17 Burst results for "professor of physics"

"professor physics" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

04:34 min | Last month

"professor physics" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"A little boy. Actually, I made the video before I started watching it all. Put that up on my instagram just so people can hear my thoughts in advance. Oh, perfect. I love those because you're always so dismayed Video audio. Just look at dawn's face. That's that's offend. Just tryingto put your own words in her mouth. It's hysterical your faces so like, Oh, my goodness. Oh, you mention it. Can I ask you Because over here, Ted, Producer Ted at the Jason Show watches big brother. I don't So I rely on him. I heard about that scandal. Mom, the housemates making fun of the guy that's on the autism spectrum. That makes me so mad. This guy's brilliant. He is brilliant. Hey, went to two lane. He is a physics teacher, a college professor physics teacher. He's one big brother before because this is an all star season. So, yes, he is on the spectrum. He rocks a lot, which you know, he's always in the hammock. He's always sitting there, Rocky. He doesn't ever sit still because it soothes him. It's just a comfortable shame, Mechanized. Exactly. And you know, it's stressful to be in there. So anyway, they were. It was like four or five of them. On the live feeds were basically making fun of it. They're annoyed with him right now. But for no other reason other than these people are all in an alliance together, and it just was in very bad form like Don't they ever sit there and go? Oh, my gosh, I shouldn't one of them's making fun of him like imitating him. Thea, other ones They're laughing along and saying I just hate. I can't stand there and talk to him because it just makes me uncomfortable that he rocks all the time. I I just can't stand. It's like This is not right. And you know, every year Big brother has something, whether it's ah, racist comments terrible things, you know, because I think they forget the cameras are on them honestly. Well, we played the clip yesterday. Alexis. I was so again. I don't watch it, I'l. I'll hear about it from dawn. Or, you know, we sometimes have McCray on the talk show. Who's a local big brother? Legend, too, who was on many years ago anyway? We played the clip of all of them talking about this guy and the one I think it was. I don't know if it was the man or woman. They were like, Oh, My worst nightmare would be toe wake up and see him rocking back and forth at the head of my bed like a horror movie or something like that shine like the red rum. They started calling him the red rum kid. This is his. Yeah, His name's Memphis and I can't wait until he's ejected from the house. He's very cocky. It's so unnecessary and I come on. I mean, there's like I said, You can make fun of a lot of things. I mean, there's there's some safe things you can make fun of. Like, if they don't you know they don't bathe for a couple days and whatever but You don't make fun of something that someone can't help And they've all been on the show before. Yeah, it's all it's all Star season in one of the girls, Nicole. She's also a winner supposed to be his friend. They're the two former winners of big brother in the house, so they've already won 500,000 from the show. In the past, she actually got dropped by Olay skin care. She doesn't know that yet because he's not out of the house but which I love exactly because they're like that is not something that we aligned with them. We won't be using her as an endorser anymore. So good. There's consequences. Exactly. And Phil Jones watches He just type to us. They continued making fun of him. He writes, even after the producers scolded them s O. I mean that. That right there jumped. Yes. Yeah, And and that that right there. Two shows you their butt heads a lack of respect. Yeah. Now, now you're made aware of what you're doing. To feast friends are the worst to. He's probably thinking she can rely on him too, and he'll know now it's so well because I I reference this yesterday and he won't mind me saying this. You know, Colin when he gets nervous, he does this little like he scratches the back of his neck. And it's either when he gets excited or when he's feeling a little anxious, and I sent the show yesterday. If anybody made fun a call I I would lose my mind like you don't make fun of things like that. There's a lot of safety things you can. You can have some good ribbing and good fun. That's not one of them. That's just not one of them. I bothered.

Phil Jones dawn Colin Thea Memphis Nicole Olay professor McCray Producer Ted Jason Show
"professor physics" Discussed on Surprisingly Brilliant

Surprisingly Brilliant

09:25 min | 7 months ago

"professor physics" Discussed on Surprisingly Brilliant

"An IT career at GD. It means owning the opportunity to play a crucial role in transforming how agencies operate join DDAT for challenging and impactful work that advances your career apply now at DDAT DOT com slash careers equal opportunity employer after all you've been through. The class of twenty twenty deserves a proper sendoff which is why I heart radio and Doritos brings you commencement the podcast featuring speeches and dedications from we admire most here from Halsey since we were little kids. We've shown the world that while we can be sold a lot of things we will never buy a dream and pit bull guys at generation. Stand-up guys generation. Make a difference. You guys generation go change the world. Techy G John Legend Cashew Angie Martinez Khalid and many many more all have something to say to you. The amazing class of twenty twenty so choose firmly choose willfully and choose confidently listen to iheartradio. New podcast commencement now on the iheartradio APP or wherever you get podcasts. With a special DORITOS Valedictorian episode. Where Doritos takes graduation? Speeches to another level by naming five victorians giving them each fifty thousand dollars in tuition assistance and sharing their speeches with the world. You are the ones that's GonNa make a difference. Welcome back to surprisingly brilliant. This is the story of Wilson and pens. Es and annoys that they hear what that noise is spoiler is gonNA lead to a huge leap in our understanding of the cosmos. So excited at first. We need to go back. We need to go back to nineteen twelve to important discoveries happened in this year that I don't think the credit they deserve and that's one of the things that we're about when this podcast right heroes. I want to introduce you first to Avesta life vest. Oh analyzes the light that's coming from distant galaxies spiral nebulae in In particular any produces spectrum of that light to show what elements are present and he sees the lines of this spectrum are redder than they expect and he realizes that. This is due to something called the Doppler shift. Which tells us what's happening to those galaxies. Doppler is in like the doppler effect like win. An ambulance goes by it. Sounds different exact a close to it. Why why what? How does it work? Let's ask Abby that exact question yes. When we hear the siren of a ambulance we can see the peaches. Changing the is passing near us. Frequency of the sound waves is higher when the ambulance is approaching us. Compared to win. It's receding away from us. And the same thing applies not just sound waves but to any types of ways that are emitted by source including electromagnetic waves and so efficient galaxies approaching us. The light is shifted to the blue. We here we can see higher frequencies off that light and when galaxies receding away from us. It's shifted to the red so I think as the waves bunched up together if it's coming towards you and the way it's kind of spread out equivalent if he's gone away from me so therefore it's shifting to the Red Bat suggests and this is what's life realizes that the galaxies therefore moving away from earth the cells that's huge universes expanding well. You don't necessarily know if it's expanding you just know that. All these galaxies are moving away. Away from me is the whole university. Perspective is important but also this is one thousand nine hundred twelve. I had no idea that we had this. This technology available at nineteen thinking about like cosmology and astronomy. And things like that. And I'm thinking we have this tech. I don't know twentieth centuries what they can't do yet though in one thousand nine hundred. Is they calculate how far away those galaxies long? That's the work of another brilliant mind in the same year nineteen twelve. Who deserves some more attention at all some limelight? I should said on this is Henrietta Levitt yes. Henrietta levied was One of the computers. Those women that were hired at the Harvard College Observatory to look at photographic plates and measure the brightness of stars and she discovered something extremely important She looked a group of stars that the roughly the same distance at the large Gilani cloud and noticed that they changed their brightness but in fact the period over which the brightness changes relates to how bright they are and so in principle fund measures the period one can infer intrinsic brightness of those stars and just like a lightbulb. If you know how many watts it emits and you see how bright it is you can tell how far away from us it is to these known as variable stars styles whose brightness dims and comes back and let actually discovers two thousand four hundred of these variable stars by hand also of the known variable stars in her day says she is responsible for fifty percent of the stars were discovered in this burial. That's amazing and I feel like not a lot of people actually know that the first like we refer to computers today as our left on right but a computer in nineteen twelve is a human being. Yeah usually woman performing calculations by hand amazing mental in so much scientific discovery. It's incredible so You've got VESTA. Lifer working out that the the Nebula is moving away from us these guys. He's a a moving away from us. One Levitt who's figured out a way to actually measure the distance to those stars but it takes another ten years to save ten years before someone jumps the idea. Forwards again and that person is Edwin Hubble. Oh you might have heard of Familiar Hubble telescope right as his name so nine hundred twenty nine. Hubble is at the Mount Wilson Observatory in California and is using Levitz way of measuring distances building on slices discovery of redshift. And he realizes that how galaxies red shifted depends on how far away they are and when he plotted the recissions speed. As a function of distance. He realized that there is a linear relation. That in fact the more distant galaxies are faster from us and he announces this in Nineteen Twenty nine. Yeah and leads to one of the biggest shifts your when that came out of your mouth. You're like anyway. Yes one of the biggest shifts in how we view the will because what he's saying right. Is The our galaxy on a galaxy? Our Universe isn't stable. It is changing and that leads to a massive debate. Which I'm going to mention the second I though I would like to shout out to other people that happened across in my research and who also it looks to me like they suggested the universe was expanding four hobbled it but how will someone who normally comes into story later. I'm to bring back is George Lamar Tra le. Maitre okay. Who In nineteen twenty seven? That's the year he gets his PhD. From M I take two years. Before Hubble announced his Lemay trashy calculates that the universe must be expanding in all directions equally. But it was just it was just a theory essence. He didn't have any data to back it up so people just kind of ignored it and then there was some before him who I also think should take credit as a Soviet scientist who Alexandra Friedman a few years earlier anyway. So hob how doesn't know of the maitre or Friedman's work. Apparently but after Hublin nounce is that the universe is expanding and he has the data to demonstrate to locate tra- then uses Hubble's discovery as evidence for his own fairy and then and this is the point in elementary normally appears in this story. He says the if all galaxies are moving away from each other then we could run the clock backwards. They must be expanding out from somewhere. And that's what he calls and I quote a primordial atom which contains all the matter in the universe has your. That's fine story written some rain Al. All wishes so this is I mean I. Can you imagine being around at that time when that idea comes out like when this very I thought that everything in the universe existed inside an atom when that is is on the scene I mean I feel like you would just I would freak out? All of these. Things are coming together. All of the the observations that you mentioned so far yeah now let maitre starts thinking. What could this primordial atom be like? How did it all begin amiss here from Avi Again George? Lameta was Jesuit Belgian cathodic priest mathematician astronomer and professor physics at the Catholic University of Louvain and he was the first to recognize the fact that perhaps observations imply that the universe is expanding. It took him a while to convince people of that. Notion including Einstein was unclear at the time about how to interpret the habits expansion but they also instant preferred to believe that the universe is not expanding static and he invented the cosmological constant that would balance the force of gravity and keep.

Edwin Hubble Henrietta Levitt Maitre George Lamar John Legend Cashew Angie Marti DDAT DOT twenty twenty Alexandra Friedman Doritos Halsey Avi Wilson Red Bat Abby Harvard College Observatory Mount Wilson Observatory Catholic University of Louvain Hublin nounce Einstein
"professor physics" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:50 min | 1 year ago

"professor physics" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Real world. Conditions needs to be thoroughly re-examined test. Trump's reportedly, considering that guy to run his own climate, change panel designed specifically to undermine actual certian. Actual climate change, scientists in the government. What could possibly go? Meanwhile, the most important story in human history struggles to penetrate daily cacophony of scandal gossip political conflict and presidential perfidy, cave aaronow is a fellow at the type of media center. She wrote recently in the guardian about the Trump administration's suppression of climate warnings Kate, we'll come back to kind of be back. Let's start with three changes to government climate reporting, the first rollback limits, that time line, certain federal agencies are able to use to make scientific predictions about climate change the second change at least according to a story in the New York Times, this week, would primarily target, the national climate assessment, which is a collection of reports released every few years by variety of government agencies. But the administration apparently thinks the result is to. Too alarmist. So what should we expect the NCAA to look like now it's a little hard to tell in part because, you know, the New York Times released this report earlier this week saying that this policy change was coming that they were going to look to limit the worst case scenarios, and then in the days afterwards heads various federal agencies were interviewed, and we're a little bit confused as to what was coming out. I think a Representative from the department of interior said the report was wrong, which may or may not be true, Noah, the National Oceanic assessment agency said that they had no plans to change their compliance with the national climate assessment. And so it's unclear at this point, exactly. What will be laid out in the future. What is clear is that the global change research act of nineteen ninety mandates that the federal government needs to do exactly the type of forecasting, that the national climate assessment has done the needs to do this every four years as. As many people who've been interviewed about this change of said it would be a legal in a sense to actually move forward with the third thing is a sort of content moderation infrastructure. There will be a panel of reviewers responsible for evaluating whatever federal agencies wished to publish on climate matters. This sounds to me like appointing regulators to regulate regulators. I mean, I think calling it a regulation. It's very generous to the climate review panel as it's been floated would be headed up a guy named blame hacker, who was tapped by Mike Pompeo and how sort of this long long history of circulating through these various sort of climate denial, think tanks and networks received a lot of support from the Mercer family, which has funded a lot of climate denial over the years when this news is announced this week, a clip from two thousand fourteen of him popped up and the, the comment I made the demonization of carbon dioxide is just like the demonization of the poor Jews under Hitler. He is paid to go around trying to undermine actual climate science. Exactly. He would head up this climate review panel, which would essentially evaluate the findings of federal climate scientists William Halford does have a science background. He was a professor at Princeton for many years, a professor. Physics it should be observed not of climatology, and that's sort of the case of a lot of the climate denier networks, is that somebody will have some sort of nominal scientific credential, whether or not it actually has to do with climate forecasting climate modeling anything, anything, remotely related to it, but they have a PHD after their name, and so they can be sort of trotted out by the Heritage Foundation or the heartland institute, or whoever wants to use them to cast doubt on, well, regarded peer reviewed science, that aforementioned time story suggested that all this began after the release of the last national climate assessment in November. And I guess, no wonder if you're a climate denier, like the president the assessment was a repudiation. Trump dwells in a world of unreality, but I guess it's sort of stings when your own executive branch makes a liar of you and. And there's a couple things happening here. One probably Trump was himself surprised that this sort of thing existed. I don't know if anyone had briefed him on the existence of the national climate assessment, but there's more kind of specific logic to the administration might be going after it. Now, which is that the national climate assessment can be used as ammo for lawyers who are interested in challenging some of the administration's other policies to do things like expand oil and gas drilling to ramp up, fossil, fuel production and exports. They can put in the national climate assessment and say, look your own governments. Scientists have said that if you keep doing this, if you keep pouring carbon in the atmosphere, and the way that you are the results will be devastating three or four years ago. Governor Rick Scott of Florida Senator, Rick Scott prevented his state agencies from talking about sea-level rises. This seems like the federalization of, of that political strategy. In some sense, have a very firm grasp of just how catastrophic impacts are sort of what the implications for federal policy, are if they do this. I mean it's not a secret at this point that there are plenty of sort of climate scientists in the international community who are just looking sort of at the facts on the ground and reaching dramatic conclusions about what needs to happen to the global economy in order to ward off this crisis, and it doesn't take much to reach them conclusions that I think are out of sync with what the Trump administration would hope to do in some ways you offer a hat tip to Republicans for at least reckoning with the consequences of global catastrophe, the Democrats say, not so much. There's one particular democrat who is the front runner for the presidential nomination, Joe Biden who has displayed. Let's just say not the greatest sense of urgency on all of this Joe Biden really is, is hoping to return to. To what Obama was doing when he was serving his vice president, which is to make a lot of very big sort of showy gestures toward the idea of doing something about climate change while at the same time expanding oil and gas extraction. In the greatest way, we've seen of our lifetimes than which is just very plainly out of touch with what we need to do to cap warming. It's sort of reasonable levels that is not a status quo. It is either safe or why is to return to. And I think that's what Biden is really hoping for is just to go back to sort of policy circa, twenty sixteen polls are showing that the general public is gradually, beginning to internalize, the scale of climate dystrophy. But the future of the planet, incredibly doesn't seem to be exactly a hot button issue political scandal and various friends of the culture wars are. So much more dependable for generating anger and emotion. And, and political will, at this stage isn't even really a question of more information short of video of Manhattan underwater is there anything, the government could publish or not publish that would catalyze the public? I don't think that there is more startling information which can be add with the pot, which will in and of itself, create sort of public backlash. I think what we've seen that has actually been very effective at catalyzing sort of public opinion around this has been the social movement, uprisings, which have arisen in response to things like the intergovernmental panel on climate changes report in Europe. For instance, climate is now reliably a top issue for voters that concern came from a number of countries having these massive school strikes. So I think the science at self is obviously important, obviously and the science shouldn't be stifled. Anything just as important, and maybe even more. So for catalyzing political energy around this is to really make an unavoidable crisis. And the more that, that.

Trump Joe Biden Trump administration New York Times federal government National Oceanic assessment ag Governor Rick Scott William Halford professor Mike Pompeo NCAA Europe department of interior Heritage Foundation president Princeton Obama
"professor physics" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"professor physics" Discussed on Science Friday

"Special relativity for really for at least a solid decade to decade and a half this assigns Friday from WNYC studios on my rep Lino here with any Munaf co host of our undiscovered podcast, working on the new history of science ideas, talking about the ether I with David Kaiser professor physics and of history of science at MIT in Cambridge. I mean so David is this a tragic story for you? You have Michelson poor guy working his whole career to try to measure this stuff that he's convinced is there. And he just thinks he's a failure because he can't, you know, design the instrument that's going to be fine enough to detect it seems to me like a pretty sad story. You know, I think on the individual level, I think it does have some sadness now again. Let's be clear. He had a brilliant, Nobel, surely the blow. That's right. He he, he did okay from the local boy did good. But, but nonetheless, he considered himself scientifically that he'd never really achieve. What you said out, too. And that, that is, there's a there's an element of real of real sadness to that. On the other hand, the instrument has outlived its original motivation. Many fold he was able to do other things even in his own lifetime with that instrument that really did trigger enormous progress. He used as instrument to be the first person to measure the diameter of a distant star. That's pretty amazing. He also was able to measure effects in atomic physics that really helped jumpstart quantum theory. I mean, there were many things that he could even his own lifetime could point to with real pride, even though he died thinking, they must be an ether any failed to find it, sit did they either do us any good. Or would we have been better never to have conceived of this idea? Joe I think it did as worlds of good. I mean, I always joke that our students here at MIT in many places can still buy t shirts with maximum, equations on my love those shirts. Maxwell derived. The laws that we still use the, the governing laws for trinity magnetism and, and, and therefore all of optic. And everything else because he was trying to understand the physics ether his colleague, Lord Kelvin said in the eighteen eighties. The luminescence ether is the only substance. We are confident of in dynamics, the only substance one thing, we are sure of is the reality, and substanti- -ality of luminescence either et. Drove these people's work and we still use their equations. We use their work in many ways, as a guide really to this day. Is there any modern day equivalent of the well that's a good question. You know, Einstein himself toyed somewhat tongue in cheek later in his career wondering if his own later work in relativity, had sort of reintroduced, something like an aether his work on the general theory of relativity, warping space time, maybe it wasn't a material substance in a bowl of jelly. But maybe there's some other substance that we should think of, and then more, you know, in modern days, we have we think about the Higgs bows, on pervading all of space giving rise to observe a properties. I mean, I think there are many ideas, we can, we can see with some analogies at least David Kaiser professor physics at the history of science history of science at MIT. And cambridge. Thank you for joining us. Thank you great. Any monop- co host of undiscovered podcasts, whose hard at work on new series all about the failed. Ideas of scientists three, thank you any way. Look forward to this one and one last thing before we go one hundred years ago this week, Sir Arthur Eddington made his famous measurement of Starlight, slight bent. By the gravitational mass of the sun, his measurements, proved, Einstein's, general, relativity theory, and there's predictions were correct and made Einstein and overnight sensation. We have a special a history of that momentous experiment in the.

Lino David Kaiser professor physics MIT David Cambridge WNYC studios Sir Arthur Eddington Einstein Michelson Lord Kelvin Maxwell Joe I one hundred years
"professor physics" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

03:53 min | 2 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"They say, fully one hundred percent by the intense magnetic field that can be found within a neutron star. So then then you go below the atmosphere and you've got a crust across of normal Adams actually kind of normal. Not not like super dense neutron. Neutrons, but kind of regular Adams and their crushed into this. Well, they're not that normal. They're kind of crushed into a solid latte laddis surrounded by get this surrounded by degenerate. Gas of ultra relativistic electrons had low. Also. Electrons. Ulta stick, but even more so really, really close beat of light, not not just a significant fraction of the speed of light, but really close. So Stumm some studies get the stage. You're gonna like this. Some studies have predicted that this crust could be ten billion times stronger than steel. Oh, so below the outer crushes in across the models predict various types of layers that are that are very dense and complex, of course, and you could kind of generally simplistically you could say that it's mostly neutrons going down toward towards the core. The ratio of neutrons increases greatly and you know it is a neutron star after all. So yeah, there's lots of neutrons. All smashed really close together. But that said there are protons that probably exist within neutron stars. But if they do exist, there's probably not more than five percent. So five percent of the entire stars protons that's still a lot, but, but relatively speaking, it's really not that many. You wouldn't think that a paltry five percent would have much of an effect. So now this background that I've just given you. Should make this latest studies seem seem a little bit extraordinary. The researchers claim that meant that this minimal amount of protons could actually have a significant impact on the various properties of the of the neutron star, which sounds kind of kind of out there because it's really only five percent, even though it's it's a good chunk of mass. It's really nothing compared to all those neutrons and other other kind of particles that are there. So. So this is due to what's called a never even heard of this short range correlations. So short range correlations is, is very simple. Sometimes a proton and neutron in a nucleus of an atom can pair up and go flying through the nucleus with with a lot of energy. I mean, it just spontaneously happens and that's called short range correlations so imagine got an atom. You've got a nucleus. This approach on neutron will spontaneously kind of pair up and careen off through the nucleus, which very weird never heard of that. So so what they did the scientists looked at. Car, regular carbon, atoms, aluminum, iron, and lead. And they noticed that as the ratio of neutrons to protons increased. So did the probability of the creation of these neutron proton pairs. So you got that. Yeah. So the more neutrons you looking at any any nucleus of an atom. And if you happen to have a lot more neutrons and protons, chances are higher that you're going to this weird thing is going to happen where you've got these so-called short range correlations happening. So so so if you could just extract think about that and you can extrapolate where they're thinking now. So the study study co, author or Han who's assistant professor of physics at MIT, man, I'd love to be matchy being an assistant professor, even a full professor physics. So we think we, this is what he said. We think that when you have a neutron rich nucleus on average, the protons move faster than the neutrons. So in some sense, protons carry the action. You describe care, they do it. It means they do what they do. You know a lot of work more than you would think so..

Adams Ulta assistant professor of physics assistant professor MIT professor Han five percent one hundred percent
"professor physics" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on Science Friday

"I think we have is number. So where where do you go from here with this? What have you learned? How do you apply that to what you want to do? Well, you know, so I'm a scientist physicist, and so for me, it's the joy of discovering how secrets of nature and these answer just so incredible at what they do that. I feel like we've understood a little bit about how a group which has no leader and has limited information about what everyone else is doing. Can accomplish a complex task that no individual can. We are presently trying to understand how the ants develop this optimal digging strategy. We have evidence in our computer models and robot models that in fact, such a strategy evolve pretty quickly. One of the interesting experiments we did was take in a bucket of thirty ants the top five excavators out and let the remaining twenty five excavate a fresh batch. And we found that the remaining twenty five Doug just is affected but five more stepped up. So how that. Happens were very interested to know and how we can teach the robots to to quickly converge on this distribution is interesting to know as well. These were fire ants. You're using correct. We were a little careful about that and we're, we're very careful about that. We wear gloves and the the sides of the containers that we house them in our code in baby powder because they can't walk across very well climb across it, but but if you don't bother them like most animals, they don't tend to bother you. And they're just great study subjects because they see soil and they dig. There's just because they're in Georgia. Could you do this with other kinds of aunts that might be found around the country yet? We could do this there lot of species that digs subterranean structures, and they're quite beautiful. In fact, you can buy casts of these things. Molten casts are made particularly by professor Walter chink old Florida state, and you can buy these casts and see the different structures, but fire ants turn out to be a very convenient in Georgia because they've taken over everywhere. Could do you think termites build the same way? That's a great question. I don't know. Terminate great tunnels and how you know mounds of Iraq. Correct. They built structures and tunnels, and I think that it's well worth looking into what about applying botch to to taking him to Mars or to another planet to do you know to to work on their own digging stuff? Yeah. Well, I think this brings up an interesting point in that that you know we presently have now robots that are pretty good flying robots. You know, the little drones that you can buy for a couple hundred bucks and you can actually get swarms of those two pretty interesting things. Like if you remember the Olympics swarms fine, but we don't have not even close to having comparable robots in terrestrial environments like like rubble, like rockpile light at, you know, the material after a building collapses or earthquake. And so we need to get robots that actually capable of moving in those terrain. And once you have robots that are capable and moving those terrain, you could. Agean putting many of those robots into a nasty terrain and what you have many, then you have a swarm. And then we think some of the principles we've discovered will be useful for such swarms. Well, we should great luck. Got to thank you. Yeah, of my, I saw that movie. This warm read the book. Then the golden is professor physics at the Georgia state institute of technology. Thanks again, we're gonna take a break, and if you think nuclear reactors are a modern invention. There is a natural nuclear earth. This had natural ones below the ground, two billion years ago. I mean, well, we'll we'll talk about where they are, what happened to them, but they still running. We'll talk about it after the break stay with us. This has science, Friday, replay. Oh, you know, once we figured out how to do with generating energy with nuclear fission is actually something simple to do. You just Chuck some neutrons with enough energy at the right kind of uranium or even plutonium and you've created a chain reaction that can power a city or a bomb. Sounds easy. Now took a lot of time for people to figure that out, but you know who figured it out a long time ago..

Georgia professor Walter chink scientist Georgia state institute of tec Iraq Doug physicist Olympics Chuck professor Florida two billion years
"professor physics" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on The Science Show

"Now meet another extraordinary scientist. Giovanni Zoki. He's professor physics at the university of California Los Angeles, and he's trying to make brains on the bench in his lab. If you're a physicist, why are you playing with nerves and axioms and parts of brains? What I am physicist, but I come for a feel of physics which is called complex systems. And so this field of physics deals as name says, we systems which are complex as opposed to complicate, not just complicated, but complex, meaning that out of their complexity comes new behavioral SO. The complex system could be something as simple as the inflow. Port of fluid heated form Belo's doubts to convict and the patterns in that flow becomes complex. But after why it's nice to study turbulence and cooking pots. On his false. But if you're in the business of looking at this kind of complexity than the most amazing known Lena complex system is of course life. Okay. So that brings me to the nerve fiber, the Exxon, and you are studying the ways in which this famous electric charge. The signal goes down it as we never never system is made of gaps, which have got a chemical bridge the sign apps, but what are you doing with the Exxon to study? It's what's action potential signal. It's very interesting that you bring up immediately the gaps the synapse because that is a path that we cannot do at the moment. That's an ex- step and that's very important that junction and that poses of going from the electrical to the chemical and back to the electrical, what we're trying to do is not really to study the acts on the action potential in itself because that is, you know, we understand that without construct the struck. Show at deficiently basically artificially in the sense of using the molecular components, but putting them together at the fish list of starting form the south. This is how narrow biologist normally study action potentials stuff from the new on the nerve cell, and then they study its commission partisans on. We want to make the nerves activision. How'd you just take a wire? Usually it's amazing lobby I've got. I've got to tell you it's busy because we this question, your hit the nail on the head country. Just take away. Okay. There's a fundamental difference that our tonics, our electrical signals that we're used to the particles that are making the current, the electrical, the signal comes from allicance. You might call it a yawn IX. The way our brain works is not electron IX. It's not Alexander making the qualities Tasso miles calcium ion. So so it's a onyx now that's very different physics. If the current is carried by electrons, if the current is carried by irons in what? And so that's why, if you want to make anything that is based on the same principles as the new on, no, you can just take a wire because a new is based on the different actor. How can they make the signal so fast than because ions charged particles charged molecules and you have this idea of this lashing along most slowly. And yet we respond instantly. When I ask you a question, you reply within the half a second. This is great. Excellent. Because you say fast. In fact, it is. It's very slow compelled to electrons, and that's why for the point of view of making a computer and so on and so forth with a IX, you might think why wasting your time because it's so much slower than electrons. When you say USB question despond instantly. Well, if I was a computer, I would respond much much faster in the sense that our. Instantly scale is a second fraction of a second. They're not little minute six seconds, but the computer electronics we elect tonics normally at g-go hurts, which is a billion things happening every second. But in your individual nerve, the basic timescale in which the elementary pulses happen is milliseconds. And so we are very slow basically, but we do things very much impact on. So that's why you can make these very complicated. Whereas computer does essentially sequential in lesser quantum computer. Of course. Unless it is a quad to computer..

Giovanni Zoki physicist Exxon Belo Los Angeles scientist university of California Alexander six seconds
"professor physics" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on Science Friday

"This about this new finding of neutrino oh okay so you have we have all kinds of tools on his trinamool we have we have telescopes thick and see infrared ultraviolet x ray gammaray gravitational waves and now we've got neutrinos gift how do you put all that together to get a better picture of what the universe is looks like or should be your what it's made out of yes i mean that would be the the the most amazing thing is if you eventually we'll see something at every single one of those messengers and so that hasn't happened yet we we have the gravitational waves were i seem sort of by themselves and then they were seeing last year with this where there was a electromagnetic radiation at the same people saw light and and gamma rays defame time and but we didn't see neutrinos at that time seeing all of those things from from one object maybe it would be fantastic but maybe asking too much what's happening right now is that a lot of these tools are for each sort of question you want to ask a subset of these tools that are that work the best so for there's a good connection between let's say looking for gamma rays and looking for gravitational waves there's a good connection if you went to from this happens the gravitational waves will come from things that merge to black holes lamb together to neutron star slam together that's the kind of thing that makes very intense gravitational wave emission and so that's what gravitational wave detectors are good for for these blazers you don't have the same as far as we know you don't have the same sort of dynamics of two masses coming together so it's not expected that you would get strong dacian wave signal from blazers so this is where neutrinos would come in neutrinos together with gamma rays and x rays and interesting i know you've worked on this for a decade right did you imagine you ever get to this point when was it what is it feel like yeah yeah well you do and you don't yeah i mean this this certainly start with optimism and then at a certain point you you're wondering if you are ever going to to see anything so i mean it's there's the there's the moment where these things start to connect and and i think myself and others you know find found it you know hard to believe we'd never seen something like that before things seem to to fall into place so there's a i mean there's there's a lot of going back and checking and rechecking and trying to make sure that you really have all evidence solid fitting together but i mean it's it's tremendously exciting to to get to this point and start to feel that with this lead you you actually know where where to go next which is to go back with the first thing i mean the thing we're doing now is going back in our data and looking for more evidence may already have and then the next steps are we have there's there's a there's a plan we have an idea of how we can improve already that the data we have with an upgrade that can the main thing we've learned running the telescope for ten years is how much better we can make the that's always better you can upgrade it and see we go from there i'm fortunately we've run out of time but please come back and talk more with us failing chat finley socio professor physics hits taco university also former leader for ice cubes point source analysis working group we're gonna take a break bookworm science friday book club is back if they classic bestseller stephen hawking you know what book i'm talking about we'll be back after the break stay with us this friday i may oh this spring physicist stephen hawking passed away and of course he's remembered for many things including his poetic descriptions of the often technical work of physicists and other scientists here he is in science friday back.

ten years
"professor physics" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Doughnut from homer it's one thing to have big thoughts it's another thing to want to drag the rest of us along in his in his footprints if i can put it that way i love that i love that attitude that is sort of lifting all up you know he he lifted us all up with these sort of grand goals and i think that that's essential today that we have people that that we can look towards that inspire us to to be greater than than maybe we thought we could be but you know what we haven't even mentioned his disability it right it's true it's true i mean the fact he was able to achieve so much inspire so many while also overcoming which which must have been a tremendous physical challenge of his own is just tremendous and it makes it all more inspiring james bullock professors physics astronomy at the university of california that does sound like a whole generational cohort of scientists and theoreticians all inspired by stephen hawking a lot of reaction coming in of course on social media on twitter from scientists from people in the tech world and from the general public this is from sundar pichai the ceo in google says the world has lost a beautiful mind and a brilliant scientists rip stephen hawking sativa naudet and microsoft as we've lost a great one today stephen hawking will be remembered for his incredible contributions to science making complex theories and concepts more accessible to the masses and this from neil degrasse tyson prominent us scientists saying his passing has left an intellectual vacuum in his wake but it's not empty think of it as a kind of vacuum energy permeating the fabric of space time that defies measure stephen hawking rip always this week we've been taking a closer look at the situation in puerto rico that american territory in the caribbean six months after it was hit by hurricane maria hit and devastated so natural disaster which human exodus an estimated hundred thirty five thousand people have left puerto rico and.

ceo google stephen hawking neil degrasse tyson puerto rico hurricane maria james bullock university of california microsoft caribbean six months
"professor physics" Discussed on Orbital Paths

Orbital Paths

06:10 min | 2 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on Orbital Paths

"So for years now, enemies has been watching nature through the eyes of the Hubble Space. Telescope. And what he sees keeps getting strange when we talked Adam and his colleagues were about to publish an article in the Astrophysical Journal. And then it They document that the rate at which the universe is expanding is not just accelerating its accelerating Raith that cannot be explained by our current understanding of physics. Speeding up even faster than thumped. Just don't know why. So my colleagues and I have been improving measurements of today's expansion raising the Hubble Space Telescope. We been observing certain kinds of pulsating stars, And we've been up calibrating their distances using a technique that goes back to the Greeks called PERA lacks we make an observation when the earth is on one side of the sun and six months later, it moves to the other side. So it gets the second vantage point. Trigon Ahmici tells us, Oh, I got side. I got an angle. I can infer another side, And we find to our amazement that other universes still expanding too fast. Even with the dark energy included It still too fast. We don't know exactly what this means this. He called attention right now because there's a difference between the prediction in the measurement. This tensions building over the last five or so years, and it's gotten to a point where Tartu. Perhaps dark energy, his little weird or any different than we thought the possibilities. There's no the particle That could explain the result. So on So far, the universes failing into test in. That's kind of excited to us. So can you imagine Hubbell Edmilson rights and go from the universe that was eternal and static? And the galaxies were just always were they are to an entire universe that must have had a beginning, Right? And that implies that maybe it has an end mean that wasn't a tremendous shift that happened at that period. And the the amazing thing is united lived through something similar with the accelerating anniversary, betrayed. It used to be my expectation that the universe would recall laps because it's the only thing that seemed to make sense to me like rebirth in a Shen Anto one of the strangest things about the universe accelerating is it makes it most likely that it's doing this only once you not expanding one time and it just seemed strange to contemplate Why are we here for the one eatery Shen of the universe Lu. Why did this happen in a timeframe? We could even observe. Most of the future history of the universe will be Disick celebrating faced with even less and less to see. And so you know, hundreds of billions of years from now if we don't keep good records of this, nobody Liam yield to do the same experiments to recognize the same. Thank thing SIS. It's really mind-boggling to think about. We know that there was a big bang beginning to the universe because of the deeper meaning heat, The microwave background that we talked about. And the fact that all the galaxies are rushing away from us. And there's no sign that the universe is ever going to re collapse. So the universe had a beginning, were living in this error where there are stars and there's a light and there's energy. And now four, whatever eternity me, everything will be dark. And they'll be no evidence. The universe ever had a beginning, the microwave background, The colder, and colder and dimmer endeavor until on observable. And if there are people in trillions of years, the look into a dark sky with no evidence that there ever were any other galaxies. That it doesn't seem quite well that were in the special time. Right. And it you know, really is a puzzle to a lot of people. You know, it's great. Hasn't even physics, the wind now problem. Live delivered the special time. When recently dark energy is transition to being dominant, that we could still see things in the universe to infer this. There are some mysteries that are quite a bit bigger than something we could try to measure. Adam race, He's Distinguished Professor physics and astronomy at Johns Hopkins University and a Nobel Prize winner for his work on dark energy and are expanding universe. So it seems like the ultimate fate of the universe is endless darkness, That seems a little hard to take. But one of the things that I think about is that we've Moley just-started understand the larger universe around us. In some ways, we just poked our heads out of our caves. It hasn't been very long. And I think about smaller creatures all around us. I take a fruitfly a fruitfly lives and dies in the course of a single day. So to a fruitfly the entire universe must his fade away into darkness. It's not even aware that the sun rises again. And sometimes I wonder if that's what we're up against. Maybe right now we see the end of what we call the universe. But perhaps were not even aware of larger cycles even bigger than our current imagination can show us. Expert questioning him on his excellent. Path Trumpian ranks. We'd love for you to check out more episodes at orbital dot com p r ex dot org. Support from orbital bathroom is provided by the Ulster peace Lung Foundation, enhancing public understanding of science technology and economic performance. More at Sloane dot org. This episode of orbital path produced by David Shulman editor is Andrea mistake Special. Thanks to John Barth. Genitive spots learn to using into the darkness backup hearings. Exciting Offer now I'm Michelle father a little bit debts. Darkest.

Adam race Hubble Space Telescope Astrophysical Journal Shen Anto Trigon Ahmici Hubbell Edmilson David Shulman John Barth Tartu Ulster peace Lung Foundation Shen Michelle father Nobel Prize Liam Disick Johns Hopkins University Distinguished Professor physic editor six months
"professor physics" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

02:18 min | 4 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Not complete in that and and and then she has been complied with request from the two periods boykin agent it to revive information to make a report and don't so that was not and then and in the second lotion but the motion to dismiss inability it up occasion all together with if i'm deftly not talked about it and they to talk about that it again on february right and so they it is the definitely they're trying to not get but the push it through and they you know it is i keep the the day but you this is the water from the which would rather plus don't i mean it you know their their ignoring if you know they're going to get back but you know it but the millions of got until you're the gallons of water that the bears they need to put a player and you know what to get this out of the gate using the water from the which would rather border so i mean there day or not considering they don't care about the people in a while they don't care but the state of an eye only just care about them so and and and to be center to the resisting are ready to the people burma there's already a significant energy facility up there already is in there yes yeah yes so when when peter done yeah look to pay tonight professor physics or down talks about what he calls economic racism what we've got is one that part of the state i week two on fairly bear the burden of the devils station that they potentially could take place without really sharing the load whatsoever with the rest of the state fair statement so what it is the danger of course is if if they get approval without having a fully fleshed out a plan they really got a blank slate to do whatever they want don't they oh definitely and and is to air anything to suggest at this point as they're willing to operate in any form of goodwill well that thing but i don't think pick yeah that it plant but the believe we could let out a lot as we have appear out and with climate need you.

peter boykin professor
"professor physics" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"It's something he's and time to win it thanks exactly mr nishioka he really good diseases to make sweden from harvard university he will commodity and first and this descent glass you just pasty increasing some interesting california brooklyn no professor physics as to the university of new york for thirty years he's goal to complete i'm steins dream of a theory of everything to to rhyme the police in to some royce all that visible last you have string field theory on their of the international bestsellers hyper space visions and pearl a world and voted as one of the one hundred smartest people in new york profiling the latest cutting edge development and signs which revolutionized our world and touchdown lions now the science fantastic with professor this is signs friend cause that but that doesn't make you know cox i find spent positively profile the amazing jaw dropping scientific discoveries which i revolution icing world end types seeing our lives and in this hour we're going to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary the start trek series that's right it's hard to believe it has been fifty years since the start track enterprise the lanes the way for science as well then science fiction and with us today to talk about the fiftieth anniversary.

sweden harvard university brooklyn new york professor california university of new york thirty years fifty years
"professor physics" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"High near twenty steady through the afternoon kansas no shows monday low twenties i'm chaotic you d meteorologist bill speed that spring he's and time to two minutes barclays center mr nishioka could theoretically diseases graduated from harvard university some look at monday and first in this position class you seem to speech de interesting some numerous be california broken and now professor physics and see the university of new york's with thirty years he's goal to complete i'm stunned screen three of everything to drive the cleats in to summarize all that cristobal last go founder of string field theory on their of the international bestsellers hyper space visions and girl a worlds and voted is one of the one hundred smartest people in new york profiling the latest cutting edge development and signs which revolutionized our world and talks are lions now it's science fantastic with professor this is signed spend fast pick that professor meets you know happened signs fantastic we profile the amazing jaw dropping scientific discoveries which are revolutionized thing our world and touching our allies and in this hour once again within a throw the lines open because this hour is your our this is a time when you can get to the phones and call eight six six to read two three two one to nine.

mr nishioka harvard university new york founder professor kansas california cristobal thirty years two minutes
"professor physics" Discussed on Undone

Undone

02:45 min | 4 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on Undone

"People like this guy i wanted to go and make revolution in buckets that this is per vance who boy his a professor physics and sociologist and pakistan was convinced after beast was an extremely and just society that guy had been but or cup in and so i wanted to now to change everything per vez and if i came work together and islamic body university they were _p's in the pocket nineteen sixties intellectual just outta grabs cool they were all activists social it's really together they were hoping to change pakistan as a volunteer does a teacher and a pair maddux in a small village change organize demonstrations for women's rights that was one thing she was a really passionate about jay in it's an amazing person she's got a show you exactly what needed to be done overtime she became essentially the leader of the group that we worked in but then the nineteen seventy eight rolls around james and shaking now have a second child daughter and there's a government too a new dictator comes into power his name is mahal man is the we'll talk institute's martial law shuts down the country's major newspaper any begins to target activists like you're cousin james home serve rated people disappear one member of the chains group the guy named nine year remembers just how scary that time was on the first you know when when his friends first i was with done and to put his station in all night and in this dined my wife in the hell's burnt a looking mckeon that good win a three you can anybody kill they he and a lot of time for people like team and curb as a nine year who's whole way of life was about fighting government impression rather than be silenced this is the moment they doubled down he found out an official from the us department of state was coming to torres one about and the group thought he's the perfect target for their message they could right pro democracy and try imperial is slogans on the wall throughout the city we knew pretty much to do would be i'm it to have to be done very fast before anybody dante maintaining because just now he's time about was becoming more and more police even if it was midnight to you would have spy he's and they'd be following every carter and so per vez.

pakistan maddux james mckeon official torres carter professor jay martial law us nine year
"professor physics" Discussed on KMET 1490AM

KMET 1490AM

02:06 min | 4 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on KMET 1490AM

"It's something he's and time to news i'm in his role don't think signed center mr nishioka he really diseases graduated from harvard university salute the money and first in this distinction class received his phd in contention in numerous beat california broken i know professor physics and see the university of new york for thirty years his goal to complete einstein stream of a flurry of everything to drive the cliche to some rise all the physical laws cle founder of string deal pirri onto the international bestsellers hyper space visions and pearl a world and voted as one of the one hundred smartest people in new york profiling the latest cutting edge developments and signs which revolutionized the world and touchdown lions the science and testing with professor rob down once again this is a doctor biggio and this is science fan tastic signs fantastic we profile some of the most amazing developments in science and in this hour we're going to talk about the search for indians in hot hearse pace we're not talking about ufo's for talking about the science but science how hundred thousands of scientists around the world are interested in revealing some of the greatest secrets they universe are we alone in the universe and once again we should also pointed out that i'm always onto around the country so go to my website and copley dot org and kate que dot org maybe lb in your city signing your copy of mind latest paperback book a new york times bestsellers called the future of the mind top fifty pelican nice this recording memories up loading memories all the stuff you see in science fiction movie did you know that we scientists can actually do in the laboratory.

harvard university california founder new york rob professor university of new york york times thirty years
"professor physics" Discussed on KMET 1490AM

KMET 1490AM

02:33 min | 4 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on KMET 1490AM

"To approximate be could you elaborate sure well these little tiny our kept their being called would go to space and they actually would have to each one of them to clear fail i'm not fail would be celebrated not i win but i lhp and if we would have to figure out how to build and on the ground would be thinking about something like a clear kilometers devoted to telescope like that we have to correct hurt the blurry ineffective for that and so this actually and ending and isn't that also going to be a problem also given the fact that light is a wave it also bay's well highs american certainty when you fill third celebrated you're done with the lakers actually been done with time and then hopefully we can youth and for other things like johnny have but really we have to get wanted even know that is very difficult it's probably not the biggest challenge of star shot i think we can figure out how to focus light and in that something that's not too far from are okay we'll stick another shot commercial rank once again you are listening to science fantastic with professor meets you know caught to a special guest today is doctor seager professor physics and planted terry science at mit and we are talking about exo climates he is anyone looking back at us from modest raise as we look in two day four life find out if they prefer commercial break and also give us a call the hot line number is eight six six thirty two to raise the feeling that you know you want home his defensive guy as the answer and then the soon to be as of late in his career this is just going to tennis today you would make their build a house.

lakers professor doctor seager professor physic johnny tennis two day
"professor physics" Discussed on KMET 1490AM

KMET 1490AM

01:36 min | 4 years ago

"professor physics" Discussed on KMET 1490AM

"Being and turn minnesota mr nishioka he really does is just graduated from harvard university community and first in this position class he just phd in physics in numerous the california berkeley no professor physics as to the interest of the new york for thirty years his goal complete understands becoming the theory of everything to run the gleason just summarized all the school laws string field theory on their of the international bestsellers hyper space vision and pearl a world and voted as one of the one hundred smartest people in new york trolls slightly no latest cunning and development and sign with revolutionized the world and touchdown lions nine and testing professor this is signed friend cut big with professor michel crack unsigned fantastic we profile the amazing jaw dropping scientific discoveries which are revolution icing a world and touching our allies and in this hour we're going to go to the very limits they universe.

harvard university community berkeley new york minnesota california professor thirty years