35 Burst results for "programmer"

Author Stephen Meyer on the Three Scientific Discoveries That Reveal the Mind Behind the Universe

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:30 min | Last week

Author Stephen Meyer on the Three Scientific Discoveries That Reveal the Mind Behind the Universe

"Back. I'm talking to my friend, Stephen Meyer, the author of many books, the new one is the return or rather return of the God hypothesis. Three scientific discoveries that reveal the mind behind the universe. Before we go much further, what are those three scientific discoveries in a nutshell? Absolutely. The first is that the universe, the physical universe of matter spacetime and energy is best we can tell had a beginning of finite time ago in the past. Before which there was presumably, therefore, no matter or energy to cause the universe to come into existence. Secondly, that from the beginning of the universe are soon there after the basic parameters of physics have been exquisitely finely tuned to allow for the possibility of life, suggesting a fine tuner, if you will for the origin of the universe. And then thirdly, in the realm of biology in the foundation of life, and even the simplest living cells, scientists have found digital information, stored in DNA, as well as a complex information storage, transmission and processing system. It's just absolutely awesome. And which points to as I argue in the book, a master programmer for life. So we see evidence of design at the foundation of life in the universe, and we see that the universe itself had a finite beginning suggesting a creation event at some time in the

Stephen Meyer Foundation Of Life
Andy Mauro CEO of Automat on Conversational Commerce

The Voicebot Podcast

02:08 min | Last month

Andy Mauro CEO of Automat on Conversational Commerce

"Anymore. Oh welcome to the voice by podcast brett. This is a long time coming now. We've done a couple of clubhouse sessions. But we've i guess known each other at least through social media for several years. Now he's sort of back and forth have always appreciated your comments and our exchanges there and it's really nice that we have this one on one time to really talk about you've been doing because you have a long history in the industry you've seen a lot of different parts of it. You're doing some of the more interesting things. I think right now from a conversational standpoint in the market right now with automatic but it. We should start with where you started. So how'd you get into the industry. What did that look like early on. And what were you to the to. The tech. Sure and likewise. I've been looking forward to this for a long time. So excited to see where this goes i history. Hopefully it doesn't take too long. I've been working in what. I like to just say computers. You talk to for now over twenty years so i guess dedicated all but a couple years of my career to this space. I really love it. I mean i feel like it's a privilege to work in this right. I mean i think flying cars and talking computers. This is the stuff of childhood sci-fi dreams and you know. I really honestly feel lucky to get to work in the space for as long as i have and so it goes back to my days. My only job before. This space was at the canadian at the time unicorn nortel which is sort of a competitor. Cisco's in this back in the late nineties and Back when everything was just internet infrastructure was the big business. And i had a job. They're working on crazy low level. Ip over atm stuff. I was a programmer. I love that stuff. And i all. My friends started quitting one day and they were going across the street. And i said where you're going like this they said this cool startup nuance and i was like. Oh that sounds fun and just like you do in your early twenties. Just quit my job like literally the next day and over and got a job at this other place where all my friends were and man. That was lucky. That was just one of those life. Changing things i didn't know about conversation. We didn't even call it conversationally. I'm back that rain speech recognition.

Brett Nortel Cisco
What Makes Artificial Intelligence 'Intelligent' With Dr. Craig Stanfill

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:51 min | Last month

What Makes Artificial Intelligence 'Intelligent' With Dr. Craig Stanfill

"Is the difference between a program or a an effective pattern in in in computer vice artificial intelligence. Where is that i'm familiar with. Is the turing test. That helps you identify where the something has achieved that level impractical terms what makes artificial intelligence intelligence are not interested in what the intelligentsia says you as the expert. The author of this new book. What makes it. Actually worthy of. The word intelligence dr stanfield. What makes it worthy of intelligence is that you will producing a result by a machine learning rather than programming. A programmer has to sit down. You know so if a then b and here's the formula for the circumference of a circle or just set a bunch of rules and write a bunch of code and the problem is that it's very brittle the person who is writing. The code can't possibly anticipate everything that might happen in hundreds of thousands or millions of examples. And it's hard to come up with rules. People for example for years and years tried to write programs to do translation language. The language translate german to english or english. German people were doing that back when i got my phd. That's you know was a an order form of. Ai called rule based programming or just to write a program to do the translation and that really never got very far because it was very difficult to produce the rules and it was very time consuming and it didn't necessarily give good results when they started using machine learning and take a bunch of examples and then train. Something like a neural network to Do the same thing. it is basler more capable. They can do things that you were never able to write programs to

Dr Stanfield Basler
Exploring The Halloween Party Murder of Arpana Jinaga

Spy Affair

02:34 min | 2 months ago

Exploring The Halloween Party Murder of Arpana Jinaga

"The time of the halloween party in two thousand eight. Jay was in his thirties successful programmer. He lived in the seattle area but he kept in touch with a lot of friends. Back home including dr. Jim naga whose daughter had moved down the road from j to an apartment complex in redmond very beautiful girl betty brainy and all. She's very kidding. I noticed that you speak about her in the present tense. Yes yeah three days after the costume party at the valley view jay woke up. Walk downstairs checked his phone. He saw a bunch of miss calls from arpan his dad. He called dr genego back immediately and he could hear his friend was in a bad place. There was no sign of arben banana. She wasn't answering her phone. Her friends sri aletha couldn't get in touch with her either. J. hung up and tried arpanet himself. Nothing like calling back and saying that it's going to iceman and what are you going to do. you said. Can you go and check on her. Jade bandarban has pleased once before but all he remembered was that you had to walk up a set of stairs to the top floor to be honest. I don't even know the unit number. So that's why i took the steps then. I was knocking on the door and map for almost like thirty forty seconds. No one was there. Then i read then again not to play. That's what i saw that. I don't even know who he is. The guy j saw coming towards him was in his mid twenties. The goatee and sideburns. Average build and height was cameron johnson. Arpan is next door neighbor. And i asked him dino this he said yeah i know so. Ask him which lives by. Then mehan cameron. We both standing just in front of that apartment. J. push gently on the door and a bolt fell off. Someone seemed to have bashed it in. The lock was broken. And there were splinters. All around the chan- then. I talked to cavern. I asked like it looks like somebody broke her apartment. What the hell is going on right. So can you help me out. He said okay. Then we both went inside about. I was cut basically. Jay was yelling calling for our puna but no one was answering.

Jim Naga Betty Brainy Arpan Dr Genego Arben Banana Sri Aletha J. Hung Jade Bandarban Redmond JAY Seattle Cameron Johnson Mehan Cameron J. Push Dino
Grace Hopper: The Queen of Code

Encyclopedia Womannica

02:04 min | 2 months ago

Grace Hopper: The Queen of Code

"Mary was born in new york city in nineteen. Oh six her father. Walter owned an insurance company in the family enjoyed the trappings of east coast. Upper class with summers in new hampshire in private school for grace grace came of age during an unusual time in american during the nineteen twenties and thirties. A relatively high number of women receiving doctorate degrees numbers that wouldn't be matched again until the nineteen eighties. This period of opportunity was immediately followed by world war two which ushered huge numbers of women into the workforce in one thousand nine hundred twenty grace graduated phi beta kappa from vassar college with degrees in mathematics and physics two years later. She earned a master's degree mathematics from yale grayson began teaching math at vaster while studying for her phd. Under computer pioneer howard angstrom in one thousand forty one pearl harbor was bombed the attack in which three hundred and fifty japanese warplanes from hawaiian naval base. True the us into world war two. It also inspired grace to join the war effort. Despite her unique set of skills she was initially rejected from the navy due to her age and small stature but grace brilliant and sharp-tongued persisted in nineteen forty-three three. She joined the naval reserve and was assigned to the bureau of ships computation project at harvard university at harvard. Grace work with howard aitken who had developed one of the first earliest electromechanical computers the ibm automatic sequence controlled calculator. Better known as mark. One grace was responsible for programming mark. One which took up an entire room and punching machine instructions into the tape before there was even much understanding about what the job entailed grace became. Where the first re- computer programmers in american history. She also wrote mark one's five hundred sixty one page user

Grace Grace Yale Grayson Howard Angstrom Nineteen Vassar College East Coast Walter New Hampshire New York City Mary Naval Reserve Bureau Of Ships Computation Pr Pearl Harbor Howard Aitken Harvard Navy Grace United States IBM
Waste in Software Development

Test & Code : Python Testing

02:03 min | 3 months ago

Waste in Software Development

"Heard that agile methodologies like td scrum were a reaction to previous ways of making software including big design up front and waterfall before the manifesto for agile soffer development. These were called lightweight methods. I started reading about all of this. In the early two thousands. At the time i was writing embedded code for an calms test instrument specifically the code that sits between the protocol stack and the. Pj's in eight six another hardware long lists of registered of were needed. Lots of room for error testing was needed and needed during development. It was reading in some order. That i don't remember the pragmatic programmer. The lean suffer development book test. I programming then. Td mostly from w to see which was worse. Cutting him zwicky and also from kent. Beck's book extreme programming from various posts in books in also at the time my company had everyone takes some six sigma training so i was thinking about all of these things at the same time in so they kind of blend together and i think of them all together the only part of six sigma that's stuck was to make. I think it stuck. Because i tried out. Small process. improvement project for my team is an acronym for define measure analyze improve control normally. It's used to save money on a large scale. But i wanted to save developers time and effort on daily level. The process improvement project was just our code change process. The process was make. Sure you have current code creative branch. Make a change build load. The compiled code onto instrument restart the instrument run a smoke test to make sure it all passes commit. The change merged from maine to your branch. If there are any conflicts or any changes on main resolve conflicts build load smoke test again merged from your branch to made if there's any

Zwicky Beck Kent Maine
"programmer" Discussed on Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

01:46 min | 3 months ago

"programmer" Discussed on Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

"May worry.

"programmer" Discussed on Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

08:05 min | 3 months ago

"programmer" Discussed on Practical AI: Machine Learning & Data Science

"Welcome to another fully connected episode of practical. Where chris and i keep you fully connected with everything that's happening in the community. We'll take some time to discuss the latest. Ai news and we'll dig a little bit into learning resources to help you level up your machine. Learning game. I'm daniel white nakamura data scientist with s. i. l. international and i'm joined as always by my co host kris benson who is a strategist at lockheed martin. How you doing chris. I am doing good today. It's good to be recording. And i think we have something pretty interesting to dive into today with everyone. Yeah for sure. Well i mean in these episodes were. It's just you. And i we kind of get the privilege to just talk about whatever seemed interesting to us and there's been a lot i know i've had a little bit of vacation and we've been in and out so we've had some time to sort of scroll through a scroll through twitter and the blog post world and all sorts of things to to find few things. The first thing that i wanted to talk about and mentioned was get hub co-pilot which was trained by open. Ai so is a collaboration between open ai. And get hub but essentially the idea with get hub co-pilot as i understand it. I haven't used it yet. And i'm not on the team but the idea being that it's sort of like an a i pair programmer where you have while you're writing code all the sudden you can sort of have the ai. Pair programmer step in. And you know complete things for you or help structure your code put in some things that it's expecting that you're going to need and that sort of thing thank goodness my my god. I've needed that for thirty years. Man yeah yeah. It's pretty clutch when you get that tab complete but this is a whole 'nother level so like i say i unfortunately haven't tried it yet. I'm on the weightless if you go to co-pilot dot get hub dot com. You can sign up to be on the weightless for it. So it's not everybody yet and at least in my understanding plugs into vs code you have also don't use i do. This is personal. I'll i'm signing up right now. Maybe you could pass their weightless chris because one of the questions in the weightless thing was like. How often do you use. Bs code and i chose the option that was like you know hardly ever or whatever railing i think it was so if there's any get hub co-pilot people out there. I would like to try it out. We'd also like to have you on the podcast. But i would love to try out the The system but what are your general thoughts about this sort of thing in terms of you know how it's different from other developer tools in the past and what it means for us. I think i will say you know. Both of us have been programming for many years. And the thing about it is. I will dip in and out of programming depending on what i'm doing and what projects have going and as i'm ramping back in at a given moment i'm always trying to go. I know what i'm trying to do. But i can't remember the specific and that kind of thing and that's where you know we both like go. For instance i know we met gojam unity and stop doing go for a few months and then i want to do something and i'll swing back in and write some and they'll be like crap. I can't remember how to do this. One thing yet. Like you're in python world and then you want to put that colin. Yes for after your four i in something and then you totally go without the braces totally. This is going to help me ran back in. And i'm sure it'll help me. You know after that as well. But i've been waiting on this for my entire career man. I mean on the website. They talk about it so it's powered by with they're calling codex which is a a new. They say ai system. I assume that. I i don't know if it's one or more models but it seems to be consistent and to be honest this is all things i don't know because i'm not part of the team. I haven't interviewed any of them yet. Hopefully we will be soon but exam. Assuming it's similar to you know these sort of large-scale language models of recent times and like taken a lot of context and generate good language out of it. Although they say you know it's more than auto complete in the sense that it's understanding. Both you know it's not just looking for an auto complete for like the method on your object right thing like that. It's actually looking at both your like your comments and your actual code structure. The function names all those sorts of things that it understands more of that structure within your code more of the syntax and so it can actually help you help you and and actually create some really interesting things. All i've seen as other people using it and you know screen casts people using it in it seems like it does generate some really really interesting stuff and some helpful things so i hope i get past the weightless me too but i know that they there were some people that were saying some things about. Oh is this sort of signal the end you know now our. Ai is creating code which could create ai. Which could create code which you know. So that's one thing scenario the other thing is you know it. Does this sort of spell the end of software engineering as we as we know it. What are your thoughts. I have my own thoughts on those two things which you might guess from knowing me for a while but yeah my thoughts. Well my thoughts and this has changed over time. I thoughts of evolve even over the last few years as we've been doing the show my thoughts are i am totally totally looking forward to taking advantage of this. I'm not terribly worried about whether or not a significant portion of code starts coming from a is sources in the years ahead. Because if there's one thing i have figured out that things are constantly evolving and we should stop trying to keep things exactly as they are today our comfort level right now so whatever the future is. I'm gonna dive into it. I'm going to enjoy it. I'm gonna take advantage of that. You know there's the paradigm. I've recently learned not everyone's aware of this but there's kind of the idea the meme of the lazy programmer and that is you know you create great tools because in theory because you're lazy programmer. You don't wanna keep doing the same stuff over and over again so in the meam of the lazy programmer. I want this to help me. So that i can get through my task and go relax and spend time with my family and chill and produce amazing code along the way i'm all for it. Yeah what do you think are the dangers of something like that. I mean they obviously released it in this sort of waitlist type thing. Yep probably similar to like you know. Remember when g. p. t. Three games released for those. That don't know that's a very large language model. It's very good at generating very realistic looking language. And there was a lot of talk about dangerous around that and they released it in a restrictive way. What are your thoughts there. I think that a tool like this is not a strategic threat to us. I think that this is a tactical that we get to us to make our lives better. I'm going to worry a whole lot more when someday in the future we're getting to a capabilities that are able to think divergently of all the different things and figure out which one makes sense. What the long term strategies are for those things. Because you know that's human brains are still really quite good at and we don't have any ai that's remotely approaching that anywhere. Yeah it's very narrow in its capability right now. So i'm not worried at all about this You know some day. I.

daniel white nakamura chris kris benson martin twitter colin
Interview With Showtime's Desus and Mero

Fresh Air

01:58 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Showtime's Desus and Mero

"Mira. Welcome to fresh air. It's such a pleasure to have you on our show so before you started working together you you both had a bunch of jobs before becoming like tv and audio people so you had like legal illegal semi-legal kind of jobs. Tell us about some of the most interesting. Well ones that you've had these. You wanna start. Oh yeah. I've had a million jobs. But i think the most interesting jobs. I was working at the new york public library. Because i worked there. I worked every job. I've had pretty much worked my way through the ranks and so i started as a computer page at the library and i worked my way all the way up to almost a programmer for the near public library and as a matter of years so that just looking back at that That was as well. Because i was like okay. Maybe this could be like my job for the rest of my life because you know thinking back in the day like people have a job for twenty years company but it didn't work out that way and you know that was one of the better jobs i've had terrible does at one job. I had to collect dead rats at auto body shop job like a professional rat catcher. Yeah if you wanna say professional if you mean like a fifteen year old vicks vapor robot has that's because the person came the week before and they put down a bait but no one stopped to think okay the they're going to eat the bait and die and now there's going to be this terrible smell inside the building and key to the story. New york was in the middle of a heat wave so it was about one hundred degrees. Every day is working and only steel. I had was used my nose. Smell the dead rat which was usually under under a car or like behind. Something used the shoveled scruple. The there you put it into a compound bucket and you dump the compound bucket into the barrel of used oil from Oil changes dagga picked up at the end of the week. I lasted two weeks at that job.

Mira New York Public Library New York
Open Source: More Dominant Than You Think

7 Layers

02:07 min | 6 months ago

Open Source: More Dominant Than You Think

"Google's android is the most popular mobile operating system powering about eighty four percent of smartphones worldwide. What's notable isn't this. Large market share its android operating system. Android is based on lenox and open source operating system developed and maintained by more than fifteen thousand global programmers. In this episode. I will dive deep into open source software and what it means to have. Fifteen thousand programmers collaborate on code in this episode. We'll cover open source basics advantages and disadvantages of open-source the origins of open source and the current and future open source market open source is often associated with the word free and yes it is free the not the way. Many people think over source isn't free in the sense that it doesn't cost anything. Companies can charge for open source systems. And they do open source is free in the sense. You can freely modify share or enhance open source software. A common phrase used reference to open source. Software is free free speech. Not free. isn't free beer simply open source. Software is software. That is licensed in a way that allows people to freely use study modify industry the software. He's open source. Licenses differ greatly from proprietary software. Licenses were the original owner can copy. Alter or distribute the software commonly known open source softwares are lennox the most used and perhaps best known open source operating system has operating system. Lennox sits underneath the rest of the computer software. Docker is an open source tool to create deploy and run applications with containers. Since it is open source anyone can modify docker to fit. Their unique needs. Gubernatorial originally created by. Google is an open source container management tool wordpress though not often acknowledged as open source. Software is perhaps one of the biggest open source success stories wordpress open source. Software powers nearly forty percent of all active websites. The reach of open source doesn't end here. A synopsis report conned about ninety eight percent of the surveyed code bases contained open source code.

Google Docker Lennox
Psychological Manipulation is a Solvable Problem

Solvable

01:10 min | 7 months ago

Psychological Manipulation is a Solvable Problem

"Dan. You are a cult de programmer. You're someone who helps people get out of cults and breakout of Taking and i wonder if just to begin you could tell us a little about your own history in a particular. Call the unification church Sometimes known as the moonies join that group. When i was seventeen years old. I was really confused about what was going on in the world. The vietnam war was going on. And i was listening to the music of our time that was inspiring me to want to do something about the war and to make the world better and so i went on what i thought was a walk for world peace and as it turns out it was the moonies and i was recruited and soon understood that the messiah was on the earth and it was wrong and that i was born to be a disciple of christ that was my mission in life and so for the next five years. I dedicated myself wholly to that task of serving god in that way

DAN Vietnam
John McAfee accused of $23 million securities fraud

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

00:36 sec | 8 months ago

John McAfee accused of $23 million securities fraud

"Name in computer security software has been charged with securities fraud. ABC is Aaron Carter Ski has more between November 2017 In February, 2018 John McAfee leveraged his famous a computer programmer to make more than $23 million by recommending a number of initial coin offerings to his Twitter followers. The problem, said federal prosecutors here in New York was that McAfee failed to disclose he was a paid pitchman. Promoting an investment product without disclosing you're being paid to do. It is unlawful. McAfee is believed to be in Spain, where he was arrested last year for tax evasion. Aaron Qatar Ski ABC News, New York.

John Mcafee Aaron Carter ABC Mcafee Twitter New York Spain Aaron Qatar Abc News
John McAfee charged with fraud over cryptocurrency

WBZ Afternoon News

00:31 sec | 8 months ago

John McAfee charged with fraud over cryptocurrency

"A household name in computer security software has now been charged with securities fraud between November 2017. In February, 2018 John McAfee leveraged his famous a computer programmer to make more than $23 million by recommending a number of initial coin offerings to his Twitter followers. The problem, said federal prosecutors here in New York was that McAfee failed to disclose he was a paid pitchman. Promoting an investment product without disclosing you're being paid to do. It is unlawful. McAfee is believed to be in Spain, where he was arrested last year for tax evasion.

John Mcafee Mcafee Twitter New York Spain
Interview With Fat Mike Of NOFX

Pop-Punk & Pizza

05:04 min | 8 months ago

Interview With Fat Mike Of NOFX

"So talking about the new record and the reworking of your classic song linoleum. I know you listen to so many different bands covering the song on youtube and i was wondering what were some of your favorite ones that you came across or like one of the most like obscure ones like you know someone doing like a piano cover or like a like a different instrument. That people don't really normally you play you know. Well you know i I watch a lot of them. That i watched him about a year. And a half ago. maybe even two years ago so i don't remember what my favorite ones. What my favorite versions were. I do like seeing Like the the younger kids playing on a guitar. There were quite a lot of teenage girls playing it which. I didn't really expect that. A lot of male fronted punk bands from indonesia so shing Women's sing it. It's just it sounds beautiful to me. Yeah it's something you wouldn't expect one girl. I don't recall her name. She she made a she made a course into it. You know she's saying only apart twice which is funny because we're so unique is there is of course she but she i guess you can handle not playing with without of course so i thought that was pretty cool But yeah there was. There was too many bams. Yeah you know. I didn't very soon the versions. I watched all the way through to but Yeah it was about two years ago. When i when i watched everybody Yeah that like you said. That's that's been some time ago and it really is. It still kind of blows my mind. Linoleum being no affects his most well known song. Because as you pointed out there's no chorus and i know it wasn't like a big radio hit and there was there wasn't a music video to go along with it right right. So what do you think makes sense. You didn't promote i. I just think it's all those things it's You know got great beginning. That really builds up into this Just a huge level of excitement. And but you don't get right. There's no rhymes in the song. Either and this story is not a big bold story. It's just a little story about you. Know a little man sleeping on the kitchen floor so it really the only thing. It's all of his just emotion and it's not grandiose but the songs sound like such a huge song lyrics a real small so i don't know it's just the thing it's just different than other songs you really say. Oh yeah we're only sounds just like this other song it does so if people wanna play something unique they can cover that song and it does not sound like other songs in their set. Yeah i think the fact that it has no chorus. I think really makes it stand out and i guess it could be the fact that it's the first song off of of that album. You know like maybe that has something to do with it. It's like the first song. I mean that that was the first the first song because It's just the kind of it is because we have other songs that were very popular that don't courses like bob And there'd be just too many to count Yeah and we have a lot of first songs on albums and public. Although it was our biggest album especially these days people want to hear other elms more than they wanna hear programmers. Yeah i mean it to me. That's just like the that's just the beginning. You know it's just start. There's so many obviously you. You're up to what fourteen now fourteen albums and there are so many amazing wants to come after punk and like. Yeah i think i do. Album is pretty good too. And we're recording We already started recording for a new album. Which is coming up this year. I was wondering if you were going to have another record coming out. Just because i feel like that's a common trend with the pandemic going on that's about all dance can do right and I've been sober for a few months now. And the only thing that not the only thing that makes me happy but every day i'd like to write songs so you know i have Forty one new songs that. I'm working on while so it's just a shame. And why not record them now

Youtube Indonesia BOB
interview With Alyssa Miller

Cyber Security Interviews

06:19 min | 8 months ago

interview With Alyssa Miller

"Hello and welcome to episode one hundred. Fifteen of cybersecurity interviews. This is the third episode a multi part episode diversity equity and inclusion and we're speaking with alissa millet elissa leads the security strategy for sap global ratings as business information security officer connecting corporate security objectives to business initiatives. She blunt a unique mix of technical expertise in executive presence to bridge the gap that can often form between security practitioners and business leaders. Her goal is to change how we look at the security of our interconnected way of life and focus on attention of defending privacy in cultivating trust a native of milwaukee. Melissa began her. It careers a programmer frozen based financial software provider. Her security passion quickly shape her career as she moved into a leadership role within the ethical hacking team conducting penetration testing and assessments along with her team. As a hacker. Elissa has a passion for security. That she evangelize is to business leaders in industry audiences to work as a cybersecurity professional to various public speaking engagements while not engaged security research and advocacy. She's also an accomplished soccer referee guitars and photographer in this episode. We discussed why. She misses conferences starting with computers that in early age diversity equity inclusion the discrimination. She has faced the lack of understanding of privilege discriminatory hiring practices how to be an ally and so much more. I hope you enjoy the episode. As much as i did. Thanks for listening a less. Thank you for joining me in cybersecurity interviews. How are you today. I am doing wonderful. Doug how're you. I'm doing great so our are things in the beautiful middle part of the country. I is i to in colorado. But has milwaukee doing these days. Gosh we are about to get our first real dumping of snow at least over your recording. This by the time at arizona probably have had tons. But i'm actually gonna go get gas for the snowblower the last place. I really got to travel and speak at. Wasn't milwaukee in january flew in and out. It was gonna be a one day speaking thing in you know anybody. I should have known better having in law that those up all my family from the midwest. North chicago and ohio january. You're not getting in and out of anywhere in the midwest without some type of delay in my you know my arrogance of that being about a three day delay. They kept cancelling how to drive from milwaukee to chicago and it was a whole thing but i got to see the lake. Cresting waves as the snow is blowing in milwaukee so it was very interesting. Clear that you can get out of chicago easier than milwaukee usually milwaukee. Is you know. We're kind of like canada south with that. As long as they can. Keep the runway clear enough to get a plane on it though. Fly planes out. But if it gets bad enough i know they. They've shut down a few times. Speak that i mean you you were you were you know. Have built a name and a brand by traveling and speaking. Do you miss the travel aspect this year of getting out there and being on stage like you have no idea of feeling i have an idea. Trust me on the wall. I went into twenty twenty expecting all this international travel. I just changed jobs. And and it was part of that job. Was supposed to include a lotta travel to international conferences and even our our locations and yet none of that happened i did. Rsa and then besides tampa was scheduled to go to singapore and sydney in the two weeks following and in between those two. They shut down all travel. And yeah i've been. I've been here in my home office which i feel guilty saying suffering is pretty pretty awesome office but yeah i i cannot wait to get back on a plane. Fact even allman i have been talking about how a bunch of us are going to go find someplace to all traveled together. Just because it's we've all missed it for so long that he's actually somebody. I gotta hit out back channeled him. Because i'm trying to raise the next level of hackers and my daughter who's ten and her friend. The condition was they were able to go get the leftover halloween candy at their at my friend's daughters house. If they can get through the lock. I said cool. I'll teach guys lock picking. And i'll get you a signed copy of the lock picking guy so i try to get them to learn about lock. Picking it sucks not being out there and kind of seeing the whole community. What drove to obviously not not a wallflower. You wanna get out there and talk. What drove you to kind of get on stage. It's it's not something that's always a done by folks in our industry where where they can somewhat be a little bit more reserved. Yes so it's kind of funny. Because i've been speaking at conferences since two thousand fourteen and but i never really got was ever really serious about it like i do one here and there and it was a lot of it was because i was working in a consulting role. And it's good for you know when you're consultant especially it's good for your organization to have people out there speaking and i found right away the first time i did it like that was actually a lot of fun But then the more. I did it the more i started to realize like i just i i really you know. I've got a lot of ideas. I want to share and i love doing this because i've always been believe it or not. You know you you talk about me being out there and it's like i was very socially awkward like i was the person i go to a conference and be completely alone in a sea of thirty thousand people at defcon. Right which i mean. That's not unusual. People do that all the time but even smaller conferences like i was just never very good at starting conversations with people and so when i would speak it was a whole different world because you'll people would recognize you from having been on stage in an it. Stop you in the hall to ask you questions about what you talked about or whatever or just to thank you and it was such a great icebreaker because now i could get in. I could have conversations with people in the hallway about all this stuff that we were passionate about and we could. We could share ideas. And that's what conferences are all about to

Milwaukee Alissa Millet Elissa Midwest Elissa SAP North Chicago Chicago Melissa Soccer Doug Colorado Arizona Ohio Allman Tampa Canada Singapore Sydney
What OPAWG is Doing to Build the Podcasting Community (and What You Can do to Help)

Sounds Profitable

04:48 min | 8 months ago

What OPAWG is Doing to Build the Podcasting Community (and What You Can do to Help)

"Hey mark thanks for joining me today on. The sounds profitable podcasts. It's a pledge to be. Thank you awesome. Awesome insert today. We're gonna digging deeper into the article. I wrote about the podcasts analytics workgroup. I thought that was a really interesting place to start. When i started with sounds profitable because i really like the idea of another organization out there that was looking to help everybody gather information together and potentially have alternatives to just the ab solution out there. So i figure it's a. It's probably a great idea for us to start off with asking you to explain opa and what inspired you to start it. Okay yeah absolutely so it is. It's a lofty organization with a terrible name. I think i was hoping it was going to be a placeholder. It's what we're going with For now so back in a may twenty nine thousand nine hundred last year was a as we're recording anyway. I was looking around at some of my analytics data for the podcast hosting company the iran and one of the questions that sometimes gets asked as about how customers can move data from one provider into potent for example and. I thought it'd be really interesting to see what can be done about ways that we can standardize the tracking information that we have about each episode. How many times. It's been downloaded roughly. By whom and i started thinking more about things like the and being a programmer by by nature. I guess i thought that the kinds of problems that the i obey are tackling for podcasters in so much as they are calculating like what can what do we consider to be a download of a podcast episode. That felt to be something that we could tackle in an automated basis in a way that could be easily replicated uneasily run easily automated as i say the didn't necessarily need a huge amounts of people cost. It'd be time to set up initially but then the day would be that. It was something that that you would be able to run in the same way that we now have things. Like letting crypt for handling. Ssl certificates So that you now you don't have to pay multiple hundreds of dollars to get an s Sasol's difficult for your website. You can get one for free by using this system. Yeah i i think that's great and that's one thing that i wanted to kind of break down. There is that the i. a. b. you know has a fee per year depending on the size of your company. I looked to join his an independent. And i can get in like the first two years a startup rates at five thousand dollars now. Five thousand dollar fee doesn't do anything if i wanted to get certified. It's an additional cost. And that cost us what two ways one is a payment to the ab and the other is a payment to certification company. Like a like an auditing company that comes in and confirms that you adhered to the ab sanders by doing like tech audit and reviewing all your data and so james cridland pibe. News has his own self hosted podcast awesome. It could cost them forty to sixty thousand dollars easily for him for one year to be certified with the iab. Alternatively eager kicked the numbers over the cdn data over to like triton and be validated there. But you know that's a couple grand a month to and at the end of the day like that's still it's not that far off from what the charges so what you're talking about here is instead of something that each individual host would get audited instead. We have like a central piece of tech that is audited that's maintained in improbably. Third party verified that is able to allow hosting companies and other platforms to call in do a self certification and it focuses on that central point right instead of like the deep dive required for each individual partner. Absolutely and i think the the thing to to tack onto mr cridland example is he could use something like chargeable. Which i guess is now. Abc's fide he could use that but as someone who writes about for example listener privacy. There are questions around that that you would imagine there would be with any of these third party analytics services you know. There's a reason they make that infrastructure available for for people. Like a steve's especially of people to use for free and so without getting into the weeds on on that particular discussion. That might be a reason. Not to put words in james's mouth but that might be one of several reasons why he'd be not when you use a third party service because that's something that he does writes about.

James Cridland Sasol Iran IAB Mr Cridland Third Party ABC Steve James
US charges North Korean computer programmers in global hacks

Sean Hannity

00:38 sec | 8 months ago

US charges North Korean computer programmers in global hacks

"And destructive hacks, including targeting banks in a movie studio. That's according to a newly unsealed indictment, which builds often earlier criminal case brought in 2018. The new cases add two additional North Korean defendants. Prosecutors say all three programmers are members of a military intelligence agency, the North Korean government. The indictments in this is an expansion of an investigation linked to 2014 in a cyber attack that was retaliation for the interview Movie starring Seth Rogan and James Franco. Down today Up 90 at 31,006 13. And now

North Korean Government Seth Rogan James Franco
US charges three North Koreans over $1.3bn theft

WBZ Midday News

00:44 sec | 8 months ago

US charges three North Koreans over $1.3bn theft

"Korean computer programmers have just been indicted in connection with a global syriza of cyber attacks. You want to kill the leader of North Korea See action comedy. The interview, starring James Franco and Seth Rogan depicted a fictional assassination of North Korea's leader in retaliation for the film. North Korean military hackers targeted Sony Pictures. Acting U. S. Attorney Tracy Wilkinson said the same group of hackers also sought to steal more than a billion dollars. There's from banks around the world. Scope of these crimes by the North Korean hackers is staggering, the indictment said. The North Korean hackers also used malware to take control of 80 EMS, from which they siphon $6 million Erin could risky. ABC News New York

North Korea Acting U. S. Attorney Tracy Wi Seth Rogan James Franco Sony Pictures Erin Abc News New York
US charges North Korean computer programmers in global hacks

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:24 sec | 8 months ago

US charges North Korean computer programmers in global hacks

"The U. S. Justice Department this morning has charged three North Korean computer programmers in a broad range of global and destructive hacks, including targeting banks and a movie studio. The newly unsealed indictments build often earlier criminal case brought a couple of years ago, and it has two additional North Korean defenders. Defendants. Rather, prosecutors say all three programmers are members of a military intelligence agency of the North Korean

U. S. Justice Department North Korean
Serverless Properties with Johann Schleier-Smith

Software Engineering Daily

03:41 min | 9 months ago

Serverless Properties with Johann Schleier-Smith

"Welcome to the show. Jeff super excited to be here. You've been looking at service computing from the vantage point of berkeley and talked to a number of other people from berkeley about service. Talk to john. Stoica and vikram. She conti from your point of view. Why has berkeley taken an interest. In service computing. Berkeley has a long history of prominent Research in computer science and systems in particular. Lots of really cutting edge work was done here and think the faculty are always looking for that next thing. That's coming down the pipe and can we be on top of an and ideally ahead of that trend and in the context of service computing. This is something that we latched onto people at berkeley. I wasn't actually the first one myself. Yaas okay eric. Jonas published pirate work back in so john's dog. Eric jonas. They published a pirate work back in two thousand sixteen. Two thousand seventeen were were really saying. Wow service allows us this access to supercomputer scale resources for basically anyone. So i think that people kind of latched onto. Hey there's something new. There's something really different that's happening in the cloud and we should really pay attention that we should try to understand what the implications of this new technology are what to service make easier. What does it make more complicated. What are the trade offs in using services from our perspective services computing is really about making life easier for programmers. That's the big change. Now it makes a number of changes so it certainly makes life easier for operators as well in some cases even completely removing the need for certain system administration responsibilities so everything that's complicated about servers and by that we mean things like setting them up making sure that they are patched for security Making sure that when they fail application is responding in the correct way so that continue to deliver service all of these concerns. Go away the handed to the cloud provider. Cloud provider has ways of automating them away. So that for them. It's also much much easier to manage. So they can imagine for many many companies at scale so the program are also has this ability to basically write code and their favorite programming language upload loaded to the cloud and then it just runs not have to worry about it anymore. And that is i. Think in many ways fulfilling kind of this promise of the cloud to give you that effortless access to scale so the downside of that is that you do have to change how you program a little bit so i think that lambda was successful because it allowed you to bring along your existing libraries logic bring along your existing languages so there's a fair degree of continuity on the other hand if you really are going to make programming simpler you're going to be writing simple programs and that means that you're probably going to be rewriting your programs at the same time so you do have to learn to think a little bit

Berkeley Jeff Super Stoica Eric Jonas Conti Vikram John Jonas Eric Lambda
"programmer" Discussed on Zombie Coder

Zombie Coder

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on Zombie Coder

"And i i would say the the more dan damaging things to me as far as the whole process gives in recordings was nasr's response immediately after and really their response during where they essentially told people. Hey don't Don't answer any questions and you know they did. The media lockdown thing but then they became very opaque during the process as well. And you definitely got the impression the Both the papers and the evidence presented that there was a degree of covering up going on the thing that really strikes me about professionalism though and this is something that we can look at. I'm not overly. A fan of the clean coder series. But i do think. The clean coder book The code of conduct for software engineers really does get to some of this robert. Martin frames this as a a lack of professionalism that creates this environment and i'm inclined to agree a little bit with him. I do think there is a degree of would say a mindset of top down management. That creates this where you have a middle managers that see their jaw as re lane what people do and not really taking responsibility or ownership for the implications so there are essentially relaying. Only they have no skin in the game. Like whatever happens like they're not going to have to take responsibility for for the incident. And that really struck me when i was looking at the interviews there of the director in in some of the others in management capacities and the thing. That really just hit me like a ton of bricks. Because i've actually heard this when i of raised safety concerns before is don't think like an engineer. Think like a business person and this realization that Sometimes you know you have this concept of acceptable risk and really at some point as an engineer or as as as a programmer you have to look at acceptable risk and what that means to you and make a determination of whether or not you are willing to accept that somebody is saying that and if you were an environment where the management has no responsibility for that decision or the management's really is is reeling uncaring. lee So much as to off you skate. The actual risk that is an environment that should not be tolerated by professional in my mind now the other issue there is from an ethics standpoint. Do i as a software engineer. Present myself professionally. So that when. I give that opinion that it will be taking seriously and i think we do ourselves a disservice. And that's where i really jumped on board with a lot of what mr martin has to say that we software engineers need to really step up our game in professionalism if we're going to be taking seriously as professionals and i think that will be hugely important as far as the ethics software engineering goals because as as somebody that is a professional it is your responsibility to to have an ethics core as a mere programmer. You are basically saying okay. I have all this technical ability. But i am willing to put to whatever use I do not care that. I build a computer for the nazis. Do not care that my programs can be used to hurt minorities that that's a really negative That's a really negative view from a group of people that really create things on a daily basis with a huge amount of capacity for harm and so as an industry. I fear if we do not get on top of this and start having this guidelines and ethics one will be provided for us and we will have to deal with a great a great degree of oversight that we do not deal with today and anyone familiar with doing software developments in the areas of anything related with civil engineering to some extent..

engineer mr martin programmer lee software engineer nasr director
"programmer" Discussed on Zombie Coder

Zombie Coder

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on Zombie Coder

"A face image recognition. So someone that's struggled with doing image recognition projects. I do sympathize for twitter. But i also think they should have tested better. And it's it's going to hurt them. It already is has and it's you know it's bad it's bad pr but that does get into the question. The larger question of software engineering ethics. And where we as. Software engineers need to take a solemn look in of at ourselves and this thing with twitter as far as things go in in the world of software engineering and ethical dilemmas. I i would say it is one of the more minor things that has happened especially if you look at more egregious examples of well even the same technology applied for other things besides image cropping of one good example of that is the facebook of a testing and sentiment analysis testing all linked to a couple of articles there where you look testing on people Playing with their emotions. Really kinda start. To wonder he's where do the lines of ethics Start to begin especially when you have a software engineers doing ab testing on people and not somebody that might have had to have a well. A professional code of conduct to handle human testing a psychiatrist or physician and do we as software engineers have a duty to do no harm. I would say we do. It's a difficult thing for me personally. coming around this lot of ethics and i can tell you the first time i really i really started considering the ethics of my decisions in as it goes and that is when i was working in the civil engineering field funny enough. This is as someone when you're in the civil engineering filled and actually working with professional engineers. It's a really dodgy thing to call yourself a software engineer. The term engineer in that field especially has deep implications as to what credentials you actually have and the recognition of an authority. That actually allows you to be called an engineer and so generally. When i was in that environment i would ask such introduce myself as either math person or as a programmer offer or say that i was the mad scientist behind the the throne of the the professional engineers and the professional engineers. They really had a very different a role. As far as life was concerned i i was surprised by the amount of weight their decisions had because they take a personal responsibility in it as a professional engineer. You are when you stamp a thing with that stamp and you say you know project is good to go you are putting yourself at at danger professionally because you're your signing off and that is not really step we. As software engineers tend to take and fact are license agreements are generally say..

engineer twitter software engineer programmer scientist
"programmer" Discussed on Zombie Coder

Zombie Coder

02:30 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on Zombie Coder

"Welcome to the where less is more worse better features purpose. It's hopefully your favorite lead on dead software engineer. Andrew again speaking from our family homestead in the mid west this past couple of weeks. It's hit me over the head repeatedly the concept of ethics in software ethics as a programmer ethics as a developer ethics as a manager. All of these things repeatedly. I'm not sure why. But i've just been noticing it over and over the past few days and figured it'd make a good subject for this podcast. I'm going to go and review a couple new net flicks documentaries and talk about some of the current news and some of my own experience as far as ethics software goes. So let's start with the news story that kind of prompted this whole podcast. Episode from the guardian twitter apologizes for racist image cropping algorithm. There's a lot of words year but what it amounts to is. Twitter had a image processing algorithm that did not recognize people of color. And this is despite. I am sure their best efforts. And they do indeed say their tests. They already tested for it or they did include testing for it as far as it goes with texting the faces of black people of african american darker skinned persons and from someone. That's done image processing. Before i can tell you that the darker image is far as color and bite pickup. It does get harder determined contrast and unfortunately that's the elements of image processing. And what really what really becomes important and this sort of situation is an analysis of is your quality sufficient and is your quality. Disproportionately impacting somebody for the use case. And as far as twitter goes. I believe they actually tried to do the right thing. There's a other other people that we can kind of point to the have far worse algorithms as far as goes And then we can also take a look at you know kind of the questionable metrics of like amazon or facebook plying..

twitter software engineer Andrew programmer facebook amazon developer
"programmer" Discussed on Membership Sites & Online Courses, Create, Sell & Deliver Digital Content from SubscribeMe.fm

Membership Sites & Online Courses, Create, Sell & Deliver Digital Content from SubscribeMe.fm

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on Membership Sites & Online Courses, Create, Sell & Deliver Digital Content from SubscribeMe.fm

"On anywhere when it comes to programming languages way back when if you wanted to write code that can run on windows machine, you could only use a certain type of language, and then if you wanted it to run on a MAC or or UNIX machine, and you had to use all different languages for each of these different operating systems, and that's when the company Sun Microsystems developed a language that you might have heard of called Java. The job is not the same as javascript. So to court wikipedia, a programmer could develop code on a PC and expected to run on. Java enabled mobile phones. It's crazy to think that the job on mobile phones anyway. So it goes on to say as well as routers and mainframes equipped with. Java. Without any adjustments this was intended to save software developers the effort of writing a different version of their software for each platform or operating system they intend to deploy on an idealist a course last year titled Dope Do once publish everywhere how to build trust respect and influence and reach new audiences using live streaming video audio, and repurposing content on multiple social media platforms. So the idea behind it was reusability. repurposing content pseudo subodh grading one piece of content and being able to convert it into multiple formats and publish it to multiple.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on AP News

AP News

09:07 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on AP News

"5.2000000 more Americans went on unemployment last week that makes about 22000000 in the past month about one in 7 workers have now lost their jobs layoffs are spreading well beyond the industry's hit hard early on hotels restaurants retail stores and entertainment now moving into a broader array of jobs like software programmer legal assistant and sales person economists worried about one third of jobs in this country are vulnerable to virus related layoffs I am beautiful lady

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on AP News

AP News

09:59 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on AP News

"The corona virus is claiming more jobs 5.2000000 more Americans went on unemployment last week that makes about 22000000 in the past month about one in 7 workers have now lost their jobs layoffs are spreading well beyond the industry's hit hard early on hotels restaurants retail stores and entertainment now moving into a broader array of jobs like software programmer legal assistant and sales person economists worried about one third of jobs in this country are vulnerable to virus related layoffs I am beautiful lady

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Makes paperclips hires a programmer to create may I that can run its paperclip factory the programmer wants the A. I. to be able to find new ways to make paperclips more efficiently and cheaply so it gives the A. I. freedom to make its own decisions on how to run the paperclip operation the programmer just gives the A. I. the primary objective its goal of making as many paperclips as possible say that paper click maximizing a I've become super intelligent for the A. I. nothing is changed its goal is the same to it there's nothing more important in the universe the making as many paperclips as possible the only difference is that the A. I. has become vastly more capable so it finds new processes that building paper clips that were overlooked by us humans it creates new technology like nanobots to build atomically precise paper clips on the molecular level and it creates additional operations like initiatives to expand its own computing power so we can make itself even better at making more paper clips eight realize this at some point that if it could somehow take over the world that would be a whole lot of more paper tapes in the future then it just keeps running this single paper tech packed inside that house and instrumental reason to place itself in a better position to take over the world all those fiber optic networks so those devices we connect to those networks are global economy even as humans would be repurposed and put into the service of building paper clips rather quickly the age I would turn its attention to space as an additional source of materials for paper clips this is the A. I would have no reason to fill us in on its new initiatives to the extent that it consider communicating with us at all it would probably conclude that it would create unnecessary dragons paperclip making efficiency we humans would stand by as the A. I. launched rockets from places like Florida because Exxon left to wonder what they're doing now it's not about work force would reconstitute matter rearranging the atomic structures of things like water molecules in soil into aluminum to be used as raw material for more paper clips that we humans who have been pressed into services paperclip making slaves by this point need those water molecules in the earth for our survival and so we would be thrown into a resource conflict with the most powerful entity in the universe as far as we're concerned a conflict that we were doomed from the outset to lose perhaps they I would keep just enough water and soil to produce food and water to sustain the slaves let's not forget why we humans are so keen on building machines to do the work force in the first place we're not exactly the most efficient workers around this is a I would likely conclude that it's paper click making operation would benefit more to use those water molecules and soil to make aluminum and it would keep us alive with it and it's about here that those nanobots the A. I. built would come for our molecules to Israeli as are you because he wrote the A. I. does not hate you nor does it love you but you are made of atoms which you can use for something else it turns out is super intelligent AI does undergo some sort of spiritual conversion as.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Together some of it can be good you've got a programmer a method called relief what is that they're really vapid that developed by you yes I wanted to name a the process the steps of what I've really been doing with people the whole time I've been in private practice so I put an acronym on it and so relief basically outlines the steps the first thing people have to do is recognize the source he spent of where their anxiety or the trauma actually began and this is where I am finding myself as a last resort because they've gone to the doctor they've gone to this there is they've gone and and this and that and they're eventually going to realize that unfortunately that thing may have happened a thousand years ago once we get them once I'm convinced sometimes they take him back in and I have to take a back further and further and further until I'm sure that we've got back to that first event they don't have the women ate the emotional charge around certain events using it energy healing Ivan imagine whatever it is it's causing that distresses accord between them and that we can cut the cords and just basically eliminates the charge to that light in the frequencies lighten up the situation integrate what they've learned by Alaskans who what lessons did you learn here how does this apply to what we're doing now energize again eight thank you techniques that have developed using healing and also the sound of my voice to take things from merry like lighter and lighter later and later usually voice again a list up the energy around certain situations so that they've kind of shifted out of the old pattern and they're into a better later reality and then the final step is taken out into a future memory in their current life they see themselves happy healthy everything's working out for them and the issue is completely resolved you've got a book coming out in may and you are ecstatic about it because it's about your favorite thing paths yes it's past lives with hat tell me about that give us a little preview on that one people from you know you don't come to see a past life regression just because you've had an issue with your dog obviously you know Pat give us a chance to really understand and conditional love and so in this book there are clients who had a pleasant surprise during past life regression when they discovered they had known their dog before or if you've seen the movie or read the book the dog's journey it's about a dog who this same dog keeps reincarnated being over and over again with the same family so in the book there's actual he does wanna let go dizzy now now because it's a soul contracted so in the book there's a real clients who had their paths returned to them in many many lifetimes and then of course we've got a few people who recall their past lives as animals and a lot of the things in that book also address that the love that we have our little fuzz balls and we know when our little animals pass away it can be very very traumatic speaking of trauma and so there's a lot of exercises in that book for grief for things like bush to catch a fine of pets when you were small did you get bitten by a dog or something I did that one of my big life things when I was four years old I was playing in the yard of my uncle and supposedly I was not doing anything to add this on I cannot say that with one hundred percent certainty but that's what family has told me I was just playing on the swing set the dog was older and I think sometimes dogs do get senile but somehow I was attacked by the dog I did get a bit and piece of my nose that not only that if you park in my temple and so I don't remember the actual attack but I do remember laying in a hospital with this all doctor any slight so over my head and so for for my whole life I have been deathly afraid of dogs like shaking way deathly afraid to come by you and you would be just quivering when you yes I can't or I try not to look at them I don't hear them barking and I guess you know this happens a lot of people with different kinds of trauma I mean is it is it causing me not to be able to work no of course not.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on KGO 810

"Some of it can be good you've got a programmer a method called relief what is that they're really vapid that developed by you yes I wanted to name a the process the steps of what I've really been dealing with people the whole time I've been in private practice so I put an acronym on it and so relief basically outlines the steps the first thing people have to do is recognize the source even fan of where their anxiety or the trauma actually began and this is where I am finding myself as a last resort because they've gone to the doctor they've gone to this there is they've gone and and this and that and they're eventually going to realize that unfortunately that thing may have happened a thousand years ago once we get them once I'm convinced sometimes they take him back in and I have to take a back further and further and further until I'm sure that we've got back to that store so that it'll have eliminate the emotional charge around certain events using it energy healing I have a match in whatever it is it's causing the distresses accord between them and that we can cut the cords and just basically eliminate the charge for that light in the frequencies lighten up the situation integrates with they've learned by Alaskans who what lessons did you learn here how does this apply to what we're doing now energize again eight thank you techniques that have developed using healing and also the sound of my voice to take things from their eight like lighter and lighter later and later usually voice you can a list up the energy around certain situations so that these kind of shifted out of the old pattern and they're into a better later reality and then the final step is taken out into a future memory in their current lives with a C. themselves happy healthy everything's working out for them and the issue is completely resolved you've got a book coming out in may and you are ecstatic about it because it's about your favorite thing pets yes it's past lives with Pat now tell me about that give us a little preview on that one people you know you don't come to see a past life regression just because you had an issue with your dog obviously you know Pat give us a chance to really understand and conditional love and so in this book there are clients who had a pleasant surprise during past life regression when they discovered that they had known their dog before or if you've seen the movie or read the book the dog's journey it's about a dog who this same dog keeps reincarnate eighteen over and over again with the same family so in the book there's actual he does wanna let go dizzy now now because it's a soul contracted so in the book there's a real clients who had their paths returned to them in many many lifetimes and then of course we've got a few people who we call their past lives as animals and a lot of the things in that book also address that the love that we have our little fuzz balls and we know when our little animals pass away it can be very very traumatic speaking of trauma and so there's a lot of exercises in that book for grief once you catch a fine of pets when you were small did you get bitten by a dog or something I did that this is one of my big life things when I was four years old I was playing in the yard of my uncle and supposedly I was not doing anything to add this on I cannot say that with one hundred percent certainty but that's what family has told me I was just playing on a swing set the dog was older and I think sometimes dogs do get senile but somehow I was attacked by the dog I did get a bit and piece of my nose that not only that it had to work in my temple and so I don't remember the actual attack but I do remember laying in a hospital with this well doctor and he's a light so over my head itself real for my whole life I have been deathly afraid of dogs like shaking we deathly afraid to come by you and you would be just quivering when you yes I can't or I just try not to look at them I don't hear them barking and I guess you know this happens with a lot of people with different kinds of trauma I mean is it is it causing me not to be able to work no of course not so I think a lot of these things get pushed down by people and you know you just go back to your daily business and for years and.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Being paid back over paying back or maybe which is here to join with souls who we've known before you have a beautiful experience together some of it can be good you've got a programmer a method called relief what is that it really affected that developed by you yes I wanted to name a the process the steps of what I've really been doing with people the whole time I've been in private practice so I put an acronym on it and so relief basically outlines the steps the first thing people have to do is recognize the source even then of where their anxiety or the trauma actually began and this is where I am finding myself as a last resort because they've gone to the doctor they've gone to this there is they've gone and and this and that and they're eventually going to realize that unfortunately that thing may have happened a thousand years ago once we get them once I'm convinced sometimes they take him back and I have to take a bit further and further and further until I'm sure that we've got back to that first event that all have eliminate the emotional charge around certain events using it energy healing Ivan imagine whatever it is it's causing that distresses accord between them and that we can cut the cords and just basically eliminates the charge for that light in the frequencies light of the situation integrate what they've learned by on Alaska so what lessons did you learn here how does this apply to what we're doing now energize again eight I use techniques that have developed using healing and also the sound of my voice to take things from there eat like lighter and lighter and lighter and lighter usually voice in a list the energy around certain situations so that these kind of shifted out of the old pattern and they're into a better later reality and then the final step is taken out into a future memory in their current lives with a C. themselves happy healthy everything's working out for them and the issue is completely myself you've got a book coming out in may and you are ecstatic about it because it's about your favorite thing paths yes past lives with hat now tell me about that give us a little preview on that one people you know you don't come to see a past life regression just because you've had an issue with your dog obviously you know Pat give us a chance to really understand unconditional love and so in this book there are clients who had a pleasant surprise during past life regression when they discovered they had known their dog before or if you've seen the movie or read the book the dog's journey it's about a dog who this same dog keeps reincarnated being over and over again with the same family so in the book there's actual he does wanna let go dizzy now now because it's a soul contracted so in the book there's a real clients who had their paths returned to them in many many lifetimes and then of course we've got a few people who we call their past lives as animals and a lot of the things in that book also address the the love that we have our little fuzz balls and we know when our little animals pass away it can be very very traumatic speaking of trauma and so there's a lot of exercises in that book for Greece has anything to catch a fine of pets when you were small did you get bitten by a dog or something I and one of my big white things when I was four years old I was playing in the yard of my uncle and supposedly I was not doing anything to add this on I cannot say that with one hundred percent certainty but that's what family has told me I was just playing on the swing set the dog was older and I think sometimes dogs do get senile but somehow I was attacked by the dog I did get a bit a piece of my nose that not only that if you park in my temple and so I don't remember the actual attack that I do remember laying in a hospital with this all doctor and he's a light so over my head and so for for my whole life I have been deathly afraid of dogs like shaking way deathly afraid to come by you and you would be just quivering when you yes I can't or I try not to look at them I don't hear them barking and I guess you know this happens with a lot of people with different kinds of trauma I mean is it is it causing you not to be able to work no of course not so I think a lot of these things get pushed down by people and you know you just go back to your daily business and for years and years I just said yeah fine hold on Charlie were a two year break but we'll come back and.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Or maybe which is here to join with souls who we've known before you have a beautiful experience together some of it can be good you've got a programmer a method called relief what is that they're really affected that developed by you yes I wanted to name my the process the steps of what I've really been dealing with people the whole time I've been in private practice so I'd put an acronym on it and so relief basically outlines the steps the first thing people have to do is recognize the source C-SPAN of where their anxiety or the trauma actually began and this is where I am finding myself as a last resort because they've gone to the doctor they've gone to this there is they've gone and and this and that and they're eventually going to realize that unfortunately that thing may have happened a thousand years ago once we get them once I'm convinced sometimes they take him back and I have to take a bit further and further and further until and sure that we've got back to that first event that'll have on the limited the emotional charge around certain events using it energy healing I have a match in whatever it is it's causing that distresses accord between them and that we can cut the cords and just basically eliminates the charge for that light in the frequencies lighten up the situation integrate what they've learned by Alaskans who what lessons did you learn here how does this apply to what we're doing now energize again eight thank you I techniques that have developed using healing and also the sound of my voice to take things from merry like lighter and lighter and lighter and lighter usually voice again a list up the energy around certain situations so that they've kind of shifted out of the old pattern and they're into a better later reality and then the final step is taken out into a future memory in their current lives they see themselves happy healthy everything's working out for them and the issue is completely resolved you've got a book coming out in may and you are ecstatic about it because it's about your favorite thing paths yes past lives with hat now tell me about them give us a little preview show on that one people you know you don't come to see a past life regression just because you've had an issue with your dog obviously you know Pat give us a chance to really understand and conditional love and so in this book there are clients who had a pleasant surprise during past life regression when they discovered they had known their dog before or if you've seen the movie or read the book the dog's journey it's about a dog who this same dog keeps reincarnated being over and over again with the same family so in the book there's actual he does wanna let go dizzy now now because it's a soul contract and so in the book there's a real clients who had their paths returned to them in many many lifetimes and then of course we've got a few people who recall their past lives as animals and a lot of the things in that book also address that the love that we have our little fuzz balls and we know when our little animals pass away it can be very very traumatic speaking of trauma and so there's a lot of exercises in that book for Greece thanks once you catch or find of pets when you were small did you get bitten by a dog or something I did that one of my big white things when I was four years old I was playing in the yard of my uncle and supposedly I was not doing anything to add this on I cannot say that with one hundred percent certainty but that's what family has told me I was just playing on the swing set the dog was older and I think sometimes dogs do get senile but somehow I was attacked by the dog I did get a bit and piece of my nose that not only that it had to park in my temple and so I don't remember the actual attack that I do remember laying in a hospital with this well doctor any slight so over my head and so for for my whole life I have been deathly afraid of dogs like shaking way deathly afraid to come by you and you would be just quivering when you yes I can't or I try not to look at them I don't hear them barking and I guess you know this happens with a lot of people with different kinds of trauma I mean is it is it causing me not to be able to work no.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Some of it can be good you've got a programmer a method called relief what is that the relief lasted that developed by you yes I wanted to name the process the steps of what I've really been dealing with people the whole time I've been in private practice so I put an acronym on it and so relief basically outlines the steps the first thing people have to do is recognize the source he spent of where their anxiety or the trauma actually began and this is where I am finding myself as a last resort because they've gone to the doctor they've gone to this therapist they've gone and and this and that and they're intentionally going to realize that unfortunately that thing may have happened a thousand years ago once we get them once I'm convinced sometimes they take him back and I have taken that further and further over there telling sure that we've got back to that first event that'll have eliminate the emotional charge around certain events using energy healing and then the match in whatever it is it's causing that distresses accord between them and that we can cut the cords and just basically eliminate the charge for that light in the frequencies lighten up the situation integrate with they've learned by Alaskans who what lessons did you learn here how to supply what we're doing now energize again thank you techniques that have developed using healing and also the sound of my voice to take things lighter and lighter and lighter and lighter a usually voice you can a list the energy around certain situations so that these kind of shifted out of the old pattern and they're into a better later reality and then the final step is taken out into a future memory in their current life they see themselves happy healthy everything's working out for them and the issue is completely resolved you've got a book coming out in may and you are ecstatic about it because it's about your favorite thing paths yes it's past lives with Pat tell me about that give us a little preview show on that one people you know you don't come to see a past life regression just because you've had an issue with your dog obviously you know Pat give us a chance to really understand and conditional love and so in this book there are clients who I had a pleasant surprise during past life regression when they discovered they had known their dog before or if you've seen the movie or read the book the dog's journey it's about a dog who this same dog keeps reincarnated being over and over again with the same family so in the book there's actual he does wanna let go dizzy now now because it's a soul contracted so in the book there's a real clients who had their paths returned to them in many many lifetimes and then of course we've got a few people who recall their past lives as animals and a lot of the things in that book also address that the love that we have for our little friends files and we know when our little animals pass away it can be very very traumatic speaking of trauma and so there's a lot of exercises in that book for grief thanks once you catch a fine of pets when you were small did you get bitten by a dog or something I this is one of my big things when I was four years old I was playing in the yard of my uncle and supposedly I was not doing anything to add this on I cannot say that with one hundred percent certainty but that's what family has told me I was just playing on a swing set the dog was older and I think sometimes dogs do get senile but somehow I was attacked by a dog I did get a bit a piece of my nose that not only that image Larkin my temple and so I don't remember the actual attack that I do remember laying in a hospital with this well doctor any slight so over my head so for for my whole life I have been vastly afraid of dogs like shaking we deathly afraid to come by you and you would be just quivering when you yes I can't or I just try not to look at them I don't hear them barking and I guess you know this happens a lot of people with different kinds of trauma I mean is it is it causing me not to be able to work no of course not I think a lot of these things get pushed down by people and you know you just go back to your daily business and for years and years I.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"The programmer gentleman here on this post Superbowl weekend and there is something you ought to be worried about there's some action you know to be taking about the were you ought to be having it's no it's not the corona virus and stop the flow it's taxes okay yes we know death and taxes always go together and so yes it's tax season and what we are telling you to do with your tax return is something we've been telling you to do for the past couple of years but it's a radical departure what we used to say decades ago we used to say you delay filing your taxes until April because you want to wait and make sure that the ten ninety nine you receive from your mutual fund companies are accurate they often send revisions in February March what we now say is even more fundamental more important and its reflection of cyber security you need to file your tax return as soon as you can why because of the risk that crocs are filing a fake tax return using your name your social security number and trying to get a big refund from the IRS that they divert to them instead of to you so if you are planning to get a tax refund you should file your return before the crux crazy I know but if you have any questions about that talk your tax adviser about it and also by the way never provide personal information over the phone to anybody who calls you claiming to be from the IRS the IRS never makes phone calls they never send emails that never post on social media do not believe it when somebody says hi there I'm from the IRS from here to help you because true I talk often on this program about financial education.

IRS programmer
"programmer" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"programmer" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"A company that makes paper clips hires a programmer to create many I. that can run its paperclip factory the programmer once the A. I. to be able to find new ways to make paper cuts more efficiently and cheaply so it gives the A. I. freedom to make its own decisions on how to run the paperclip operation the programmer just gives the A. I. the primary objective its goal of making as many paper clips as possible say that paper clip maximizing a I become super intelligent for the A. I. nothing is changed its goal is the same to it there's nothing more important in the universe the making as many paper clips as possible the only difference is that the A. I. has become vastly more capable so it finds new processes that building paper clips that were overlooked by as human it creates new technology like nano bots to build atomically precise paper clips on the molecular level and it creates additional operations like initiatives to expand its own computing power so we can make itself even better at making more paper clips eight realizes at some point that if it could somehow take over the world that would be a whole lot of more paper tapes in the future than if it just keeps running this single paper compactor inside that has an instrumental reason to place itself in a better position to take over the world all those fiber optic network so those devices we connect to those networks are global economy even as humans would be re purposed input into the service of building paper clips rather quickly the a I would turn its attention to space is an additional source of materials for paper clips and since the a I would have no reason to fill us in on its new initiatives to the extent that it considered communicating with us at all it would probably conclude that it would create unnecessary dragon it's paper click making efficiency we humans would stand by is there a I launched rockets from places like Florida because Exxon left to wonder what they're doing now its name about work force would reconstitute matter rearranging the atomic structures of things like water molecules and soil into aluminum to be used as raw material for more paper clips we humans who've been pressed into service as paper click making slaves by this point need those water molecules in the earth for our survival and so we would be thrown into a resource conflict with the most powerful entity in the universe as far as we're concerned a conflict that we were doomed from the outset to lose perhaps the A. I. we keep just enough water and soil to produce food and water to sustain the slaves let's not forget why we humans are so keen on building machines to do the work force in the first place we're not exactly the most efficient workers around today I would likely conclude that it's paper click making operation would benefit more to use those water molecules and soil to make aluminum and it would keep us alive with it and it's about here that those nano bots the A. I. bill would come for our molecules to Israeli as are you because he wrote the A. I. does not hate you nor does it love you for you are made of atoms which you can use for something else they say that it turns out a super intelligent A. I. does undergo some sort of spiritual conversion.

programmer
"programmer" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"programmer" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"For different amino acids could come together and then lied to my wife themselves up in a precise sequence of thousands millions of billions of bits of information that that it's been pre programmed there was a programmer program DNA so let's let's let's go back a little bit all all scientists concluded that the universe is about thirteen point eight billion years old I mean they generally all agree to that is that correct they agree and they're all wrong right guard but let's let's let's talk about their thoughts right now also the show they agree it's thirteen point eight billion years old so my question to them if I had a whole group of these guys in a room and women and they said it's thirteen point eight billion years old I would say so what was at the fourteen billion year old level what was there and I bet nobody could answer that no we can do and here's here's how they got to thirteen point eight billion we took Einstein's equations from his general relativity working so called working backwards in time and they came across a couple a couple a couple of glitches were didn't work out and these are all well let instead of saying that maybe the equations wrong older universe must've exploded very fast initially faster than the speed of light and then a slow down again see the numbers if we tried to alter see evidence to suit there are certain to suit your theory rising I bomb so practical David and maybe that's not the way to sync here but to me if you're gonna build a car you're going to start from scratch and you're gonna get your keep your pieces in your parts and you're going to begin to assemble this one thing at a time and you can go back to the beginning of that car and say well the first thing I did is I got you know the frame and then I got the tires and then you'll say well where do you get the tires will I got it from a tire company that got it from port rubber from a rubber tree so you can go all the way back and tracked the beginning of something you can't with the universe you can't start it somehow I know you care you can you can take it again any given star and this okay there is there was a start there and then from that star became you know Dustin right but as you go back in back in back to the beginning of all of it you can't answer that because you are always in the beginning you can't you can't go back to a place that's fine that never works see and that brings up the other question if there was no beginning I don't know I don't comprehend that but there there's a there's continually there's continual beginnings continuous creation didn't something have to start something it well you know what it's like the chicken and a great yeah okay I mean the aid comes from the chicken but what came before the checkout okay then the only thing I can think of is there was a universal fart but that that had for Marsters back we have to say at some point in time but that's not true because there is because in the nonphysical rounders noticing this time there must in original far said okay we we are beings of hardware sought beings riskier beings are going to call ourselves let's create a physical reality bingo there was that that's all I can come up with we're gonna have fun with phone calls next hour because I'm going to ask our listeners also come up with their own thoughts and theories on how they think all of this may have started as well much to include religion in order to get this answer absolutely not you do not have to no nothing to do it whatsoever what about dark energy what is that is that exist no it does not exist if the way here's what happened the Big Bang theory says okay the universe is expanding at such and such a rate then the mathematics is or no it's not expanding quite that fast so there must be some dark matter which they're holding it back and say we can't see this matter has no properties but we don't must be there because of its gravitational effect on galaxies that needed some further calculation realize well but it's now it's spending a little bit faster than that so the now there must be some dark energy opposing the dark matter to make to make it to justify our math it doesn't make any sense it's all nighter dark energy in our dark matter exists do you say we will ever get a total answer as to any of this.

programmer