40 Burst results for "professor"

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on The Mungenast St. Louis Honda Sports Open Line

The Mungenast St. Louis Honda Sports Open Line

00:50 sec | 16 min ago

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on The Mungenast St. Louis Honda Sports Open Line

"I'm the host of a new podcast called Deep background. I'm a Harvard law professor and a Bloomberg Communist, testified at the House impeachment hearing. So I both studied the news and have on occasion even contributed to making it in each episode of Deep background. I interview an expert or a policy maker to explore the historical, scientific, legal or cultural contact behind the headlines. You confined deep background on radio dot com or wherever you like to listen. In 2007 the red hot Chili Peppers decided to sue Showtime. Why Who's over the use of the name Californication for one of its shows. Clothing with the title was quote immediately associated in the mind of the consumer and quote with the Peppers, 1999 album and single, the show's creator and executive producer, claims he first saw the term on Organ bumper stickers, which.

Peppers Bloomberg Harvard Executive Producer Professor
Ethnic Studies: Born in the Bay Area From History's Biggest Student Strike

Morning Edition

06:50 min | 9 hrs ago

Ethnic Studies: Born in the Bay Area From History's Biggest Student Strike

"Legislation earlier this summer that would require all incoming freshman at Cal State universities to taken ethnic studies class listener. Michael Variety asked our Bay curious team this question I've heard that there was actually a revolution in the Bay Area for an ethnic studies field. Is this true? And how did it happen? The short answer. Yes, it's true. Reporter assault A sonnet. Poor tells us how it went down during the longest student strike in US history. It was November of 1968. The US was 13 years into the Vietnam War. American soldiers hiking their way through the sweaty jungles of South Vietnam, searching for enemy Martin Luther King had been assassinated earlier that year, and the Black Panther Party demanded systemic change for black communities plagued by poverty and police brutality. That's what black students at San Francisco State wanted to bury. Proves to be a member ofthe last. This is Nesbitt Crutchfield. He started studying at San Francisco State in 1967 and soon joined the black student union. It was the very 1st 1 in the country. It was very clear to me that Black soon Union representative. Very progressive. Among black spoons at state among black students in the very but just a small percentage of black students went to SF State admission rates for minority students had dwindled down to just 4%. Even those 70% of students in the SF Unified School District for from minority backgrounds is a black person you expected for all intensive purposes. To be one of the very few black people in whatever classroom laboratory auditorium. The U. N was overwhelmingly white. Amidst that whiteness black students were hungry to study their own history. The black student union had been pushing the university to create a black studies department for nearly three years. But administrators resisted the idea. was an era of young people asking questions and want to transform their communities. Jason Ferreira is a professor in the Department of Race and Resistance at San Francisco State College of ethnic studies. And that impulse that That hunger to transform one's communities is actually what forms the basis of ethnic studies. It's around this time that Penny no. Okatsu was grappling with her own questions about race and identity. We want Asian Americans, then we were Orientals. An Oriental is a term that was imposed on us by the largest society, so starting to use the term Asian American was a way of taking back er. Our own destiny. Henny became a member of a student organization called the Asian American Political Alliance. It was just one of many ethnic student organizations popping up on campus and an early fall of 1968. These organizations banded together in formed a coalition, the Third World Liberation Front. And at that particular time, third world referred to the Non Aligned Countries are cultures in Asia, Africa and Latin America. It was synonymous with how we might use people of color today. English professor and Black Panther. George Murray was one of San Francisco state's most influential anti Vietnam organizers. Students loved Murray, but his outspoken politics didn't sit well with us of state administrators. The war in Vietnam is racist. That is the law that crackers like Johnson are using black soldiers and poor white soldiers of Mexican soldiers as dupes and fools to fight against people of color. In Vietnam. The board of trustees fired Murray over Comment like this one on November 1st 1968 5 days later, the black student union and the Third World Liberation Front joined together and went on strength in aspic, Crutchfield says Despite coming from different backgrounds, the strikers had a clear goal. I wanted to find out and be educated about ourselves, and we could not get that the nobody getting educated Initially, strikers did things like cherry bombs in toilets and check out tons of books at once in order to overwhelm the school's library system, But almost immediately, administrators invited police on campus. Jason Ferreira says they swarmed the school armed with five foot batons. Students responded by throwing rocks and cursing out the police. Police came down heavy hard, and they just began cracking skulls Strikers carried on anyway. Penny No. Okatsu was protesting on January 23rd 1969. In what many call the mass bust. Two lines of police came up and basically surrounded the over 500 people who were there for the rally and tracked all of the individuals who are part with that net police charged at students, Penny says it was one of the bloodiest and most frightening days of the entire strike. That was a military movement, literally a practice orchestrated military movement. Hundreds were arrested. Virtually all of the individuals arrested head Tio spend some jail time. There are real consequences to having participated in that event. It's up two more months. But eventually in March, administrators and strikers negotiated a deal after five months of protesting the school agreed to many striker demands. They promised to accept virtually all non white applicants for fall of 1969 and they agreed to establish a college of ethnic studies, the first in the country. Class is about communities of color. Ethnic studies is a way of embracing all of the cultures that make up not just this country, but with the world. And if we don't understand each other, how we're going to get along. I'm a solace on before the news For more details

San Francisco Vietnam Third World Liberation Front George Murray Penny Black Panther Party Nesbitt Crutchfield Jason Ferreira San Francisco State College Of Black Panther Okatsu United States Professor Bay Area Sf Unified School District Martin Luther King Assault Michael Variety Reporter
Fresh update on "professor" discussed on KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

00:48 min | 44 min ago

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

"Disco was a rock and from Vegas that formed on the members were just kids. In fact, their first Emma was recording when they were in high school. There. Official debut album went double platinum. Their name came from a Smith song, a song Panic. One of the lyrics in the song is burned down the disco US Panic at the disco was born. My name is Noah Feldman. I'm the host of a new podcast called Deep background. I'm a Harvard law professor and a Bloomberg Communist, testified at the House impeachment hearing. So I both studied the news and have on occasion even contributed to making it in each episode of Deep background. I interview an expert or a policy maker to explore the historical, scientific, legal or cultural contact behind the headlines. You confined deep background on radio dot com or wherever you like to listen. Trivia. In 2007 the red hot Chili Peppers decided to sue Showtime. Why Who's over the use of the name Californication for one of its shows. Clothing with the title was quote immediately associated in the mind of the consumer and quote with the Peppers, 1999 album and single show's creator and executive producer, claims he first saw the term on Organ bumper stickers, which said Don't Californication or against Harnessed profile eagles. Eagles foreign in L. A in 1971. Their list of accomplishments is impressive. Five number one single six number one albums, six Grammys, five American music awards and album sales of Over 150 million. Originally, the founding members were brought together by Linda Ronstadt for her band. They disbanded in 1980 but reunited in 1994. They're still active even after the death of founding member Glen Fry, continuing on with his son, Deacon. My name is Willie Williams. I thought guys like Joe Simon. They daily. I'm 86 years old and I have my share of fighting. I took him and I gave him way are broken..

Disco Peppers Noah Feldman Joe Simon Eagles Linda Ronstadt Emma Vegas American Music Awards Founding Member Glen Fry Harvard Willie Williams Bloomberg Smith Official Executive Producer Professor
TikTok threatens legal action against Trump US ban

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:32 sec | 11 hrs ago

TikTok threatens legal action against Trump US ban

"Issued and kids executive are doing D orders I late y last nasal night swabs banning twice Tic Tac's a week parent company from doing to business answer in some the U. of the S mysteries corresponding. about the Corona We Judge virus. Jang They're enrolled from the White House in this band's experiment quote Any investigating transaction how kids with the are infected. apse, Chinese Now many parent have symptoms company, Bright and how Dance, likely and they we'll go are into to effect spread in 45 Cove. It days, Dr. But David Tic Tac Kimberlin is fighting is a pediatrics back professor in a new at the statement University this of morning. Alabama They say they'll Birmingham. make sure Its the rule peculiar of the law because it's is arrest followed virus if not and generally, by the Children administration. are more severely Then by affected the U. S. by respiratory Courts viruses. the administration accuses But for some by reason, this one seems to affect Children less And so is the

David Tic Tac Kimberlin BUT White House Executive Alabama Children Administration. Statement University Professor Birmingham.
Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Marketplace

Marketplace

01:04 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Marketplace

"Along all week. Kodak is back in the news after an unusual turn of events. Last week, the federal government called on Kodak to help produce pharmaceuticals related to Cove in 19 treatment. It was a new twist for a company that's already had several from the premier photography company in America to bankruptcy in 2012 to this loan under the Defense Production Act that's now under congressional inquiry. To produce generic medicines that right now we mostly only get from China. Oh, yeah, There's a China angle, and there's some questionable stock sales in there, too. But we are going to try to answer the simplest question We can Why Kodak marketplaces Jasmine Gars tackles that one until about 10 days ago. Kodak's place as a household name was going the way BlackBerry and Blockbuster did. Then the Trump Administration announced its giving Kodak a $765 million loan to produce chemical ingredients for covert 19 treatments. Professor Rosabeth Moss Cantor from Harvard Business School, says it's not as weird as it might sound photography. I think when it was invented was all about chemical bath. So Koda cared chemical routes that many are raising eyebrows like medical chemist and science writer Derek Lowe, who's suspicious of what's being heralded as Kodak's big comeback. He says that the company will have to compete with a global and possibly cheaper supply chain production for generic drugs is not exactly a path to riches. They are going to be hard pressed to produce a lot of these things at any kind of price that can compete with what we get now from offshore supply. It's hard to imagine this in the age of the Selfie, but photography used to be something for special occasions and important people. Kodak became a household name because it made photography accessible to everyone. Codex got the instant camera..

Kodak China Professor Rosabeth Moss Cantor Derek Lowe Jasmine Gars Harvard Business School Trump Administration Blockbuster America Cove Koda Writer
Trump signs executive order that could ban TikTok and WeChat in 45 days

the NewsWorthy

01:25 min | 17 hrs ago

Trump signs executive order that could ban TikTok and WeChat in 45 days

"President trump's threat to ban. TIKTOK is now a formal order. Trump signed two new executive orders to ban US companies from working with the Chinese parent companies for both the popular video sharing APP Tiktok, and the messaging APP we chat, the ban will go into effect. September. Twentieth is an American company does not by the APPS. First, the president cited national security concerns for the sweeping new restrictions, both APPS, are owned by Chinese companies and tensions between the US and China have continued to escalate. Trump argues the APPS. APPS give the Chinese Communist, party too much access to Americans data and the ability to run disinformation campaigns in the US. Still Tiktok has insisted that is not the case, and that data is not even stored in China to be clear cybersecurity experts have said, it's tough to know for sure one social media professor told USA Today if the Chinese government were to request Americans from Tiktok, the parent company by Dan would likely have no choice but to hand it over. So what would trump's ban really mean? There aren't many specifics out yet, but likely the APPS would no longer be available in apple or android APP stores as a start. Then end, the ban may never actually happen. Remember Microsoft is already confirmed. It's in talks to buy parts of TIKTOK and plans to decide before the orders deadline. Oh and also both executive orders are expected to be challenged in court since they're so unusual. In fact, the reports, it's still unclear if the president actually has the legal authority to enact the ban,

Donald Trump Tiktok President Trump United States Executive Chinese Government China Apple Microsoft Usa Today DAN Professor
Fresh "professor" from KYW 24 Hour News

KYW 24 Hour News

00:49 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "professor" from KYW 24 Hour News

"Mattan K Y. W News radio the 19th Amendment 100 years later coverage presented by the National Constitution Center. At the turn of the last century of movement was gaining momento em in America, focusing on getting women the right to vote. What is K y W sawdust cousin? It's reports. Not everyone was behind it. As the idea of the new woman emerged in the early 20th century, and Krukowski, associate professor of American history at Westchester University, says women began to become a little more independent. They dress more casually participated in sports rode bicycles by the turn of the century. A lot of those strict Victorian gender boxes are starting to dissolve and pen history, Professor Kathy Price says As women's roles began to be redefined. Some began to internalize what those changes men. I think they were worried about making the country more unstable by destabilizing the family. National Constitution Center exhibit developer Elena Pop Chuck. They just thought it would be an apocalyptic changed society. If women exited the domestic sphere and went to vote once or twice a year. The pen political science professor Don t ll says It wasn't just men who were against suffrage, women who were against suffrage. Some of them were worried that it was going to Threatened women's economic well being to have women participating in politics and, you know, be expected to earn income and the economic impact of suffrage was also a concern for tavern owner's Laurie Ruffini. Chester County archivist says a connection was made between suffrage and the temperance movement, the goal of which was to get men to stop drinking and ultimately banned alcohol. Domestic violence was a really issue and they saw alcohol tied to that film were opposed to suffrage for unconventional reasons, like anarchists, political activist Emma Goldman because She believed women were more reliable to legislate morality. But even among those who wanted the vote, price explains many we're not in favor of suffrage for all women. Many suffrage is who were white did not support the idea of black women or black people in general, having the right to vote and ask cousin, it's K Y w news radio. Rating in Philadelphia Storm's making for treacherous driving conditions will get.

National Constitution Center Kathy Price Professor Emma Goldman Associate Professor Laurie Ruffini America Krukowski Elena Pop Chuck Chester County Philadelphia Westchester University Don T Developer
Expert Says U.S. Current Trend in Coronavirus Cases Isn’t Sustainable

Mark Mason

06:55 min | 1 d ago

Expert Says U.S. Current Trend in Coronavirus Cases Isn’t Sustainable

"With us. Dr. John Wade CI, the professor of the Global Health Programme, professor of health system and policy program. And the director of the Center for Global Health College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon. And Dr CI Welcome back to the Mark Mason Show. It's my pleasure to be back with you. Well, I'm glad to hear your voice again. I always use you is kind of our update into the really world of Corona virus. What's really going on and a lot has happened since we last talked. On that the virus seems to be more prevalent than ever. But we seem to be learning to live with it. I suppose one of the virus limits we can live with. I mean, we won't like it. But can we get by at this rate? No. We add a to high rate a TTE this great, many, many stay or counties there. Health care for city would not be able to 15 we We have to bring down because most European and Asian country at much lower levels, so they are able to lead you much higher level of activity, which we still cannot. And so if we maintain this high level or pandemic, it will hurt both our economy and people's life and health, and so we had to do something to bring it down to a much lower level. Wow. I don't know how we do that. The governor's talked about maybe travel restrictions. Is that one possible thing we should seriously look at where maybe people from high incident states are are not allowed to come where they if they do. Come there, quarantined. Well, it is. It's It's a good idea, in theory, but in practice will be very difficult to implement. Because he had to send lots of people to monitor to supervise and that costs money. So are you thinking another lock down or slow down? No, no, I think for the last Upfield. Early June, We duty our 2.5 months left town. And we see the serious impact on Mike, honey, and I don't think al economy can sustain more locked down. What we need to do is to learn how to live. Save it. How to operate our business. I work safety and one particular major. Uh, I know the difficulty but that's very critical measure, not just Oregon. But slowly, 90 states we were not able to implement and that is one of the biggest reason we are in this high level off epidemic. So remember in my early and Evi I mentioned that there are three step process. That's important. The first step is contact tracing. The second step is testing and so We're not doing a superb job, but we have the great improvement compare with March or April in term of the first step. But we still fail on the last step that is after the testing. What do we do with the confirmed cases So far, we only isolate people with moderate to see via symptoms. And completely neglected people with mild or no symptoms, and the latest studies, said just people with mild to know Simpson. They accounted for about 80% of total infection. But this 80% of total infection also, if we don't contain them, they also contribute to about 70 to 80% of new infection. Just think about this way. We pay attention to the Penta pus it with more moderate to severe symptoms contained them. But we let the other 80% continue to spread the virus free tea, and it will be a miracle if we don't have. Ah, hi. Hi. Cases continue to be in this house. How did we get more testing? I mean, we can barely my doctor tells me that he has no more tests because they've shipped him off to Florida and Texas and other states that need him. That's a problem I was comparing with Beck in March or April, Wright had done better dimension. We're not doing a super job during the testing as well, Well, I'm with you on the testing, and they and the containment. It's just a question of Why aren't we doing it? There are multiple reason one if people are still resisting the idea ofthe isolation and quality scene and the other financial Many Asian country. I don't know much about European country mediation country like Taiwan, they when they have a mandatory quarantine, isolation, government pay for the costs and company people. The example of Taiwan in their quarantine and isolation. Everyone who and the quarantine everyday received about equipment to certify us started per day for 14 days. So people who need to be quarantined need to be compensated because they lost income and we're not able to do that. I know we're on our financial crunch. So it's both financial reason but also political social reason, because people are not waiting. Yeah, I would have to be afraid, though. Doctors at the AA liberal Mike what would fake Corona virus just so he could sit at home for two weeks and get paid by the government? But there's you know, there's the question of you gotta have the test and it's got to come back positive. So I'm with you. I think a lot of listeners were with you test and contained testing contain, And maybe that's what they should be trying to come up with. In the way of money in Washington, D C right now, the World Health Organization says We should not expect a miracle where a vaccine is concerned. Are we being spoon fed in folded a cure A vaccine, If you will make may not be what we think it's going to be. So that I have some reservations because we still know ability to about the vaccine because there's no effective action available yet. I think I just saw the news. Russia has a plan to have a effective action by October, and we don't know how safe it is, but I think they're waiting between safe and effectiveness. For the U. S. I think the earliest might be the beginning of next year. And I cannot say anything about how effective it is because we haven't seen that yet. We don't know yet, but most likely given the nature of the disease, even an effective vaccine. The immunity may not last very long. If the image can last up to a year. That would be wonderful, but most likely will be somewhere between six months and 12 months. That means we may need to do more than one dose of

Center For Global Health Colle Oregon Professor Taiwan Corona Dr. John Wade Ci Global Health Programme Oregon State University Director World Health Organization Corvallis Penta Beck AA Mike Russia Simpson Washington Florida
Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Glenn Beck

Glenn Beck

00:29 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "professor" discussed on Glenn Beck

"Months ago on suspicion they stole jewellery and money from people at gunpoint. Baker is being formally charged with four counts of robbery with a firearm. No charges will be filed against Dunbar. Senator Marco Rubio is concerned Election night could be filled with confusion, uncertainty and even chaos because of the vote by mail surge because counting all the ballots could take weeks, Rubio tells medium dot com He's worried our adversaries like China will use the period of uncertainty to cast doubt on the results. Florida Atlantic University political science professor Kevin Wagner also worries about all the snap booze that could come with the mail by ballot. Serge Think big concern that I have a selection is whether or not states haven't had as much Millon body be prepared to handle it. The U. S Election Assistance Commission says in 2016 5.9% of voters wait in by mail. The number is expected to be over 50% this year. Wendi Grossman. NewsRadio 6 10 W Y O D Broward Sheriff's Office. Detectives are trying to identify a suspect they say shot a man on land from a personal watercraft. Police say the July 11th incident of the 1400 block of old Griffin Road in Dania Beach, left the victims suffering from a gunshot wound, although he refused medical treatment of a suspect is described as a 25 to 30 year old Hispanic man. With short black hair operating a blue personal watercraft. There was some sort of altercation, police say before the shooting, which grazed the victim's leg. Anyone with information is being asked to call crime stoppers. You can watch the surveillance video of the incident unfold w dot com Wall Street Numbers said of the day in the mixed category, with the Dow gaining 47 points when the day of the week 4 27,033 The S and P 500 was up two points with the NASDAQ lower by 97. Closed at.

Senator Marco Rubio U. S Election Assistance Commi Wendi Grossman Robbery Dania Beach Baker Florida Atlantic University Dunbar W Y O D Broward Sheriff's Offi Serge Kevin Wagner Newsradio Professor China
Biden will beat Trump, says historian who predicted every presidential race since 1984

WBZ Afternoon News

00:43 sec | 1 d ago

Biden will beat Trump, says historian who predicted every presidential race since 1984

"Record Picking the winner of presidential elections makes his bed for this year's race. His name is Alan Lichtman, a professor at American University. Presidential elections Don't work the way we think they do. He has correctly predicted the outcome of every presidential election since 1984. It was one of the few in 2016 to predict a trump victory. Uses 13 key factors to come up with his determination. Most notably, it comes down to a referendum on the incumbent party sizing up all the information this year. Lichtman predicts a Joe Biden win in November 7 of the factors swing in his favour. Six Do for President Trump, Steve Cave and CBS News 308

Alan Lichtman President Trump Joe Biden Steve Cave American University Professor Cbs News
COVID-19 vaccine may not be as effective in obese people

KNX Evening News

00:49 sec | 1 d ago

COVID-19 vaccine may not be as effective in obese people

"There's bad news for more than 100 million Americans. When it comes to a Corona virus vaccine. It may not be effective for them because they're obese. That's according to a CNN article that science scientists who believe obesity interferes with the body's overall immune response. But that doesn't mean if you're obese. He should not get the covert vaccines has nutrition professor Rise shake at the University of North Carolina will be less effective newbies. We're not saying that it won't be effective so All people should get vaccinated. But the key is we think it'll be like, he says. This is mostly a theory based on precedent a lot of data with one's showing that less effective India be so That's why we think it'll be less effective with be subject with a potential code vaccine. All that 107 million American adults are considered obese, which the CDC defines is someone whose body mass indexes 30 or above.

CNN CDC University Of North Carolina Professor India
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 1 d ago

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
Gold just hit $2,000 an ounce — but that could be a scary sign for the economy

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:14 sec | 1 d ago

Gold just hit $2,000 an ounce — but that could be a scary sign for the economy

"The price of an ounce of gold is now up to $2000 but analysts say this could be in people are losing confidence in the stock market. Carnegie Mellon Finance professor says people are buying gold during the pandemic has a safe asset, but the price is not

Carnegie Mellon Finance Professor
Has China Won? With Prof. Kishore Mahbubani

Model Majority Podcast

05:30 min | 2 d ago

Has China Won? With Prof. Kishore Mahbubani

"Professor Shore Mahbubani welcome to the Model Majority podcast today my pleasure rejoin you. All right. So to get a conversation started, you know the focus of our interview today is your New Book Has China one, and there are a lot of things over to dive deep into with you on this book. The first thing I wanNA chat about is this notion of the Chinese civilization party as you know, very well, the as an acronym is sort around quite. Casually, in the media in foreign policy circle to describe China as a whole right the Chinese Communist Party and you believe that this is actually quite an inadequate framing to understand China as a country as a people and you believe that by thinking of the CCP as the Chinese civilization party is perhaps a better way to think about it. Why do you think this kind of change in terminology is helpful in helping the United States in particular understand China. I think it would make a huge difference. If the American people came to realize the truth. which is the main mission of the Chinese Communist Party. Is Not export communism to the rest of the world. which was the mission of the Soviet Union's Communist Party. But to try and reform I've and strengthen China's civilization. I what I told you is is a basic of. But most Americans, do not know this basic truth. Because, when they hear the what Chinese Communist, party. The what communists in the American imagination. is by definition somebody WHO's evil and doing bad things. That good a good communist continent, an oxymoron. In America, in American linguistic discourse. So when you when you tell them that they're dealing with the Chinese Communist, party the by definition, they believe they dealing with an evil party that is out to undermine America out to oppose the American values out to diminish. America's standing in the world without realizing. That the core mission of the Chinese Communist, party is is to make China's strong and what's interesting. And to understand how deeply rooted this mission is remember remember the send the words that Chairman Mao us. When the People's Republic of China was established in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, nine, he did not say, Hey, today we celebrate the victory of communism over capitalism and said that he said that she that the keyboards used that China has stood up he said it twice. China has to. So, even chairman mouse goal and he was much more of a communist clearly than the current leaders are in many ways was still China's strong. Too. That's why I think that the communist is. Creates a form of intellectual. Laziness in American minds because they cannot look behind that what the see what is really the purpose and mission. Of the Chinese Communist Party that's why I think that thinking of it as a Chinese civilization party, then they'll begin to realize the most important thing that America in China and live in peace because Chinese civilization is not opposed to American civilization American civilization and not oppose the Chinese civilization and both can live together in peace. Right right. What do you think the US not just a public but really even the foreign policy circle. Right. The folks in DC. The people who are supposed to understand the stuff for living because it's their job. To kind of display, this laziness intellectually speaking, is it just because the Cold War was still such a recent memory I guess for the United States generally positive memory. 'cause we won that we just kind of put the Communist label back to where it was just because it was something that we think we understand. You ask them very difficult question because this is the great. Paradox. About the United States in the United States spent more money. On strategic, think-tanks than any other country in the world I think he spends hundreds of millions of dollars. You not billions of dollars on tragic thing. And yet America the America is the best digit think-tank were. America has the worst thinking in the. And and is shocking for example, though any comes to understanding China? More strategic think tanks very Lisi and using all the conception tariff Nelia the Cold War in the Soviet Union. And then applying it to China, when is clearly not relevant? China. So. The inability. Of the strategic think tanks in in the United States to understand the real nature. Of China. Is actually quite a frightening. Thing to watch today,

Chinese Communist Party China United States America Chairman Soviet Union Professor Shore Mahbubani DC Lisi
More Shows To Watch If You Liked HBO's Watchmen

The Popcast With Knox and Jamie

04:42 min | 2 d ago

More Shows To Watch If You Liked HBO's Watchmen

"We're GONNA talk about recommendations. I for the long haul and these are things that we are either current or in the way back and there's this you know the. He is like when I sit down to try find something there's so much going on that I spent like an hour being watched I don't WanNa Watch. That should do this and it's like I, just want someone tell me what to watch. That's what we're going to hear for. Yeah. So we're GONNA basis off the some of the nominees for best show in the emmy categories I start off with HBO's watchmen as from Damon Lindelof this set in an alternative universe and drafting off the ground and comic book watchmen is It's like this dazzling procedure designed to also make you think that twenty six emmy nominations, the most of any serious. Like NERF gun to your head best show of the year. What would you say? Oh, it's watchmen watchmen to me like for limited series. So it's an a different categories, but I would even say it's better than all dramas on I. Think. So it's it's crowning achievement of TV this. So for sharp for me, I'm I'm thinking of like I want a show that looks great. Visually also will make me think. So I I wanted to go directly off of Damon Lindelof because I feel like he's kind of peak of his powers right now. So guys are wondering like other stuff he's done and I I can't think about the leftovers it's a similarly. It's a great show. It's alternative universe incredibly well, made really thoughtful but also like very simplistic in terms of you applying it to your that feels like watchmen felt current but also set in a different time. And leftovers current but also sat in a different times. So I love that the weirdness of the masks in watchmen which was so precious. So yeah, it's it's. It's phenomenal the other one I was thinking of when I want to. Recommend a show in in that Washington vein I'll say Black Mirror it's close enough. It's not really narrative based. Yeah. It's vignettes and different standalone stories, but it's kind of an alternate. Reality it looks close enough to realize that you're not sure that it's not. Yeah. But it's also telling us some darkened weird stuff about yourself. And the good thing about Black Mirror is to watch it. You're not watching it in each episode is its own Y'all episode so That's will put like some of our own favorite episodes that we both have really loved that we can include in the note. So you don't have to wonder because listen that first episode it's Just you just need to skip it. Hear me if you don't hear anything else if you don't hear Jamie doing the weird change of momentum at the beginning of the show if you forgot that already that's okay. Forget it. Here me this do not watch the first episode. Mom Don't do it dad don't do it much mom don't do it nobody do. It. Would be a mistake. Okay. It's a for me. If you love watchmen where you're like, that seems like it's good. Let me tell you to other shows that are good. So on that flakes, you can watch Jessica Jones I chose this because you got strong female lead just like you have in watchman, you have a superhero component which you also have and Jessica Jones it's dark. It's Gritty the villain in Jessica Jones is played by David tennant in that first season and he is per faction it keeps you on your toes. It's also very you're very to the visuals also recommending legion. Hulu. That's weird. Right because I think when you watch watchman, you're like I'm confused. Limits where you're like I, need to watch this again. Being, existing Ip it makes you think should I know that and I can confirm I. Didn't know. And watchmen I would sometimes read like recaps after I. Would Watch an episode and that would help me catch things maybe that I didn't grab the first time with Legion stars Dan Stevens? Famous playing. Matthew on. Downton Abbey He. It's a done by Noah. All Superhero Jason because this is the story of professor x his incredibly powerful, mentally ill mutant sign and so it's it also stars Jean Smart who is also in watchmen man she's in a Lotta. Golf that she has very good taste, and so it's weird enough that you're like It's not that classic Superhero which is what I also like about watchmen if we had done if we'd time traveled and done a designing women saying draft Jean Smart would not be my. Number. One pick would be any pots it would be we'll for private. Not. It be any pods, Anthony Delta Burke Julia sugarbakers. dixie Carter lab next to last over Jean Smart. Yeah. My point here is everyone would have been before Jean Smart Jean Smart was second. I'm going to be in Sweet Home Alabama and you're not going to know what to do with the low key cares. Okay.

Watchmen Jean Smart Jean Smart Damon Lindelof Emmy Jessica Jones HBO Anthony Delta Burke Julia Suga Jamie Hulu David Tennant Sweet Home Alabama Matthew Washington Dan Stevens Golf Noah Jason Professor
The Importance of Self Compassion

Therapy for Black Girls

04:58 min | 2 d ago

The Importance of Self Compassion

"If there's anything we can use right now and in the coming months itself compassion. Today I'm joined by Dr Kristin Nafta about the many ways of compassion. He can be a helpful to us to get through these difficult times. Kristen is currently an associate professor of educational psychology. At the University of Texas at Austin. She's a pioneer in the field of self compassion research conducting the first empirical studies on self compassion over fifteen years ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles and book chapters on the topic. She is the author of this book self compassion the proven power of being kind to yourself released by. William Moro. In conjunction with her colleague Dr Chris. Germer she has developed an empirically supported training program called mindful self compassion, which is taught by thousands of teachers worldwide. Dr Nefyn I chatted about what self compassion is how is different from self esteem, how it can be helpful in mediating difficult emotions and her favorite activity for practicing self compassion. If anything resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share with us on social media using the Hashtag t BG in session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Chris and I'm really really excited to chat with you. Self compassion was are yellow collective book club choice for last month. So it feels very timely for you to be joining us for this conversation. That's great. Wonderful. Happy to be here. Yeah. So I wonder if you could start just by talking with us about what self compassion is in what it isn't right. So the easiest way to think of what self compassion is simply being a good frontier self I saw in. Terms of how you relate yourself. Especially when you're struggling, you're struggling because you feel inadequate made a mistake or just when life is really difficult that you treat yourself with the same type of kindness warm care support concern that you would nationally showed two good friend, right? Most of us don't do that most of us go if we talk to our friends where we talk ourselves who would have no friends I in. So really self compassion is just turning that around and doing a u-turn in being kind ordered to ourselves. Now. Some people get confused about this they think. To ourselves me being self indulgent being lazy being selfish that actually that's not passionate right so so if you want the technical definition of compassion is concerned with alleviation of suffering. and. So in your self indulgent or you're lazy or you know you're helping yourself in your naturally getting your suffering, you're actually causing yourself more problems in the long run. Also, the word compassion comes from the Latin Pasha means to suffer an income means with. So. There's an inherent connectedness in self. Compassion is a sense set while everyone's imperfect everyone struggling. You know it's not just me, and this is what makes up compassion different than somebody Mike self-pity. Self Passion US remember that this is part of the shared human experience. You know it's not just me. To say that especially in today's times whenever I say that some people think this is like a coded version of all lives matter. Right. It doesn't acknowledge that some groups suffer more than others. Absolutely do the amount of suffering is different. The source of suffering is different. All people in all groups do not suffer the same way, and so we need to acknowledge that as the human experience. And yet every single individuals especially when it comes to relating to their own suffering, their own suffering is if you're paying. If you treat your own paying with kind of a kind caring response. You will be able to turn your attention outward more effectively. So it really sounds like you know sometimes we hear this conversation around like Grief Olympics are paying Olympics right where we're trying to say like, Oh, my heart is bigger than your heard, right? Yeah. Exactly. It's not like that York saying that my pain is bigger or smaller you recognize people's pain different is very important. I think especially nowadays you we have to recognize. Those. Who structural reasons pain of all people is not the same. And yet was self compassion. We can treat our own pain as worthy of a compassionate us. We're just saying that, hey, I haven't paying I haven't perfect and I'm not the only one very simple outweigh. The reason that so important is because if you get into self, pity was made for me like victim mentality fx not helpfully

Dr Chris Kristen Dr Kristin Nafta University Of Texas Associate Professor Austin Dr Nefyn William Moro Mike Self-Pity Latin Pasha York
Armor on Butterfly Wings Protects Against Heavy Rain, Study Finds

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

02:41 min | 3 d ago

Armor on Butterfly Wings Protects Against Heavy Rain, Study Finds

"Apparently Butterfly Wings are built like armor to protect them against heavy rain a June study in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analyzed how water repellent properties on the butterfly's wings protect them against Raines impacts quoting dot org. The research showed how micro-scale bumps combined with a scale layer of wax shatter and spread these drops to protect fragile surfaces from physical damage and hyperthermic risk. Previous studies have looked at water hitting insects and plants at low impacts of noted, the liquids cleaning properties, but in nature, raindrops can fall at rates of up to ten meters per second. So this research examined how raindrops falling at high speeds interact with super hydrophobic natural surfaces and quotes. Senior Authors, Soon Juan young associate professor of Biological Environmental Engineering College of Agriculture and Life Sciences pointed out that raindrops are one of the biggest risks for butterflies getting hit by a raindrop for butterfly is like getting hit by a bowling ball for a human. For the study, the researchers placed the insects as well as samples of leaves and feathers on a table and released droplets of water from two meters above they recorded the experiment at several thousand frames per second so that they could watch back in ultra slow at which time they discovered that when the water hit the surface, it rippled and spread on the Nanos scale wax layer while the micro-scale bumps created holes in the droplet quoting again, consider the micro bumps as needles young said, if one dropped a balloon onto these needles, he said, then this balloon would break into smaller pieces. So the same thing happens as the raindrop hits and spreads end quotes. Not. Only does this reduce the impact force, but it also lowers the heat transfer from the cold drop, which enables the insects muscles to retain enough warmth to fly. Instead, he's like this aren't just interesting to learn more about butterflies and feel at ease knowing that they're relatively okay during big storms like today's but also these types of studies can inform consumer products. So called bio mimicry products in this field have already led to water resistant sprays for clothes and shoes, as well as the de Icing coatings for airplanes. There is so much weird and cool stuff from animals and. Nature. So thinking about how we can adapt some of it for humans is extra fascinating to me is all the other day that someone had redesigned the umbrella to open and close upside down so that you theoretically don't get as much water all over you. But what if we can coat on with some of this manno scale wax and micro bumps so that they repel water I mean that would be pretty cool.

Proceedings Of The National Ac Biological Environmental Engin Raines Associate Professor Bowling Juan
Trump is losing big to Biden in voter polls

Scott Sloan

10:01 min | 3 d ago

Trump is losing big to Biden in voter polls

"Used to the day not to the date, but to the day we go to the polls all over the United States. Of course, there's massive mail in balloting and elect the next president of the United States. It will either be a reelection of Donald Trump or Joe Biden will be the next president of the United States. But where do things stand? Really? As we're now 90 days out from deciding who the leader of the free world will be a lot of the poles that are out there. Have Joe Biden up if you look at battleground state polls Here in Ohio. Biden is up plus 2 2.5 He's up in Michigan. He is he's up in New Hampshire. Trump is up in Texas barely up in Missouri, and Trump is up in Iowa. But apparently it is Biden, who is making hay and a lot of the states that Donald Trump won back in 2016 and needs to win for re election now, But how accurate is polling? And did we learned any lessons from 2016? That should look at polling now with somewhat of a jaundiced eye? Standing by the way in and all of that is one of the great political minds of art of our lifetime. Someone who understands the INS and the outs of elections how people get elected, what polls really mean and the taste of the voting electorate in this country. He is Dr Eric Morrow, the head of social sciences and political science professor at Tarleton State University. And Dr Morrow. How are you on this glorious Tuesday? I'm great. Can we've got some cooler weather here in Texas. So, ah, not break from the summer. He had some rain last week. So that's the best we can ask for in Texas in the summer. Well, you know, it's cool in a lot of places not bad here, but it's tartan. Or, as we say, here in Ohio, fixing the heat off politically, Let's Just get to the landscape as it exists right now, As you look at this presidential race, is it really Joe blind that has the lead and if it is, how much of a lead not necessarily and popular vote, But as you look around the landscape of the country in these battleground states, how much do we put How much fate should we put in these polls that air out right now? Well, I think it's uh It's a mixed message at this point, and I say that because we had the experience in 2016 with the Poles and a lot of polling places, especially the quality ones, learned some things and it made some adjustments. But you know we're still 90 days out, and there's a lot happening and And part of this, too, looking at each individual state. And what is the makeup of the voting? The registered voters and turnout expectations there how they're handling elections. I mean, this is this is where we're on the ground now and where the challenges are. And polling while it does give us some some glimpse, Ah, take Texas is a great example. Ah, they most the polls show that they're basically even between Trump and Biden. But ah Ah, we've got a ways to go here and one of the things that really impacts voting and the and the results of an election is tech in Texas. Not just your big metropolitan areas. We have a lot of smaller metropolitan areas. And if turnout is strong there those air Republican bases and so I still give the lead to trump on DH. Not just that they're even but I give us a little bit of a lead to him in the state right now, because we just don't know what that That result will be with turnout in those areas. Well, Trump, I think still has his base. If you look a TTE, a TTE, the various polling among Republicans, he's he's been consistently at 94 95 96 inside his own party. If you look at that what he's doing from an approval standpoint, there's some Poles, the rest missing pool, which has traditionally favored Republicans. It's it's Ah, it's it's I think has Trump right now at 50% approval, but most of them have him in. At best, a load a mid forties. It seems to me that Trump is having a really difficult time getting past his base and energizing people that might Either be fence sitters or undecideds. I don't think there are a lot of undecideds or people that he just hasn't connected with. I don't think he can do much until he gets coverted under control because To me. That's what everybody is, is consumed with whether it's from a health standpoint or an economy standpoint, he can't get covert under control. Not that I'm not saying he but we can't get Cove it under control. And because of that, I think it kind of stymies him in picking up those that are not in his base. Would you agree with that? I do. He needs a win, and he's been. It's been an uphill battle on this all along. And ah, this recently Ah, put some things out on federalism, where I think that the Trump presidency is a victim of that, especially in relation to this. Ah, pandemic on that is because of the challenges with working with states and That comes into theologian process now is that you've got some of the more challenging conditions related to the pandemic in states where without the pandemic, he would say, Well, well, Trump has that state and it wouldn't be any questions now about whether someone has a lead or not. It would be a good thing could be a very, very close race at this point, but Where it's not is that people are starting to question what's happening and how this is being addressed and just not seeing results, and that's what people want. They want. They want the economy six. They want a vaccine. They want cases to go down. They want results, and we and he really needs to see something happen. Significant. Well, there has to be something that happened significantly to get Joe Biden. Out of his basement and out on the campaign trail. And so far, there's no compelling reason for Biden to go out and do that is there and now there's not no, he can play it safe. At this point, it seems I mean, I don't know that that's the the best overall strategy. But, um, one of the things Heard recently in terms of strategy coming out of his campaign was that that they're looking at what the right moment you know when, when is it time to Ah, that it won't, uh, create additional challenges, depending on what he does or what he says. But when he can jump out there and put himself forward, even Maura's the person to say, Well, look, he's not Trump's not been able to fix any of this. Our address it in the appropriate way and and thus try to seal the deal on the election. A Sze Yu look. ATT at Joe Biden. And you hear some of the rhetoric that's been out there in the last couple of days about debates and whether there will not be debates and whether there will be. I think once you wed your way through that, I don't sense the Joe Biden can say. At the at the 11th hour. I'm not going to debate. We're not going to have any debates. I think at that point he would look weak. There will be debates this year. Don't you think I do. I think that I think that's what their strategists are looking at. Is that the point in which he inserts himself more into this? I think one of the challenges or one of the things they have to be looking at. And this is really for the Trump campaign is that In the debates and part of the previous election, so he benefited from a live audience. He was able to play to the crowd. He was able to kind of make it work for himself, both visually as well as the The effect of having a live audience. And that may not be the case this time. And so that may be a challenge for Trump. But he certainly not goingto back away from the and, in fact, Ah Biden doing that. They would certainly make that an opportunity to say that he's not willing to engage in a public forum in these difficult issues that we're facing. Former vice president obviously commits a lot of gaps there. Some who think he may have cognitive issues whether he does or he doesn't. I don't know. Nobody knows unless you're his doctor or those close to him. How much how much of a liability. Do you think A live debate would be to Biden particularly If he continues to behave like he does in some of the few public events he does. I think these extended debates with just two candidates are going to be more of a challenge. We saw him kind of moved back and forth. He was challenged in a few debates recovered and a few others and and so it's gonna be interesting to see this over an extended period of time. As to how you can engage. You know, Biden has a long career in government and with policy, and when you get him going with that, and he's in the depths of it, hey, can show his his ability to really engage with it the challenges in communicating that because as we've seen for many elections when they run the studies, people start tuning out when you get into the details of policy, and I think that's where In addition to what Biden might say that he doesn't intend to say is that when he started jumping off in the depths of discussing policy specific policy issues, people are just going, they're going to fade, and that that isn't necessarily help is well, so I don't think it is his strengths or they're just I think it's going to be. Where are we with all of these issues and what Trump Has been able to accomplish or see happen under his presidency. And then how Biden portrays himself coming into that engagement with him,

Joe Biden Donald Trump Texas United States Ohio New Hampshire President Trump Michigan Tarleton State University Iowa Dr Morrow Dr Eric Morrow Missouri Sze Yu Vice President Professor Maura ATT
Washington, DC's police reform commission to review police discipline and the role of police officers in public schools

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 3 d ago

Washington, DC's police reform commission to review police discipline and the role of police officers in public schools

"Commission from teachers to professors, civil rights groups and mental health professionals. The D. C. Police Reform Commission's mandate covers several areas. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson says the appointees will explore things like police officers assigned to public schools, other ways to respond to police calls and involved behavioral and social service experts. A review of police officer discipline and injecting other conflict resolution methods that officers can practice the commission's formation part of recently approved emergency legislation that band police choke holds and the use of tear gas and rubber bullets on protesters. Ken Duffy w

D. C. Police Reform Commission Phil Mendelson Ken Duffy W Chairman Officer
How to Do #MeToo Without Prison

Unladylike

04:58 min | 3 d ago

How to Do #MeToo Without Prison

"When the METOO movement caught fire in two thousand seventeen. The loudest demands centered on calling out offenders and seeing them prosecuted. But metoo founder Toronto Burke has been clear that mass incarceration is not the solution. Today's guest. Dr. Eliza Ackerman agrees. Prison doesn't work. The fact of the matter is only three percent of people who commit rape will adversity a day behind bars. And, the process of going through the criminal justice system is incredibly incredibly harmful for survivors. They are disbelieved, they are victimized again. Their entire sexual history is put on display in the courts. So knowing all of that we are looking for something that actually decreases harm. decreases, violence increases, empathy decreases recidivism, and that's what we find with restorative justice. Dr Ackermann is a criminal justice professor at California State University at Fullerton where she specializes in research on sexual violence and sex crimes policy. She's also a pioneer in her field of resolving sexual violence through a process called restorative justice. So ordinarily, our legal system response to criminal behavior with three questions. Questions what law was broken, who broke it, and what punishment is warranted. But restorative justice asks who was harmed, what are the needs and responsibilities of everyone affected and how can everyone involved collectively repair the harm that was done. Basically, it's all about healing survivors, communities, and offenders today. Eliza is guiding us through the restorative justice approach to sexual violence. Would it feels like for survivors and why it's a promising path toward preventing sex crimes in the first place all to find out? How can we do me to without prisons? Harvey Weinstein in an orange, jumpsuit has come to symbolize me to era justice, but the movement's original vision resonates far more with transformative and restorative justice approaches. Right. So toward the end of last week's part one. On feminism and mass incarceration prison abolitionist. My Shinwari told us about the transformative justice model that model aims to resolve harm without creating additional harm and without involving the legal system at all restorative justice shares that goal, but it can be put into practice both. And outside the system, what it entails is creating safe spaces. For. Survivors and for people who have caused harm to talk about the impacts that sexual harm has had, and it gives the survivor, a safe space to talk about really the very intimate aspects of sexual violence and the aftermath of that. It allows the survivor to ask questions of people who have caused harm. It also allows those people who have caused harm to ask questions at gives them insight about the behavior Dave engaged in that they would never get. From being processed through the criminal justice system, the term restorative justice was coined in nineteen, seventy, seven by prison psychologist, Albert igla-s, but its core principles come directly from indigenous forms of conflict resolution like sentencing circles and peacemaking courts most. Restorative justice programs focused on youth offenders and family welfare cases. But in recent years, experts like Eliza have started applying it to adult cases involving sexual violence for a number of practical reasons. Yeah. Many survivors don't trust police to properly handle their claims and many know their perpetrators and don't necessarily want to face them in a criminal trial plus evidence suggests that the restorative justice approach is both more empowering for survivors that going through a criminal trial and that it's a more effective method for perpetrators to actually learn their lesson and not re-offend. COMES BECAUSE? People. See as soft. Right they see you've done something wrong. You need to do the time for it. But Harsh Punishment Austin to anything to reduce harm to anybody, and if you ask the men that I have worked with what they would rather do face may or face another survivor, sit in a prison south, they will tell you prison cell every time. So I think once people understand that restorative justice is not soft. And, that it's actually much much more difficult to do. Maybe they'll get on board.

Dr. Eliza Ackerman Dr Ackermann Harvey Weinstein Metoo Founder Toronto Burke Rape Fullerton Shinwari Albert Igla-S Austin Dave Professor California State University
The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

Gastropod

05:55 min | 4 d ago

The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

"To start our watermelon adventure, we called one of the world's great watermelon. Harry Paris he has worked on watermelon science per years as part of Israel's agricultural research. Service. Well, I think the first thing that comes to the first two syllables water right? This is a true rich table. which has a lot of water and which actually probably the first use by people of this particular natural products. Was To quench thirst I've spent summers in Israel, and it is basically watermelon paradise but that's not actually were Harry I fell in love with a watermelon it all started when his dad grew watermelons in the backyard in their home in Brooklyn in the nineteen sixties then Harry gave watermelon farming himself fifteen years old and there was a new variety called Crimson sweets that came out and plans at a few seats in the garden and Lo and behold by the fall we got one nice big sweet high quality watermelon fruit. That we grew in the backyard in Brooklyn and from then on I was just hoped. Harry was well ahead of the local war hipster curve in Brooklyn but the watermelon is neither from Brooklyn nor from Israel, in fact, its origins are a little bit of a mystery. One of the big headlines was back in the mid nineteenth century when the British explorer David Livingstone went to the southern African deserts and low and behold. It was the year in which there was more rain than average and he found a large areas just covered with wild watermelons. He's wild watermelons were hard but does the name says have water say to pound them and so on and so forth but you could squeeze the water out of them David Livingston was searching for the source of the Nile. But apparently, he was also as a side hustle looking for other sources like the source of our sweet watermelons and people thought he'd founded the wild ancestor but Livingston was wrong about the source of the Nile and as it turns out now. We know he was wrong about those wild watermelons to now that scientists can examine the DNA of melons. They found that the Kalahari desert wild melon that Livingston came upon is not the ancestor of our sweet watermelon. But DNA is just one of the tools that scientists are using to try to figure out where and when the watermelon was domesticated, you can't just use one approach. You have to use an archaeology approach you have to use clients science you have to use. Linguistics you have to go into literature some of it'll some of an ancient. And even more than that. Of course, with the latest that we know genetics and genome can assist us first of all the plant Science Livingston was at least on the right continent because there are wild watermelons of various different species all over. Africa. So the wild relatives watermelon their fruits are smaller and rounder not elongate. They have often perfectly round it small fruits the outside looks like a watermelon like little, green and white. But inside they all have this extremely bitter and usually white. Whitish pulpits azan Renner is a professor of biology at the University of Munich and she's another one of the world's watermelon expert Suzanne's as you could boil these Super Beta watermelons for jam or you could use them medicinally as kind of a purge to clean out your insides. Basically, the wild watermelon wasn't a tasty thing to eat raw at all. So where the desert watermelon comes from, there are two things that have to happen to these bitter wild melons to turn them into the watermelons. We love today to specific genetic mutations. The first one is a mutation. That switches off the production of bitchy chemicals and so this mutation occurs in nature as bad for the plan because the plant of course has this bitterness to defend itself not eaten so that the fruits would not be yeah for the plan is better to lose the bitterness but for us, it's good and we can only imagine that native people every once in a while tried one of these melons maybe for what may be hoping for something to chew on and found some that wasn't bitter Suzanne's scientists know what that mutation is and how to find it in. A melon they just to look and the second mutation is the one that turned it red inside rather than white the red colors also well understood this is well studied and it's a completely different set of teens. This is and other scientists know exactly which two mutations they're looking for. Those mutations aren't common and wild melon. So when did they happen? When were watermelons domesticated Harry says the place to look for those clues is archaeology in ancient Egyptian tombs. Archaeologists have found paintings of whole watermelons on a platter there oblong and striped watermelons today not round like the. Wild bitter ones but did those ancient Egyptian watermelons taste like the ones we eat did they have the mutations for sweetness and maybe for the red color the painting can't really tell you that. But fortunately, some other watermelon evidence has showed up in a four thousand year old Egyptian tomb complex the seeds and leaves from the tomb ended up at the q Royal Botanic Gardens in England Suzanne wanted to find out if those remains held any clues about whether the watermelon had already been domesticated by them. So she wrote to mark Nesbitt who coincidentally starred in our tonic. And who runs the economic botany collection at Q. and she asked if she could borrow a watermelon leaf from the tomb, it was in a glass box encased in a box and he opd mark opened it, and he said it hadn't been opened since eighteen seventy one or whenever singles arrived there then and her colleagues analyzed demand the leaf and I they were thrilled the watermelon leaf DNA did in fact, have the mutations that would have made the fruit sweet and read but then when you see fourteen Dating for this material that we had received for Mark Nesbitt, it turned out it was much younger than we thought it turns out the watermelon material in the two had been left there by a later visitor carbon dating showed it was from the late eighteen hundreds huge bummer.

Harry Brooklyn Israel David Livingston Suzanne Mark Nesbitt Harry Paris Science Livingston David Livingstone Kalahari Q Royal Botanic Gardens Africa Harry I LO University Of Munich Azan Renner Professor
Wendy Osefo on the Black Lives Matter protests, and the 2020 election

The Electorette Podcast

04:32 min | 5 d ago

Wendy Osefo on the Black Lives Matter protests, and the 2020 election

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner, and this is the electorate. On this episode. A have a conversation with Wendy Osafo when he is a political commentator and a professor of education at Johns. Hopkins. University, she also served on the Obama Administration's anti-poverty initiative when he joins me to talk about everything from the current political climate to the recent black lives matter protests. We also discussed recent polling of the twenty twenty presidential election, and of course, many many failings of the trump administration. So without further ADO, here's my conversation with Wendy Assefa. Welcome to the broadcast. Thank you for having me. I really wanted to talk to you about this moment in history because I saw a tweet, the other day that really got my attention I think it was from Congresswoman Anna Presley and she said that the civil rights movement didn't in it didn't end and that we're living right now it's ongoing and I think that that's pretty you know accurate what's happening in the streets with black lives matter protests you know what do you think this moment actually means I think this moment right now is a defining moment in our country. And our nation I think that what we have to realize is that without cameras, this has been the backdrop of the lives of black people for years is just so happens that the death of George Floyd was videotaped but this has happened so many times in enough is enough I was told people you know I'm so happy that black lives matter has become a battle cry that people more aware about now in twenty twenty but I remember marching when black lives matters started before was even Hashtag with the death of Trayvon Martin it was the death and killing trayvon Martin that. Ignited the hash black lives matter and so I say all that to say, you know the civil rights movement was a time that we look to as a historic time society and we came through that as a nation but it hasn't ended because just evolved in different ways, and that's what people have to understand and I'm just so excited to see different faces, different races, different backgrounds really fighting now because it's going to take our nation to come together as one in order for us to end systemic racism. Now you're absolutely right it has evolved right? That's the perfect word. For it and when I think about you know what you just said marching when Trayvon Martin was murdered a movement was kind of in its infancy. But what I think is really interesting now is the reaction from conservatives now that people are marching around the world for black lives matter they their reactions were really extreme Ryan, I mean it's like splashed holy water on them like what do you think that they think black lives matter actually means what does it mean to them? You hear people saying like not in my town you're not gonNA bring black lives matter into Maya. Town. Yeah I think is really interesting in the way I. Answer. This question may actually be controversial I think that they are very clear what black lives matter means I think they are very clear but black lives matter stands for, but they don't want to accept what black lives matters means because if they do that means that they are accepting that this country's inherently racist and that's the truth and as uncomfortable truth we are saying black lives matter because black lives are the ones that are under attack were saying black lives matter because the statistics show that black and Brown children in schools are treated differently. That's why we're seeing black. Lives matter but you see it's not just black lives. Matter is black lives matter because black lives have been treated as less than for so many years in this country. So I think that conservatives are fully aware of what this means I think that is willful ignorance for them to say, no black lives with not only to accept that is not the Hashtag that the issue is the premise of the Hashtag doesn't issue and I think that when we're having these conversations with people, these are people who are elected Congress people they're pretty smart. You know they're pretty erudite nature, and so you know these are the same. Individuals who say because they're conservatives that a baby's life matters at the beginning of Jess station. You don't have to come out of the womb for your life to matter but soon as your created your life matters and therefore they're against abortion. So if they're able to understand that a baby's life matters at the beginning of creation than I'm pretty sure that they're competent enough to understand that black lives matter because black lives are the ones under

Jim Taylor Skinner Trayvon Martin Wendy Assefa Wendy Osafo Obama Administration Professor Of Education George Floyd Anna Presley Jess Station Ryan Congress
Breaking Through at CVRx

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:33 min | Last week

Breaking Through at CVRx

"Welcome to the MED tech talk podcast your host Pardo and I'm very excited to welcome the deem yard CEO CRX to this edition of the podcast Nadeem has had the lustrous career starting at GE and then his GM of MEDTRONIC's navigation business but his biggest and most important challenges come CPR which we're going to focus on today for full disclosure. I've had the pleasure to get to know Nadeem over the past eight plus years, and for the last four I've been on the beam sport and killed as an investor in Cebu. Rx. and. I'm really looking forward to the conversation today. Deem it is great to have you on cats. Thank you jeff it's great to be with you today. Terrific will good what we have a lot of things to cover today and really want to focus on CBS which is turning into I think an incredibly exciting story. But of course, their their roots to the CRX story and maybe you can take us through that a little bit the genesis of. Both. The CRT is therapy in heart failure but also barracks. Absolutely Jeff. So I talk about heart failure it is. A devastating disease. Very expensive from a cost perspective, but also from the human side of things, patients unfortunately suffering from heart failure, end up having those episodes of congestive offense way as they feel that drowning, it's like a continuous waterboarding expedient just how painful that is right and unfortunately one of those episodes could lead to their death and. In the United States hot figure is the second most expensive disease. If we consider cancer as one disease, if you stopped separating cancer between breast cancer by cancer sets that hot figure becomes unfortunately the most expensive disease in the US. What is hot forget? It's. When the heart over the years of. Insult or injury to starts becoming larger the walls of the heart becoming thinner. And the heart's ability to pump blood to the system is compromised. And that's. Compromise happening in multiple forms. One of them is called synchrony when the left side and the right side of the heart start becoming disconnected from each other. So think about it like a car. Engine where have the cylinders not kill into properly? Than the COD would not produce horsepower that you need. You need to tune the car that is what's Artie Cardiac. Surgery synchronization therapy. Was designed to do they. You know put two pacemakers right now it's only one pacemaker with two wires. That's why they call it by basic they based both ventricles and they tried to synchronize the left and right side. That works wild if the heart is distinct honest. However in heart failure. Only thirty to forty percent of the patients have synchrony. That s of the patient's heart become lodged the world's thinner. But the left and right sides are still beating in harmony but not strong enough. And for those patients, unfortunately crt devices did not produce the results that WHO, hoping for. Ten fifteen years ago when we're testing them. And that is where our approach berry. Flex. Therapy comes into play. The genesis of this therapy goes back multiple decades not gonna go to the whole history with Dr Professor Bronwyn than his wife and everything, but nevertheless indie. Let me take one paper from Dr. Abraham. From nineteen ninety nine and that is about CRT devices. In this paper that was published in the New England. Journal of Medicine Dr Abraham demonstrated the sustained. That's or the sustained benefit of CRT. Comes from the fact that when you should denies the left side on the right side of the heart, the pulse pressure of the volume of the blood leaving the heart. Activates the Beverly Flex. In the cutouts dodgy. Trusting. Right. So those patients with this synchrony, you recent combined the left and the right. Now you're sending a pulse pressure strong enough you activate the battery flex let a convoluted way to do it. How did you see that actually signed to do it well? Alex secrets wandered in the body we went with a Wyatt directly into those better receptors in the. Wall and activate though cells. Jackie with. Why go all around right now, our device would work in all forms of heart failure, but we have to go in developed the evidence one by one and demonstrates and in our first. Quote Unquote. beachhead strategy. We selected a large segment of patients who are not able to be treated by CIT devices. Why not the eligible for Siasi devices? Those patients are those who do not have distinctly. Right. So they left the right side of the heart beating in synchrony, but heart is not strong enough. The walls fin the muscles of the heart are tired at the. Pump, the blood.

Jeff Nadeem Cancer United States Dr. Abraham Ceo Crx Medtronic Journal Of Medicine Cebu GE Pardo CBS Dr Professor Bronwyn Artie Cardiac GM New England Jackie Alex Wyatt
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

12:05 min | 2 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Going into it thinking. I'm going to design an experiment. I'm going to do an experiment and see which is best. I probably would have done it differently in recorded things differently and that but I didn't. It was just part of what I was doing as a teachers. I'm going to try this and see if it works in a probably won't so who cares. That's okay there's always next year and won't harm them too much and so yeah so the tough thing about doing scholarship of teaching and learning is that you know to do in a study that has this level of control. You really have to plan it very well. Ahead you know not only in terms of the actual content of what you're delivering but getting Irbe full everything like that. And I don't know about you Kevin but I think a lot of bull lament that they get their teaching assignments very late or they change or a pandemic happens. You know so. It's very challenging to plan ahead so very often. We're doing a lot of the scholarship of teaching learning retrospectively. So looking back at and saying okay. Well was there something define in that in this course rather than having the opportunity is to design it in advance? So I personally know knockoff. Topic really excited about everything that will hopefully come out of what we're going through right now in terms of teaching and you know comparing face to face for zone line results and I'm sure some are trying to very tightly replicate their in class experience and some are totally going a different direction and you know I think time will tell which is the right way to go under the circumstances that we're all in right now so you know type back to the whole point of the article about engagement. I think we're going to find that. There are so many ways to engage students online that we haven't thought about and I've had several experiences teaching online and not having that face to face lecture in going into that thinking. You know. This isn't going to be as fun. Or how will I know that they don't understand and if I can't see their faces and things like that but they're so first of all in all our learning management systems are so many tools to engage with students? There's also you know if you are dealing with students that may be aren't intrinsically motivated by the material will you can engage them by doing little things like frequent frequent quizzing or frequent little mini assignments. That maybe don't count for very much but giving them stuff to do on a couple of times a week that they have to be checking in with the course and then you know rather than something. I was calling my online lectures when I teach are sort of more of an online conversation that goes throughout the week at my previous institution. We had voice thread and I really liked that all night. Haven't found one. That can do the same thing yet where I can post the slides with Audio Narration. And they can listen to one slide at a time so it's not like a video that you have to watch the whole thing but then right on that same slide with my audio track. A student can text or record either audio or video a question so throughout the week part of their assignment was to ask or answer. You know two or three questions on that slide set basically so the mice slides or you know what would be the traditional in class. Lecture Became living discussion board. That went throughout the week. So it wasn't just a one and done type thing and it gives students at least from the feedback so much more time to digest the material than they would in one class because they had questions that occurred to them four or five hours after class was over and they would just forget to shoot often email or not bother and things like that so this is one example. There's so many other ways to interact with students online than in the only have him for class or office hours which nobody attends anyway but some raising. I learned something really cool every time I talk to Krista. I'd never heard of that tool. That's that's amazing. I'm going to investigate that a little bit further for myself but as you mentioned there are so many tools out there and that's part of the fun of some of these organizations like hats and triple A. And so on that you really can't. That's why I keep tuning into as many of those town hall meetings. I can't because I want to hear what other people are doing. That always gives me ideas on not necessarily doing it the way they're doing it but it gives me an idea for how. I can tweak what I'm already doing in help with evolution that I talked about that. Not only that my podcast but applies to our teaching. I think we're paying attention as teachers were. We're also evolving as teachers in the you know you mentioned the interaction. Something that I have found is I I think I have better rapport. Or maybe I should say I. I get to know my students a little bit more deeply in an online class compared to at least the larger regular traditional lecture classes just because of the way it set up you can really have those individual conversations but you also learn more about them and I think there are some people I've mentioned on podcast the number of times that. I'm naturally an introvert in so I'm not you wouldn't know it sometimes it meetings but The I wouldn't necessarily in a class be the first person to raise my hand. It's not until I get very comfortable with being a student in that class and get comfortable with the instructor and get comfortable with my classmates that I'm ready to do that. And there are some students who never reached that level of comfort and being online. It's sort of like social media where you hear from people that you don't normally wouldn't expect to hear from very much of course that has a dark side to it in social media where you'd rather not hear what some of those people have to say but online works out well and you can really engage students more and you learn more about them as people as individual people and and I think having those kinds of connections really engages me. Moore's an instructor in there's been some you know quite a bit of research that shows that students who feel connected to at least one faculty member tend to stay in school longer. It'd be more successful in end up really achieving the degree that they not necessarily the same decree that came in for but achieving degree and And there are you know. Unfortunately so many students who don't get that far but if we can engage them then they can and and you can really do that in online education and I know a lot of people that haven't done much of that. Don't believe it but I can see you shaking your head by the way where were connected. Not only by audio video is we're doing this. We didn't record the video. But we're just recording the audio so I can See KRISTA shaking her head. It's funny that A few hours ago I did as soon Paul sort of a reunion with three of my students from my online pathophysiology class last summer and They were always working together. You know they kind of came into school together. They're all doing. Emt hours and all applying PA school at the same time and all of them had really unique things to say about how the class summer got them to think differently. Just about themselves The way that they learn and then how much. They're applying not toot my own horn about my class but how much they're applying that material in their daily daily life getting clinical hours and things like that and but the point is that in a year later. You know I'm doing zoom call. Because they wanted to catch up with me and I was that professor that has stuck with the three of them And that that's what a privilege that is for what we do. You know to have professors that I still think about end. I wish I could. I guess I could tell them that. Maybe I will. This'll be good inspiration. But there's a couple and they made such a humongous difference. You know whether not even their class but just the way that a approached me as a student trusted me as a student believed in me and what that got me through at times. You know it's immeasurable. So why not be that professor and you can absolutely do that online Like you mentioned. I got to know my students so much more usually because the classes are smaller but they don't necessarily have to be there's a lot organically built-in more room in time to approach your professor when it's you don't feel like you're bothering them because class just ended in their off to somewhere else so it it gives you that natural breathing. Room to meet whatever's more convenient for your schedules. It allows more time. You know that than maybe you would feel like you had with professor in person. There reminded me something you just said about. You know you have those teachers in your own history that you think about it. Maybe a shade reach back and talk to him and and I've done that a couple of times in my career but an assignment. I've given some of my students in the happy program ungraded assignment and I don't check up on him but I tell them your assignment is to go find one of your old professors or or even a high school teacher. That really made a difference in your life and just try to track him down reach out to him and say hey. I appreciate you even if it's just that short and I think the neighbor were this on. I think I saw something that this is like National Teachers Day or World Teachers Day or something like that. So I'm giving you an assignment dear. Podcast list your assignment is to go to their one teacher. Reach out to him somewhere. There probably hold up somewhere not here. Many people are GonNa WanNa hear from you because we all know that you all know that. I know that Krista just mentioned that that we as instructors. That's where it is. That's where it is for us and so to hear the feedback that we really made that connection with our teacher is going to be golden to them another. I have for anyone listening to this. Podcast is to give some feedback on this journal club idea and on how you think this episode went. What suggestions you have for future episodes. And we're going to be doing this as an occasional kind of thing so it's not you know every episode is not going to be a journal club. But we're going to be doing this regularly. So we need that feedback so that we know for the next one. We have some ideas that we can work with as we kind of mull this into whatever shape it's GonNa finally take and Krista it's always a pleasure talking to you I really appreciate The assignment gave me early on in reading this paper. And it's one that I would not probably have run across myself. would not have popped out to me but I'm glad we read it so We'll paper that. We have some debate about because I think we pretty there. We agreed on our. That'll be interesting to when that happens. But if anybody listening has Something that they would like to debate us on regarding that or have an opposing opinion. Or whatever then go ahead and and shoot that to us and You know we we might be able to get it on the air. We might address it in a future journal club or something like that and if anybody has good articles that they want to suggest as well go ahead and in some that into the podcasts. Top Line or podcast at the Professor Dot Org and I'll pass that along to Krista and we can go from there so Krista. It's been a lot of fun. I'M LOOKING FORWARD TO OUR NEXT JOURNAL. Club senior.

Krista professor instructor Kevin Professor Dot Org PA school teacher Paul Moore faculty member
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:42 min | 2 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Elizabeth F Barkley once wrote student. Engagement is the product of motivation and active learning is a product rather than a some because it will not occur if either element is missing. Welcome to the. Anp professor a few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Heaven Pat in this episode. I talk about a seminar on running concepts and KRISTA Polski joins us for a journal Club about content delivery style a.

KRISTA Polski Elizabeth F Barkley Anp professor Club
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

13:17 min | 3 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A if we want to have a different version of anyone attempt of anyone test and we want to allow at least three attampts. Whoa that's a lot of different tests to right. Isn't it allow unlimited tests? Which is the direction which I've been having then. Wow we need a Jillian versions of each test. Any of that is pretty much impossible right or is it impossible. Not only is it possible. It's fairly easy not super easy but fairly easy. All the learning management systems have the ability to use. What I'M GONNA call a question set but each has its own name for this feature. Here's how it works for test item. One I ride three versions. They could be three different ways to ask the same question or they could be three different aspects of the concept that I want to assess in test item one for example it could be three different examples of cardiac muscle tissue to identify or it could be one. Each of three major types of muscle tissue when a student takes attempt one one of those three items in the questions that will be presented as test item one in their next attempt. It could be the same item presented or more likely one of the other two versions because it's randomly selected by the learning management system. Even if it's the same item one that they saw in their first test attempt each item in the task. Let's say fifty items total we'll be similarly randomized so yeah okay. Test Item? One is the same as they've seen before. But maybe probably all or most of the other forty-nine items on attempt to will be different than they've seen before as with a slot machine having three items in each question site for fifty test items will generate now on your seats here. It'll generate seven point two times ten to the twenty third different possible test attempt versions. Yeah that's all right. It's it's more than a mole of different versions. The thing is I usually have more than three items per questions. I divide up. I want my students to know in the fifty categories some of which overlap because I want to attack some things at different levels of understanding or application or style of test item. Then once I get going and I'm constructing three items from my first category or my first question set you know what I always think of a fourth item which boxing idea for fifth item Mandalay that but for multiple choice and matching items I can set the LMS to randomize the choices. So I've got another billion Brazilian versions of that test being generated because not only is the LMS picking random items out of a question set of three or four or five. It's also scrambling up the choices within a multiple choice or matching item. When I first started doing this back in two thousand and two I got a math. Professor help calculate the possible number of versions on any one of my tests and her calculator could not go that high. It just gave an error being a math professor. She had a pretty powerful calculator. And you know what that's all I needed to know. I didn't need to know the exact number I just needed to know. It blew out the math professor's calculator so that was good enough for me. That is good enough to ensure the my students weren't getting the same test and every attempt of course I waited until the semester started to begin making my first time hoops ship. It started that way and advanced so well so heavy days that first semester. When I came home from school I immediately set my timer for twenty minutes and wrote as many test items as I could before the timer went off doing that every day. Yeah it was a chore. But really twenty minutes was not that big of a chore and it became a habit so it really wasn't that hard to sit down and do it for twenty minutes every day. Because that's just kind of what I got used to. After my first test was done I was really getting good at writing test items and getting faster and faster about coming up with good test. Items and his students were taking attempts of their first test. While I was working on test to they were taking the first test. And they were giving me feedback on. Which items were poorly constructed or just odd or Fulla? Typo is or something was wrong with it. I could claim that I did that on purpose. But I didn't know I just got started late but it did turn out to have that silver lining then the next time I taught that course it was easy to add a few more test items to some of the question sets of course I was by now a seasoned pro at test item writing something. I'd always dreaded it because I didn't feel like I was any good at it. But all that retrieval practice gave me a certain level of mastery mentally mastery of test item writing but I also gained insights about the AP concepts that. I was considering for test items. I lived through it and I'm a better person for it or at least a slightly better person for and so yeah like any new project. It seems intimidating but it's like a very long walking trip. You take one step at a time and I don't know if you walked for twenty minutes a day four days a week for two sixteen week. Semesters you'll end up having walked more than one hundred twenty five miles probably with no injuries. No collapsing on the roadside. No dehydration just a smile on your face. So do it one step at a time and you can do it to me and I also want to mention some icing that I put on that retrieval practice cake and decorations after all. Isn't that cake that much better when it has icing and grains one thing? I did that helped a lot. The icing was give students an online pre-test before much of the course and online attempt taken from that huge test bank that built over that coming modules content because I told them to expect to fail it but they had to take it to unlock the videos and other learning resources for the coming module honestly it took a while to convince them not to read ahead and not to study not to prepare for it. It was merely to give them a peek at what they be expected to know later. But we're not in any way expected to know yet and you know what those pretexts helped a lot now. The cake decorations consisted of making my online tests. Cumulative every test had questions from all the previous tests the really important questions the core concepts the big ideas. Yeah of course. They balked at that one. I I told them who wouldn't. We've all learned. The cumulative tests are scary. But it didn't take them long to realize that those questions from prior modules were the easy questions to answer on a new test and by the time they got through a few tests. Those questions got even easier because they kept seeing those kinds of questions again and again questions on those topics cap coming up so they grew to love cumulative testing. I know that sounds weird. I know don't believe me but I swear it's true and I know what you're thinking that if we're doing all formative testing and it's open book and students can even consult with each other than well. Can we trust that? They've actually learned anything that they have any knowledge in their heads that they can use without a book without asking anyone and also there on the right track. Well the answer to that is an emphatic. And wholehearted yes. How do I know that? And how can I be so confident about it? It's because when I first started this and for many years thereafter I also did to summit of exams to see whether all that retrieval practice worked. And you know what it did. Not only students walk into their exams with more confidence. They did way better on them. Then my pass classes had done on their exams before I started doing. Any of his formative testing possibly part of that improvement came from their confidence. But I'm sure that a lot of it came from all those open book formative tests and my students told me that they not only felt confident on exam day. They also told me that they tried to cram for the exam but found that well. There just wasn't any need to as they prepared to cram the night before an age old ritual. They felt compelled to perform they realized as they reviewed the course content that kind of knew it all and knew it pretty. Well so yeah. I don't have any problem thinking that. The formative testing alone gave them what they needed. There's more to my story of retrieval practice in the AP course and a lot of that story is told in previous episodes and in seminar that I have available in the links and the show notes episode page. But before I wrap it up for now I want to mention that I really think it works. Best if we write our own test items most of the time sure the test items at the end of textbook chapters in study guides in online study or quizzing programs and the like are all useful tools and have their place and learning. But I've grown to like making my own and I think if I use my own test items that integrate easily with the way I tell the story of amp it works better for learning. But that's a discussion for another day. A in.

professor AP cardiac muscle dehydration Mandalay
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

06:49 min | 3 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"I've talked about this retrieval practice thing in past episodes so you may want go back and listen to the back catalogue you know as you walk your dog around your neighborhood at a safe distance from others but right now. I do want to summarize the essential way my implementation of retrieval practice works in case you WanNa try something like it or in case it sparks an idea for some little tweak that you can make to what you're already doing or are already planning for the next semester. I it's based on online open book tests. That open book thing seems heretical. I know all but really this is real life so I just needed to get over that and I'm glad I did because it turns out that this is the way that students achieve mastery by getting help when they need it. Just like in soccer or trout fishing and you know what isn't looking things up and consulting with peers. Something that the truly competent health professionals do all the time. Hey if they're taking care of me I'd rather they double check the proper dosage of that script. They're about to write for me or ask a colleague. Check my medical imaging before making a diagnosis. Why wouldn't I want my students to use those options in amp? The next thing is that I set my learning management system to serve the questions one at a time just like they do in the online board exams that most health professionals have to take to get licensed or to proceed from one stage of professional training to the next. I heard so many of my former students told me that this one time format raised their stress levels even higher than they already were walking into that board exam meaning maximum stress. Right after I'd been doing that for a while in my class I started hearing from former students that think. We're so glad that they've gotten used to doing that in my class. And then unlike some of their classmates who didn't have me for amp. My students didn't freak out when they had to do test items one at a time on their board tests. But you know what that's just gravy. The main reason I do the one in a time thing is that I'd found out that during in class testing some students had difficulty focusing when they were faced with many items on one page. Now I know you and I are used to. That are more likely. Our brains are just wired a certain way to allow us to focus on just one item on a page of many items but for some students probably each with their own unique set of neural pathways and connections the ability to see just one test item at a time helps them focus which means that it helps them to succeed next. I don't strictly time mine tests. There's usually a start date and an end date but not a limit of a certain number of minutes way back in two thousand and two when I first started doing you miss. I didn't plan on giving untying tests them up in my first one with a one hour time limit and it had to be on a certain date and within a certain limited window of time like ninety minutes guess what because I had at one of the highest number of students per semester at our college and because I was apparently the first professor in history of our college to give students one test item at a time there were too many hits on our server per hour and the learning management system started weasing and coffee in will. It simply stopped working for a while. Not what you'd want to happen. When two hundred and fifty students have a limited time to take a test right especially in amp test because those are always scary and even more so when it's an online test because remember this was almost twenty years ago when not very many students had ever taken an online test or at least. We're very comfortable with them then. Matt at our college certainly so I went to our staff and they advised me to stretch out the day to my test taking window and make my tests on timed of course that sticky frozen stay in my comfort zone. Part of my brain rebelled. What an untying tasks that they could take over the course of several hours or days but the alternative was the shutdown our server for my students and all students that are so. Yeah okay I relented and I think I kinda did pout. A little bit at least in my head I was pouting. You know what though it turned out to be a breakthrough on time? Testing is so freeing to the learning process and in so helpful to students with almost any kind of learning challenge. Which is everyone in my opinion. Sure eventually medical professionals will need to be able to answer things quickly on the spot but we should not expect them to start their should we? So okay maybe closed. The books notebooks and have some kind of time limit on a midterm or final exam. Maybe but really. I'm thinking of the closed. Books and timing should come at or near the end of their degree program. Not In my course at all and AIM P. They're still beginners even at the end of my course marketing support for this podcast is provided by. Half's the human anatomy and physiology society promoting excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology for over thirty years. As I've mentioned in the last.

soccer difficulty focusing professor Matt
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

02:46 min | 3 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hey I have some exciting news. We have a new kind of segment plan for the next episode. Or maybe the one after that these days. I've learned that one must not make plans based on the world staying on. Anyone assumed trajectory but soon I hope what is it I can tell you. It's not a book club we already have one of those and won't be getting a new book club recommendation soon. So now it's not a book club. It's a journal. Club the ADP Professor Journal Club. And we have a new voice joining in for that one. It's a voice that we've heard before on this podcast and a voice that you may have heard before if you've been active in town hall meetings or in Triple A. Or any of a number of other venues including her own journal articles on teaching and learning. It's my friend. Krista Room Polski who is an associate professor at Moravian College in Bethlehem Pennsylvania and part of the ANC authoring team over at McGraw Hill? Every other month or so she'll be bringing us a journal Article She's found. That helps enlighten us about evidence based approaches to teaching amp. I have a link to the first journal. Article in the show notes in the episode. Page if you WANNA read ahead and perhaps send in your recorded reaction but you don't have to read ahead. Don't worry about that. Crystal will be summarizing. The article in the Journal Club segment. And then she and I will be discussing it a bit as always if you have any ideas to share about that or any other feature of this podcast or perhaps a new feature. You'd like to suggest. Please let us know so that we can better meet your needs. Hey let's have a peer review. Wait we already have that. It's called the listener survey. I don't have nearly as many of those in is. I'd like to have so why not go to the? Ap Professor Dot Org Slash Survey Right now and tell me what you think anonymously. Of course this is professional peer review or after all right searchable transcript and a captioned audio Graham. This episode are funded by AAA the American Association for Anatomy at Anatomy Dot Org. Did you know that if you're looking microscopic images to use remote teaching triple a? Has You covered? They have something called the virtual microscopy database or Vm. De.

ADP Professor Journal Club Article Krista Room Polski Journal Club associate professor Professor ANC Bethlehem Pennsylvania McGraw Hill Moravian College American Association Graham
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

07:25 min | 4 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"I know you've missed it but here it is finally once again were are where we practice what we all do in our teaching and take apart words. Translate their parts to deepen our understanding. Sometimes they're familiar terms. Sometimes their terms that are new to US may be so fresh that they're new to everyone and the first one on our list today should not be surprising. It's the term virus. Now that's a simple term that everybody uses all the time. But what does it literally mean? Well it literally means when we translate it poison which makes sense right it can also mean slime or ooh which makes it sound even uglier and Nastier than just thinking of it as poison. So these little particles that are creating such havoc in our world right now those we can think of in a way as poison particles. Of course they're going to be working differently than many other poisons do but they are a hazard particle that is a hazard to our biological function. The next term list is related and that is krona virus in the word part corona which actually is part of a lot of different terms in anatomy and physiology as well as in virology in corona means crown. This virus is named for the crown like arrangement of protein spikes in the virus particles protein code or captured. And of course the second part of the word is virus so it's just corona attached virus meaning the virus with the crown or with this crime like arrangement and that group of viruses called the corona viruses was named quite a while ago back in the nineteen sixties. So it's almost as old as I am. But of course we've only more recently been hearing a lot about it in the news and in coming up in various conversations that we're hearing right now and related to corona virus has our next term in our word dissection list and that is the name of the virus itself and that is SARS covy too so that's Capitol S. A. R. S. Hyphen Capital C. Small Capital V. Hyphen to SARS. Covy to and breaking that down the first part. Sars is an acronym that means Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome virus. Got that name because the virus that causing the current outbreak is genetically related to the virus that caused the SARS outbreak of two thousand and three and then the next part the covy part is short for Corona Virus Co for Krona V for virus. So putting those two parts together SARS covy. We're talking about a SARS related at least Czars Related Corona virus. Okay that tells us a lot so far but it wasn't the first one discovered it wasn't the one that caused the SARS outbreak in two thousand and three. It's a new one so we're going to call it number two because it's not the first one in SARS covy to was officially named in February of Twenty twenty now. This virus causes a disease that is called. Kovin nineteen and covert nineteen was broken down in a word dissection back in the special post preview episode number sixty four. She can go back and review that if you want now in that previous word dissection. I mentioned that the World Health Organization named Bokov in one thousand nine hundred. So that's the disease and they named the disease using existing guidelines and they did that on February eleventh twenty twenty now that who names diseases in the ICU D. or international classification of diseases on the very same day the International Committee on taxonomy of viruses or ICT named the SARS. Covy to as the agent of that disease. Now it's the ICY TV. Who such the official names viruses. So the World Health Organization names diseases and this organization on the taxonomy of viruses. They name viruses. Their official name is International Committee on taxonomy of viruses. Ict Now interestingly the World Health Organization has been avoiding using the term SARS covy to directly when they're giving out through public communications because they want to avoid the public confusing Kobe. Nineteen with SARS. That is that original operate from two thousand three because it is a different virus and a different disease. Yes related yes conceptually. They're with each other but it's so easy in public communications for things to get out of focus and confused so in order to avoid confusion there instead preferring to it indirectly as the virus responsible for cove in nineteen. Now they're not denying or abandoning the official virus name. They're just you know kind of finessing. Their language a little bit to avoid using the official name again to avoid confusion the next term on our list is pandemic and we all use this term a lot but breaking it down I think gives us insight into its meaning that a little bit different maybe than we we have when we're not thinking too much about what it means so the first word part pan means all and the next part damn means people as in our term demographics or democratic so when I say people I'm I'm really using out in the sense of a group of people as we would look at in a demographic study for example and then the icy ending means relating to so pandemic describes a situation that relates to all people now of course that's not met absolutely literally it just means that potentially all people could become exposed to a pandemic disease or be affected directly or indirectly by pandemic disease now that's a more widespread phenomenon than the next term on our list which is epidemic an EPA means upon so we put that together to upon a group of people are related something relating to something that affects a whole group of people so a condition becomes epidemic when a whole group of people is affected when that extends to a wider group. Pat Is across the globe now again not literally every single corner but much more widespread than a typical epidemic. Then we elevate that to the status of pandemic and again it's the World Health Organization that usually gives the official designation of something being an epidemic or pandemic. You'll see these terms. Often used outside of those official.

SARS World Health Organization official corona Twenty twenty International Committee US Kovin Capitol S. A. R. Pat Respiratory Syndrome Kobe EPA
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:41 min | 4 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A in the upcoming full episode. That is episode number sixty six. We're going to continue the conversation about how to quickly and effectively move our on campus amp course to remote learning. And as part of that discussion. I'm going to talk about what author and Professor Bruneta Brown Calls F F ts Now. I translate. Ft's as fumbling first tries. She has another fray she uses. And I'll talk to you about what that phrase is and why it's important for amp teaching in the full episode. Something else I'm going to talk about is a phenomenon called Zoom bombing and it's something that I put some links in the show notes for the previous episode but run across it in time to get it into the audio part so I'm going to be doing that in the full episodes sixty six something else. I'll be talking about briefly. Is the online protein folding game called folded and how we can use that in teaching and learning and how that relates to the current pandemic and the featured topic is going to be about our teaching slides how we can keep them simple and keep them connected to the story. We're going to tell in. These are skills that I've learned in continuing to learn over a period of time. And it can help us now at this time when we're scrambling to deliver our story and our slides in a different way than we're used to but these are principles and techniques that can also be used once we get back on campus too so all of that and more coming up in full episode number.

Professor Bruneta Brown Ft
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:04 min | 4 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hit yet another episode focusing on strategies to cope with teaching amp e during the cove in Nineteen Upright. This one is the third one. The first one was bonus episode sixty three which I titled Mid Winter Winterizing of our AP course in which came out a few weeks ago just before things officially hit the fan with this outbreak in the United States. We better get ready for a pandemics of planning tips and strategies. And that's still helpful even now that we're in the thick of things. The second one was bonus episode sixty four B which came out a little over a week ago enlisted nineteen additional specific tips for quickly moving from an on campus course to a remote environment. I called that episode quickly. Moving to remote delivery the musical and we did have music. Amp teacher and stem music composer. Greg crowder graciously sang three songs to sing along with so yeah really was a musical and now this third episode which probably won't be the last before. I jump into my list of additional tips. I WanNA clarify few things. I you may be listening to this episode way later than when I'm recording this. Which means that you are a survivor of the cove in nineteen outbreak of twenty twenty. That's great congratulations. You made it through but you might be thinking and there's nothing in these episodes for me but you'd be wrong. Most if not all of these tips really can help us in the cove in nineteen scenario but they are also useful for any course anytime anyplace second if you find even one thing in any episode that sparks. An idea for your teaching or is helpful any way. That's a win. Remember Kevin's law a professional development that I mentioned in the bonus APPS conference episode way back in twenty eighteen. It states that if I learned just one useful thing in a professional development experience. It's worth it. I've been reading and listening to a lot of advice often from colleagues who have never even taught online before that. Well just isn't the best advice in my opinion so I'm thinking there will be one thing in this episode that will spark a different way of thinking for you. If in fact you do learn just one thing in this episode or in any episode. Will you do me a favor and share it with a colleague? Email social media singing it off of your balcony would ever gets it out there to folks that could use the help. They're not flying those advertising glimpse anymore so this is the only way to spread the word third. You probably noticed that. I've not been providing my usual update on scientific discoveries in human biology for the last few episodes part of the reason. Is that the big story now. At least that set of stories keeping our attention right now are about the cove in nineteen outbreak could discuss these stories in this podcast but given the rapidly evolving nature of what we know and what we think. We know what we thought we know. But now we know we didn't know and and given the time between planning and episode recording an episode and then getting it all set up for release. Well whatever I say. We'll be out of date by the time you hear it. So what I'm doing instead is putting the top stories in my nosal newsletter which is a daily update of up to ten headlines. I've chosen for that day. Just go to nonsol- dot com slash. The professor nozzle is also nuzzle dot com slash the ABC professor. And take a look at some of the past issues if you think. It's helpful vent subscribe. It's free by the way you just need to put in your email address and share that newsletter. To if you know someone who may be interested fourth wow fourth. This is giving a longer than I intended. Oh men wait a minute. Don't tell me you're surprised by okay..

Kevin professor United States Greg crowder ABC
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

06:04 min | 5 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Immune. I guess one of the things I would need to keep in mind if I'm teaching. This technique are offering this technique to my students is that I need to emphasize with them. That lets him sitting down with a handful of students in my office and in there asking me you know. How can we deal with this fire? Hose of information and I'm giving them different techniques and they might say well concept. I just can't get the hang of that or flash cards. Just don't do it for me or you have something else you know and and also what about these memory palaces and kind of walk them through the idea of it but I guess something? I need to emphasize with them. Is that when they walk out of my office? They're not going to be fully prepared to that. It's something that they have to just keep coming back to until they get more and more comfortable with it. Would you say that's fair? I definitely think that's fair Personally I actually I heard about some of these demonic techniques before med school unfortunately I just watch a few videos online and tried to learn from that. I think I could remember a couple of numbers better because I made a visuals seen one time but after about a week or two hit a roadblock and I didn't know where to go so I completely cut off the practice without actually developing satisfactory technique. Can I didn't use it all through Mexico only revisiting it later on towards the end because it's not something that you're going to be able to teach in one session. It's something that requires a little bit of practice every day or a couple of times a week or something along those lines so when someone is actually taking this seriously we often recommend they spend ten fifteen minutes a day maybe in the morning first thing before they get out of bed using these demonic going over their old ones trying to create a new one or two at already have Flash Card deck for instance they can go through the flash cards probably on their phone or IPAD and then make a demonic or while. They're sitting there in bed. Write it down or store I would suggest writing it down on your flash card deck or drawing it out or having some reference point for later on because you might not remember it the first time. So there's still space retrieval required in it but it tends to be much less retrieval and much better organized when you can implement these techniques but this technique sounds great. I'm glad to have it now in my little toolbox that I can open up for my students in show. Hey look there's lots of different tools here and it. Kinda you know this this idea of taking a lot of practice kind of brings to mind something that I learned late in life and that I give up too easy you know. I'd need the channel that when I'm talking to my students who likewise you know You give technique like let's say the Memory Palace and and really give along with that. Not just the technique but the encouragement that it's don't give up too easy like I would unites when you're a little kid and you're learning to write for the first time you're learning to read or you're learning to ride a bike or catch a baseball. You keep working out. I mean just think about you know little kids learning to walk. They don't follow over and then give up. They get right back up when they try it again and fall over and get up and fall over and then eventually they get the hang of it and I need to to do that. You know I need to learn to do that as an adult when something is difficult for me. A new learning management system is thrown in my lap. Oh my gosh. I'll never learn. But if I stick with I do and the same thing with these memory palaces if I can encourage my students to stick with it then it can be a very useful technique and and there are a lot of resources out there. That students can to kind of get that. Hang of it and and learn what to do. And that includes some of those At your website and show notes in the episode page so you can learn these memory techniques and you can also point to them off for your students. And they're they seem to be geared toward medical students but I've listened to a lot of them and you know why they applied. Amp students to. I mean everything that they're talking about in their a fits with what our students are going through so I highly recommend it and once again thank you very much chase. No thank you and yes. There's a lot of examples on on the podcast and on our youtube page. They can go and check and feel free to email me or contact me on social media and give a little more instruction possibly a regular listeners. Know this but if you're new or just need reminding don't forget that I always put links and the show notes and at the episode page at the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four. In case you WANNA further explore any ideas much in this podcast or if you want to visit our sponsors for this episode chased DeMarco gave me a link for an example of how to build your own memory palace in a video tutorial called memory palaces for medicine they're also links to his podcast episodes on Memory Palaces. The story method pneumonic and a blog. Post on evidence based study strategies. You can reach chase directly by way of email or any of the social media accounts listed in the show notes or you can even set up on one on one session with him. And you're always encouraged to call in with your questions comments and ideas that the podcast hotline. That's one eight three three Lion Dan or one eight three three five four six six three three six or send a recording a written message to podcast at the Professor Dot. Org I'll see you down the road. The professor is hosted by Dr. Kevin Pat An award-winning Professor and textbook author in human.

Memory Palace Professor Professor Dot baseball youtube professor Mexico Dr. Kevin Pat An DeMarco
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

07:21 min | 5 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Greg crowder is a dedicated and creative. Ap teacher besides being a rockstar literally Rockstar in creating in using music and stem education if you haven't explored his many many songs that relate to m. p. education. You really need to do that. When go to that? Link in the show notes or episode page also find a link to the page for another of Greg's pieces. That's great for a sing along that one students learn some basic ideas about spinal nerve plexus when you go there check out the fact that Greg provides many different ways to experience his songs for this one about nerve flexes. One of the options is a carioca screen. That you and your students can follow as you saying really you need to check these out a tip number fourteen read the book you know that unreasonably large and expensive tax book students bought for your course. Now is the perfect opportunity to get them to actually read it. They'll be socially distance anyway. One hopes and looking for something to read more students raid their textbook rather than actually reading it. Now's a good time to turn the reading of the book into a bigger element of the course. If You keep your instructor provided explanations at a minimum as I advised in an earlier segment then students have no choice but to get a lot of the needed information from their textbook tip number fifteen just in case and center substituting Your Plan Lecture Class activity with a case study. There are plenty of these case studies available online but I found it to be fun making up my own. It's much easier than you think. If you've never done it I often use medical images and make up a story around it and then ask questions. About this. Scenario the tease out important concepts of anatomy physiology one option would be to post that maybe divide the class up into groups in your learning management system and give each one a different case to workout and then posted in a discussion forum of just for that group. And they're easy ways to do that. Your folks at your institution will help you figure out how to do that. And then have them more the case and then have each group present their case to the other groups and what their conclusion was and why tip number sixteen learning is art and art is learning. Drawing drawing is a powerful learning strategy. Nearly everyone can draw. Sure some folks are regular Davinci's when they draw many of us most of us are not and that's okay making stick and ball. Figures can work just as well as the more realistic kind of art. This can really help with lab activities. When the lab's not available consider drawing in labeling exercises drawing out concept maps making organs from household items like paper or doe or scraps of fabric bake a cake in the shape of an Oregon in heaven share picture of it online things like that. Tip number seventeen simulate reality even if we've never used computer simulations of anatomical structures or physiological functions. We know they've been around for a while. Your institution may already provide access to some of these and there are some available online at no cost. I provided links to a few of them but go out searching. Send your students out searching and play around with them and see how that might fit into your remote learning scenario tip number eighteen embrace reality if things go well any temporary move of your face to face class to the online environment is well temporary probably a few weeks then the emergency past and we're back to our usual mode so yeah it may be nerve wracking but normalcy will return soon right tip number nineteen no side trips. Somebody in your course. Maybe you might suggest that you're suspended on. Campus class should meet somewhere off campus. Maybe a cafe or restaurant after all these venues are likely to be virtually deserted and would welcome even a little bit of business. Do not do it do not that would defeat the whole purpose of suspending face to face class meetings which to slow or even break the cycle of the viral outbreak. We're not doing this just for us. We're doing it as part of our social obligation to support and protect each other. So let's keep that our priority. Yeah there are a lot of other things that we can do quickly and easily once we put our minds to it and hopefully this short list has already stimulated some IDs. One final thought. Let's look at this at the adventure it is. The universe has thrown in unexpected challenge at us but tries to the occasion and tap our creativity in our experience to make some awesome. Lemonade or those lemons. Our positive can do attitude can go a long way to reassure our students and to motivate them to do some strong self powered learning a as. I mentioned several times earlier. I put links in the show notes and at the episode page at the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. In case you WANNA further explore any ideas mentioned in this podcast or if you want to visit our sponsors tell us what's going on with you your tips and suggestions and your questions at the broadcast hotline. That's one eight three three line Dan or one eight three three five or six six three three six or senator recording a written message to podcast at the AP professor dot work. I'll see you down the road. The professor is hosted by Dr. Kevin Pat An award-winning Professor Textbook. Author in human anatomy.

Greg crowder professor Rockstar Professor Textbook m. p. education instructor Davinci Oregon Dr. Kevin Pat An Dan senator
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

04:55 min | 5 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Your students. Don't expect a Ron Howard film or Morgan Freeman voice over. They just expect you being you in fact the more you you can be the more comfortable you and your students will be during this weird adventure that we're all on right now or maybe a slightly more laid back and casual. You might be an order. You know to engender that all important. We're all in this together vibe that we want to create right now tip number nine. Do some audio visual courses such as anatomy and physiology. You probably need at least some images for some of your instructional media but consider supplementing with audio in remember your textbook into our lab manual or lab atlas probably has a lot of the images you need anyway now audio is often even easier than video and students love it. They're part of the podcast generation after all and they can stream it to their mobile device and listen while they're doing other stuff like organizing their survival bunkers supply of toilet paper and bottled water. You'll be right in their ears as if you're sitting on their shoulder and sharing your insights tip number ten keep things brief. The knee jerk response to switching from live video and audio his simply do lectures that you've given classroom into a camera and Mike you do that if you want. If your anxiety level is climbing that may be the best strategy for you but remember an earlier point about less being more. Consider just doing really brief media clips. It's easier to hold the tension into effect of instruction in short bursts when working remotely trust me on this one too if you must spend a lot of time on a topic then break it up into short clips but consider taking those. Long winded presentations and chop chop chop them into a simpler easier to digest version. Tip number eleven be nimble in the martial art called Tai Chi Chuan. One way that we practice being nimble is to always keep our knees flexed a bit sort of like cats do when they're on the prowl. Doing that one can quickly move with great power into any of several defensive positions swats do that. Let's be nimble by being ready to shift positions quickly in response to what's happening in our course ready to change directions if we have to expecting to have to shift some things around. If your regular listener you knew I was GonNa Work. Taichi analogy somewhere right. You're probably also waiting for me to somehow work in term carbon no hemoglobin. But you know what I just could not find an angle. So you won't be hearing me say carbon hemoglobin at all in this podcast because carbon me. No Hemoglobin just doesn't apply right now. Tip Number twelve teach by testing. Give a lot of low stakes open book multiple attempt quizzes and tests retrieval practice. Any I've been preaching this message for decades but even in face to face courses. This strategy is a game changer. Now's a good opportunity and try and prove me wrong. Tip Number. Thirteen testing is not always teaching. Okay wait really I think. The testing is always teaching something. But you know there's the formative kind of testing I was just talking about that. Is All about retrieval practice. And then there's the summit of kind of evaluation after students have had a chance to do retrieval practice in this kind of some of testing test. The final outcome of learning. Maybe for this emergency we could just combine them and call the formative testing summit of when I picture when I say this is that we could allow multiple attempts at an online test with only the best score counting toward the course grade that would allow students to do retrieval practice until they gain more and more mastery some links in the show notes and episode page at the A. P. Professor Dot Org Slash Sixty Four B. That explain more fully what I mean by this..

Morgan Freeman Mike A. P. Professor Dot Org Tai Chi Chuan Ron Howard
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

11:27 min | 5 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Hi there this is Kevin Patent. With a brief audio introduction to episode number sixty four of the amp professor podcast also known as top radio and audio salon for teachers of human anatomy and physiology in the upcoming full episode. That is episode sixty four. I'm going to have a conversation with chase DEMARCO. Now Chase. The Marco is widely known is a numbness. That is a memory expert. He's also a consultant entrepreneur more and believe it or not initiative that he's an MD PhD candidate who has a passion for helping medical students succeed in their studies and in their professional exams. Now I got a lot of support from my recent discussions of Flash Card techniques and episode fifty eight fifty nine and sixty and this conversation will complement those with an explanation of a study techniques sometimes called a memory palace which is based on something very old and very effective called the method of Loci. But wait for the full episodes. Sixty four where you'll get to know chase and learn a lot more about this memory technique. The free distribution of this podcast is sponsored by the master of science and Human Anatomy and physiology instruction the happy degree. I'm on the Faculty of this program so I know the incredible value it is for an MP teachers check out this online graduate program at NYC DOT EDU slash. Happy or click. The Lincoln the show notes episode page. And you gus that it's time once again for were where we practice what we all do in teaching and take apart words and translate their parts to deepen our understanding. Sometimes they're old and familiar terms and sometimes terms that are new to us or maybe they're so new that nobody knows him yet because they just got made up by somebody today. We have a few related to our main topic in that. Is this memory technique that we're going to be discussing with chase the Marco and the first term is come up before actually more than once and passed up assode and we did dissect at once back in episode number fifty nine and that is the word mnemonic so just to refresh our memories a little bit that word part non means memory literally. It means mindful but we use it in terms of memory and then the icy ending needs relating to so pneumonic when you put it all together means relating to memory and usually refers to something that aides memory it can be a mnemonic sentence or phrase where the first letter of each word and sentence has the same first letter of items in a list that we wanna remember but there are other mnemonic techniques. And we're going to be discussing one of those techniques in the full episode regarding pronunciation. I find myself going back and forth between me monarch and pneumonic and that usually depends on the context words around it and my brain just goes there with when to or not. Just come out of my mouth. And maybe they're things like that you do two now. The latter pronunciation MNEMONIC is preferred by most of the sources. I looked at so I'm going to try and stick with that as much candy or we'll see how that goes. The next word on the list is a related term. It's actually just another version of the word pneumonic. And that is numbness. And it's the same as demonic. But we're going to swap out that IC- ending in demonic input in ast ending which means an agent or performer of something and so an honest literally van is a person in agent performer. Someone who performs memory most often the term in the English language is used to describe someone who's adapt out or skilled in feats of memory. Like I dunno remembering the order of cards and a shuffled deck or Memorizing as much as they can from a page from a phone book or maybe trying to learn all the bones of the skeleton. Yeah that's a feat of memory and that takes some work and maybe there are some techniques that we can use to make that. Go more simpler for students at still going to be hard. But maybe there's a way to help them organize that and and get done quickly and effectively really be able to retrieve that information when it needs to be retrieved and yeah I sometimes find myself pronouncing it sometimes which actually that does show up occasionally dictionaries but it's most often pronounced nemesis are honest. I sometimes mistakenly US methodist instead anonymous. I don't know where that comes from. But anyway I swap out the end for a t go figure. I promise to work on that. If you promise to overlook my mistake okay the next term on our were dissection list is Loci L. O. C. I it's a word that's GONNA come up related to demonic technique that we're going to be discussing in the full episode. It can be pronounced. Loci as I just did but other common pronunciations are low cy or Loki but when I hear pronouncing that way Loki High. I think of that trickster. From Norse Mythology Loki L. O. K. I. So loci it is from me but you get to pick your favorite LOCI. Is the plural form of the Latin word locus LLC US which we also use as is an English meaning place or location? In fact the word location is derived from the word locus. We sometimes use locus in genetics. To describe the physical location of a gene within a chromosome. So you may have run across that use already. Loci is the plural form of locus. So it simply means places. We're going to be talking about a technique sometimes called the method of loci which we can now more easily see simply means method of places. This podcast is sponsored by hats. The human anatomy and Physiology Society promoting excellence in the teaching of human anatomy and physiology for over thirty years. Go visit HAP- s- at the professor dot org slash hats that's h? Aps only hey but step into the bookshop and see what we may want to add to our personal professional bookshelf. I'M GONNA go straight over to the medical shelf this time because I know exactly which book I'm looking for. It's called read this before medical school out of study smarter and live better while excelling in class and on your use a complex board exams. It's by chase DeMarco Theodore McConnell and Grodin recognized that name chase DeMarco. He's the guy I'm chatting with in the upcoming full episodes sixty four as you can tell from the title. This book is for students in medical school and you may teach. Medical students are students in some other health profession program. Or maybe you're teaching. Amp TO PRE MED or pre nursing or any of the many other students in the typical amd p course. This book could be helpful to any of them really why because all the students had just mentioned are being hit with what's surely feels like a fire hose of information if feels that way because it really is a lot of information and ideas to learn in a very short period of time and most of them will eventually be facing licensing or other professional exams of some sort right whether it's complex or in class or even try outs for jeopardy advice and strategies offered in. The book could be a game changer for some students. This book covers all the important things to consider when trying to figure out how to succeed in. Aim for example. Why STUDY SKILLS ARE IMPORTANT? Y? Class participation is essential how to use the teacher's time and resources effectively using the school's resources how to study at home making a study plan in managing time effectively. A lot of my students could use. I could use the value of study groups and how to organize and run a study group and even how to optimize work life balance. There's also a big section on test prep which strategies for both course exams and those big professional exams. I just mentioned a moment ago and because there's a lot of memorization required in amp. Yeah you know there is right. There's a big section on memory strategies. This is a great book to have on your teaching show to offer to students as a place to start learning how to study. And how to handle that? Fire Hose of ideas. Amp or perhaps. Add to your list of recommended resources for your students. Just go to the show notes or episode page or the AP Professor Dot Org Slash Book Club to take a look at this book and be sure to listen to the full episodes sixty four featuring a chat with the author chase DEMARCO. Hey you probably forgot about that survey that I've been taking. That's part of my end of season. Debriefing I'm asking you now. Please take just a few minutes of your time to respond to that anonymous survey because it's your experience as an individual listener. That's important to me. Just go to the AP professor dot Org Slash Survey and as always. Thanks for your support. Searchable transcript and a captioned audio gram of this preview episode are funded by AAA the American Association for Anatomy. Check out there many resources and events on their newly redesigned website at Anatomy Dot Org. Well this is Kevin Patent signing off for now and reminding you to keep your questions and comments coming. Why not call the podcast hotline right now at one eight three three? That's one eight three three five four six six three three six or visit us at the AP Professor Dot Org. I'll see you down the.

chase DEMARCO professor Kevin Patent Marco amp professor American Association for Anato NYC locus LLC US consultant Loki High Physiology Society DeMarco Theodore McConnell Loki L. O. K. amd Grodin
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:07 min | 5 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"It's discouraging to make a mistake but it's humiliating when you find out your so unimportant that nobody noticed it. Welcome to the amp professor. A few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Kevin passed in this episode. I talk about how stress turns. Our hair. Grey the discovery of a new type of immune cell and making mistakes. When we're teaching a if.

professor Kevin
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

03:44 min | 6 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Don't forget that initial the I found out just a couple of weeks ago. Somebody was trying to do that. And if you just put amp professor is not going to show up afterward the amp professor and then you just download it for free and put it in your vice. So what are they. What are the bonus content items that are in there? One is a little video showing you how to make flash flash cards flip in the air so that one was a silly one but the rest of them were a much more to the point in terms of actual teaching and learning one was the list of syllabus warnings that I include in my syllabus and we talked about him one of the episodes so that gives you a copy of what I am so you can use that is sort of a launching point for perhaps including your own warnings in your syllabus and along similar lines I also had a page a handout type thing that have my safety information. uh-huh called safety first. So that gives you the kind of safety addendum that I give in my syllabus. I have another resource there. That's called terms terms that are often misspelled or confused. Name P and I think that's a good one to revisit every once in a while just Ha- just print it out or save it on your disc or something somewhere and go through it every once in a while in that is useful for students because they can go through and see where they're likely to make mistakes but it's also good for us because we make mistakes stew but it's also good in helping counsel students and then another resource was regional spelling differences. So it I was GONNA say it spells out but maybe that's the the WHO said it walks you through how spelling is different between. US spelling and non you you asked spelling so it gives you some of the patterns and then gives you examples of each of those within anatomy and physiology so that you're aware of some of these different spellings so those are the regional spelling differences. And then the next resource was actually was published. Are Put out there before that one. I'm going in can reverse order. Here is a handout on the fishbowl model of homies stasis which I talked about in one of the episodes so it kind of spells it all out and you can use that handout with your students or just use it as kind of a starting point if you WanNa tell the fishbowl story or stories similar to it. I also had a video which was a seminar that I did at one of the half's meetings on running concept lists so you can go look at that and then. I had a little video showing when you a sorting folder that I use when I'm doing tests and exams in class and this is especially useful for a large class even a smaller moderate size class. What it does does? Is it Kinda automatically alphabetize student papers as they turn them in in a very simple straightforward way and the video shows you how it works and then I have a diagram that you can use in your course if you want. The chose the location of the FABELLA which is a bone of that more and more of us are showing up there showing up on our knees. It's increasing its frequency in the population. It was considered to be relatively rare anomaly announced becoming more common that was discussed and one of the episodes and then we have another table that you can use as a hand off of your students or just for your own years and it's a muscle name cable where a translates each of the major muscle named it translates them literally and we can use. That is the Monica device to help us remember characteristics risks of that muscle so shoe. Lots of stuff this year. And that's not the end of it. I'M GONNA actually dive into some of those groupings that I just talked about in later.

professor WHO
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

05:28 min | 6 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Cartoonist and film producer Walt Disney once we keep moving forward opening new doors and doing new things. Because we're curious and curiosity keeps leaving us down new paths welcome to the amp professor a few minutes to focus on teaching human anatomy the and physiology with a veteran educator and teaching mentor. Your host Kevin Past this episode is review of the past year of this podcast. Just mentioned in the intro and also talked about out in the preview episode that preceded this full episode. What I'm going to be doing is debriefing? What went on in our podcast cast over the last year and I did something similar last year at the end of the first full year of the P. Professor podcast and I called that episode sowed a big year and so this episode of calling another big year? I should've called it an even bigger year because I was actually Kinda surprised as I. I went through my process of debriefing and Look what went on holy smoke. We covered a lot of stop. And I'm beginning to that in a minute but before I do I just want to remind you that. Debriefing is something that I've mentioned a lot. And that's because I really believe in it. I think that at regular intervals throughout the academic year and maybe even separate debriefings. You know at the end of multiple years like every five years or something like that. We should step back and really take some time and effort and really mindfully debrief and decide and review and reflect on what we've been doing because I think this can be really affirming. I mean it is for me that I can go back in especially in a year or a semester or even a half a semester. When I'm thinking that all I've been doing is putting one foot in front of the other and that really accomplishing publishing? Anything much. Not Anything useful. I often find that when I go back and actually like tally it up and look at it and think about it. I'm really happy about the fact that there were some things in there that I really did accomplish some things. So that's one of the main reasons so I I liked the briefing is because it makes me feel good but it also gives me some great ideas on things that I can leverage and maybe do better next time for or extend in and do more or gives me an idea to do something completely different and so I just WanNa spend a few minutes talking about the advantages of debriefing. It's a good reminder for ourselves what worked well and what didn't work well over the past period of time. It's also also a good time to bring our C. V. up-to-date our resume or publication lists. However it is that we're recording our life's work and we can do anything anything related to that so Chaz it some schools You need to submit a timeline of things that you've done committees you've been on projects you've done and how often you did pet sitting for your deans pats and that goes into your promotion package or it goes into your evaluation file or something like that so you you can really make that debriefing time you can roll a bunch of different tasks into it and make it a really useful thing it in many different ways and and it's also a form of spaced retrieval practice because it gives us an opportunity to identify in reinforce or concepts concepts because we're going over them again in recalling them again and pulling them back out of our brains so as I go through this episode and I mentioned past topics things things are going to get pulled onto your brain. You'RE GONNA go in there and start pulling things out again and that's going to help keep them in your long term memory when we do this in our courses. We could ask students to do that. Students always want in class reviews right for them. I think they see that sometimes as a substitute for actually really studying like let's review the test. Meaning I don't want to spend my own time reviewing for the test. I want you to review for me but might not be a bad idea if you have have class time to do that. Yeah they're looking for specific. Can't on exactly what's going to be on the test. They'd they'd probably preferred if you just gave them a list of the correct panthers or something thank by what you can do is just spark them a little bit and get them thinking about all of the different things that they have been learning all along long and that will help them with their retrieval practice. There are other ways to do it to The way I usually do tonight in class but in the form of online practice exams Right before the midterm exam and final exams so that gives them the way to do their greet debriefing and relearning stop. Because it's Kinda showing them wear wear and their study materials in their textbook. They need to dive back in and refresh themselves. So let's do it. Let's.

panthers Kevin Past Walt Disney professor P. Professor producer Chaz C. V.
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

01:36 min | 6 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"Sixty two of the ANC professor podcast also known as tap radio. You an audio laboratory for teachers of human anatomy and physiology well. This is a preview of the upcoming full episode which is episode number sixty two and it's titled Another Big Year in Teaching Anatomy and physiology and that parallels the title from an episode. We did about a year ago called a big year and that was a debriefing. A review a look back back of the first year of the professor podcast. And so we're going to do that again in episode number sixty two. And so. It's all about debriefing. It's all about reflecting flocking. It's all about looking back and reviewing what we did so we're going to take a moment to think about to remind ourselves about how we as teachers can in deep grief in a way that is constructive and helpful and affirming and then we're going to dive right in and summarize a whole year of this podcast. Okay non exactly summarize everything but at least sit at the scenic overlook and take in the broad view of everything finger pointing out a few of the most interesting things that happened along the way.

professor ANC
"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

The A&P Professor

08:34 min | 6 months ago

"professor" Discussed on The A&P Professor

"A common and perennial conversation among amp. Faculty is what prerequisites If any should be required for the amp course that is should students have to pass a biology course or some other course maybe chemistry or maybe even some flavor of English or Algebra before they can be expected to succeed in our anatomy and physiology. Of course heck I've thought about requiring a solid study skills course before student gets into my AP class. I think I'd rather they be able to make a news flash cards and make concept maps then to be able to solve quadra equations for example the AP Course skied lines from the human anatomy and physiology society half's suggest a whole list of required and recommended courses with a minimum among grade of C hats. Members can access the course guidelines at the AP professor dot Org Slash perhaps that's Ha ps ps but perhaps guidelines are well intended as recommendations for programs that want to align in well with the learning outcomes which I've mentioned before in this podcast specifically in episode fifty and for courses that one have a high level of rigor in their program in my mind at least these recommendations are not absolute requirement. And that's that's helpful but when things are not strictly definitive are when we have obstacles at our school for implementing anyone's list of recommended prerequisites requisites. Then we meaning. I tend to still fried about things a bit or sometimes fred a lot. Sure sure any answer to the prerequisite question is going to depend on factors unique to that institution or to that program or department. Our course Actually they're even more considerations than those I just listed but I'll circle back to some of those a little later even after we account for all all those factors. The answer never seems to satisfy Est.. Does it at least not over the long term. We we seemed always WANNA come back to it because no matter what our prerequisites aw or our previous decision not to have required Requisites it's we never seem to be fully satisfied that things are just right. Why because not all our students students seem to transition easily Dr Course and not all of them succeed at least not at first so a solution that always seems obvious? Assayas maybe we should reconsider our prerequisite requirements and it seems to me that this is a wheel that is continuously elite. Reinvented over generations. And remember. I'm as old as an oak tree. I've actually been around for generations all that time paying attention to what we're doing with prerequisites because that's what we aim peaches do right we ask teach other about prerequisites and we theorize about what's ideal and it seems that no matter how much or how often we fiddle with our course prerequisites that prerequisites situation. We have just well never really works. I've come to the conclusion that it's not that prerequisite courses don't work it's just the prerequisites never truly fulfill fill the expectations that we have for them so that begs the question. How much should we expect students to remember from their prerequisite? It's my answer to what we should expect from prerequisites. Is this nothing really. We should not expect anything. I know I know that. Seems like a negative cynical answer but but I don't see it that way. I think it's realistic. And it's well kind of freeing in a way if I'm not really expecting expecting my students to really own concept of ions protein synthesis or chemical equilibria or what. ATP is what it does then. I'm free of expectations and because of that I won't front about it really now. I smile the smile of a Buddha when I hear my colleagues fretting about the prerequisite requirements or at least. I like to think I'm doing that not only that now. I'm far less likely to be tempted to judge. Judge my colleagues teaching those prerequisite courses badly and I'm less likely to be tempted to judge my students. Badly to by not having Any expectations of prior learning were all starting with a clean fresh slate. What a great feeling man you might ask ask? Why don't I expect students to remember anything useful from what they may have been exposed to in their prerequisite course or courses well first off? I don't mean to imply that none of them know anything. I'm just saying that I've come to believe leave that. It's just not realistic to assume that most of them remember everything and that's kind of what we do right. Expect them to know everything from their prerequisite courses. Why don't I expect that partly because we don't typically teach for the long term think about it the classic way of teaching and approach that I used myself for many years is to prepare students for the next test best and hope they all pass for those that pass? They've learned at least sixty percent of what I wanted them to learn. Now think about that for for minute. That's just a little over half of what they ought to have mastered and that's just for those who actually passed for those who didn't pass pass that test all is not lost. They can learn about two thirds or so of what they ought to on the next test and it might average out to a passing course grade right. But let's say they're learning a solid. Seventy percent are so on average a C grade that means means they've mastered or at least become familiar with a bit over two thirds of the material for their unit test. But because they're not asked about again until the end of the semester it's going to disappear until the week before the exam one. It's going to be relearned at least in part for another week or a two and then lost again. That is unless we excuse them for the exam. Because they've been doing well on the unit tests that measure short-term learning even those with solid long-term learning need refreshing but let's say they were and of course that really did promote long-term learning. Let's say they had to master eighty five to ninety percent of the concepts and that they were continually expected did to retrieve that knowledge and demonstrate mastery on a test. Okay they're still gonNA forget some of it even if they mastered a hundred hundred percent of the concepts and then taught the prerequisite course or the or maybe they taught all the prerequisite courses. There's still gonNA forget some of it maybe not all of it but some of it but of course the more typical case is they're not that competent when they reach us so again. Isn't it more practical. That is more useful to just assume that.

professor ATP