35 Burst results for "program manager"

Astronauts flying reused SpaceX rocket, capsule for 1st time

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 2 d ago

Astronauts flying reused SpaceX rocket, capsule for 1st time

"NASA and SpaceX are about to take recycling to a higher level as a crew readies to head of the international space station NASA commercial crew program manager Steve Stich says a coming launch is on or go for launch on Thursday morning an international crew of four astronauts will board a previously used SpaceX dragon capsule on board a previously used a falcon rocket for launch from Cape Canaveral to the international space station Benji Reid of SpaceX prefers the term flight proven reuse vehicles on flight proven vehicles is key towards greater flight reliability and lowering the cost of access to space each capsule is designed for at least five missions with the crew the falcon can be used ten times for satellites SpaceX and NASA are assessing how many times it can safely launch astronauts I'm timid wire

Spacex Steve Stich Nasa Spacex Dragon Benji Reid Cape Canaveral
What Does It Take to Become an Astronaut?

BBC Newshour

01:57 min | 3 weeks ago

What Does It Take to Become an Astronaut?

"Libby Jackson is human exploration program manager of the UK Space agency, part off the E essa. So what does it take to be an astronaut? You have to be calm under pressure. You have to be willing to work as a team. You have to be happy to go and spend six months living and working on the international space station where there's no shower the portal. Ooh. And if it breaks it breaks often has to be fixed by. You know, plumber on orbit Long days, but with amazing views. You're carrying out science that can only be done in space that will help everybody down here on Earth. New to lead better lives to help discover new materials with researching drugs on of course, astronauts are the sort of faith of the space industry, but they are absolutely not the only part off the space industry. The space industry is global. There are jobs in every possible skill set that you can imagine. And if people want to join the industry if they think space is something that its sights and they should feel empowered I'm able to do so we'd love to have him so calm. Scientists who conducted of plumbing on bond maybe speaks few languages. You have to be fluent in English. Knowledge of other languages is an asset but not essential. But you do need to have a grasp will be able to learn other languages because the international space station works in both English and Russian. You've got to learn Russian. No, I'm a Russian speaking. But unfortunately I am. I'm just north of 50. So that counts me out. There is a maximum age limit, isn't there? There is it takes out 5 to 10 years to train our pastor rolls and you only will get a mission perhaps every 5 to 10 years so they can't put on upper age limit on it. But it's higher than the last call back in 2000 and eight all part of this drive to increase the Paul to be as diverse and inclusive as possible. Mrs. Really lovely to see that it's increased to 50. Actually, it's a shame we had to put in angel bid

Libby Jackson Uk Space Agency International Space Station Paul
"program manager" Discussed on The Growth Hub

The Growth Hub

04:51 min | Last month

"program manager" Discussed on The Growth Hub

"The show is rebecca rhino so senior content editor and guest post program manage e two. And today. we're talking about how to actually run a successful guest post program. Guest posting is a great way to scale your content marketing activities generate some great results for your business but how can you create a systematic process and program while rebecca has cracked the code. And she's joining us today to spill all secrets. Rebecca manages. g2's editorial calendar for old guests article contributions which have generated over off a million yearly website sessions eighty percent of which are organic now in this episode. Rebecca discusses the value of guest posting how to draft a good and clear set of guests post guidelines. What goes into strong guest posting editorial standards and the story of how. G2's guests post program has evolved over time. Now there's all this and more so here. We go with episode sixty six the growth of podcast with rebecca rhino so senior content editor.

Rebecca rebecca eighty percent today G2 episode sixty six million g2 e two
Finding the Right Leader For Your Org

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

07:56 min | Last month

Finding the Right Leader For Your Org

"The managing director equity initiatives for koya partners melissa is responsible for ensuring that quiz commitment to diversity equity and inclusion is infused into every aspect of the firms work with clients candidates staff in leading this work. Melissa applies experience as search leader for numerous organizations as well as for background in social work in staff development prior to this role melissa served as managing director equity executive search with partners primarily focusing on identifying senior leaders for social justice organizations melissa lead or co-lead executive searches for organizations including innocence project diaz community changed foundation for justice society move on southern poverty law center and hentrich martin institute though her earlier nonprofit through her earlier nonprofit work melissa developed a deep understanding of variety of nonprofit roles and organization cultures prior to joining coy in twenty fifteen. She held positions with unicef. Usa safe horizon and cities of service. She also served as a founding core member and program manager with city year. New york melissa serves on the advisory council of equity in the center a national initiative dedicated to creating a more diverse equitable social sector talent pipeline. She actively volunteers time to provide coaching and mentorship to leaders of color and members of the lgbtq plus community. Melissa holds a masters of social work from the school social policy and practice at the university of pennsylvania and she earned her b a human services and theater performance from northeastern university. Well listen thank you very much for joining us and sharing your insights today. Thanks so much for having me john. It's great to be with you. So folks are drew bio and is one of the things. I just love about people in search. There doesn't seem to be. Maybe there's a degree in it but i very infrequently talked to someone who has such a thing my friend. Derek clarke failed. Who from dri who also been a podcast. Guest runs another search firm. She's an ordained. Rabbi every search leader seems to have this kind of wacky wildly diverse backgrounds. So how did your professional path leader to search. Please don't leave out. How cedar performance visit scrape up. Dick place for the start and especially i love. Dr and i agree similar to her and said lord is so many people in search we. You know it's it's things that line us up for this work even though we have no idea and then all of the sudden one day it's the only thing that we can do and so funny thing. It's actually a funny thing. Because i don't i mean maybe there are lots of other professional You know sort of professional career paths. That are like that. But this one seems uniquely wacky in that way definitely definitely and i think it's people think about what their superpowers might superpower. I rarely the smartest person in room. Sometimes the most interesting but what. My superpower is figuring out who the smartest in who are the most interesting people aren't any room and then introducing them to each other and just so you just shared my bio. I've had the chance to be in so many different types of organizations then community based work and national work in global work and in different parts of the organizations mostly in development but also on the program side in operations i. I'm social worker by training as you said i've got this theater background. Which is an interesting and so when it gets down to it. I love talking to people. I loved networking. I love having genuine and authentic relationships and seeing how i can be a resource folks and i was extremely extremely lucky and fortunate when i was at you at nsf usa to have Onondaga as my leader. When i was there and he was a believer. Not you know him. Joan of stu. He believed in creating ten percent of everyone on his team's time to carve out for them to do other work something. That benefited the organization. In some other. Way wow yeah. And and that's unusual. Especially considering he was leading development team and so what we found was that i love recruiting. And i liked going out and talking to people and letting them get to know unicef usa and in so. I was having a great time doing that. But it wasn't. My core job is really a fundraiser. And it was just threw a perfect stroke of fate that i was introduced to katy baton. Who's the founder of partners and she talked to me about what her vision was the work that clay was doing. She talked to me about her values and just as she talked to me about. I had no idea what an enormous sector the search field is and how many variations exist of nonprofit search professionals. But i i just decided that this is what i needed to do

Melissa Koya Partners Melissa Lead Or Co Diaz Community Changed Foundat Hentrich Martin Institute Council Of Equity Derek Clarke Southern Poverty Law Center Unicef Northeastern University USA University Of Pennsylvania DRI Rabbi New York Dick John Onondaga NSF
World's first face and hands transplant gives New Jersey man a second chance at life

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

World's first face and hands transplant gives New Jersey man a second chance at life

"Man who received a face and double hand transplant procedures so rare it had only been attempted two times before this. This is really quite unprecedented. Trish Henry, program manager for the reconstructive transplant research programs, this has only ever been 18 face transplants and 35 hand transplants in the U. S. Also worldwide, only two other combined face and hand transplants have ever been attempted. On those were unsuccessful before his surgery six months ago. Scars from third degree burns covered much of Joe DiMaggio's eyes. He couldn't smile. His 10 fingers were mostly gone. We are thrilled to be playing a small part in giving Mr de Mayo a better chance at life after his horrific accidents. Christi King W. T o P News the

Trish Henry U. Joe Dimaggio Mr De Mayo Christi King W.
Getting Women Excited About Tech with Facebook's Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

Technically 200

04:48 min | 2 months ago

Getting Women Excited About Tech with Facebook's Caty Caldwell And Jessica Odeyemi

"This is the first of a series of technically two hundred talks or roundtable conversations. Where it's not just a one on one. But one onto plus. And i am very excited about this one because we have miss jessica odor yemi once again from ibm technical product manager. And we've got Ms katy call technical program manager at facebook. Such a pleasure to have you both here to night so i just wanna start with one question for each of you in. Why don't we start with katie. Katie what's your first memory of being excited about tech my first memory of being excited about tack. It has to be. I think in my freshman year computer science course. It's like an introduction a computer science. I just remember. I had started at princeton as a chemical engineer and i was just like i was in my first chemistry class. I was like this is like watching paint dry like this is not like the chemistry. I know from high school and i was just really excited about this idea. Setting chemical engineering. But when i took my first computer science course everyone had worn me before the course that was going to be so challenging difficult and i just remember just like enjoying every assignment and every assignment just felt like it felt like a puzzle. Felt fun and i. I felt like i was spinning. Just an inordinate amount of time. Just focus on by computer science work over my chemistry homework and i hadn't even got into sort of like the chemical engineering courses yet and i was like this'll make sense. Why by studying. Something that i am like. Great like begrudgingly. Getting through versus has studying something that i love so i just remember just being super excited about the next assignment and computer science like always wanted the next one wanted to do like the extra credit. I love that and jess unless you that same question. Yeah so let's see. I got into the tech industry per se a little bit later in life. But i remember the first time i was excited about anything. Simulated was an elementary school. When i found out I don't know if you've ever heard of them ike rube goldberg projects Like i don't know if you've ever seen a movie pee wee's big adventure. But at the very beginning he has all these contractions that connect to each other to do different things. But i kind of find out found out an elementary school. There was. We were introduced to the the concept of a rube goldberg project. In thought it was so cool. So i did something similar for science fair project and i thought it was the coolest thing ever As far as you know the tech industry goes. I think that happened much later in life for me. So that probably didn't happen for me until i was working and i think we've chatted about this a little bit before but i was working in the oil industry and it just occurred to me that i was out on the rate drilling wells and that was great but there was this whole other world behind what we were doing. You know software insistence. That was kinda powering. Everything that we were doing out in the field. So i think that's when i first got into Tech per se jessica. I did the rube. Goldberg is file. When i was younger. i've loved it. I went to the. I went to the national competitions. Like and since. I'm so close to purdue growing up so i would go to indiana. Just go see what the students The cooking up so had logged. Rube goldberg did that. When i was like what is the most extravagant way to crack in a like the prices so so member game mouse trap. I love that like that.

Jessica Odor Yemi Ms Katy IBM Katie Princeton Rube Goldberg Facebook Jess Goldberg Jessica Indiana
"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

NASCAR on NBC

02:23 min | 3 months ago

"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

"Are thanks again to laura. One drop clousre for joining the nascar and bc. Podcast of the rolex twenty four at daytona and also want to say thanks as well to ryan smith at corvette racing. Who helped set up this conversation with laura and thanks as well to my nbc sports colleague. Emily convoy who helped ensure that this recording went smoothly. This was done remotely over zoom which is not normally record. These podcasts and emily was there to guarantee that. I didn't screw up the audio or the video from this conversation. We will have a video clip from this podcast. That will be available on the motor sports on nbc youtube channel. So if you enjoyed hearing the podcasting wanna watch some video Both of our conversation and probably some highlights as well from cadillac in corvette racing. I can go to the motor sports on. Nbc youtube channel and check out video clip from this episode of the nascar abc podcast. As i mentioned. Laura manages the cadillac program. Which is vying for its fifth consecutive overall victory in the rolex twenty four and she now also manages the corvette racing program for chevrolet. Corvette racing is the defending series champion in the gts division and is trying to get its first victory in the rolex. Twenty four with dr model that made its debut last year so as i mentioned these are a very busy two weeks for laura and we really appreciate her squeezing in some time to do the podcast and give us a lot of insight into her career and the teams that will be fielding jimmy johnson and chase elliott in cadillacs for the rolex. Twenty four at daytona. I was just looking at the entry list for this race. And this is an absolutely star. Studded field of driver talent and championship level teams. I promise i'm not just blowing smoke as an nbc universal employees. When i say that the depth of this year's rolex twenty four at daytona is truly amazing. You've got daytona five hundred winners. You've got indy. Five hundred winners. You've got the reigning series champions in the ntt indycar series and the nascar cup series. As i mentioned you've got chase. You've got jimmy. You've got scott dixon alexander rossi simon pageant elliott. Castro neves juan. Pablo montoya austin dillon. Aj dinger all the usual sports car stars as well. There are a ton of big names in this race. And if you want to check.

ryan smith laura jimmy johnson Emily Laura emily chase elliott two weeks last year Castro Nbc jimmy bc Pablo montoya austin dillon Twenty youtube nascar nascar cup series Both fifth consecutive
"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

NASCAR on NBC

05:23 min | 3 months ago

"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

"Cars. I grew up on a small farm and to me the license and the vehicle was a symbol of freedom. You could go out and do whatever you wanted and in terms of getting. it's funny. My dad was interested in cars when he was younger. But the the day that you open up the hood and you really couldn't see through to the floor anymore. Because there all the electrons and everything he. He's his interest waned a little bit. He likes the old seventies. And you know those kind of muscle cars from back. Then but i it. Just it was something that pulled on my heartstrings. To know you know freedom. The idea of horsepower going fast. I had a mountain bike that i grew up on iran. The wheels off of and it was always. Can i go faster. Can i go faster and it just it kinda just clicked and then. I had a lot of male friends when i was younger. I it just. I guess my personality probably meshed a little bit better than what some of the girls my age were up to and they were always into cars or their pickup trucks or whatever and the farmland so you picked up a lot listening to them talking and and being a part of that so it just it just kind of worked itself out but it's one of those that it must have been a meant to be because i can't imagine working on anything else. Well like you said you start working at general motors. Pretty much right out of school. I think you worked at a co op started production side. I know that you're working on corvettes when you first started. We've also worked on the cadillac the cruise the encore. The spark a lot of production models before you move toward the racing side about five years ago was it a natural shift formulas e-experienced experience to go from production to race cars and digital take a few years several years to kind of get ingrained in gm and the production side to move over the racing yet the racing opportunities at gm are. There's not many of them. Compared production right thousands and thousands of engineers put the cars on the roads each day. It's the the racing. There's only a handful of us but they usually want somebody who has experience in the company for several years before you come over and a lot of that i. It's it's building a network you know we wanna find ways that we can integrate back into the company as best we can and the more people that you know from the production side the easier that is to find those synergies and to be able to call on somebody because you might have worked with them in the past or or you had familiarity because he shared a lunch table or or whatever that is but Yeah when i actually got really lucky because of formula e. When i started with the first job fulltime They put me on the corvette. So i had the opportunity to really get to know the corvette production team which has helped leaps and bounds with coming into working on corvette racing now and being able to connect with them and everything and then from there. It was what job made sense The big three jobs at gm as an engineer is working in abd. Which is what i did with. Corvette releasing parts which each part on a production car is owned by an engineer. I had shocks and sway bars and springs on a couple different cars and then integration was the third area. And that's where you you own a feature like noise and vibration or ride in handling or something along those lines where you have to get all those parts. Get them to work together to make the car respond. The way that it's supposed to and make it a pleasure to be you know experience so once i got through those three i. It really was right place right time. The racing opportunity opened up Had a really strong background in the areas that they were looking for and through my name in the hat to see what would happen and got extremely lucky that they picked me for an interview and got the opportunity and haven't looked back since. That's terrific. Well as i mentioned that so that was about five years ago. You started out as the program manager for cadillac. Gt three which was sort of a lower rung sports car series but then in two thousand seventeen you helped with the launch of cadillac dpi. Which of course. That's the top level of sports car racing here. In north america became the program manager there and four straight rolex. Twenty four at daytona winston. Oh pressure again. This year eighteen overall wins championships. Obviously the cadillacs have really been the team to beat your daytona and now with this new role. Laurie you're adding engineering technical oversight of corvette racing while still managing cadillac on the dpi side with corvette being such an iconic car. I mean this is. This is a flagship program for gm racing for over twenty years. What's it been like adding that to your plate when you've already got all this success with the cadillac. Well i'm very fortunate that there's good bones set up you know it's not like we're starting from scratch here. We have a very strong team. We've got a great engine in that car. We've got the strong chassis. That's been built to hold it. It's it's really just getting in there. Getting to know the people that i already was acquainted with even better and then together deciding. What does the future look like for us. Obviously we know what our current is. We're gonna get out there. We're going to do the best we can. We're going to win races. We're going bring home trophies for gm but you know as we continue to build and and where. Where can we find areas of synergy between that program. The other racing programs. How can we incorporate general motors more into this to make sure that we have all the assets that we need to continue to build this program and then what can we bring back from racine to the company. That's been a key thing. Corvette is our best program in terms of technical learnings exchanges because the car is the most similar to the one that you buy the dealership so as we can continue to.

Laurie thousands This year eighteen north america cadillacs over twenty years cadillac daytona Twenty three jobs three each day third area each part first five years ago winston first job about five years ago
"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

NASCAR on NBC

05:00 min | 3 months ago

"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

"The drivers need to keep the car clean as long as they can and will do the best that we can and if we all contribute and we all work together i think we all have a shot for this. I can hear it in your voice again. I see it on social media. You obviously have such a passion for racing. Laura and curious we can double up in your background in like. I know you grew up in the baltimore maryland area. Did you know. I know you were a car person. Did you know much about racing growing up in near baltimore where. I don't really think of that as like racing hotbed like did you know you wanna get into racing. We start out or is it. I just kind of getting into cars. you know. it's funny when i think back to. What my first experience with racing was believe it or not. It was horse. Racing pimlico preakness each year. My mother and my grandmother are not gamblers but when it came to them horses. That was a whole different story. You know they love that stuff. And so that's what what racing was to me But i did. I always love cars Pretty much ever. Since i was thirteen i knew i was going to go and work for the auto industry. I was gonna move to michigan. I started letting my parents know pretty early. And i think it's funny. I think they they knew it was going to happen. But on the flip side. When i got through college and came back and had that job offer to gm which i had worked so hard for. And they're like wait a minute you're going to michigan. Yes yes i am. I want to be but But in terms of racing. What got me into that. On the car side was in college. I had the opportunity to be a part of the formula. Say competition which is really cool. That's where it's a collegiate project. It's global and your team designs builds and races and open wheeled formula style race car. And it's crazy. They let these college kids freshman year through senior design. This thing build it put an engine in it. Turn it on and drive it. I mean we did it all. It was It was cool and it was an engineer's dream it was. You took everything that you're learning in school in all those test you're taking and all those equations you're filling out and you you. You did something practical with that. So i learned so much just going through that project but really the competitive side of me was lit pretty heavy when i got through that and you know we want it to be the best. We wanted to win and just being able to get back into racing. Gm about eight years. After i had started working for the company was a dream come true i always say that what i do here is like formula say e we finally have money to play with good now exactly on the shoestring college budget anymore. Were you at in school when you were doing. And what kind of car were you designing as part of the formula. Say i went to rensselaer polytechnic institute. Which is up near albany. new york. Got my mechanical engineering degree from them. And the car. I call it a spec car. They have very clear to find rules. Open wheel single cockpit. We used to run a motorcycle engine in it. We had a honda motorcycle engine that we ran in our particular car and then the competition was a mix of static and dynamic events. So you you know. Part of it was you had to create this thing like a weekend auto crosser and you had to sell it as something that a kit that people would let you produce and and customers would buy and you had to predict how many would sell it was it was all like this business opportunity and then the dynamic portion of it was the demonstration of the vehicle so you had acceleration events skid pad an auto cross and then the endurance event which was twenty two kilometers with a driver. Change in the middle where he had to shut the car. Often turn it back on and it's pretty cool in fact. I actually still volunteer for the competition. Today that's one of my side projects. I i run the dynamic events for essay and it's been fantastic. The next generation of engineers that are coming through our in credible. This world has has lots of good things to look for forward to with everyone. That's coming through and one of the things that i'm excited about is the diversity is getting better. I can see it in the competition you know it went from. I was the only girl on the team. you know. we're not gonna talk about how many years ago. When i was in college and and and you know you go to competition and there were very few women or you know like i said diversity and now when you're at competition it that's changed a lot. I love when i see women driving. You know you also see different Skin colors in there as well. So it's great i. I'm pretty stoked about how everything's gone. Yeah i mean certainly. That's the big story. I want to touch on that diversity and female involvement in racing to but I just had a few more questions on on your background. I mean what made you become a carpenter. Obviously farmer say pushed you toward the racing side. That was that your parents. I know i think i saw a post about your dad. Encouraging you on cars. Was there something that made you want to be involved with cars. I grew up on a small farm and to me the license and the vehicle was a symbol of freedom. You could go out and do whatever you wanted and in terms of getting. it's funny. My dad was interested in cars when he was younger. But the the day that you open up the hood and you really couldn't see through to the floor anymore. Because there all the electrons.

Laura albany michigan twenty two kilometers thirteen baltimore honda Today rensselaer polytechnic institu new york each year one about eight years first experience years single cockpit maryland things side
"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

NASCAR on NBC

05:28 min | 3 months ago

"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

"That fernando alonzo one in the cadillac twenty nineteen rolex twenty four. But what's been like having chase elliott making his debut reigning cup series champion jimmy johnson seven time cup series champion. Hasn't it been having them around. The garages it's fantastic. And it was funny when we had jeff gordon with us in two thousand seventeen. That was a new experience for me. I i'll be honest. i hadn't too much involvement with nascar. I i know nascar and i. I've been to a race as a fan. But i had never been on a role similar to what i have on the sports car side and just to see in two thousand seventeen what it was like to have someone like jeff gordon. It change the dynamic of the paddock completely. In fact. I used to joke that i felt so bad for him. The poor man couldn't even go use the bathroom without having a bunch of people chasing him down to the building which i guess explains why nascar sets up things the way they do but this year. We don't have that unfortunately because we don't have the fans with us which we miss dearly. I can't wait until we go back to having fans back with but even still just knowing you have someone with the caliber that jimmy johnson and chase elliott bringing their on your team and and they have their own staff of people that they work with so we have the opportunity to exchange knowledge to talk to them about you know. How do they do things in their side. And then what can they bring for us to learn how to make ourselves better on our side. And i'd like to think that it's going both ways to. I'd like to think that jimmy and chaser picking up things on our side of the fence. That might help them. You know in their next year with jimmy obviously an india and then chase back at nascar. So it's been a really pleasant experience and of course they're cool guys too so that makes fun as well how to incorporate them into the team where you know. There's a lotta focused and distraction even as you mentioned without the fans unfortunately being there this year. There's people like me. Obviously hyper focused on. What's going on with them. How does it work with the team and gm racing cadillac can make them feel sort of integrated. Because i know especially for somebody like chase. Who's very humble driver in like. You said like head down. He doesn't really want to get caught up in the hype but naturally that's still going to be there. Well i'll say this every time. I've poked my head into action expressed his trailers to check on them. I've caught chase sitting next to either. Ian watt they're engineer or one of the fellow drivers and they're either pouring over data over a laptop together or they're sitting there chatting away about how to to handle things similar experience. We've got kevin magnusson in the one cadillac. And i had the pleasure of watching him and ringer talk about how to drive the rain. Line the other day because we started the qualifying race with wet. They become one of the team in fact. I think that i'd like to think that they just assume that they'll be out. You know pushing the car if they need to with the mechanics are are normal. Drivers do and i think that's what makes it fun that nobody's holding them on a pedestal. Or anything i it's. They are part of the team. They are one of the three or four drivers that are going to be in the car for the race. And you know it's not the situation you haven't some other series which just one driver and it's it's all up to them. It's literally a team sport and they all have to share what they do because if one of them has an incident on track balls up the car you know you're affecting all these other people as well so it's a totally different mindset. And i've been thrilled to see i all i. It's like walking into the trailer. Normally they're doing their jobs. No one's doing anything differently. Other than focused on winning. And i've heard say that as well. He doesn't wear special attention or treatment. He just wants to help these guys because they're running for a full season championship and the number thirty one. You mentioned as well he. Jimmy aren't the only big stars who are in cadillacs you've got. The new chip ganassi racing cal was well that as she said has kept magnusson coming over as a full season driver from f scott dixon the reigning. Six time indycar series champion. Also in that car. And i as i mentioned you've got the mustang sampling cars. Well that also has done really well throughout the week in practice. So i presume. Laura again like i know. You're focused on next weekend. You don't wanna get too caught up in it. But the first three days were sort of like a dream weekend for somebody who i noticed on instagram. You've been counting down almost every day. The rolex twenty four since january first. Twenty twenty one. You can check out her instagram. She's got like a photo at like a note about how many days are left to the rolex. Twenty four i would presume that countdown feels like very real and very satisfying. Oh yeah. it's a very much a dual experience rate. I am so excited. I have nervous. You know it's just everything that good butterfly energy running through It's We each year right. It's it's crazy that we start with our super bowl in the racing but this is the one that we're focused on. We get the most attention from a gm leadership on this race. Although we're lucky a lot of our leadership follow us along the entire season. They love racing But you know this is the one where you wanna show well and coming off of on. Cadillac land being undefeated on dpi. We don't want to give that up. We want to hang onto that title to the bitter end and then corvettes got a lot to prove you know. We launched that car last year and we were successful with the launch. You know we're not going to feel like we truly got it until we're holding that championship trophy in our hands. So it's it's i am. I'm so excited to see the race in and get things going. And i'm proud of what the teams have done so far and i told him i said you know this is. It's on you guys this. Is you know everyone needs to hit their marks. Everyone needs to call good strategy. The drivers need to keep the car clean as long as they can and will do the best that we can and if we all contribute and we all work together i think we all have a shot for this. I can hear it in your voice again..

kevin magnusson jeff gordon Laura jimmy johnson Jimmy Ian Six time magnusson last year fernando alonzo next year one driver jimmy january first india next weekend three this year elliott first three days
"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

NASCAR on NBC

03:29 min | 3 months ago

"program manager" Discussed on NASCAR on NBC

"We have. Laura want closer. Who was recently named the sports car racing program manager for general motorist racing. and laura. I just wanna start out. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. This is really exciting right well. I know that you're down. Daytona beach is well been exciting week for you and the race pergram. I want to get to that. But let's just start i without you. Were just recently named sports car racing program manager for general motors prior to that you were the program manager for gm's cadillac. Dpi program in the weathertech sportscar championship series. So just tell us about your job your role and how it's changed in the last week with this new position. Sure yes so by going over to be the sports car racing program manager in simple terms. What has happened is i now have all of our sports car programs which includes cadillac. Of course the camaro gt four program. And then the big one that i just picked up corvette which thrilled to be a part of of that team in that program and essentially the roles the same except just working with the different teams <hes> program manager's job at gm. We control the budget for the various programs. And that's laid out differently depending on if it's a customer program or factory program or you how we want to do that and then we also are the single point contact for the teams back to gm and also for the chassis suppliers and engine suppliers is so if they have any questions or any concerns that they want to relay back they see you go through me and then i'll take it to what i need to do. Either make a decision or or go above me. If i need to to solve a problem and then also very much. Integrated into design and development of the race cars at this point for all of those three programs. I just mentioned the cars are done. Which is exciting. So the new design and development. That i'll hopefully be getting into will be anything we do for future programs. Which is something that i'm involved in you know looking at. What would we like to do for from gm's perspective. Where do we wanna race. What brands do we want to race. All of that in the sports car arena. So it's nice. I have all different things. I get to be focused on which keeps the days different every single one and also keeps it so that i never get bored. Doing one thing like you said i mean. You've had a lot to your plate here with this new role. Previously mentioned you oversaw cadillac. And now. you've got corvette racing under your umbrella as well general question like how many people would you say you over at the company. I know you work with teams. So i guess it's probably different than if you were like a team manager but like in your role as a as a program manager that works with several sports teams. How many people would you say. You're you're looking here that's a. That's a good question <hes>. If you count the teams is being part of the family. Which very much do even though. I'm not gonna go tell a mechanic what to do. That's not my job. But you know i wanna make sure that i look out for all them. Each team is at least you know what the rolex bring more people but twenty thirty people depending and then. What is this year at the rolex we have nine cars three camaros for lax and two corvettes. So i guess if you add it all up it's quite a few people especially with delara and ecr and then our engine team at gm included in there <hes>. But like i said i. I don't really directly manage you. Know what the teams do in terms of telling the mechanics how to put the wheel on or anything along those lines. It's more so just giving them the connection. And then i control the purse strings for a lot of it especially the corvette program so you know ultimately it's like one of those love hate relationships. We have to work together to each. Get what we need

jimmy johnson daytona beach twenty four hours mike rockefeller chase elliott fernando alonzo Daytona beach Last year three Two years ago four days elliott twenty thirty people rolex last week nine cars one hundred hole Each team cadillac three programs
Laura Wontrop Klauser, Chevrolet sports car program manager for Corvette Racing, Cadillac Racing

NASCAR on NBC

03:29 min | 3 months ago

Laura Wontrop Klauser, Chevrolet sports car program manager for Corvette Racing, Cadillac Racing

"We have. Laura want closer. Who was recently named the sports car racing program manager for general motorist racing. and laura. I just wanna start out. Thanks for being here. Thanks for having me. This is really exciting right well. I know that you're down. Daytona beach is well been exciting week for you and the race pergram. I want to get to that. But let's just start i without you. Were just recently named sports car racing program manager for general motors prior to that you were the program manager for gm's cadillac. Dpi program in the weathertech sportscar championship series. So just tell us about your job your role and how it's changed in the last week with this new position. Sure yes so by going over to be the sports car racing program manager in simple terms. What has happened is i now have all of our sports car programs which includes cadillac. Of course the camaro gt four program. And then the big one that i just picked up corvette which thrilled to be a part of of that team in that program and essentially the roles the same except just working with the different teams program manager's job at gm. We control the budget for the various programs. And that's laid out differently depending on if it's a customer program or factory program or you how we want to do that and then we also are the single point contact for the teams back to gm and also for the chassis suppliers and engine suppliers is so if they have any questions or any concerns that they want to relay back they see you go through me and then i'll take it to what i need to do. Either make a decision or or go above me. If i need to to solve a problem and then also very much. Integrated into design and development of the race cars at this point for all of those three programs. I just mentioned the cars are done. Which is exciting. So the new design and development. That i'll hopefully be getting into will be anything we do for future programs. Which is something that i'm involved in you know looking at. What would we like to do for from gm's perspective. Where do we wanna race. What brands do we want to race. All of that in the sports car arena. So it's nice. I have all different things. I get to be focused on which keeps the days different every single one and also keeps it so that i never get bored. Doing one thing like you said i mean. You've had a lot to your plate here with this new role. Previously mentioned you oversaw cadillac. And now. you've got corvette racing under your umbrella as well general question like how many people would you say you over at the company. I know you work with teams. So i guess it's probably different than if you were like a team manager but like in your role as a as a program manager that works with several sports teams. How many people would you say. You're you're looking here that's a. That's a good question If you count the teams is being part of the family. Which very much do even though. I'm not gonna go tell a mechanic what to do. That's not my job. But you know i wanna make sure that i look out for all them. Each team is at least you know what the rolex bring more people but twenty thirty people depending and then. What is this year at the rolex we have nine cars three camaros for lax and two corvettes. So i guess if you add it all up it's quite a few people especially with delara and ecr and then our engine team at gm included in there But like i said i. I don't really directly manage you. Know what the teams do in terms of telling the mechanics how to put the wheel on or anything along those lines. It's more so just giving them the connection. And then i control the purse strings for a lot of it especially the corvette program so you know ultimately it's like one of those love hate relationships. We have to work together to each. Get what we need

GM Daytona Beach Laura Delara
NASA's 8-Minute Rocket Test Shuts Down After 67 Seconds

WBZ Morning News

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

NASA's 8-Minute Rocket Test Shuts Down After 67 Seconds

"Core rocket at NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi. Had to be cut short yesterday. The procedure was meant to test the rockets for massive engines. By firing up those rockets. The test was supposed to go about eight minutes and only went 60 seconds. NASA program manager Jim Hunnicutt. Any parameter that went awry on the agent could could send that. Failure. I d, but at the time that they made the call, which did still have four good engines up and running at 109%. So for now, the rocket remains on schedule for a November test launch with an unmanned Orion spacecraft. 707 to Wall

Stennis Space Center Nasa Jim Hunnicutt Mississippi
Moon rocket test firing aborted after engine shutdown

WBZ Morning News

01:03 min | 3 months ago

Moon rocket test firing aborted after engine shutdown

"For the art amiss. One core rocketed. NASA's Stennis Space Center in Mississippi was cut short yesterday this after the hot fire procedure. It was meant to test the Rockets four massive engines by firing up the rocket for a launch. Without actually launching, just simulating a climb to orbit. The test was supposed to last a full eight minutes with the onboard software initiated a safe shutdown after just 60 seconds, NASA program manager Jim Hunnicutt explains one of the four engines experience an unknown problem that triggered a major component failure that led to the shutdown. Any parameter that When a right on the edge it could could send that. Failure. I d. But at the time that they made the call, which did still have For good engines up and running at 109%. Now there's a scheduled launch for November. 2021. It's a test launch with an unmanned Orion spacecraft. It's five

Stennis Space Center Nasa Jim Hunnicutt Rockets Mississippi
First healthcare workers receive COVID-19 vaccinations at Washington DC’s Giant grocery stores

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 4 months ago

First healthcare workers receive COVID-19 vaccinations at Washington DC’s Giant grocery stores

"With with D D C C health health and and get get essential essential health health care care workers workers vaccinated. vaccinated. They're among the first retailers to begin offering appointments. Jim George was among the first ones here, the giant food stored in Northwest to get the Moderna vaccine ahead. A slight tingling for the 1st 23 minutes like any other any other vaccine injection, he says. The choice for him was easy, sir, very honorable population, so we wanted to make sure you protect yourself. Sameer Belial is the clinical programs manager here and says offering the vaccine is about providing more access because I think that's a lot of the barriers that Associated with Theo covet pandemic and overall health care free sources. The vaccine is being offered at select Jang grocery stores to healthcare workers by appointment only seven days a week from 10 to 3. Very exciting time. I think for the district and just Our community. Melissa. How old W T OBY news Now

Jim George Sameer Belial Northwest Jang Grocery Theo Melissa
Seedbanking a Floristic Province with Cheryl Birker, California Botanic Garden

Cultivating Place

03:20 min | 5 months ago

Seedbanking a Floristic Province with Cheryl Birker, California Botanic Garden

"So tell listeners. What your job title is in in what you do share is it you do. Yes so i am. The seed conservation program manager here at california botanic garden is actually the largest seed bank dedicated to conserving california's native flora. so my job. I get to go out in the wild and make seed collections of the rarest plants in california. Bring those leads back to the garden process and store them in our c. bank because if you process in store seeds correctly they can potentially live for hundreds of years in storage you making those collections essentially an insurance policy against species extinction in the wild. You know so when. I'm not in the field collecting seeds. I'm back at the garden working with those seeds. Curing the collection managing the data and conducting these experiments trying to determine the best way to grow these plants from see. It's it's it's a very fulfilling job to have. I bet i bet. The current holdings of the seed bank there are how many we currently have over. Fifty four hundred collections representing over twenty two hundred taxes on plant tax a native to california so we focus on california and the california listrik province which also goes down into baja and a little bit up into And our our overall goal is to seed bank every single species native to california which is a a huge gold. Have i mean. California is about diversity hotspot. there's over sixty five hundred. Native plant species are tax up more accurately and many of those. You know all all the pao diversity is so threatened by human activity so we have our job cut out for us definitely and so when you use the word tax you are referring to a single species so with with the word species right. There can be multiple subspecies or varieties. And those are those are distinguishable dis- different plants so there are sixty five hundred different kinds of plants in california. We would call those tax that includes all of the different subspecies and varieties. But probably there's only three thousand species if you're not counting those varieties so usually try to use the word tax. Okay so for Let safer example and we're talking occurring tax not human cultivated cultivars. Is that correct. So it was a so that the given example. I'm thinking of my beautiful woman. Hetero files that's in bloom right now and there are several cultivars on the market. That people would have run into like margarita. Bob yes so in the bank we actually do. Have accessions of those cultivated varieties but our our main focus is trying to Conserve the genetic diversity. That is naturally present in california. So those those true species and not the cultivars

California California Botanic Garden California Listrik Baja BOB
Florida's Orange County sees uptick in COVID-19 cases

Purity Products

00:29 sec | 5 months ago

Florida's Orange County sees uptick in COVID-19 cases

"Breaking daily totals of new Koven cases. Health officials in Orange County say they're also seeing new spikes. Florida Department of Health Epidemiology program manager for the county says the virus isn't being spread at big gatherings. So there are So called hot spots and a lot of places, And it's not necessarily because of a single event or single break its people sort of relaxing or letting up on the good pandemic precautions. That was program manager Alvin A. Chu. Now if you are making

Florida Department Of Health E Orange County Alvin A. Chu
"program manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

06:29 min | 6 months ago

"program manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"De Matteis, the disease and focused research on our focus money on research to help find a cure but also improve the lives of people living with. Not just on we're not as focused on cherry and we're also focused on improving the lives of people that have the disease love that. So so meaningful and you're you're walking the talk not just talking the talk and that that's really really important in in healthcare. So Chelsea what about something that didn't work out like you know I know, hey, startups deal with. Issues all the time. Is there something in particular that you wanNA share that has made you guys better because it happened now sure and you know that hurdle that we're traversing at something that you know if I can prevent any future companies or ideas from going through this I i. hope this helped but I think fat and Paddock Oh we've been we were. Looking forward and pushing for the FDA clearance or devices actually cleared by the FDA, the first foreign device and plus to be clear cried the FBI. Port. Thank you. Yeah. Huge pressure that you even really exciting that we can now get out to families but what we of going into it was. Asked to FDA clearance and that would sort of be. The same we would get reimbursement and I think that something that we quickly learned is not how that works that reimbursed, which is something that we're really pushing for this year So long road and you really need to set up your your studies and your trial, and the your platform with reimbursement and how to integrate into into healthcare had. Yeah it's definitely a big thing and you know, Chelsea I feel like there's a lot of services and products that are on the periphery that can offer a lot of value that aren't necessarily in the reimbursement path but creating models to address these exist they definitely take time and I mean I think about population health efforts and value based care efforts that aren't really align into the reimbursement models. But when you find stakeholder, there's a way. Yes. Yeah. If anybody knows anything please where we`re Living for the day color while there are a lot of great advice out there and no, we've tried to keep the embraced watch. You know low price point as possible. You know the company running info getting it to the people who is impacting it really frustrating for us when we have people that are coming out and saying look like we can afford to buy it really breaks our hearts when we can't get this everybody. So there are models out reimbursement, but we just know. That this is a way to really get it to people that anyone who needs a device for monitoring features. Yeah. No that's a great call Ouden in folks if you're listening to this and you have an idea or a partnership opportunity where something could work out definitely at the end of the PODCAST, Chelsea will provide the best way to contact her or the company and Hey. This is why we do what we do connecting the silos in in solutions through the podcast. So what? About the other side of the Coin Jessie, what's been one of your most proud moments there at impact. My God. There are so many we don't really just being where you know. So as I said, I've been here for a little bit over a year and I spend a lot of I'm going to a lot of the conferences in that and then meeting with families who are actually think are device and it's incredible to see the impact that made after clearances San Lucas amongst I mean. I haven't been able to weed for the past ten years on terrified. My son's going to have a seizure in the middle of the night I sleep in a real FM and this is the first having my life has been able to get a good night's sleep and no let him. Sleep in his own room and know that if he hasn't seizure I'm GONNA get alerted and I'll be there. Those moments are are pretty incredible that is incredible and if you don't mind me asking, can you share how much it costs? Why on so the devices to forty nine, the embraced watch, and there's a monthly subscription that comes with the alerting services of the lowest one is ten dollars a month so like I tried to keep it low. Reasonable to make it out of lowest possible for people. So that's why the reimbursement focus very good. Very good. Now, you know this is key in Dash when you think of of items from the perspective of of a medical device standpoint, it's super affordable. Yes, and actually it's interesting because that's been potentially one of the issues with reimbursement if they is it expensive, why should we? Why should we reimburse which is? Yeah something else I'm telling you but you know what the stories are there. You guys continue to find ways to make it better and you're engaged in the patient groups in the policy groups and the technology groups I know that a solutions around the corner. So keep doing what you're doing. It's so so impactful. So this is great, and so now we're we're at the point of the podcast Chelsea where where we do the lightning rounds. I've got a couple of questions for you there followed by a book that you recommend listeners ready. Sure. Okay. What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes? Now I think I touched on this a little bit already, but I, think you know I love when companies say. That the number one focus is the patient relationship patients but I think really hitting detriot of patient provider and the pair is really important. So without being able to go to the parents, this decision provider patient, you know you can hit one of those things. But if you're not targeting all of them, your system isn't GonNa go forward. So I think really having the focus of of creating A. Everyone is an important focus huge and what's the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid I think for piggyback off of this but developing for a silo. So just developing those branches into starting place but I think that you really need to have the foresight of of where that platform is going to go moving forward and also not make any.

FDA Chelsea De Matteis Paddock Oh FBI San Lucas
"program manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

08:11 min | 6 months ago

"program manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"Host. So Marquez. Welcome back to the podcast today I have the privilege of hosting Dr Chelsea Trengrove. She is a PhD in Bio Pharmacology and neuroscience currently a program manager at impact of focused on innovation through collaboration and Pataca is an MIT media lab spinoff emphasizing the use of sensor data to inform patients, health and wellness and daily life. Their first focus is epilepsy justice background in Pharmacology and biochemistry allows her to take her insights with the intersection of neuro. Science to come out with some great solutions. She did all of this at Boston. University prior to impact, she worked internationally in the Pharma and biotech industries, assisting companies to build external collaborations, aligned processes, and incorporate FDA guidelines. We all know is hyper important an advocate for health and wellness. She's also a black belt and daily practitioner of Aikido, a martial art. So with that I, WanNa give a very warm welcome to Chelsea to the podcast. Welcome. Solid great to be here. It's a pleasure to to have a here. Chelsea. In folks Chelsea was at the Ted Med meeting. That I also attended last year and talk about some brilliant minds and. Just thought it'd be a great opportunity to have her here on the podcast to tell us her story and what she's up to so Chelsea what got you into healthcare. Talk of an interesting journey for me as you mentioned, I started off in Academia A. Ever, since I was five years old I was actually super interested in the grain to go to the CD ROM as the Pedia that my dad got me over Christmas and I used to. Read articles about the brain. So really average does it should. I knew that I was interested in I ended wanted to go feel and being in academia teach neurosciences wonderful. I really love getting swift for and investigate new areas of whether or not was sell pathways or new molecules equity impact diseases My PhD was specifically at neurodegeneration I love that investigation but it. Felt like a release slow process, it was married focused on one pathway at a time and the research can take can take decades. You can the whole career for one line at a textbook sometimes, and you some people have these incredible spruce and some people are just built for the research but I wanted to do something I saw a little bit more impactful and collaborative. I, love the the cell culture dishes that I was working with but I did want to interact with people and feel like I was in acting DEFEC-. More on a face to face daily local go after a finish. My PhD I went into consulting working like you said and Pharma a devices getting for the new language of FDA allegation and regulatory work, which is interesting but I did miss a science. So I started looking around for new ways that I could still be in the math farmer world but also get to sort of delve into science and they've found in paddock. Anything really edge research and I mean both healthcare and neuro field really lucky to be taken on their the program manager a little bit over a year ago. That's a fascinating journey Chelsea. Gosh, the area of neuro degeneration, the brain mental health, these diseases affecting the brain and nothing like there's no vital sign for the brain like there's a big gap there in a an also big opportunity. Now, Alzheimer's increasing year after year. What's your thoughts on all mad I? Mean I know I know I just said a lot. But warned why why are we trending that way? Why not the other way? What and what do you mean by the other way meaning better weren't? Well I think the brain has really one of the final frontiers away and there's just so much that we don't know about it and I think a lot of our focuses are either and it's been biology or like really the molecular level or cellular level and I think it's nippy important to angry the different sort of Filo of science but it's not GonNa, be you know one answer on this drug or you just need? To affect the pathway. So that's why I think sort of movement towards big data and machine learning is heavy, really hard using. you know censored like their lungs that we use an Konica and machine learning and Gino make to really create a holistic picture of a person supposed to vote. For thing down on someone it'd be small areas It's not really promising in the next few years. I'm love your your hopeful outlook there. And it's a, it's a great one to have especially in the field and focus that you're up to. So one needs to be on the minds of health leaders, agendas today, how are you and in Paddock approaching it? Yeah. Well. Let me give you a little bit of background on what impact does in case Any of your listeners aren't aware paddock. So as I mentioned, we are machine learning wearable a company out an MIT media lab off, and our first focus has really been creating the ball beautiful mart wash called the embrace and the way that it works has sensors that will monitor for convulsive seizures will detect the. User's risks and both ends on alert to a Caregiver Attack Mukesh and phone college gas location. So impacts focus has really been creating these sensors that will help create peace of mind in people's lives out of the hospital really gives them the freedom to go and live their lives. So our big focus has been machine learning, but something that we've encountered as the importance of creating these not just for the patient, but we need to find a way that really integrated the health care system and that's something that we've. Learned over the past few years, the importance of creating these platforms that aren't just only for the patient, but can also be used by this edition provider so that integrate into a meaningful way into the healthcare system I. Think it's a really important connection to make you reference the silo nature of even brain research. This expands even to the point solutions and solutions that we could offer to improve outcomes. It'd be interesting to hear from you Chelsea, something that you and the impact team have done to create results do a better by thinking differently. Yeah. I think something that we've really had to focus after Muslim paddock is You know where a bunch of scientists and engineers who are developing the technology for people who are living everyday with Luxy. So something that we've really needed to focus on and. Help, improve. What we created is working with patients with people who have not to improve the products. Now, just humane that will know what that working with them to improve our algorithm so that it's the taxing measures that are going to be the most impactful in their life. So for us, it was not focusing on every type of you're looking directly at compulsive shirts which are one of the. Most dangerous types of seizures most dangerous. So really just sort of reiterating on the device with the people that are really in the League of having the diesel part of daily life. It's great that you guys are doing that. There's so many people looking for solutions and such a smart group of people working on a on on a single problem. I. Mean there's so much power and focus just. Yeah. It's incredible that you guys are so aligned with this single problem I mean you share with me your urine DC right now for epilepsy meeting yeah I'm I'm here for the National Epilepsy walking you. In the National Mall and no family from all over the US gathered together to raise money and awareness for epilepsy related to help try, and.

Dr Chelsea Trengrove FDA program manager Pharmacology and biochemistry Chelsea Boston Marquez neurodegeneration MIT Academia A. Ever National Epilepsy Pataca US Konica Filo Alzheimer National Mall
Synthetic fertilizers are heating the planet

Climate Connections

01:10 min | 8 months ago

Synthetic fertilizers are heating the planet

"From raising livestock to growing vegetables, farmers put food on our plates. But agriculture also creates emissions that warm the climate and the most warming is caused by nitrous oxide and especially potent global warming gas. The use of synthetic fertilizers is the biggest source of nitrous oxide emissions. Laura Snyder is an education and research program manager with the Organic Farming Research Foundation. Fertilizers basically providing a form of nitrogen to the plant and so when you add that to the soil, a lot of it is lost to the atmosphere as nitrous oxide. But she says, the farmers can reduce those emissions by changing some of their practices. For example, she recommends planting cover crops in the off season. Instead of leaving fields bear some cover crops can reduce the need for fertilizer because they naturally fix nitrogen in the soil. LAKENHAM cover crops are excellent at taking atmospheric nitrogen and putting it in the soil in the form that plants can use, and so that's another way that we can provide fertility to plants and it doesn't result in the same kind of pulse of nitrous oxide into the atmosphere. So by enriching soil, naturally, farmers can also help reduce global

Nitrous Oxide Laura Snyder Organic Farming Research Found Program Manager
NASA's Mars helicopter is ready for the red planet

Innovation Now

00:54 sec | 9 months ago

NASA's Mars helicopter is ready for the red planet

"The team at NASA jet propulsion lab began developing their idea for a Mars helicopter, they reached out to some helicopter experts to help refine their design. Here's Susan Gorton Program Manager for. The revolutionary virtual lift technologies team at NASA Langley Research Center the Mars helicopter is what's called. The technology demonstrator is sold goal is to show. We can actually do this mission flying on Mars is like flying at one hundred, thousand feet on earth. There's not much air the broader blades on air. So we had to have a very efficient kind of helicopter and small and lightweight to make it work on Mars. The Mars helicopter has rotors that are stacked atop each other one spends one direction wants bins the other and win this helicopter hitches a ride to Mars on the Mars Twenty twenty mission. The entire team is confident it will

Mars Twenty Twenty Mars Nasa Langley Research Center Susan Gorton Nasa Program Manager
Crew Dragon astronaut reveals what he loves most about spacewalks

CNN 10 (video)

03:20 min | 11 months ago

Crew Dragon astronaut reveals what he loves most about spacewalks

"It's been a couple of weeks now since the amazing historic launch. What surprised you the most about the journey I think just in general the. The the biggest surprise, probably for both of us was just how different the rocket felt than what we experienced with shuttle I mean we expected some of that to be different. Just because it was a liquid fueled rocket, and the shuttle had solid boosters, so that was going to be different, but it certainly was a great ride. It was just different very exciting all in all I would say that was the first big highlight, and then the second one was was getting space station and. Three Smiley faces when we came through the hatch. It was just great to see those guys and I I think they were happy to see us. Get you know. Get a little change of scenery, onboard station and a little bit more help now. Bob We know you've been busy training for an update spacewalk. Can you tell us a little bit about what you'll be doing during that? Walk in at this point, you know you're a veteran spacewalker, so what is? Is your favorite part about spacewalk we'll be changing out all of the batteries on one of the channels on the space station from my perspective, adding done a few spacewalks and being a veteran, I really look forward to the views of the earth. When we get a free moment, and and this time they'll be dragon vehicle pointed on the forward into the space station, instead of the space shuttle, and so I'm looking forward to that something new new view. View that I can capture and share with the world. Some might say that the most dangerous part of the mission still lies ahead the journey home and this time you guys won't be landing on a runway when you land back on Earth, you'll be splashing down in the ocean. What are you anticipating? The ride back home to be like an? Are you guys at all nervous? No I don't think were nervous. We watch the Demo one flight. The test flight the. The crew test flight in the vehicle performed very well. We've seen the flight aboard tests and the vehicle perform well again. We have full confidence that the vehicle will perform just like it's supposed to. That being said it's a it's a completely different entry profile than what we are used to or had been used to in the space. Shuttle will land in the water. As you said, we'll land under parachutes much more dynamic entry. They'll be much higher, Jeez and That's just part of the unknown as to. We have prepared port, but we can only prepare so much, and we'll see how the vehicle does, and we'll see how we do when we get back now says I s program manager. Kirk Sherman is down, and this comes after Nastase head of human spaceflight resigned in May. How do all of these changes in leadership affect you guys and the other astronauts that are currently living on the International Space Station or I think if you look at who is. Replaced some of those positions you'll you'll, you'll see. People from within moving up and stepping into those roles, and just doing an excellent job and so That's one of the strengths of an organization like NASA is that? We don't rely on a single individual to drive the entire assessment and evaluation and management effort. We use a team of individuals to do that. And and the team is strong enough to be able to recognize their role in assisting that new leader, and and coming into their own as they take over the organization.

International Space Station Nasa BOB Smiley Kirk Sherman Program Manager Nastase
The Mescalero Apache Tribe declares a state of emergency as COVID-19 cases start to emerge

Native America Calling

03:42 min | 11 months ago

The Mescalero Apache Tribe declares a state of emergency as COVID-19 cases start to emerge

"This is national news. I'm in Prenton Gonzales. The Mescalero Apache tribe in New Mexico declared a state of emergency Monday as tests confirm the first cases of covid nineteen on the reservation in New Mexico. At least four people tested positive for the disease. The tribe says it's waiting on the results of some six hundred other tests. Mescalero ordered lockdown businesses and public establishments for at least the next two weeks. The tribe is also closing tribal government offices to the public. The order puts restrictions on individuals movements and asks that one member of each household use Tuesdays and Thursdays for buying food and other essentials. The tribe is closing entrances to tribal land although the main highway through the reservation remains open. Mescalero president gave Aguilar told Q. E. T. V. The measures are away to protect the tribe. He says merely urging people to practice physical distancing failed to keep the virus from spreading an out of state. Seafood worker is the first person to test positive for coronavirus in the city of Valdez. Alaska officials say the infection was caught through. Routine. Testing Louisa. Castroville is Acting Infectious Disease Program Manager for the Alaska Department of Health and social services in video conference Monday. She said it's not clear yet. How the individual contract the virus it's individual came to Alaska from the lower forty-eight in late April and Co was quarantined. Onsite there for two weeks because as some demonic during that timeframe as well and there's been working on campus since then and has not left. It's not clear the source of the infection whether this was something that was picked up locally since the person had been there for a month or whether this is the test that we're seeing the positive result if it's picking up virus that might have been An infection in the distant past. And we're just seeing residual virus from that Castro deal says health officials are working to determine anyone who may have come in contact with the infected person. Alaska officials remain vigilant as the commercial fishing season is getting underway and thousands of people. Come from all over the world to work and processing facilities. The state has a little over four hundred positive cases of covid nineteen total as of the start of this week. The regional hospital in gnome close to the public. After an employee tested for the coronavirus. The Norton Sound Health Corporation expected employees to go back to work Tuesday after all of them are tested for the virus. Katie Oh news reports. The facilities were subjected to afford a extensive cleaning on Friday. The city manager issued an emergency order restricting travel into nome and mandating a two week quarantine for anyone traveling into the city from the outside. Some face masks sent to the Navajo nation through a company established by a former White House. Aide may be inadequate to properly protect those who wear them the news organization Propublica reports almost two hundred fifty thousand of the masks sent by a company headed by former White House. Deputy Chief of Staff Zach Pontus may not fit the guidelines established by the Food and Drug Administration propublica reports. The total cost for the masks is around eight hundred thousand dollars. The report goes on to say that in another one hundred. Thirty thousand masks are not the kind specified in the procurement data. The News Organization Says Flint is secured. The three million dollar deal with the Indian health services. Eleven days after he formed the company the sell personal protective equipment. Ihs officials say the masks are unsuitable for medical use. The regional office is determining whether to return them flint told propublica his connections to the White House played no role in his company selection as a provider for IHS the Navajo nation has the highest per capita rate of corona virus infections in the nation with National Native News. I'm Mark Hughes.

Alaska White House Mescalero New Mexico Prenton Gonzales Aguilar IHS Alaska Department Of Health Valdez Acting Infectious Disease Prog Norton Sound Health Corporatio Nome Flint Food And Drug Administration Mark Hughes Castroville Katie Oh Propublica
How Coronavirus May Affect Grocery Shopping Habits

BBC World Service

12:23 min | 1 year ago

How Coronavirus May Affect Grocery Shopping Habits

"This failed by cost yeah six months ago we did plowing microscopical jets a lovely lovely us well and that was always a good sign of a healthy soil who got it from a guy using Watson that tending to the soil on is one hundred and forty acres of land here in the U. K. it's all happening down at his farm we grow various vegetables just about stock picking strawberries would grow globalists checks with a couple's prime Brooks laid out so squash and pumpkins since garden pays that sort of thing so you must be really busy right about now because everything's coming into season yeah we've just gone states that the pumpkins and it's now turned extremely cold and very strong easterly wind them work trying to nurse them along and keep them alive until it gets warmer again at the end of the week yeah we it's coming into a pretty busy time for the start thinking strawberries next week guy founded river Ford farms a company that delivers boxes of organic vegetables to consumers across the U. K. ever since the coronavirus lockdown business has been booming so how does god explain the surge in demand for his produce there is some reevaluation of people's lives people spend more time cooking crops thinking a little bit more about what they took and and being more concerned about the quality and provenance and environmental and social impact of what that Boeing you know we are certainly getting a lot more customers which is all good in the Bahamas that grow and supply said delighted that will increase that crop and programs by twenty five percent this year and at the moment that doesn't look like it'll be enough but I guess we have we have to be cautious I mean at the end of this will people get back to their normal habits soul well you know what I have to stop this new habits guys sing Watson as he says he thinks the lockdown is changing people's habits when it comes to food and the question is whether these habits will stick but in the meantime the corona virus pandemic is also changing global food supply chains that means the range of products consumers in the rich will see on the supermarket shelves is changing too Richard Wilding is a British academic and business professional specializing in logistics transport and supply management he says big buyers in the food industry in the developed world I'm now looking closely at the resilience of their supply chains and finding different ways to source that produce amid the lockdowns and he warns these new routes could become the new normal so we have to remember at the moment since the lockdown actually occurred and particularly the impacts on air freight if you think that most of the time it's passengers in the top of the aircraft and then yes this thing the banks but also there is a significant amount of air freight and if we're looking at food for example you've got Chilean blueberries Argentinian blackberries Zambian sugar snap peas now what we've actually found is the air freight costs have increased dramatically because of me just people not flying and therefore vote starting to trade some significant challenges in terms of the cost the cost to serve particular customers so what we're finding is he's a number of things coming together I'm thankful the new normal which we can start to see will probably be much more focused on what we call me shoring fast trying to source goods much closer to the actual customers if you go to new school from the consumer's point of view that means less choice if those blackberries coming from Argentina on no longer being brought over then that means also that there's going to be less choice in the supermarket yes but in terms of choice we're already seeing that actually so just on say some of the products if you looking up pasta for example generally you know a lot of the supermarkets will have a offering twenty different sort of lines of pasta different shapes and so on and so forth the pastor that has already been rationalized down to six so if we go into a supermarket now compared with China wary this year you have less choice threes within the supply chain by doing actions like that it means you've been able to increase the volumes of simplifying if you want the movements of those goods to the customers is this happening globally yet what we have to realize he's he's that the global rationalization of if you like choice consumers because of the challenge of managing supply chains because of the increased cost to serve we may start to see the organizations are going to offer less choice across the supply chain as a whole and I'm an implicit in this or this is basically last trade internationally well with this drawing for me is shoring what we can find is that global supply chains will rationalize we still going to have global supply chains but what we might find these a more vanilla products she's actually being moved around and then actually we got to find more local processing interestingly enough for example if you look at the Scottish form processing industry is done in Thailand so what we find is that these things of fish thank you for example around Scotland they then moved to Thailand where they're actually you know be shelved and everything else and then moved back again and so you know those are the types of examples that we've seen in the past what people are trying to do is to actually leverage if you like low labor cost however with the technology that was starting to see that labor costs becomes less of a challenge and therefore what we were able to do is to do these things locally after the quisling cost because we're not using people we're actually using machines the loss of our listeners on the world service are in emerging markets emerging markets that depend on being able to export food products to the developed world listening to you here this will be a huge blow to them because your affected be telling them that may never be able that kind of normal resumption of food exports that we had before unfortunately I think there is going to be some significant changes in this new normal if we looking up all supply chain environments coronaviruses created a burning platform for change across all supply chains not just food supply chains and what is going to have a big impact so many communities around the world including western communities as well bots my concern is that this may fall harder on those developing nations and is there anything that that should be done to help those communities that are going to be really hit hard by this the key things that we need to actually think through its procurement professionals that means that the big supermarkets the people you know who who have procuring goods around the world they don't just think about calls the economic impact of their decisions they don't just think about sustainability in the environmental impacts of their decisions but they also think about the society and I think what we have to do is we have to consider that yes it may actually cost a slightly more to point from in certain communities globally but actually we need to do that to support those communities professor Richard Wilding then perhaps more a case of conscientious trait than rather than fat trade but how these developments going down in places which have traditionally grown produce to exports to the developed world up to what how Barry is a country program manager in the west and central Africa division at the international fund for agricultural development the U. N. agency he's based in Abidjan in the Ivory Coast which is just coming out of lockdown this is the mango season in record you our exports have dropped significantly because the markets are closed in Europe on and of the importers in Europe not honor the contract and they said as it reported effect on the exporters in the developing countries especially in West Africa could you for so what is happening to these mangoes are they just sitting in a warehouse rushing then some of them are able to go through the system and get the product to Abigail which is the port but the ships and the also with plain as not moving so those people are also stocked with the products three to two thousand dollars a year this is what could you what export to the international market right away if you cannot sell that means that you stayed here Mr Austin come but lost income for the exporter but lost income also for the farmer a west tech with a very big drop from a from the tree to the Saudi oil you grow your own defined flags every away flights because of the quantity of Brighton main goals this season not thank god for which is the season right now and I'm I'm telling you it's not beautiful and these exporters in these farmers are they mostly small holders or all the big Mona cultural farms owned by companies who is this affecting the most in Ivory Coast but also just generally in West Africa for other food products I didn't I think the hardest hits is a greedy a farmer because the farmer eats in general poor and cannot meet the DVD needs and help you concerned all farmers exporters in Ivory Coast another west African countries that some changes we're seeing now the inability to export that these things might become permanent this is not just a temporary blip but actually something that might change the way he a lot of western bias source food yeah I I think I tend to be optimistic I think that this would change in the next few months I hope I hope that recorded nineteen he's not going to be a stumbling block for countries like could you what to Exploratorium it is is it compounding food security in hunger problems in countries like Ivory Coast now swear in West Africa prices have started rising in Abidjan because people could not export to Abidjan so in the cities is becoming a little bit difficult food you mean yeah getting access to Ford it's difficult especially for poor people spend a big chunk of very incompetent for not for not quite confusing in the sense that this is all this produce it's not being exported why isn't it being consumed within the country what you have sold prints there are products of late cool cool cashew which are not made for consumption in could you offer a service so what do you do it and when you cannot consume yeah let's also remember the agriculture season starting now for those we didn't have the means to buy imports it means that they cannot produce the food for the next three to six months only seven players you mean the seeds seeds fertilizers pesticides they don't have them still well what what do you do what's your biggest worry for farmers in Ivory Coast and the rest of it West Africa for the next three

Watson
An Efficient Helicopter Plans to Fly on Mars

Innovation Now

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

An Efficient Helicopter Plans to Fly on Mars

"An aerial vehicle that could take off and land multiple. Times would let see much more of Mars. This is innovation now bringing you. Stories of revolutionary ideas emerging technologies and the people behind the concepts that shape the future when the team at NASA jet propulsion lab began developing their idea for a Mars helicopter. They reached out to some helicopter. Experts to help refine their design. Here's Susan Gorton Program Manager for the Revolutionary Virtual lift technologies team at NASA Langley Research. Center the Mars helicopter is what's called. The technology. Demonstrator is sold. Goal is to show. We can actually do this mission. Flying on Mars is like flying at one hundred thousand feet on earth. There's not much air. The broader blades operate on air. So we had to have a very efficient kind of helicopter and small and lightweight to make it work on Mars. The Mars helicopter has rotors. That are stacked atop each other. One spends one direction wants bins. The other and win this helicopter hitches a ride to Mars on the Mars Twenty twenty mission. The entire team is confident it will fly

Mars Twenty Twenty Nasa Langley Research Susan Gorton Nasa Program Manager
Best Practices For Managing Remote Teams | Hassan Osman

The LEADx Show

06:56 min | 1 year ago

Best Practices For Managing Remote Teams | Hassan Osman

"Welcome to managing remote scenes. My Name's John Osmond and today we're GONNA be talking about six best practices for success. So here's what I'm going to be covering today. I'll start with a little bit of a bio background about myself will then cover some virtual team statistics and then we'll talk about the number one reason. Why virtual teams fail and then we'll cover six best practices that can that you can Use and help In terms of helping you manage your your team all right so. Let me start with a quick speaker by our backgrounds. My name is Hassan Osman. I'm currently a PM. Oh detector at CISCO SYSTEMS PMO's stands for Program Management Office. And I lead a team of senior program managers who are all remotes on delivering complex. It programs. I do have to mention that views are my own. Not THOSE OF CISCO'S I don't represent Cisco's business in anyway. I'm also the author of a few books about remote work including influencing virtual teams and don't reply all and I've been fortunate that Their number one Amazon best-sellers also an instructor on About courses regarding remote work delivered online Parts of the Youth Emmy for Business Instructor Pool which is selection of courses delivered for Fortune. One thousand companies and. I teach everything from had to manage your remote team To how to have better. Virtual meetings The liquid ven diagram. I have shared here Shows the circles that intersect virtual teams project management and productivity and. I usually kind of show that when I wanNA give a little bit of information about my background And areas of interest so with the project management circle. I've been in project management for most of my career work at E. Y. Analysing why projects fail and

John Osmond Cisco Hassan Osman Program Management Office Business Instructor Pool Instructor Amazon Fortune
"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

09:56 min | 1 year ago

"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Next step aside. He's professional engineers. We all have a a drive arrive if you will so the fact that you can fulfill that neither of meeting with people that talk like you look like you that you can learn from more power to you switching gears a little bit. I was wondering if you could share with me again. I love the folks that listen to this day. Liked to switch jobs like every two to three three years or so someone like what has kept your info for for this time. You know what has driven you to build your career. They're great question because I tell a lot a lot of people like you know if you had asked me when I graduated college what would my life be like or what I would want it to be what I thought it would be a said like I would be traveling leveling the world in many different jobs and I would be just hopping a lot quite often and it just happened that that I ended up staying at until for thirteen years it has been a combination of liken where you are in the area of Oregon. I have liked it. They're you're having a family and having kids and then the kids going to school. And maybe you don not wanting it to disrupt disrupt. It happens that in Oregon again until is the biggest name in town. So I'm probably in the best company that I can be in that area now. If it were in the bay the area I could switch companies without disrupting a lot of those other things that have kept me in Oregon right. I also three years ago. Move my parents so so to From Puerto Rico to Oregon so I feel what I'm not going to move now. Let's say to California. After I moved my parents here I would have to move them with me and California's Elliott a bit more expensive than we. We have perfect weather BUBBA. We pay for it but overall I mean I think it's every person has different circumstances and what I tell people. Is You know what whatever you do as long as you have a recent and you can explain it is okay. The same answer or or disclaim solution doesn't work for everybody and it's okay. If you're says different yeah and some people are nourish the stability and people appreciate the community. you have these deep network of folks at Intel. You know how things to get things done. You know how to speak the language. I guess like after five six seven years if it's almost like you're moving to different country. Yeah when you're doing different at the same time you have to embrace change and sometimes if we stay too long in the same situation can you forget about embracing change or you start feeling it and we on as I did and really changed like I said jobs for the first time so when I thought in my years eight torso to switch even to different part of until it was a little frightening it was like man I mean. Can I do something new when you're in college. You don't even think about that because you're already doing many different things having who blew Niclas and then doing a different one you are with change but if you stay somewhere too long it could would be that that effect of the frog right but to be honest once I switch I felt this adrenaline rush of the learning and than you and and that was really powerful so even if people change jobs to yours right some people may see that as well you're not wear you're switching jobs you cannot stay with one thing like if you have a reason right eight. I switched to this new thing. I learned it first. Year was a lot of learning second year I mastered yesterday. I want something new. That's fine. That's present some things you know. He's also the economic realities is a big deal for some folks that I can say at this. This company does good and I give me up three percent raise every year but if I switched jobs I get Ten Percent Fifteen percent twenty percent race. That's a great point because actually what a lot lot of people say you know what the best way of growing in a companies to get out of the company and comeback. I heard many many times and I have seen people people doing it. Yeah so the economics are very important to anybody. has their own journey right. So like Over I believe he's a chapter six. So is the episode six of these guests. We actually have a friend. The cuando America knowing some machine learning engineering. He double his salary. In two years switching companies he worked at a startup for six months and he told me that working that startup environment basically accelerated his career five five years just being in that startup environment. So like he didn't have weekends for three months. You have to put himself through that gauntlet but in the anti paid off and just so you know. He actually achieved something that I mentioned every time because I think it's very admirable the fact that she moved his parents to from Venezuela to the US. She bought them a house in Florida and he has bought a house in California. And he's only I wouldn't have been able to do this unless I had done these switching around because I wanted to provide to them so it's a it's a way of looking at things like what's your purpose. What do you WanNa get out of what you value again? Everybody has their own journey. Yeah and you know what this this is going a little back more. I was talking about A group of an old like five hundred kids in high school and particularly with US Latinos. You'll have to provide for her family right so a a lot of kids graduate and they decide not to go to college because they want to help their parents they just need to get a job right now and help my family and we had to just still have general and will what the best way to help your families to go to college. Go to college. And you'll multiplied by a factor of five to ten what you can make and then and you can help them that relates to that example. You said the work in Byron. It's different if you're going to move for a three percent increase right yacht. Got Your moving for a twenty percent increase on one hundred thousand dollars salary or more. It's a big difference at the same time. It's it's very personal if you aside you know even though I had that opportunity not taking it because I want to do X.. As long as you're doing an informed decision I think that's okay. Yeah so just leave your own journey. Dan You know you. You have any idea of what you like what you're good at and the things that you need to learn so you anything else you'd like to have these audience of well one. The one thing that you ask that I didn't address. What's the Difference Between Program Management and project manage right so this is one of those words that people use interchangeably and they could mean many different things right? So I'll give you my definition and what I have read on kind of ended up deciding it so when you're talking about project management it's at a little bit more depth level right you're talking about milestones you're talking about. Let's say getting the project on schedule an executing that project from start to finish. It's very centric on the project and making sure you get all does things right When you're talking about program management it's a little broader? You may have many different products under a program and also you may have a lot more influence on the strategy or how you're trying to achieve that right so like which project is prioritize which along as they prioritize. Finish wish this first before we the next or even how let's say that You have a diversity program right. That's the bigger umbrella our like to call it. And then you have the friend in super projects. We should be okay. We want to match representations to the market that is one project right and even within that product there could be many different projects right but another part of the diversity program may be external engagement so external engagement with the community external engagements gay shipments with the universities. Right so you're talking. They're like different projects and areas within a bigger umbrella. So that bigger umbrella. is the program room. Those smaller umbrellas under are more projects with that said. Let's say you're looking for a program management role when you're doing your certian linked in or anywhere else for project management. Because you want to first go interview and then bureau out with that employer what this project management then mean to you. What does program management mean to you? And then you'll be able to assess I always recommend it is good to have project management experience before program management. Because you understand a little better of what does it take to get. Those projects done particularly software projects. One of those things that we talked about engineering and business is that when you're talking about engineering and management they one thing just to be done quick right. They understand why it's taken so long ride. When when you're at that project level with the software folks you understand how things are interacting with each other? How you change a code in one side and it could I have impacts on other just moving data from one place to another may be who heart? Maybe data validation even the agile process right. How something could take longer or you? The team may switch focus. And you don't get that unless you are deep into the project management barked and knowing how how that has handle will help you do that. Program Management Role Better and explained to management better. Why things are delayed or why? We cannot expand expand this code to cover. Let's say two databases to three databases. You'll be able to explain those things better than if you didn't have that experience so hopefully that helps hopes thank you so much. Thank you so much..

Oregon California Intel Niclas Puerto Rico America Elliott Byron Florida Dan US Venezuela
"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

10:56 min | 1 year ago

"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Myself an and hopefully hung a little bit. Yeah it's critical because actually I do a lot of what is called Matrix management which means so you have to manage a lot of people that are not reporting to you so you have to manage by influence and like I said a lot of people are senior to you but you you still need things from them meaning that they need to complete some tasks for your group and you need them to finish it but they don't report to you so it's a little bit tricky because what is your leverage. So so what's your leverage. How do you approach that? I have evolved on this overtime by a lot of times particularly already beginning was a lot of talking with them and convincing them. Why this was important? That's still valuable right but A lot of times we might previous years was escalation. Listen which means that. Okay if you do it I have Lescott it to your manager because I needed that in theory works but it leaves us our taste and It depends also how culturally accepted. Eat is in their division. I was before it was. Actually there were so many escalations that it was not at something completely out of line where I'm at right now. It's definitely something you shouldn't do unless you really really tried to work it out with that person and told them ahead that I will have to escalate this. If it doesn't come through bod what I have found that has been the most successful is that I tried liked to say it ahead of time. meaning that hey we need this information and the is done in two months. Is that doable. And they will most of the time they would say say two months. Yeah sure that's doable. Right if you for something for next week most likely those eight years I mean that would be really tough but yes for something for here in two months and you say okay. Most most of the time you need things from many people and you have to put it together so you do a documenting wish. Everybody Connecticut right and they put their own information there. And you say okay so when it for two months and then I sat up on I tell them we have a meeting with his. VP in a week after that so we are presenting and and that meeting becomes a forcing function because they don't want to look bad in front of the VP. Right and they know schedule already so they will meet that headline and that becomes actually emotionally for me. It becomes a lot better because I don't have to bug people as much and yes if we need to move the meeting getting we do it but for the most part it works. I live at a week so we can massage it and have a pre presentation I but they cannot have the excuse accused of. I didn't have enough time. We set up this meeting two months ago so I wanNA talk a little bit about the the Ova finding your purpose Kosovo. I know you've been at info four thirteen years now. Yes and how many jobs you had with an Intel. A you can count off. You know what it's interesting because my first church job at until it was an facilities manager. Something's the titles. Don't even go with what it is right now. I T's like all all the job. Titles you see are are made up. Yeah and sometimes like the company's job title doesn't match what do so what you put in lengthen. It's totally obscene. You you in the end of the day is like what skills are you using. What does the deliverable look like? That's a great point but in the my first job I basically was managing facilities are in tow and it was probably a job. That was way ahead what I should have been done at the time but I grew into it and then I continue you and we said that we operated into our own little islands and I I feel I was kind of almost like you own part of Your Business. Division division individuals attributable your scope is so big that I mean we were building factories very much and were responsible or I was responsible for saying how big big should some of the facilities fee. I honestly wasn't that Joe for my first seven years now the scope increase but technically the job was the same. The job title was the same but the scope increase and increase and increase and increase to the point that I was like I need to drop. somethings and and didn't get to that point so it was pretty exhausting and high stress. And you don't realize that while you're in there we're talking about the frog earlier. Yeah Yeah. But it's sitting in the boiling pot and they don't realize it if you raise the temperature later by Lehto you don't realize it right so work can be like that and Now that I'm in a different role I was like. Wow that was tense. Right but yet find purposes is a great question because us. I say you can do something. You're good at or something you're made for and to be honest I I'm doing something I'm good at annoy. That's what I'm made for. There are some times where good is good enough right. I mean could I find a better job probably but this as of right now. Oh it's fulfilling some of the things. I'm good at it so for now. It's okay right Bud finding a purpose something that I I don't even know if you ask ask yourself. Honestly what is your purpose. I don't even know if you know I ask myself that. And sometimes say the Noah. My philosophy is more I may not know it but I'll see a recognize. Recognize it when I see it exactly and the and again just the full disclosure. The reason why bring this up is because a recording this at the shop National Convention mentioned in two thousand nineteen and can put us are forever so maybe people in twenty forty realism to this of new pressure. So a young professional approach me Eh. And he asked me you. Are you recording with jury today. Yeah I am. Oh that's awesome. Really look up to him and his you started. I didn't tell Oh. And then he was asking me about like finding your purpose and making sure that you are aligned with Would you WANNA do. I feel the same way like. I don't look at it that way. Look Gab I have a list of skills things that I know. I'm really good at and at least of things that I wanted to learn and things that I need to learn to be better at my job and then some things that I just hate doing and those sorts of things that I tried to delegate yes automate or or what have you but in the end like the way that I found mine. Hi My dream job if you will that I align these opening this job opportunity with my strengths so things like storytelling public. Speaking speaking and I love my job because I get through them every day so to me. Is that my purpose. I don't know but I'm a good at it and I feel really satisfy than growing so I'm going to keep going so I'm going to keep adding value to people that way. So is a different way of looking at it. It's tricky right. I mean it's like the other question is should you. You do stuff if they are not your dream or sure your this wait for the drink to show up and then to stuff is like different people. Think different ways. I think you can not just a a still so you should do something even if it's not what you're one hundred percent schneider as long as you don't hate it right. I have the concept of staying in shape and be within striking distance right so that when the right opportunity comes in you can jump to it versus if you are in your bed. Ah and something comes in. That says okay. It may be too late. You may not have enough time right so you have to stay active enough and that to your point in scales heels in networking and all that that if the right opportunity comes in it doesn't take you too long to jump into it because by the time it takes you too long by the time you're ready they'll paternity may be gone and the other thing that I said it's Sometimes your job may not fulfill all your needs But you can find other ways to do that. For example you are very active in the Latin community right and Italy's not paying you for that. But what you do it on your own and Intel or to position you have right now allows you to do that so within like the whole you probably feel very fulfill I do and and again if a went back the technical route as macgyver Java programmer and I was coding six seven hours a day. I think I would start making even more podcast because that way I would satisfy my social knee. The doctor different people so so there's a balance for sure any my case. I feel that I use some of the skills they have in my hobby and at work and some good at them and I enjoy them. It doesn't feel like work. Sometimes I stay up to a one in the morning on the Sunday goes. Oh guess what. Have a Monday episode to put out on Monday morning. I'm Groggy Bob. Hey Coffee's free at work yeah I'm sure you have learned some skills that you wouldn't have learned at work. Yeah yes while. I'm managing multiple multiple pipelines of content and cold humane people so yeah definitely so and for example that I say like with the employee resource groups writer. I'm active with the into Latin Latina Network and I tell people you know you you can use this as a career growth opportunity to I do things in Ireland that I cannot do it on my job because I have some good people or co workers that I mean we set up division right I can set the strategy. I have a budget. There are are many things that I do not have that level of freedom in me my particular role so you are able to do some things. Imagine like if you are Ah Basketball player and you are in accompany or in a team. They don't want you to shoot three pointers and then you go to your volunteering deem there you can do that. Then that you develop that skill in a way that later on you can go to your real team and say hey I have gotten much better at this. Give me a chance and I believe it has been. I'm very strong and when we sat trying to sell people in joining I as a board member we tried to highlight that this eight. This is not just one of doing. This is growth growth. Fine a position where you want to get better at. Let's say. Communications is a great example. Someone that doesn't have a lot of background. POWERPOINT goal to the communications team and learn about all that and that may become an opportunity later on. So yeah I believe things like this that you're doing right now. Open your level of skills else into areas that you wouldn't be able to do at work. Yeah I agree A thousand percent. You need to have a hobby or volunteering. Whether as your employee resource group you're an affinity grew at any company or unknown for profit by.

Intel VP Lescott Kosovo Connecticut facilities manager Basketball Lehto Italy Joe Bud schneider Groggy Bob writer Ireland programmer
"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

Latinos Who Tech

13:12 min | 1 year ago

"program manager" Discussed on Latinos Who Tech

"Slash Latinos. Gos- afford them since they support us. Thank you you really meet us. Welcome to Latinas attack. Thanks for having me my pleasure wanting to do this for a while because your one of the a few people. I think you're the only person I know the has pedes the and an MBA. visine time. So tell me a little bit about yourself. Well I'm Marie from Puerto Rico. Went to school at the University of Puerto Rico. Ecuador's graduated with a Bachelor's from industrial engineering. After that I went to Wisconsin Madison and I did a masters and PhD usually and I completed the NBA there. So this story with that is I went to Wisconsin to complete epecially. At that time I needed to do a minor and and I always wanted to be that person that yes it wasn't engineer. But no what the implications of the business were and I started taking business classes to complete that minor minor. It was pretty cool. I liked it a lot and I ended up taking a lot more classes about even though I didn't need them and at some point I was like man maybe I can get a degree out of this right so I ended up finishing an MBA there. And I figured that you know that this won't help me right now. Got A job this I was I had just two. Your six year ends Sunday. We it's pretty raw and no one was going to hire me for an MBA manager. Oyo but I figured you know five years on the line. When I'm looking for a job Bob? This may be a differentiating factor right and at the very least it captures the people's attention they ask. Why or how and I feel that it's actually a very into her. Apart of who I am because I am a person that I looked looked at the engineering details but also tried to elevate it to what the business impact is and to be honest a lot of that. It's a lot easier to sell that when when you say you have. I mean the background education just versus. I just think that way. So it has helped me in some ways snug that I've got an job because I'm an MBA. But I feel in the way that execute ejup just is just part of me so it helps me that way because you have an MBA as having these toolbox wchs bad. You can almost like Batman by little belt. Put All these tools so you can reach out to them. Oh we need to do forecasting I not. Oh we need to do product marketing. I know how to do that. So that's Kudos to you. That's amazing and I think it's always the question of depth versus breath right and I see the engineering degree at having a lot of them. Then I see the NBA as having a lot of breadth. Can you elaborate on that. Yes so something deep may be. I mean when you go to very technical talks they are going into not just when it is bridge to a strong. No we need this bridge to have this work. I'm in this mass this very detail things that you're wondering something that does that matter. Yeah it matters engineering level right then. The breath comes into okay so now that the which is good right and there's a lot of engineering behind that. What do we do with it right? What problem does it? So how can I leverage that I can I make money out of it so all those are things that I associate a lot more with breath. And that's where the business implants comes on and now you get this even in stereotypes thirty types right you get the marketing folks like to talk a lot about the engineers about how they do so much. That really is not going to sell stuff. And then they engineer folks are talking about the marketing guys is like well they just want to market this and they don't really care how this works or why it works this way right so pretty and they may cool look in presentations. Exactly and the truth is that it's a little bit of both right. You need a good product stuck in order to market it pretty well. And it's just different routes wind engineers to do good engineering. We did the marketing guys. Do good good marketing now inbetween. Ideally you need someone that can translate. Oh that mediate and actually look at some engineering thing on say. Hey that there's value there and maybe a marketing person may not see that value but you would background in engineering can see it and now as your role to translate that so that the marketing folks see it and now it's a very good value proposition right so it is something very needed in the people that can bridge the the gap between engineering and the business world. It's very important right. And a lot of people may career show that there is actually a program what I did the NBA. It's a it's all TM. It's go operations and technology management and it's kind of like that is a bridge between engineering gene and business at work. Actually I mean the board for the University of Portland in one of those programs that I think is very important. It's not a PhD program it's not MBA program. It is the bridge between engineering and business and I think we need a lot of that Nikolas ultimately you only want to build a product you also want to hopefully sell it to our peoples who can reinvest that gain back into the company's organization but I wondering 'cause you're technical program manager manager at Intel and I'm wondering if you can tell me a bit about that role in technical program manager and I hear like project managers at the same. Is that the front like what is T-. PM Do alone that program versus project in a minute but I joke with people that A program manager is one of those roles that can vary from being someone's assistant to almost running the show. It depends a lot of your work for four and it depends a lot on what you make out of that role if you take a step back and you let things happen and you're just transferring information or taking in minutes Things like that. That's one part of the role but you can be an influence or you can bring ideas you can drive them and execute get them things that sometimes some peace do right back but you're doing them as a program manager but you need to empower your manager to do that though they don't say hey why are you going to this. Vp without my authorization right so you need the right environment to be a good program manager but in my particular role I do. Different things. Things from running initiatives meaning that there's an idea let's say enhance productivity of our organization and we have to do a strategy for that unemployment and implement that so one example. When I came into this job we were really high on the Autobahn was driving? And things like that and I came in and The job that I do or the the group I work with basically they built software so that the software developers could optimize into hardware right so daintily harbor were. It's a ship that It is what it is now. The software developers pass coat through it and it goes at a certain speed. How can they changed changed that they use our software and the software says? Hey your software. He's graduating this problems in the hardware. If you change it this way it would run faster. So they run this kind of like the border and they changed our code now runs faster so I'd come into this team and they have all this software plan fight platforms. I asked my manager so who owns how tournaments driving and he says well autonomous driver part of its own by this product part of this product art of this product and part of this broader because if I products do different things. Yeah but who owns autonomous driving to make sense to make sure that all that. Because you don't want to have duplicated efforts or even how how they complement each other so we came up with a strategy of okay. We need an owner of autonomous driving. That will be someone from this five teams that will make sure that things are lining so they'll create their own forum or meeting in which they are going to be talking to each other. There is a big change or strategy or something that they want to do they have to bring it to that forum get it approved and then execute and we did that for like five initiatives and that's what we call gone off Horizontal integration versus the vertical. That would have been the team still road the the products and that created big big optimization. Listen in the team and things are run a lot smoother so that's an example of big initiative that my manager said. Can you do this. And we executed and that S A program manager my role is to talk to the stakeholders which a lot of times in a lot more senior than me and convince them that this is the right thing to do or get them to do the right thing. And that's part of the skill. How do you talk to those folks without them seeing you across as someone junior trying to tell show them what to do it? Sparta what you develop A. I mean it's how you ask it's sometimes convinced lansing them that the idea is cannot more dim than yours. I for Mesa very interesting role. You can mow that many different ways. There are some time that I'm doing presentations for my manager. Right so he says hey. We need to address this topic and part of my job is to create something that is at least eighty percent. Ideally of what it should be and then he goes to exit and that's when he may have to do keynotes or things like that or sometimes we need to address our organization quarterly. So I help him with that and many other initiatives now. I'm working and creating different conferences where we can promote our products so again turn a league people aware of all the things are going or do you mean an externally early. That's point actually because one of the key things that we establish there was that a lot of our customers or people that use our tools or external but actually a lot of people are internal that people that are building the platforms so they want to use our tools so that they can optimize said before it even goes out in the market and at some point we were kind of deprioritize in that because it we're not real paying customers right so part of the other thing that I was asked to do with how. How do we change that culture? And we just started an internal customers for him right in which we brought brought in some of our main internal customers and have them explain how are tools impacted their product and actually as some things that are told. Were not doing good enough right so all of a sudden it turned into okay. We can improve our products and improving the products on this area. Would actually help was once the other external customers he has got it but my question then is How do you approach that Conversation with somebody because they see that you're we're talking about somebody's baby and you're telling them hey. Your product is not doing that good. Maybe you can do this to optimize it. Make it better. So how the person that conversation of weed out costs hurting the relationship yet. Well so I the customers would approach it. Were say to us the internal customers right. Meaning the Data Center Group. And I think that the saying of customer's always right right. You have to take it as I hear you and actually let's evaluate it and also let's see this as an opportunity to make the product better right so part of what we tried to tell. Our team is like we need the criticism right because we want to get better and we need extra late to hear this things versus not hearing them. Yeah so I think that's something key for for building accessible culture the fact that everybody is great at spreading good news but something that my mom me now told me and I believe deeply. Is that good news. Should travel fast but bath. News should travel faster. Because an I'm not gonNA get mad at you you because we're bringing that up. I'm not GonNa kill the messenger of you will because I want to have that that sentiment of worrying this together. And I'm no. I'm not gonNA penalize you because you're bringing something up it's a cultural thing and and it's really difficult to break and What we started hearing hearing from manager was discounts up? Fail fast right but communicate it. So it's like yes. If something is not right say it as soon as you know it. But don't wait until the last minute and then say because then it becomes a price and we have a lot less time to deal with it so mulligan. Expectations is is part out of the job right. So I'm wondering because the manage any people right now or that's interesting too because Joke with my daughter. I said When I got this job job so what is your new title? I'm technical program manager. Oh cool so. How many people do you manage Zero.

program manager NBA engineer Wisconsin Ecuador Puerto Rico University of Puerto Rico University of Portland T Bob Intel Vp Nikolas Data Center Group
"program manager" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"program manager" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Is the program manager at banking on our future they are a program of operation hope I'm doing pretty good so tell me about self so I know we tell the listeners about yourself well I am the program manager is set for baking our future Dallas which is a youth financial literacy program that we operate primarily in you know the Dallas fort worth area we are all volunteer driven so we have volunteers to go out into the classroom day or community organization they teach kids about how to make a budget how to bounce a check book they learn about credit cards and loans and investing we do a discussion about financial dignity and what that means to be a a financially dignified person a little bit of financial empowerment and we've been doing it for about six years now and I've been running the program for the past six years passengers basically started I opened the Dow's open yes I'm sticking around you are here and basically if you look at the website would give everybody writes about what his operation hope dot org okay and there are several different programs under operation hope we're gonna talk about their beginnings as well yes one of them obviously being banking on our future and when you go to that section there for making our future pretty much just here's what you just said making our future elevates the dignity hope and economic self sufficiency of people in low wealth communities throughout the finance through financial literacy so couple things on that you're pretty much dealing with a lower income families and children of lower income yes we can arbitrary target low to moderate income communities is not a requirement to participate in the program but that's our goal to target the communities that we feel like or maybe not getting the education at home that they need or that their families are are needing education as well and it's really just to try to get people like you said empowerment is the big words were to get people to kind of what you know better you do better so once again early age right you can get the basics of understanding just how money works in your attitude towards money and and kind of your attitude towards how you would manage your money we're trying to lay that foundation for kids we start in the fourth grade we go all the way through high school try to get that conversation started and then get the the community in the family is involved as well okay and as you mentioned you open the Dallas office is about six years ago yes okay and there's other locations where Audrey yes and since its inception the program's help over half a million students more than seven hundred schools community based organizations in the U. S. as well South Africa we'll talk about that initiative as well all these classes are free their offer yes okay for schools and communities we do churches were the girls clubs basically anywhere there's a group of kids and they want us to come out and we can find a volunteer that will be able to work with that schedule and come out it teach the class usually the volunteers are financial professionals are coming from the banking industry or financial industry but we have a lot of volunteers that are just people that think financial literacy is important and maybe they've learned the hard way they're they're self taught or financial executives in transition so to speak LA are affected right now from the economy and such and have the expertise if you were talking about not necessarily from the banking industry but being an executive and having do had run a business right knows financial literacy and financial responsibility so they're able to teach at absolutely we provided training to all of our volunteers they go through our program to give them the skills that they need to kind of facilitate the class we provide the curriculum which is of all you're gonna see the guys all the materials are provided and it's really just basic personal finance so most people are dealing with this as an adult you know in the yes hopefully dealing with it it's whether they're deride smart manner right that's to be debated so there's a lot of people that have experience which is able to then be translated into lessons for the kids and I always encourage my volunteers to use their own personal experiences because the kids are going to be able to relate to that if you tell them you know this is a mistake that I made this is what happened to me this is the consequence I had and here's how I learned to do it better the kids can really kind of relate to that so makes it more personal for them absolutely now these folks obviously know what they're doing they've received the US treasury department's John Sherman war for financial literacy excellence as well as Oprah's angel network use your life award yes crash is pretty awesome yeah also the partner the Nelson Mandela's children's fund in South Africa to promote financial literacy empowerment in Africa where banking on a future has educated over thirty thousand students in with their we're gonna come back to North Texas your mobile with their you and I were talking off Mike a little bit it's a little bit different mindset whereas in South Africa it's more of a mindset of helping to rebuild an economy and and teach entrepreneurship yes yes there is definitely a focus on entrepreneurship in the South Africa model and you know the financial dignity piece was a very big part of the South Africa curriculum as well that's actually we took that kind of model and incorporated the dignity into the United States curriculum as well which is really talking it's more of a message of empowerment the idea that if you have the education and you have the the drive in you you know can doctor said if you do what you need to do to succeed that you're really going to be able to to do whatever it is that you want to do whatever your passion is in life so we talk to the kids about that really trying to get them excited about the idea of you know accomplishing their dreams okay as we mentioned in the onset they are a program of operation hope which whether website is operation hope dot O. R. G..

"program manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

12:22 min | 1 year ago

"program manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"For product management is just shooting through so pm's to me are an example of how to place for me. This is a segment that I want to go after because it's hard track it's for career switchers and it's it's one place is a VP thing that he you know what the job placement. You don't really matter. I told you Mr job profiles but doing switch your resumes may not article as the same skills as what the companies want so our company peniche ideally build a product which will help you do that because they have all their portfolio resumes on the B. of seen order so many years got all the job posting all so many years as a a whole new heart thing. Let's apply machine learning and natural language processing so when you get a new person and skillset. Let's help them build their resume perch so you can article donate your transferable skills. Well maybe meet your needs and really to me is it's an engaged product that I want to be honest with you. I really want this to be my next revenue generator so buying a couple of years. I want this to be the place where I place twenty. Thirty percent of my job placement on my revenue come through this product rates are now with this Framing is where we are going to maneuver and so what this means you got this download. You're going to share this with you are development managers design managers orders for let's call us. You're going to build that going back with your marketing sales. Partners are going to take to market and present this case and just say hey. This is what I'm thinking. Thinking is undergoing a lot of questions immediate question like. Is this a product or a paid product. Do you want to be payback. Engineer will say so. You know what we'll try this stuff with the idea but is this the only thing that they wanted to get done or can we try some other ideas too. There are so many other ways to create this tunnel which generates thirty percent of the revenues eventually. You're okay like our goal is to focus on like a new product initiate. Oh it's a new channel creation in the Chateau. Okay marketing will say what do you do about this. Branding is this the same brand as career is the whole new branding like question. Sometimes we have an answer. Somebody won't have an answer and there are a lot of other risks that relied is really useful users like like this whole sniper thing does NLP stuff. Do you think they're useful users. We don't know find out first festival. Is this even feasible like engineering would say hey. I don't know that you'll be so good that you put your profile and give you a resume snippet generator. Maybe maybe you know we should go find out. Legal person might come and say. Can you really use these resumes or like the resume to place people like they're coming to use the product for just building the resume. You can't just use that place people so there's even a paid product isn't even a viable business. Is there a legal risk here. I don't find what I'm telling us. At this stage you just GonNa have so many any open questions and getting these questions in one place and to say hey. I don't know I'll go find order still success but at least it's what you're calling a shared understanding understanding. We everybody WHO's working on this product now. No the statement very well you as a team are trying to build a product for aspiring product managers not because because you wanNA solid premium problem but you're really solving career which had problems so you want this to be something generic that can help you switch careers and our success is to create shared revenues eventually but also gets platform and you build a shared understanding of why do you think uniquely capable of doing it. We have the world's portfolio resumes. We are the world's portfolio jobless things and we have the technology to solve it. Nobody else other than asking solid. That's a frantic. That's this stage of the product. Let's say a few weeks to WHO couple of weeks to three weeks depending on how fast these things take place. You've framed really well and you have you gone back and make sure all of this is exactly what he wants. Ugandan talk to your Partner Teams Rachel the airline you go to your engineers developers data scientists your squads. If your report is in your pmt go breakdown the problem rob them for them. You kind of like structure to kind of everyone is on Saint. Pete and we're trying to achieve that is a big success like framing. This problem is a big success and if the training is done really well actually when you know you've done this. Well go talk to somebody on the on your somebody else in your company and say hey. This is what I'm working. Do you WANNA come and work with US and the ad is awesome you gotta out of hiding material like if you framed the problem really well. You are able to convince a person to come and work for you. That's when you really. This is what I call us framing so this days nobody has even more than needle like no engineering has been done nor dot. SPEC has been written in the conventional sense framing the problem to take the next extent in this state. It's better to slow down better to get alignment better. Get questions answered Dan to go fast but get them all on same page and then now the moment momentum the accelerators frequently asked questions you can say hey we don't know yet not really you're not agreed on some of these things but these are questions to be addressed as we get additional customer feedback so there is a deadline of others will keep talking forever and then it's okay to to say don't have an agreement and you should actually listen to talk. I I product school about how to manage their calls. In from Boeing does fantastic like he maps or like he puts stakeholders to two and uses different kinds of methodologies. That's something I use a lot of work to so. Take a look at that. It's a very cool talk so use that in general it's a combination of this ask most of the first states. The lack of alignment is because nobody everyone aboard customers have made so made for ideas. We don't know whether any of those will stick so very very soon half as is going to go away. Let's go into the discovery face to see how much how quickly you can validate. Some of these datas could so keep going. Okay talk to us. They say get out of the building. That's what you should probably do immediately next. So how do you do that if I I want to create a portfolio of customers to go and talk to him so could be anywhere between twenty to fulfill representational customer so I say customers in our case. It's yes he does somebody who was aspiring to go and become a PM or somebody who has become a PM in the recent terms recently aspect to if you should get get hold of twenty to fifty people talk to them and understand like what were the challenges that they faced in fact the first question. Where do you want to build. A couple of answers says when asked what is your pain point. You've got a couple of differences so just understanding from them. What are their keeping points. And how did they go about this. Process is something that is of very invaluable for you and we'll do that in detail and you go and talking to these customers to eventually work with them and create a case study to say Matia. Yeah use this fictitious product. We're going to build actually move from data analytics into product management routier one company something of that sorts. That's how you're going to this. The conversations you WANNA create at least five or six people who eventually will use your product but the stage was just talking to them understand and create success story so but that mindset instead what you wanted to create and oftentimes you will not be able to recruit even fifty people for this alternative to going and talking to and that's not a failure like if you're you're solving a problem for which there is no thirty forty people in the market depending on the type of business but let's say building a consumer APP and if you're not able to find for people to come and talk to you you are solving a problem which probably doesn't exist so even that indication of brain to recruit a create. A portfolio of people talked to a few times or at least once is a big learning experience so the first step is really set of people to go and talk to then you want to call customer discovery so help me connect to practice how many of your face this challenge in terms of trying to get to opium role but I want to all the school but I wanna like practice interviews. You talked about one example like those kinds of challenges exist and finally you know what I wanted to apply in your company so starting to talk only five people mapping what an aspiring pianist journey dopey looks like these are efforts which people are really doing and we are career. Likud held them any of these places we could solve any one of these problems for democratically and and what you do next like this continue asking them which of these the most important point for you like. DOC ID thirty to fifty people and say give you one hundred points and I cannot bill all five of those that I showed you but I can only start building one then. Would you locate your resources. Just this give them a hundred points. That's the one hundred dollars. What does this mean for you. Would you spend more time in articulating your skin center. Would you want to connect to network or would you like a referendum. Would you like a practice interview right like you just going to get a sense of these pain points articulated and you can score like us or the patent starting damage wanting people don't if something is great. It's often not appropriate. This is something bad. It's often visit bag so but that sounds like a pain is real or not real going to get a quick distribution of the kind of pain. Point of this fish parts just made up his numbers so let's say fifty conversation. I have found that interview. Practice is the biggest problem plum which aspect and connecting probably the next big thing course job search is real resume builder there is at five and I really with my VP's guidance. I'm here so most probably the product. It's not going to take off at the state so so so far returnable pain points and we are now pivoting from or at least think that going from resume builder into an interview view practice like setup and that's when it goes to face callers product discovery product discovery what we do is out of these people that'd be talked to pick like ten or fifteen fifteen people with whom will give good feedback very interested in what a real need for this problem. We meet them almost twice a week and we show them our solutions right. Now is when the solution pushing starts to come to play started value props then you show some design markups and then you actually show a prototype you are to use it. Eventually product will be used with the case that even them so. It's an ongoing intense effort that he will go through and this is where you can talk about payment pricing. Would you buy and all those kinds of stuff comes in this Alexi. What piscotty stage would look like. I'm not reload resume builder yet. I'm going to go to the same fifteen sixteen users. I want to say hey I want to show value. Prop value prop be held. PM We are product really helped to create human snippets by analyzing other people who have similar experience so let's not one article eight your skills not only do we know what skills do need we also know other people like you who are successful and we article eight data and systematic way using an MP. How useful what is this for? You and you're going to go to one point two and why people are telling you know what I I can copy from Lincoln like it's not a big deal for me to put this together. It's it's it's like okay but still it's everybody's idea. You cannot kill it too soon. Let's do one more one more shot at it. So then I show him a mockup. Let's hit this is how it looks like this kind of Put in your title. You're looking for pragmatic snippets again. This is just an example. It can be any other mark that your team has come up with. How useful is this on a scale of one to read about. How how useful is this again like. You know why they're probably. They're very kind the U on the increase it from one point two one point five. Hey look if you keep those kinds of things our neck night. You know what this is exist as something that useful for me. How often would they use. You know what the day I prepare my resume as like once in three months I just go to Lincoln. I spent four hours. That's the only time I would use this definitely not something or pay for those kinds of feedback. You're getting so we're not going to give the bad news yet so we can't just go and say what building is obviously not the writing to do so we're going to try something and we said hey into practice. we said was the top point trail. Let's go with a just a slide and say hey. I'm going to distract obviously in three months. You don't have anything right now so this product product will help you practice interviews for your.

VP Lincoln US Likud Engineer Boeing opium Pete Partner Dan Matia Alexi three months one hundred dollars Thirty percent thirty percent three weeks four hours
"program manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

11:23 min | 1 year ago

"program manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"You will probably be in a position where you would but something new like that could come from if you're a new company a start up you want to set up something on your own. That's a great opportunity but often it's not just startups startups going to do new things and you would do things like hey. If you're Microsoft you WANNA bring something new. There's an obvious a constant need for innovation that happens and and the Chosen One. Are You yourself spotted that opportunity one way or the other big companies also create new products. If you're working in a product you will your product direction changes. Substantially those are times again. There's a lot of ambiguity and you have an opportunity to shaped like introducing a whole new scenario like facebook is was introducing facebook radios. It's a whole new scenario. Practically you need to figure out is this even in need like say start from there and many new a ton of internal tools in fact I would encourage people who are new department to see if you can get into one of these internal product development opportunities they will tools used by applies to US engineers. There's so so many new opportunities where product management principles of new product is applicable and what he will see is. It's a very very ambiguous process league. That's what is very unique or new product management. Every every product talented talented players but what makes new products really challenging is you don't know whether what you're really useful to customer so so to build a typical product. There's different ways of building the waterfall model. There's an ideal model different ways but at the end of the day there are some form of a value prop to the customer that you're trying trying to build translate that into a definition respect you would work with your squads of people who are engineers and designers and data scientists to build you want to play but then there's a whole face called US product is Asian like it's one thing to build up product for ten. People and other things will for ten million people so then there's a whole scaling layer read word that is internationalization that compliance this privacy that is a whole lot of what do you say like unlikely checks and Balances System to make sure what you believe actually useful so it's a very expensive process. It takes anywhere between three months to a year of build something median meaningful a new product has the risk that what you're going to May or may not even be useful so that's then as a product leader. Your first thing is hey wait a sec. I'm building something and I'm telling people to build. Something is really useful. You start questioning. Is this something that will customers value. This sometimes customers may value but there's a huge switching cost for them to move from their existing product or the solution that they're using today so they may find value but it's still not good enough off for them to make the move so those kinds of challenges you will face to face the question customers may find it valuable finding something that they are filling to even pay for it. You nailed the problem and then you go to your organization or you yourself as a leader. You're going to find a question okay but is this size of business that I want to be like. You're going to solve the super cool problem problem. People lowered its just a ten million dollar market opportunity laid. It may not be interesting even for like a ten member company big so is this. GonNa viable will businesses a place that you'll constantly questioning so these are things that you would probably not do in your head a feature space but you're going to start answering these questions you would also do taking a product product market and when you do they're like hey. I'm building this new product and taking this to market is my sales team really aligned first of All Saints Team to sell. This is my marketing really aligned to market this. Does this align with broad rounded safer Microsoft. Is this product really. Is this how Microsoft sees it says how Google seize your parent company shipping a new product like to think of other stakeholders. What does it mean for the company the father and last but not least it's a place that is gonNA be a lot of changes and most new things fails. It's very important to be systematic about it but it also means it takes a toll on the people are working on it so you the product leader. Are you ready to manage. Edge the energy levels of your whole team working on it so there'll be a lot of changes like customers will say Oh this is useful and then you find. This is completely crab after two weeks because you're going in a different direction fiction so there's a lot of people if you call and so you need to manage that you don't want people get the team to be motivated in the process like you. WanNa ship stuff that adds value look everyone wants to the matters and then there is a lot of changes. You need to manage their energy so that's something that he wanted to last but not the least you haven't exist in a big company. You don't have funding so you haven't executive sponsor who sponsors these kind of new investments and they will lose patience if you don't Delaware's so how'd you manage that like how do you manage somebody's head. This is the next three months. You're going to deliver this output on six months. I'M GONNA take the new product to market. How are you going to manage that by the vision is great but the small aw sliver of MVP that they're going to take to the market may or may not be interesting for this leader so you're gonNa feel these kind of different set of stakeholders to deal with different scope of problems. They're going to face and not to say that. The challenges are gone. You still going to think about this. You're still going to think about what we call. US is what they are doing. What taking to the market. Is it still usable by customer. So when you're the best design product is this is the customers getting into cliques getting to where the want so. There's that element to it and finally always feasability homages a cost how much dependency on my partner team of the stuff that you need to manage so there's all these writers tip because feature level challenges that you would face but as you're taking and building something new product the ones on the left becomes your research says a portfolio of worries. The one on left is is gonNA. Take a lot of your time. Is the building really useful to customers. Is that a viable business and are you really able to motivate the team and the leadership through the journey so these are the kinds of challenges you face and what has worked for me over a period of a few years of learned at three phases to this approaching new product the first one. I would say the problem really really well like framing one really does work with your team and say what exactly are you building. Why are you building. What does success look like a really really what we want to get that right like that is very applicable. Even even is you're taking a first set of as you're entering into product management career. I would say getting things written down in terms of what does success look like or what I call us framing the problem and spend a little bit more time on that is something that helps a lot. Usually they just run run run agility speed for success. The first phase of the product when you're taking a product Margaret has been I would say slow down. Get Alignment get get an understanding of Saint Pete so that's what I call us framing so get the framing right and then you can press your accelerator address your accelerator excavated. Iguana mitigate a lot of risks because it's new things as I said May or may not take off. So how do we systematically identify the new products. I'm that reprocess. RASA scholars discovery like this very talk to customers identify their needs. Shaw your bird and then scale so again walk through an example of how you do does that scholars mitigating estate discovery and this is a lot of seeds very WanNa last night's perverts as possible so when you build your teams you know when you put in your body will actually actually takes off and that's finally all of this has the people aspect to it and the sooner you realize in your product management career that you're always whether you're a manager. Nacchio aren't always managing people and their expectations. You had a rally or team and you are the wise and you need to keep the team up and running so that's something that's an important part of your work because what these are three things that I pay attention because they take a new product to market. I've learned some of these hardware but eventually I think that this is this is the kind of core toolkit that successfully the been using over the last year or so okay so we talked about it. In lot of Hamas have the crowd. Here is aspiring product managers so now let's build a product product for us buying product managers okay so a VP at a company called career. Lee which conquer company is telling you hey the company is actually is a tech based. Joplin companies would they do matching of job postings with your your resumes and they do some fancy the AI based matching and all those and he wants to build a product aspiring product managers and one of you or maybe if each one of you you are the one you are the chosen one to to build this product are half of the people here that the target audience for this product so we should probably real examples booze to this product is targeted a non PM's who want to become a pm okay so let's build a product for them any thoughts some. What would this look like before a particular story. It's got US script so just want to out of curiosity like what what do you think you would be like as a spiting product manager what product would make a difference to you to get into product management training materials. It's great one yeah anything else okay. Let's declined. What are your the top pain points that. What is stopping you from beginning minute? Let's put it that way so let's see what does. VP has decided okay so we call this as a framing the problem right so you're the chosen one and it could have been it can be any one of these great ideas have come up with we could take this product and so many different direction. So what would you do like just signing year. We've got what for ideas so. What is the product exactly so. That's where the product that I just frame the problem. It's one page you can once later depending on your company's email even like however you want but these get an agreement in terms of what exactly is the problem like the first question you would probably ask you. Why are we even doing this. Is this even even this family. There's just an experiment like what is the rationale for doing this and if your chosen like you want to know what does success look like like. Do you know why is success. Not Salaam defined yet. The customer segment has been very very clearly articulated. It's not always the case that it's not always the case that this is so clear that it's an aspiring managers and find out all of those things. What problems are you solving for them to get an idea like just find what could be wrong. In kind of building networking skills are in terms of building say different types of product management exposure for so many things that can go wrong between now and a successful product so let's let them all out so that's framing the problem and they're gonNa stab just to give you a flavor of like hey. Let's see the PM here and I've got to say he. Why the hell are we doing this so I'm trying to frame this out. What I say is okay. Doubling the new product for US fighting is great but while veered career early this is my conversation with the BBC what we'd clearly all about placing people make money on placing people and it turns out that this whole new generation of millennials and Gen Z. are just never satisfied with their look forever so they're always switching careers and b. b. m.'s have the people wanNA become product manager so the one of the classic examples of the hottest growing career switching track right but you can see Google trends.

product manager product development US Microsoft Google facebook VP All Saints Team WanNa MVP partner Delaware executive Joplin Margaret Nacchio Lee BBC b. b. m.
"program manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"program manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"I tried to keep it low reasonable. WanNa make it out of lowest possible offer people so that's why the reimbursements focus very good very good. Now you know this is key in Dash when you think of of items from the perspective effective of of a medical device standpoint it's super affordable yeah and actually it's interesting because that's been potentially one of the issues the reimbursement they say it's it's expensive. Why should we what should we reimburse. Which is yeah something else? I'm telling you but you know what the stories are there. You guys continue to find ways to make it better and you're engaged in the patient. Groups in the policy groups technology groups oops. I know that a solutions around the corner so keep doing what you're doing. It's so so impactful so this is great and so now we're we're at at the point of the podcast Chelsea where where we do the lightning rounds. I've got a couple of questions for you. There followed by a book that you recommend listeners ready sure okay. What's the the best way to improve healthcare outcomes. I think I touched on this a little bit already but I think you know I love when companies say that the number one focus is the patient relationship patients but I think really hitting detriot of patient provider and the pair is really important so without being able to go to the payer and the provider patient you know you can hit one of those things but if you're not targeting all of them your system isn't GonNa go forward so I think really really having the focus of of creating usable. Everyone is an important focus huge and what's the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid. I I think sort of piggybacks author but developing for a silo so just developing one of those branches into starting place but I think that you really need to we'll have the foresight of of where that platform is. GonNa go moving forward and also not make any assumption. That's definitely go make assumptions us. This is is gonNA work out like it makes logical sense. He really needs to do your research makes a Lotta Sense. And how do you stay relevant as an organization despite right constant yeah exactly I agree it. Yeah we're so in the weeds of that. Everyone's talking about innovation. It's about really is how you can keep pushing forward. If you have some products that you're sitting on for a while it's I mean there's always more that you can improve on and so for assets to constantly be looking. What's next. How can we make this better. Who can work with to expand this platform another way? You know constantly look. Do what's next and how you make it better. What's one of the area of Focus that drives in Paddock Chelsea okay so I know I said that unique to focus fun you know patient provider payer but for us I think really the most important focus for asses creating technology to going to create create meeting people change users lives. I think empathy is really the main focus creating a actually whereas the name and paddock had come around around and were based in Milan Italy and Cambridge Massachusetts and they named coming from the Italian word for love that what a great way to capsule the mission so these next to more on a personal note Chelsea. What's your number one health habit number one habit you did allude to the fact that I am blackhall and pretty addicted to Kyoto so I try to practice every day as a lot of fun. It's just you know getting out and doing something like that is important. Martin thing to keep you thinking wow that's awesome congratulations on the black belt attainment. That's incredible and what is your number one success habits. I think especially working in these small companies work life balance can be a challenge. I think really taking time for yourself and making sure that you're eating well and sleeping really edlund to success so taking time for yourself and making an checking in with yourself. Make sure that you're doing well because if you're not there people beautifully said totally. I agree with that. One got to carve out time for yourself. And what would you recommend the listeners Chelsea. I've been woefully inadequate at catching up on books lately I did start reading EP end which has been hugely popular passenger years pretty incredible books. I definitely recommend thinking that lately. I've been diving more into New Yorker Articles Gossiping Snippets I can so I can give some recommendations for articles. I'd be happy to do that sure sure so one that was really impactful for me. Last year. was by a local one day. It was sort of a macro overview of why adopt hate their computers is what it was called but it's about doctor burnout and the impact the springtime timing on these doctors especially for paddock super relevant for us because we're creating the technology. That's going to be adding a lot more data that they can be looking at is really important to focus on. Are we giving decisions. Along things look at or are we creating meaningful changes in the way that they're diagnosing and and helping their patients cities so it's a great article that I recommend just to get the high level overview of Dr Experiences and then There's two other ones that I've read recently. I'm not remembering the names of them right now but one of them was on become a cancer patient that came out just a few weeks ago and another one is on psychiatric drugs over prescription and sort of the withdrawal effects at that. I think the you know the New Yorker has some pretty incredible articles that are healthcare related so if you can find those long there and those are really more of an insight into people's I personally by the outside of it Yeah No. That's a great recommendation. I signed the New Yorker has been given but I think it's really great right right. I mean we have to take snippets where we can and and the Nice thing about New Yorkers that it's nice bite sized content and let's buffet today okay. That's what a lot of us are consuming. Some really great grin comes at my very millennial anther I love it. I I love it folks for all the resources and a full transcript of our conversation with Chelsea trend growth you could go to outcomes rocket that the health in the search bar type in in paddock or type in Chelsea see. At L. S. E. A. You're gonNA find all the show notes and everything we discussed there today. So before we conclude Chelsea I'd love if you could just leave us with the closing thought and then the best place where the listeners could continue the conversation with you shore at the closing thoughts is you know terror has been a seemingly slow mover and shaker. You know over the past few decades but I think that this is a time for real change with the advent of machine stand big data integrating more and more into all aspects of healthcare are moving so quickly that I think that we're all we're all in for a wild ride so just a tune love that and if listeners WanNA learn more work. Can they go to learn more about in paddock or continue to chat with you share well. There's actually though you can always go.

Chelsea Paddock Chelsea New Yorker Articles L. S. E. A. Martin Milan Italy Cambridge Massachusetts one day
"program manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

Outcomes Rocket

12:34 min | 1 year ago

"program manager" Discussed on Outcomes Rocket

"To the podcast today I have the privilege of hosting Dr Chelsea Trengrove. She is a PhD in Bio Pharmacology and neuroscience currently currently a program manager at impact of focused on innovation through collaboration an pataca is an MIT media lab spinoff emphasizing the use of sensor data data to inform patients health and wellness in daily life. Their first focus is epilepsy. Chelsea's background in Pharmacology and biochemistry allows her to take her insights with the intersection of neuro science to come out with some great solutions. She did all of this at Boston. University prior Tim Pataca she worked internationally in the Pharma and biotech industries assisting companies to build external collaborations align processes and incorporate. FDA FDA guidelines we all know is hyper important an advocate for health and wellness. She's also a black belt and daily practitioner of Aikido a martial art so with that. I WanNa give a very warm welcome to Chelsea to the podcast. Welcome solid great to be here. It's a pleasure to to have have a here Chelsea and folks Chelsea was at the Ted Med meeting that I also attended last year and talk about some brilliant alien minds and and I just thought it'd be a great opportunity to have her here on the podcast to tell us her story and what she's up to so Chelsea. What got you into healthcare the sort of an interesting journey for me as you mentioned. I started off in academia a ever since I was five years old. I was actually super interested in the grain. I used to go on the CD ROM as they Kapadia that my dad got me over. Christmas and I used to read articles about the brain so really average kid. I knew that I was interested in I ended wanted to feel and being in academia teach neurosciences wonderful. I really loved getting to it for and investigate new areas of whether or not was cell pathways or new molecules equity impact diseases my my teacher was specifically at neurodegeneration. I love that investigation but it felt like a release low. It was married focused on one unpack at a time and the research take it can take decades. You can turn the whole career for one line at a textbook sometimes and you know some people have these incredible break experience and some people are just built research but I wanted to do something I saw a little bit more impactful and collaborative. I love the the cell culture dishes that I was working working with but I did want to interact with people and feel like I was impacting DEFEC- more on a face to face daily local go after a finish my PhD I went into consulting also lower working like you said and Pharma a devices getting the new language of FDA allegation and regulatory work which is interesting but but I did miss the science so I started looking around for new ways that I can still be in the math farmer world but also get to sort of delve into science and they found him paddock which is doing really cutting edge research and I mean both healthcare and neuro feels really lucky to be taken on their that the program manager a little bit over a year ago. Mo- that's a fascinating journey Chelsea Gosh the area of neuro degeneration the brain mental health these diseases affecting the brain and nothing like there's no vital sign for the brain like there's a big gap there China and also a big opportunity now Alzheimer's increasing year after year. What's your thoughts on all mad. I mean I know I know. I just said a lot but warned ask why. Why are we trending that way. Why not the other way what and what do you mean by the other way. Meaning better weren't well. I think the brain has really one of the final frontiers away and there's just so much that we don't know about it and I think a lot of our focuses are either and it's been inviolability or really the molecular level or cellular level and I think it's nippy important to angry the different sort of silos aloes of science but it's not GonNa be you know one answer on this drug or you just need to affect the pathway so that's why I think that sort of movement towards the big data and machine learning is heavy really hard using you know censored like their lungs that we use an Konica and machine learning and Gino make to really create create a holistic picture of a person supposed to just vote for thing down on someone would be small areas promising in the next few years. I'm love your your hopeful. Well outlook there and it's a it's a great one to have especially in the field and focus that you're up to so one needs to be on the minds lanes of health leaders agenda today. How are you and in Paddock approaching it. Yeah well. Let me give you a little bit of background on what impact does in case a- any of your listeners aren't aware paddock so as I mentioned we are machine learning sort of wearable a company out at MIT media lab off and and our first focus has really been creating the mall beautiful mart wash called the embrace and the way that it works has sensors that will monitor her for convulsive seizures will detect the user's risks and both ends on alert to a Caregiver Attack Mukesh and phone college gas location compatible focus has really been creating these sensors that will help create peace of mind in people's lives out of the hospital really gives them the freedom to go and live their lives is a big focus has been machine learning but something that we've encountered as the importance of creating these not just for the patient but we need to find the way that it really integrated the health care system and that's something that we've learned over the past few years the importance of creating these platforms that aren't just only oh may for the patient but can also be used by this edition provider so that integrate into a meaningful way into the healthcare system. I think it's a really important connection to make. Could you know you referenced the Silo Nature of even brain research. This expands even to the point solutions and solutions that we could offer to improve improve outcomes. It'd be interesting to hear from you. Chelsea something that you and the impact of team have done to create results do a better by thinking differently. Yeah I think thinks something that we really had to focus their Muslim. Paddock is you know where a bunch of data scientists and engineers who are developing the technology for the people who are living everyday with Luxy so something that we've really needed to focus on and help improve what we created is working the patient with people who have not to improve the product so now you may not know what that working with them to improve our algorithm so that it's the taxing acting users that are going to be the most impactful in their life so for us it was not focusing on every type of seizure looking directly at compulsive shirts which are one one of the most dangerous types of seizures not dangerous so really just sort of reiterating on the device with the people that are really in the League of having the Disease Arctic daily life. It's great that you guys are doing that. There's so many people looking for solutions and such a smart group of people working on a on on a single single problem I mean there's so much power and focus just yeah. It's incredible that you guys are so aligned with this single problem. I mean you share with me a your urine. DC right now for epilepsy meeting yeah. I'm I'm here for the National Epilepsy walking you factor in the National Mall and no family live from all over the US shatter together to raise money and awareness for epilepsy related to help try and de Matteis the disease and focused research on on our focus money on research to help find a cure but also improve the lives of people living with not just on we're not as focused on cherry and we're also focused on improving the lives of people that have that you love that so so meaningful and you're you're walking the talk not just talking talking the talk and that that's really really important in in healthcare so Chelsea. What about something. That didn't work out like you know I know hey startups startups deal with issues all the time. Is there something in particular that you wanNA share that has made you guys better because it happened now sure and you know a hurdle that we're traversing. It's something that you know if I can prevent any future companies or ideas from going through this. I I hope this helped but I think fat and Paddock Oh we've been we were looking forward and pushing for the FDA clearance or devices actually cleared by the FDA the the first foreign device and plus to be clear cried the FBI or thank you yeah huge pressure that you even really exciting that we can now get out to families but what we sort of stopped going into it was asked to FDA clearance and that would sort of be we'd be in the healthcare system we would get reimbursement and I think that something that we quickly learned is not how that works that reimbursed which is something that we're really pushing for this year ear so long road and you really need to set up your your studies and your trial and the platform with reimbursement reimbursement and how to integrate into into healthcare had yeah. It's definitely a big thing and you know Chelsea. I feel like there's Alana of services and products that are on the periphery that can offer a lot of value that aren't necessarily in the reimbursement path but creating models to address these exists they definitely take time and I mean I think about population health efforts in value based care efforts that aren't really line into the reimbursement models but when you find stakeholder there's a way yes yeah. If anybody knows anything please where we're living for the day ACL there while there are a lot of great advice out there and no we've tried to keep the embraced watch you know low price point as possible you know the company running and getting it to you know the people who is impacting it really frustrating for us when we have people that are coming out and saying look like we can afford suffice. It really breaks our hearts when we can't get this everybody so there are models out reimbursement but we just know that this is a way to really get it to people that anyone who need a device monitoring seizures yeah no. That's a great call. Ouden in folks. If you're listening to this and you have an idea or a partnership community where something could work out definitely at the end of the podcast Chelsea will provide the best way to contact her or the company and Hey this is why we do what we do connecting the silos in in solutions through the podcast so what about the other side of the Coin Jessie what's been one of your most proud around moments there at impact on my God. There are so many we don't really just being where you know so as I said I've been here for a little bit over a year and I spend a lot of time going to a lot of conferences penner that and then meeting with families who are actually you think are device and it's incredible to see the impact that they after clearances Stanley. It's amongst I mean. I haven't been able to weed for the past ten years because I'm terrified. My son's going to have a seizure in the middle of the night. I sleep in a real mess him this is the first having my life has been able to get a good night's sleep and no let him know sleeping on room and know that if he hasn't seizure. I'm GONNA get alerted and I'll be there. Those moments are are pretty incredible. That is incredible and if you don't mind me asking can you share how much it costs why so the devices to forty nine the embraced watch and there's a monthly construction that comes with the alerting services of the lowest one is ten dollars a month so like..

Dr Chelsea Trengrove FDA Chelsea program manager Boston Tim Pataca MIT neurodegeneration Pharmacology and biochemistry Konica Paddock Kapadia DC Paddock Oh Alzheimer Mo DEFEC
"program manager" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

Reasons to be Cheerful

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"program manager" Discussed on Reasons to be Cheerful

"Is senior program manager at the new economics foundation, financial leads on coastal economies and co wrote the blue new deal report, which we're going to be talking about and the NF is think tank that promotes social economic and environmental Justice finance. Thank you for. Joining is. Thank you for having me to just try and start with a picture of how life as in those communities is sick of the British population, which is more than eleven million people living, coastal communities across islands, fishing, villages, towns and cities and all of the top five local authorities with the highest leave votes in the two thousand sixteen referendum were on the coast. Can can you talk to me a little bit about why these communities face specific challenges? What is it about life? In those towns, which made them more likely to vote leave in the referendum. Right. I have to start all. As when I talk about coastal communities. I have to start by saying that those are amazing communities with an amazing lifestyle living on the coast. That's why a lot of people retire to the coast. That's while other people want to move to the coast when they do, you know, it's the amazing coastal environment. So, you know, there's lots of positives. Really strong communities the ones that I've been meeting for the past few years traveling around the coast, but they do face a lot of challenges they are complex challenges. So the first thing I'll say is that when looking at coastal communities as one group of communities in the UK, you see higher levels of that prevision unemployment educational underachievement. Those are economies that have been lacking diversity and dynamism so many areas, for example, heavily dependent on tourism, which is a seasonal industry. And that means that they like resilience, really. So it makes them less able to cope with any shocks to the economy or environmental shocks, like the effects of climate change, for example. And what has been happening community is something that has been happening with other communities in the county, which is that. Have never really recovered from the loss or the Klein of traditional industries such as fishing shipbuilding or the glory days of rec- site tourism. And hasn't happened is a coherent plan to reinvent Costa economies into support them in filling those those gaps that have been left for too long there. So there's they really living a cycle of design vantage. That's how I see it air is. There are mostly need are also the least attractive to investment. So there's a challenge there in. How do we basically make a change? You know, how do we transform what's happening right now under potential answer to that? Is this Lou new deal? The new economics foundation propose can you talk about the deal that proposes them what it would involve? Yes. Or the blue new deal is a vision and also a plan for the UK coast. So it's first saying that the starting point for for looney deal should be goes communities. Most unique asset what sets them apart. The the reason why we talk about them. Which is the customer and environment. And so if you're looking at, you know, creating a healthier coastal marine environment and really supporting those resources on which communities heavily depend on. What does that mean? Then for economic development. How do we think about the activities we're going to invest in in how we will invest in them differently? And so the balloon deal is very much about focusing investment in.

UK senior program manager Klein looney