay. So I guess that introduction was completely false. I should've said she was the perfect girlfriend because she kind of was she lasted. Yeah. That lasted a long time. So seriously. It was supposed to be there. Only three months, right? How did it? Lasts a long. Yeah. The mission was supposed to last for ninety days. But it it was just a really well-made vehicle. You know, we took really good care of the batteries. The batteries are amazing. Even after fifteen years they were still operating at about eighty five percent much better than what your cell phone battery. Does we also had a lot of help from Mars where solar panels, and we get charge your battery with solar energy. And eventually we thought the panels would get totally covered in dust. But Mars has had these wonderful wins have cleaned off the panels every couple of. Months? So we've been able to just keep going and going. Wow. And then what kind of data did you receive lots and lots of science data so opportunity and her sister Rovers spirit. We're basically our robot geologist on Mars, and what we did was we looked at the rocks. We looked at their texture their chemistry and all these measurements. Help us understand how the rocks formed and how they changed over time. And did you discover any water at all? So no liquid water on Mars today. But what we found was that. The rocks had fingerprints that showed that there was liquid water that interacted with them in the path because the mission lasted so long able to look at rocks that was from many different times and Mars history. And what we found was that water had been present over a long time in history. But it had changed way. Early. In Mars is passed. We think the water was kind of more neutral, more drinkable and better for life. The.

Mars geologist project scientist Nasa Rover Rovers J P fifteen years three months eighty five percent ninety days
"project scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hitting the end of what they? All right. You're making me sad here. Although I was amazed to read this is a huge success story. The mission was only supposed to last ninety days, and it's been out there and working up to now for fifteen years. Yeah, I'm feeling actually pretty happy about that. It's coming to an end, but what was accomplished because fifteen years first off the Martian surface is a long time and opportunity helps scientists say with certainty that different kinds of liquid mar lottery existed on Mars, the Mars environment. Changed hugely over time in that like all these discoveries. So exciting. They increased the likelihood that life could have existed on Mars at some point our understanding of that. That's really cool. So when will they make this one final attempt to reach out contact tonight? They're sending a message, which is like, hey, reset your clock. Go to sleep conserve your energy wake up when there's more sun and tell us, hey, and I talked to Abigail Freeman she's deputy project scientist for the Rover mission. And if the whole thing is, you know, she'll have to say to the Rover by the team she's been with for her entire career. So deep down part of her part of her. She's still holding onto the sliver of hope. We've also learned never never bet against the Rover. So, you know, absolutely. We could hear from it tonight. We just don't know. So that's really hard every day being like today the day. Are we going to hear from it today? Okay. No. What about tomorrow? And people have been getting hired away since like June onto different projects and stuff. So the teams kind of breaking up already, and unless something magical happens tonight, you know, Oppy as as a lot of people have called it happens to wake up. Like, we're gonna hear the final decision..

project scientist Oppy fifteen years ninety days
"project scientist" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Hitting the end of what they? All right. You're making me sad here. Although I was a mixed to read this is a huge success story. The mission was only supposed to last ninety days, and it's been out there and working up to now for fifteen years. Yeah. I I'm feeling actually pretty happy about that. It's coming to an end, but what was accomplished because fifteen years first off the Martian surface is a long time and opportunity helps scientists say with certainty that different kinds of liquid water existed on Mars, the Mars environment. Changed hugely over time in that like all these discoveries so exciting they increased the likelihood that life could have existed on Mars at some point our understanding of that. That's really cool. So when will they make this one final attempt to reach out you make contact tonight. They're sending a message, which is like, hey, reset your clock. Go to sleep conserve your energy up when there's more sun and tell us, hey, and I talked to Abigail frame she's deputy project scientist for the Rover mission. And it's the whole thing ends, you know, she'll have to say bye to the Rover by the team. She's. Been with for her entire career. So deep down part of her part of her. She's still holding onto the sliver of hope. We've also learned never never bet against the Rover. So, you know, absolutely. We could hear from it tonight. We just don't know. So that's really hard every day being like is today the day. Are we going to hear from it today? Okay. No. What about tomorrow? And people have been getting hired away since like June onto different projects and stuff. So the teams kind of breaking up already unless something magical happens tonight, you know, Oppy as people have called it happens to wake up, you know, like we're gonna hear the final.

project scientist Abigail fifteen years ninety days
"project scientist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The here for all right? You're making me sad here. Although I was amazed to read this is a huge success story. The mission was only supposed to last ninety days, and it's been out there and working up to now for fifteen years. Yeah. I feeling actually pretty happy about that. It's coming to an end, but what was accomplished because fifteen years first off the Martian surface. A long time and opportunity helps scientists say with certainty that different kinds of liquid water existed on Mars, the Mars environment changed hugely over time. And like all these discoveries so exciting, they increased the likelihood that life could have existed on Mars at some point our understanding of that. That's really cool. So when will they make this one final attempt to reach out you make contact tonight. They're sending a message, which is like, hey, reset your clock. Go to sleep conserve your energy wakeup when there's more sun and tell us, hey, and I talked to Abigail Freeman she's deputy project scientist for the Rover mission. And it's the whole thing ends, you know, she'll have to say bye to the Rover by the team. She's been with for her entire career. So deep down part of her part of her. She's still holding onto the sliver of hope. We've also learned never never bet against the Rover. So, you know, absolutely. We could hear from it tonight. We just don't know. So that's really hard every day being like today the day. Are we going to hear from it today? Okay. No. What about tomorrow? And people have been getting hired away since like June onto different projects and stuff. So the teams kind of breaking up ready, and unless something magical happens tonight, you know, Oppy as a lot of people have called it happens to wake up, you know, like we're gonna hear the final decision made by NASA administrators at eleven AM Pacific DeMarco KPCC science reporter Jacob Margolis. This is NPR news. And you're listening to WNYC and effort in Florida to let school staffers carry firearms has run into some problems. Some of the districts had trouble finding people to even apply for their programs or they simply didn't have the time and resources coming up. We'll take a closer look at Florida's so-called school guardian program. That's after news headlines. Currently, it's thirty degrees. A light rain is falling in central park at five. Thirty Jonathan Bowlin was a star high school quarterback the first play. They hiked the ball to John. He went straight.

project scientist Jonathan Bowlin Florida John WNYC NPR NASA Oppy Jacob Margolis reporter fifteen years thirty degrees ninety days
Measuring Ice

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Measuring Ice

"The three hundred trillion green photons of light were sent to the ground as ice set to began. It's mission to monitor earth's changing ice. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. It was a sleepless night for the computer programmers tasked with analyzing the first photon cloud from is set to but Nasr's ice, cloud and land elevations satellite to demonstrated that both the satellite and the sole instrument on board were working together as designed by timing. How long it takes individual photons to leave the satellite reflect off the surface and return to the receiver telescope on the satellite. Nasa can precisely measure surface heights below within a few hours of receiving the first plots of the ant Arctic ice sheet, the deputy project. Scientist was texting screen. Shots of that height data to the rest of the team. And I sat to had successfully demonstrated its ability to provide the precise measurements, researchers will need to monitor even small changes in ice sheets. Glaciers and sea ice over time for enervating. Now. I'm Jennifer police innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA.

Nasa Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac Scientist Enervating
Spitzers Gift

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 3 years ago

Spitzers Gift

"The Spitzer space telescope youngest member of Nasr's family of great observatories just turned fifteen Susan avation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future instead of calling it quits when Spitzer's supply of instrument cooling liquid helium ran out the observatory began using its infrared instruments to detect heat radiation emitted by warm objects rather than cold ones as a result Spitzer has far exceeded its life expectancy allowing scientists to witness star birth or find planets around other stars. Here's Dr Michael Warriner Spitzer project. Scientists are no conception at all be doing this for fifteen years as successfully as we have we've created a tremendous scientific instruments which produced a fantastic legacy that people use for generations. Another highlighted Spitzer in one which is certainly totally unexpected was our to map off the distribution stars through our. So Spitzer's gift to us is a beautiful map of the Milky Way. A three hundred sixty degree look at this part of the universe. We call for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet innovation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

Dr Michael Warriner Spitzer Spitzer Space Susan Avation Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac Nasa Three Hundred Sixty Degree Fifteen Years
"project scientist" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

"We are go for launch okay also i can tell her let's play it cool all engines are started really good we like it there syrup up your crowd this is houston are you ready for the event hello welcome to the may twenty eighteen edition of space boffins we're in partnership with the naked scientists on richard holding him and with me is soon nelson and this time we've come to milton keynes in central england to discuss asteroids possibly hitting the maybe not in some might say that there's no better place to look ahead to the end of the world than milton keynes also we'll meet the romanian cosmonautics lou to the first international space station and confident that countries will continue to work together in space and as europe's peppy colombo mission to mercury arrives in french guiana ready for launch we chat to the project scientist who cannot wait for me i'm working in fourteen years now i'm this mission and finally it states very could launch the space cup now the open university in milton keynes has a pretty fantastic record actually when it comes to high profile mitch in recent years the first manmade object to touch the surface of titan with major milton keynes for the cassini hogan's mission and a team from the oh you lead one of the instruments on the philly landau that's the european rosetta mission which famously landed on comet sixty seven p but i'll guest it's fair to say is mostly interested in asteroids it's professor simon green head of planetary space sciences here and you even discovered an asteroid called not exactly the most sort of catch names thirty two hundred five and i'd say it sounds like i'm this thing but it's p h a e h n five hundred i think before you describe how you found it why did you name it then well this is all discover is quite an interesting object and so we have to follow international astronomical union naming conventions and for well known objects we have to choose classical.

houston england milton keynes lou french guiana project scientist mitch landau professor planetary space sciences richard nelson europe philly simon green milton fourteen years
"project scientist" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hey there this is john than strickland host of textile the podcast that explores the wild wacky amazing world of technology and how it affects us check us out on the apple podcast sap i recommend listening to the tv story part one because that's the beginning one and if you like what you hear subscribed i'd love to have you on board welcome to paint theft from how steph with a brace of its christian savior on september fifth nineteen seventy seven nastase historic voyager one mission launched joining its identical robotic twin voyager2 on what would turn out to be a forty year odyssey through the solar system and into interstellar space voyager2 had launched more than two weeks earlier on august 20th 19th seventy seven and both spacecraft completed the dazzling grand tour of the outer solar system's planets buoyed your one has now left our sons he leo sphere becoming a bonafide interstellar probe and the most distant human made vehicle and voyager2 is about to flirt with the outermost boundary of the helius fear the he leo pause but exploring interstellar space wasn't a mission objective back in nineteen 77 back then the twin probes aim was to reveal the rich diversity in mystery of the outer solar system's planets for ed stone who has been project scientist for the voyagers since nineteen seventy two his favorite memory was the jaw dropping discovery of volcanoes on jupiter's moon aigio in 1979 he said the eruptions on i'll with the first direct evidence of active volcanoes elsewhere in the solar system and he wasn't wrong both voyager one an to change our perspective of our solar system revealing never before seen details in planetary atmospheres and revealing new discoveries about interplanetary space new insights to saturn's beautiful rings were gleaned in a huge diversity of moon's swarming around the gas giant's was revealed.

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"project scientist" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Using data from the hubble space telescope and the european space agency's guy a satellite the team flew into the predicted path of 'em you sixty nine shadow as it crossed earth surface searching for debris is an important step in planning the spacecraft's flyby on january 1st 2019 these observations continued a history of collaboration between the two missions as researchers used sofia to make similar observations of pluto two weeks before the spacecraft's flyby in 2015 kimberly aniko smith sofia project scientist said the emmy's sixty nine occupation was the most challenging occupation we've steady but we optimize are observing strategy we also continued airborne astronomy legacy of making infrared observations of supernova 1987 a at we've links inaccessible to other observatories we are eagerly awaiting the results from all of these observations after it's seven weeks of successful southern observations the team an observatory returned to its base at nasa armstrong flight research centers hangar 700 three in palm nail california sofia is a boeing seven forty seven sp jetliner modified to carry it one hundred inch damanour telescope it is a joint project of nasa and the german aerospace center deal are now says ames research center in california's silicon valley manages the sephiha program science admission operations in cooperation with the university space research association headquartered in columbia maryland and the german sofia institute the si at the university of stupor the aircraft is based at nastase armstrong plate research centers hangar 700 three in palmdale california.

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"project scientist" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Using data from the hubble space telescope and the european space agency's guy a satellite the team flew into the predicted path of 'em you sixty nine shadow as it crossed earth surface searching for debris is an important step in planning the spacecraft's flyby on january 1st 2019 these observations continued a history of collaboration between the two missions as researchers used sofia to make similar observations of pluto two weeks before the spacecraft's flyby in 2015 kimberly aniko smith sofia project scientist said the emmy's sixty nine occupation was the most challenging occupation we've steady but we optimize are observing strategy we also continued airborne astronomy legacy of making infrared observations of supernova 1987 a at we've links inaccessible to other observatories we are eagerly awaiting the results from all of these observations after it's seven weeks of successful southern observations the team an observatory returned to its base at nasa armstrong flight research centers hangar 700 three in palm nail california sofia is a boeing seven forty seven sp jetliner modified to carry it one hundred inch damanour telescope it is a joint project of nasa and the german aerospace center deal are now says ames research center in california's silicon valley manages the sephiha program science admission operations in cooperation with the university space research association headquartered in columbia maryland and the german sofia institute the si at the university of stupor the aircraft is based at nastase armstrong plate research centers hangar 700 three in palmdale california.

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"project scientist" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"From this data scientists learned about the structure pressure and density of pluto's atmosphere some three billion miles from earth sofia's measurements were all the more valuable as they could be compared to the data from another mission collected just two weeks later when nasr's new horizons spacecraft flew by pluto at a distance of a mere seven thousand seven hundred fifty miles this allowed researchers to calibrate decades of existing earthbased pluto occupation data enhancing their analyses of all those earlier observations recently in july sofia steadied another occupation this time with a small icy body that is likely a remnant from the earliest days of our solar neighborhood called 2014 'em you sixty nine new horizons plans to fly by 'em you sixty nine to learn about the formation of our solar system however if it turns out 'em you sixty nine is surrounded by rings or debris the spacecraft's flyby would have to be adjusted to a safe distance kimberly aniko smith sofia project scientist at nasa's ames research center in silicon valley said the mu sixty nine uncle tation observations were much more challenging when compared to those done in support of the pluto flyby in 2015 as mu sixty nine is much smaller and we had more open questions about its location with respect to the background star whose light it would block it really brought occupation science to a whole new level of precision the researchers instrument team and flight crew work together to optimize our observing strategy.

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"project scientist" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

"This is the space buffon's podcast where it eases european space research and technology center in the netherlands and where in partnership with the naked scientists you can find us on facebook and twitter and we'll put some pictures at the today's recording on on you instagram page two on standing in the clean room here it as tech on standing next to me is your highness bank of the project scientist at easter responsible for this mission now this is such a difficult mission to achieve that he's taken quite a long time to get everything in place was that any point at on that journey you will you thought this was perhaps too difficult maybe not too different code but at one time even before messenger arrived at mercury there was a christian very often asked do we really meet reputable onboard there was a little bit of fear that people might decide to cancel this project but from the technical point of view i was convinced that the overcomes now the messenger mission was the nasa mission to mercury it hasn't given us all the answers from macri by any means has it knows it's completely correct countries cruise missiles abroad us many new aspects new christians retreat milk conformable andreas becker colombo and reforms of misinformation arrived people sorted mercury's may be boring planet marks the move but from messenger relearn said this is a very fantastic planet features we are not expected before this lot of full condition instead norris huge areas of food from his gifts are you souza craters magnetic field to shifted their features like paul lewis read or no awarded really is but it goes in the direction who has made me some swing rich indicate recent activity on the planet at the moment we don't know what's a composition us but if you look at these features.

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"project scientist" Discussed on Orbital Paths

Orbital Paths

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"project scientist" Discussed on Orbital Paths

"And you run it back and forth back and forth back and forth it starts to get sticky in it starts to not work so well um so we were the first one of the first soul savor coercion we have really simple very simple uh dynamic random access memory it's it's it was sophisticated at the time but that's been far surpass now there's a lot of changes that have happened over the last twenty years not so much on the spacecraft in the end really not so much on the flights off were it's been the real change has been in the ground software it's been in the things that we used to track the spacecraft i mean we've gone from uh sun workstations which i still use to today i can track alarms on my on my iphone be modest fifteen suck cassini launch from cape canaveral florida on october 15th 1997 it took three launch attempts which is unusual but we had to get everything just right cassini is one of the largest spacecraft nasa has ever launched it weighed more than six tonnes warped bravo very quickly be spacecraft on a barrier morrow correct fatter and then to watch as the rocket lifts off the launch pad at went into a cloud and this cloud brightened he could feel people around you holding their breath you know did did the rocket blow up what's going to happen in then very slowly cassini came out through that cloud on its way to saturn this is linda spill khor and i'm the cassini project scientist that i've actually worked on cassini since the very beginning in the early days have been on cassini thirty years after launch cassini began a circuitous route through the solar system.

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