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30 Lessons After 30 Million SEO Visits

Marketing School

04:45 min | 3 weeks ago

30 Lessons After 30 Million SEO Visits

"Committed to your success online. We've worked with them to a special offer. Just remarking school listeners, all you have to do is go to dream host dot com slash marking school to learn more and get your website online today. Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric, Su and I'm Neil Patel and today. We're going to do part three of thirty lessons after thirty million Su visits, so we are on what number seventeen right now. so seventeen focus on branding Google wants to rank sites have a strong brand because there are less likely to create fake news or bullshit contents at what I mean by branding is the more people that are googling your name, the higher going to end up ranking because like everyone does seo everyone at least most big companies do it? Everyone's already doing link building again. At least the big companies are doing it so if multiple sites on the same issue like BMW N. Mercedes right, which go head to head for a lot of type of cars. If. They both have millions links. Who should you rank higher, the one who has an extra hundred thousand at that point, it doesn't really matter but what you are looking for things like brandy. If five times more people are searching Mercedes and BMW would tell Google that people prefer Mercedes branding. Is that important? Right number eighteen. Look at your competition. Your competition teaches you good lessons. Don't obsess over them, but look at your competition can give you ideas ideas go a long way, so leave it or not. I like using Lexis Seo tool for this. Alexa does a good job of their similar websites. Tool does a good job of There's like a net that you can see of similar websites. And they showed that Alexa score as well sites that are very similar to you. The net of five and he can expand. It's like a spiderweb. Spiderweb almost but I like looking at competition to draw ideas from every now, and then what I will like to do is I'll look at the idea and I'll modified. A little bit becomes my original idea. That's where good ideas come from number nineteen. Don't be afraid to have duplicate content what I mean by this is people always say? Oh, king contents, not goodwill. Google doesn't penalize for. This doesn't mean that you should take other people's content. Just slap on your site. What I mean by. Don't be afraid of duplicate content is. Published blocks on your site. Why not repurpose it on link Dan facebook pushed the content out there because extra traffic and extra brand awareness is better than nothing number twenty. Similarly. Think about how you can create power pages on your website, and this is a concept created by Brian, Deane also known as back Lingo and the whole idea. What they power pages you have imagined you have one introduction overview at the top of the page, and it's a long page with just a bunch of content and you can. You can have links that was you. Two different sections almost imagine like little chapters that you have for A. A long and power page what tends to happen there is let's say I'm writing about conversion rate optimization, and it's almost like a complete guide. Sure you can split it up into different pages and just have like a table of contents at the top that's a pillar page, but a power pages you have a lot of content on there, and that ranks well because you have a lot of long tail traffic on that page, so if you. You want to write something. That's more comprehensive considered doing type of setup instead of having a bunch of different pages that are split up number twenty one. We talked about how when you're creating content, you WANNA create amazing content going to create long content you WanNa, keep updating your own content, but one thing that people forget to do with their content, and this is a huge important lesson that many of the struggle with is interlinking if you're not. Not interlinking your content together, you're not going to as well a lot of people will take their new content and linked to the older pieces of what they're not doing is taking their older piece of content, and then linking to the newer ones, so you needed to both ways, not just with your your content, the also want to go back to your older content and adjust links and push more links out to the new content as well. All right number twenty two. If you think about doing us ill, you can't really do it alone. It's it's a team sport, so think about who you need. You need content writers. You probably need developers to get things done quickly on your site. You are going to need perhaps designers, and if it's a really big website talking, you're getting millions and millions of visits a month. You might need product managers as well so you think about it, it's. It's not really just about you. You got to think about how much help you can get to grow faster, and that's going to allow you to scale your traffic a lot faster number twenty three, so you guys are all going out there. Doing S IOS spending a lotta time, and you're familiar with a lot of the strategies, and some of them are old like a MP framer. The amp framework in theory makes her pages low ver- mobile. What you'll find is in the United States and other major English speaking countries. Having a impede doesn't really give you a big boost in traffic, if any,

Google BMW Alexa Mercedes United States Eric Neil Patel Dan Facebook SU Brian Deane
Ace Your Next Interview with Jeff H Sipe, International Career Coach

$6.99 Per Pound

06:14 min | Last month

Ace Your Next Interview with Jeff H Sipe, International Career Coach

"Just to get started. My burning question is how do you even I wanna get inside recruiters head right now just like with all the layoffs that has happened so many Americans are out of job and the space is more competitive than ever but the jobs are pretty scarce. So if you can just talk from your perspective just your observation about the whole situation be great to start off and I think this is just kind of more high level for life right. We have to look at this situation and see the opportunity in all and so I think as people are out there and feeling scared and having all those emotions with what's going on. How do you flip it? How do you flip the coin? You flip the script and make positive for you because you'RE GONNA get up every morning and you're going to have a plan and you're going to go and really try and follow through with some really strong actions that are going to make you have success. And that's the opportunity that a lot of people have and so I always try and take any situation and look at the positive. And that's what I'd I'd love to do for the audience. Today is really talk about some of the positive steps they can take off of for for. I mean maybe I should a phrase it this way but usually there's opportunity in crisis you know what I'm saying literally so do you. I mean what about for you because you know your coach and you try to empower other people to help them with their search like. Have you personally been experiencing more outreach and are you writing more pieces to help other people out like how has affected you? It's a great question. And Ironically if. I wasn't aware of the circumstances going on on in the world. Nothing has really changed for me. My business has stayed very consistent so I haven't seen an uptick. I haven't seen a downtick. I do believe that there is a potential downtick coming because some of the big tech companies have kind of acknowledged including soon dr at Google that they're going to slow down or stop hiring zone just kind of waiting to hear that and see that you mentioned a great point about how I sharing and I think I need to. Maybe do more of that. Maybe a little bit more on the writing side of things to really help people out you know. I did release one video on Youtube to just kinda take a slightly different approach to covid nineteen and and how people can look at the job search and one of the things. I'm always trying to do is just talk about some of the things that other people aren't talking about you know making sure we're giving people good to get through this 'cause it it is a tough time for sure and speaking of tough times like how do you. I'm just imagining myself. As like maybe someone who's recently been laid off and I'm like okay. I need to start building a network and my instinct is to like okay like maybe setup some informational through some emails to people. But like how do you even want to? Is your advice in like phrasing that outrage of dislike. Hey I get that. This is like uncertain and challenging time because like we obviously need to acknowledge it and I think this is a time where it feels weird to you. Know kind be opportunistic even though because it is a pandemic that's affecting a lot of people's lives right like so. How do you kind of elegantly approach intro You know just so like people are like hey like you because you never know who's had space that person is at right maybe there personally affected or maybe they just don't have time for right now. So how do you approach Networking and this time? And what would your opening email be? Yes so I think it's it's a great great question. It's kind of like there's a two tiered answer to this. First we start with the warm people right. The people you know you stone with that warm network and I know that that's going to be different for every person but you reach out to the people who you think truly will help you. And of course that's not a unique strategy so let's flip to the second strategy real quick which is a give. I model so clean's I got a highlight that real quick before you go further Jeff. 'cause I like the way you said that man. Can you say that again for us? Give a first model. You're saying. That's what I emphasized. The people men nothing in the world is freeman constantly. You're not gonNA constantly get it. You know what I'm saying. You gotta give for you to have something in return. You know what I mean. But yes course. So on linked in Lincoln is GONNA be your number one networking tool in. Hey it's a bad tool right. The you is terrible but it's but it's a monopoly in it's the thing we have to use and so what I find is really successful on linked in. Is this give I so? I always advise that people do something really simplistic and that simplistic piece of advice is create a plan for how many to people you're going to reach out to on a daily basis so let's say it's five people. Let's say it's ten people and let's call them product managers so you have ten product managers your new target a few companies you target a few specific people and you say sue came across. Your profile profile looks awesome on just wanted to share this really cool article on a new trend that's happening in product management. Hope you connect with me on link debt. And that's that's all you do and you do that ten times a day for people in your target audience people you WanNa connect with and you repeat that over and over and over again and it works and I know this strategy works because I used it when I was laid off at the end of two thousand nine and this was the exact strategy that used to get a job in two thousand

Google Youtube Freeman Jeff Lincoln
Non-Animal Origin cell culture supplements and manufacturing aids for biologics manufacturing

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

06:47 min | Last month

Non-Animal Origin cell culture supplements and manufacturing aids for biologics manufacturing

"Welcome TO THE CELL. Culture dish podcast. Non Animal origin cell culture supplement in manufacturing AIDS for biologics manufacturing. I'm Brandy Sergeant Editor of Cell Culture Dish joining me. Today is Dr Tobias Hurtig Regulatory Affairs Manager and Dr Tillman Product Manager Supplement in manufacturing and both with mark. Kgi Darmstadt Germany. I wanted to start today by asking if you could give us. A definition of non animal origin. Is there an industry wide understanding of the term? I would love to give you a definition for anymore origin or industry-wide definition of for anymore origin. Free or non anymore origin. Unfortunately there is no definition and there is no useful or clear. Definition provided by the regulator switch rate. Cipolla provide you a definition for animal origin. But not for non any minority with that in mind. What are the distinctions between primary secondary and tertiary levels for non an origin? So these determine partners attach level non anymore our Chin or animal origin. Free these terms are used to what people try to distinguish how far away they believe. The actual origin is for instance primary non anymore. Origin would mean okay. Something which is not directly derived from animal secondary on animal origin would be used when you want to say okay. He has something for instance last week. Produce Feminization and dissemination media did not contain any animal orchard material for instance recumbent insulin produced by bacteria. And if I may use the recumbent intimate as an example for tests and that could be used when you want to say okay. He is pro instantly which needs kieft into instantly by an enzyme. And this enzyme that I'm using a knot of animal origin and be also is not coming out of feminization which an arched material in media. These terms are not fully defined. So if you read about these terms you want to make sure that you really understand what the author or the user actually wants to tell you. Thank you for that. That's helpful as a basis for discussion. I was hoping you could also clarify vice for for listeners. Why is animal origin? Such a big concern in the cell culture realm let you start with why Edema or a Chin a concern. Animal origin is concerned. Typically with the from sound are adventitious agents coming with that animal material Dr However other concerns for instance dictate religious concerns halal kosher concerns around the origin. That could be lifestyle concerns that you think but we can waive alleged. Cheese are CO ever. These could also allergies. Ause topic focuses planned to proteins but they major issue are adventitious agents which could be so Nautica so they could cross the species barrier from the animal to human to the patient and causes disease with the patient These competitions agents might be viruses for instance sonars. A rabies are viruses that I've known to cross the species barrier or a protein protein-based agency like There the priors causing TSE pse. Other concerns are related to the supply situation so getting animal origin raw material. Importing that into your country could be associated with restrictions likewise she ever media produced which contains unlimited died might be import-restricted into the country. Where your customers sitting with the got to the Cell Culture? There is a another concern. And that is these the celts. The mammalian cell Kasha might be susceptible to such viruses. And if you OUGHTA robbing a nephew witcher on a bio rector unachieved g conditions. You need to tightly control your by tour and a virus might have a whatsoever effect to yourself. Kasha and from that point on your cell culture would not be regarded as p compliance. We talked a little bit about the fact that there isn't a regulatory definition of non animal origin. But I'm hoping that you could share with us. What the regulatory view on animal origin components is the regulatory few on Non Amel components is of course that this is the preferred As a regulatory person you would like to avoid any more mature whenever possible or you would expect that any moment you to comply with all the Pantin interrelations with regard to non animal materials and Lesser Regulatory Person. I feel that as much as I appreciate it. I always cautious because I don't want to end. Wishful thinking and due diligence is always required. Are those non animal materials. Don't get blind folded around the the documentation truly want to understand why this material is known in origin. So keep your eyes. Open your mind work with your suppliers as close as possible to truly understand when they talking about nine non anymore origin. Is that exactly what you want to half what you think? Non Animal Arjun is to avoid any ambiguity and confusion and at the end natives disappointment. I also feel like Worthwhile when you're auditing your vendors to question the the animal or non Hemel origin situation and to make sure that you're suppliers are in fact producing S. You wish to

Regulatory Affairs Manager And Lesser Regulatory Person Cell Culture Dish Kasha Rabies Dr Tobias Hurtig Kgi Darmstadt Germany Brandy Sergeant Editor Chin Cheese Hemel Nautica
Conversational AI with Israel Krush of Hyro.ai

Voice First Health

08:21 min | 2 months ago

Conversational AI with Israel Krush of Hyro.ai

"So I'm Israel Co harder and Seal Jairo A. M. I am roaming around and McCurry started late. Two hundred days early defensible says when was in charge of extracting considering message amounts of data for operational needs. That may studied computer science. The district says coming from a machine. Learning Beck rounds started working software engineer. I Inc than than at various start companies from cyber-security at the move the product management Was Product Manager head of of a couple of companies and then most of the state said gazillion. Mba DID MY MBA at Cornell University. This typically the new compass on woodsmen Thailand. And that's actually where I met with. My Co. founders from Cohen. Who studied at Cornell is master's in computer science? We actually met in machine learning class. Wow and do use in disband narrative Dick Campus We knew that one spin out than we actually got exposed to the polyphemus Alexa Google home divisive. And we're very excited about that. That we don't have this in Israel yet am so first of all very excited and then we got a bit disappointed by South. The use cases that it wasn't Tackle as we started exploring I the voice migrant than being dial natural language understanding market including jet right and when we understood that there is a lot to do there. I called a friend of mine. From beyond from eighty two hundred who are Scipio and Co founder and then we also a master's in computer science but he actually studying linguistics in Caroline and research. The English neighbors. We have this unique expertise in The industry it's called their competition linguistics or Google. Five years I that there could search link salmon beyond the USA and then Google Duplex which I'm sure a million happy group at at Google created spoi- suspended scheduled appointments for you restaurants in her salons headed amazing about the. That's right. I remember that I remember that very that was big news at the time wild. That's amazing so you guys really have a lot of expertise coming from different backgrounds but all very relevant to what you do in very interesting so how. How long ago was this that you all met like? How how? How does this company? Yeah so minimum. Method Cornell Tech and I know for the fifteen years but the company fall immediately after graduation so incorporated in June twenty eighth Dean so Less than two years ago. Talk about what we do but basically on on the concept had that accepted to news roundtable accelerator local leading accelerator in New York City And who went from there by developing the MVP getting our first big pilot We have something that we can actually converted to annual contract. Raised are around in a four million dollars the less July and today we're at the end of seventeen people in New York City California and Delaware. Wow that's great. Congratulations on that. So far that's amazing so to tell us more about the company for so what what is it. What do you guys do absolutely so I wrote? One sentence is a black play conversation. I blog form four healthcare providers. So let me break down. Abates conventionally I as I mentioned we're trying to focus on but also the so as long as it's natural language that we don't care about the medium actually understanding natural language in healthcare providers wanted to start with and enterprises organizations Massive amounts of data and That this data is heart navigating and maybe patients or general users. Find it hard to find. Whatever they're looking for or complete the tasks in the transaction did they want to complete and finally in that's the most important aspect of our solution is the blogging play. So why research assistant markets and the generals market. We've learned a lot of a lot of the existing solutions are based on a creation platform so Us As a company gives innovation the creation platform where they can define their intense and build workflows or conversation flows officials says X. replied with fly with another Blind we maybe Detroit Branch Users set and found it to be Embargoes There's friction at both the deployment and maintenance organization so we said we try to look for a completely blogging play approach. So what we do. Is We actually up into the existing data sources of the organization scrape them and we basically translating the the date now? Two different data structure which is a knowledge graph which is composed out of the main entities Andrew attributes and disconnections when this ended his attributes and this is our own representations of the Beta and which we can query natural language sessions. Really give them an embedded that piece of code they just copying base to their Website Call Center. Alexa Google and they have their voice assistant or Well basically the content. Yes so I'm not a computer scientist. That seems like maybe you can just explain that a little bit. How are you able to go? And when you're working with different organizations which which presumably have different ways of organizing their data take one piece of code and yet make it applicable to all these different organizations. Yeah absolutely so. I'll explain a one of the main use cases we've found valuable for healthcare provider is is helping their patients. The physician find the physician based on various attributes of this position when talked about their constructing. This nottage raffle and is a natural In this case the entity is a physician. And I can you might be a geology locations that the accepting insurance length that they accept and so on and so what we do. Is We actually go on by this website? And as all of their physicians went Beijing has been so we scrape them. And we don't care whether it's under the physicians or tens of thousands of physicians with scrape them build this knowledge graph and then on every attribute that the wasn't the data we can basically retrieve the relevant dancer. And I'll give you an interesting example show when we first deployed and we thought about you know people can ask seems like looking for cardiologists to speak Spanish. And ethnic cleansing the upper east side right location language specialities insurance men and so on so we destiny the beat and we actually gave to the first female user to death and she asked for an and that's just the use case that we didn't we didn't think of why a person would fit there by gender. Maybe you think it makes a little sense liquid even think about it was amen to recline with the relevant results. Just because the data was there it was a gender female man for each physician. And I think that's the barrel of actually being based on the data says trying to imagine a pretty finding dates. That's very interesting hot. So was essentially intelligent enough to just use the data. That was there but but bring that back so. Wow very

Google Cornell University New York City USA Beck Israel Co Mccurry I Inc Product Manager Software Engineer Cornell Tech Israel Cohen Thailand Co Founder Research Assistant
Reducing The Perception of Risk  The Art of Pre-handling Objections

All The Responsibility Podcast

09:35 min | 3 months ago

Reducing The Perception of Risk The Art of Pre-handling Objections

"Go to market is really a complex and kind of many-faceted activity and not only are there interesting cross cutting interactions across the organization in the process. But there's a lot of interesting through lines from one. End of the product management process itself from finding invalidating market problems. As I describe in what I call the secret product management framework all the way to go to market now in this episode. I'm going to talk about a tool that I think technologists like us. I E those of us who kind of like technology for its own sake. We're kind of technical so you might say we often don't give enough credence to the topic of risk reduction are really reducing the perception of risk on the part of the prospect. And that's done to a large degree by a technique called pre handling objections. Now we have to bring all of our product knowledge and tools to bear when we're handling objections or even more importantly preparing our sales and marketing teams to do that pre handling of objections. This is really a simplified version of buyer psychology the idea of the subconscious perception of risk. But it's really very useful even just as a mental model and of course it does actually have some basis in psychology. So it's not the only thing you need to do while selling this idea prehensile objections but it's really a big one and it can go a long way to keeping the sales process going forward. Now I'm going to talk about how you do it how the perception of risk arises Wyatt arises even if no one is saying anything about it essentially what happens is we have the subconscious and it's big job one of its big jobs just to keep us from being eaten by a lion? Metaphorically speaking it's looking out for problems and it's trying to ignore stuff that's not a problem we're actually trying to keep the brain from even being impacted by things. That aren't problems. It's really looking for things to worry about. And the problem is that the subconscious is very sensitive. And it's not actually that accurate and it can interpret kind of any little thing as a problem. For example maybe you have a spelling error on a slide. Now the subconscious mind immediately interpret that as danger now spilling aren't really that dangerous but the subconscious kind of crisis is whole story instantaneously along the lines of well. This person doesn't know enough to spell correctly. How can I trust him or her to solve my real problems now? This is a legitimate thing that your subconscious does it. Does this kind of thing now. In some sense your subconscious will grasp at straws to protect you. I mean it looks for the tiniest little indicators of danger you can imagine when we lived out in the Bush. The Mirror snap of a twig. Might say to the subconscious. Oh that's danger. We better run now. We'll go ask questions later. So you can think of an objection to bring this back down into the world of sales as a question. That's voiced or on voiced from the prospect that indicates there some perception of risk. So for example the first thing a prospect is going to be thinking when you first reach out to them. If you're doing sales is who is this person. What does this person want from me? What does this person have for me? And is this person. GonNa be wasting my time and what I mean is the objections. Start from the first contact with the prospect. They really start from the first marketing message. That reaches the prospect because the prospect is going to have those same questions about a marketing message. What are you GonNa do about these? Well one thing you can do is to be well groomed and I mean that in a highly general sense you personally should be well groomed. You need to be well-spoken you need to appear welcoming and open and these are all things that against set the subconscious a little bit at ease so you don't appear dangerous now your presentation you're using one should also be well-groomed so no spelling errors. For example. Little Nets like alignment and capitalization should be consistent. Those those things don't bother everybody but they bother some people a lot including me but this kind of grooming only goes so far a prospect will like you better in this has often again a subconscious reaction if you reduce their fears so remember this is happening below the level of consciousness if the prospect associates of feeling of risk with you here she will not trust you and probably will not like you. If you mitigate that feeling of risk then the prospects subconscious might fully flip to. This person is taking care of me therefore I trust and like them so what you want to do is take care of them now. There's two more important ways to put the subconscious cities one of them is to show that you care and understand about the person by anticipating their needs and concerns and the other is to use stories about other people to pitch your product. I've talked multiple podcasts about using stories and I'll actually talk a little bit more about using stories in this episode because I talked about stories all the time but this will mostly be in the context of item one showing that you care about and understand the person by anticipating their needs and concerns. I'm talking about these objections or the questions. About risk arising in the context of a sales engagement but it really applies to any situation where you're trying to communicate about an idea or sell a concept or product. Even when you're just giving a status report about your project the audiences likely to have some objections. That is they're likely to perceive some risks and those perceptions even if they aren't voiced our objections there away for the person to reject your ideas. Your facts your information. Whatever you're trying to communicate if you don't handle them so let's talk about what pre handling objections really means. It means knowing in advance what is going to cost the prospect to perceive a potential risk. And just show why. That risk either isn't worth worrying about or doesn't really exist. There's different ways to do it and we'll talk about this later. So part of go to market though is enabling the sales organization and did the Marketing Organization to pre handle objections effectively. Without you even being there the reason I mentioned that is because a lot of the objections. There's going to be coming up. A lot of the perceptions of risk are related to things that we know as product managers because we went and did Mark Discovery. And because we've talked to lots of customers and so we need to communicate those to the people that actually go out and talk to prospects which is a sales people and the people that try to get the prospects into our sales funnel which is of course the marketing team. So let's think briefly just to drill down a little bit more on that what happens between somebody out in the market becoming a lead for us and then eventually becoming a customer. I'm GONNA talk about an enterprise software style sales process but roughly the same steps occur in any sales process. They might not include the same people. Some steps might be automated sometimes. A webpage stands in for a salesperson. But in general in enterprise sales it goes something along these lines so a person season ad or some other marketing material it piques his or her interests and they respond in some way. Now we might also be reaching out to those people but it's the same idea right we we're trying to touch them with an ad or with call or something like that they enter our sales funnel become a lead now obviously not everybody who sees our ad becomes the lead. This is a funnel. So there's a certain number of people who come in at the top and they attribute out through the course of the process. So what we have a lead. The salesperson doesn't initial qualifying and discovery call with the lead to determine if they're really a good match for our product to learn some things about them that we can use later on in the sales process and so on now. If that lead is qualified they become a prospect and the salesperson then starts to sales process in earnest and this may actually be multiple steps eventually if that lead is then going to become a customer. There's a some kind of a negotiation that happens. The prospect agrees to buy and then the final step is the prospect becomes a customer now. There's things have happened after that once. They become a customer. But that's really the sales process reduction perceived risk or pre. Hanley objections is really critical. In all of these steps so initial steps were going to be reducing the perception. That the salesperson's just wasting the prospects time for example. How do we do that by showing that we understand the prospects situation? They're big problem and that we've successfully solved this problem for other customers. Who are similar to them now. During the qualifying discovery conversations. The salesperson is going to ask intelligent questions about the prospects situation and the challenges they're facing. The goal is for the prospect of feel like they're in good hands with us. In addition the salespeople is often gonNA use kind of customer success stories to show how we've solved similar problems before for people just like them as a sales process goes along. The perception of risk is going to change especially for talking enterprise software. Like what I work on. The actual monetary cost of the solutions likely to be very high and the cost of failure is even higher both from the standpoint of the money and maybe from the standpoint of the person's job so their perception of risk is going to be very very high. It has additional components. Besides just cost. They're worried of course if the product won't actually work we've been telling them it'll work. We've been giving them customer stories. But of course they're still worried the more stories that we can tell that they can identify with and that are about people like them the lower that perception of risk is GonNa be. They're also worried that the product will be too expensive or that will be very difficult to implement that they won't actually be able to make it work even if it could work. That won't work in their instance. So that's the thing we have to tell stories about as well and then of course there are also thinking well. There's other things that I could spend this money on. Maybe the other things are a better thing for me to buy than solving this particular problem and I'm not talking about competitors in this case I'm talking about solving a completely different problem altogether with that same money. So that's kind of opportunity cost

Marketing Organization Wyatt Mark Discovery Hanley
Julie Maas, Senior Product Manager for Voice and Multi-Modal Sensemaking Products and Tools for Intel Corporation

The VoiceFirst Roundtable

05:42 min | 3 months ago

Julie Maas, Senior Product Manager for Voice and Multi-Modal Sensemaking Products and Tools for Intel Corporation

"People think Intel you know they might think bub-bubba up you know or you know silicon bunch of silicon rolling off manufacturing Share with us. How Intel thinks about voice? Now you were in attendance of project voice and that was great. We appreciate you being part of that. sure what this how. Intel thinks about Voice Technology. You know until it's not like Intel's produced its own smart speaker You know but Intel is watching this technology closely walk us through a little bit on on your perspective and Intel's perspective on on how all of this has Emerged yeah So I I mean until has had a presence in in smart home And and Smart Automotive Representations over time As we look at the the continued kind of maturity of the markets and the the growth Alongside of our partners. We focused a lot on the broader kind of system Enterprise and commercial deployments that we believe will be A large part of the growth in in Boyce Over the next couple of years so really focused on some of our Our big opportunities within our not verticals on from retail hospitality National Services Education As well as healthcare And recognizing and hearing regularly from our customers as we look at the The opportunity across artificial intelligence For growing demand in in voice As well and I would say that the other The other layer That were really attuned to is The growth in multi-modality in the bridging of vision and voice You know we see that In in some Just incredible Consumer domain areas right now With with the ECHO. Show with you know. Some of the the voice ops That include more of the visual interaction. No that that's going to be an area where we just continue to see. Incredible Innovation But you know we also know that that will. Those sorts of usages will be moving Very quickly into commercial enterprise as well and A good deal. But we're focusing on in terms of the the System workloads that we will be looking to help our customer support the school. Yeah so and you're right it it. It's touching everything at this point every every sector you know this year. There's a lot to be excited about. I think specifically in the enterprise. And we've seen the on bringing conversational eight I into the enterprise with things just basic stuff flight. Turn on the lights like smart home stuff but in the office type stuff and then we have seen a little bit of experimentation primarily Google into okay. What can we do with email? Maybe bring ai into into e mail a little bit But I think there's a lot more we're GONNA see this year with that. Could you share any particular? Use Case that you've seen a customer think about her take on In involving bringing a Oriented in machine learning oriented approaches into the enterprise. You know what what excites you? The most about what you're seeing play out specifically with you know corporate culture in the enterprise so at a couple of I you know I think that in the retail areas Some of the the work that were Seen scale with regard to kiosks That maybe traditionally wore more of a visual kind of display Orientation whereas you had voice capabilities into that kind of mechanism You you get just a an increase in terms of the the customer experience and the level of engagement From from that sort of Foreign factor and that kind of interaction Where we're really excited about some of the advances that are happening within the Smart Media Brim context From a collaboration and productivity standpoint When we start to to layer in transcription and the ability to do everything from Provide coaching within the context of a meeting and create greater efficiency and effectiveness for For people Within within the the day to day. Collaboration Some of those things are really exciting. And and we We are particularly interested in in sort of the voice and vision or display oriented Approach that were Watching expand quite rapidly supposedly a couple of

Intel Voice Technology Smart Automotive Representatio Google Boyce Multi-Modality Echo National Services Education
Is personalisation coming to Apple Podcasts?

podnews

02:58 min | 3 months ago

Is personalisation coming to Apple Podcasts?

"The latest from newsletter at News Dot net is personalization coming apple. Podcasts apple have republished a job opening for product manager Apple podcasts personalization which is a role to build an executed roadmap for apple podcasts personalization open. Cupertino in California jobs are free to post to Paul Jobs. Dot Net by the way charitable has two short outages yesterday thanks to their tech provides a heroic coup which impacted podcasts using their analytics prefixed cars for a total of around twenty minutes charitable plan to harden their systems move away from Kerekou Altogether Amazon's API gateway and there's no more normal news so the corona virus audio and it's repays offering a temporary license as Hindenburg journalist pro four people working from home. Pauline is offering free audio live streaming as well as a discount on podcast hosting for nonprofits and educational establishments. The New Yorker has links to podcasts to listen to while you're social distancing they favor a podcast called Corona virus. Four one one Sean Howard from fable and finally productions left a nice little message for us all to watch willing to that from episode notes and our Newsletter Today. Also Nick Craw has posted details of how? Us PODCAST COMPANIES ARE FARING. Jar Audio reconcile. Every Brandon Authority should be producing podcast to help reassure their listeners and customers as a citizen in Vancouver BC. Personally I need to hear Justin Trudeau's voice right now says the author and to that of my mayor Kennedy Stewart who he apple is not allowing anything about the corona virus into its APP store except from governments medical educational institutions or health focused NGOs. It doesn't affect podcasts. Have frankly would encourage you to report. Anything that's wrong. Or just ludicrous. Meanwhile facebook Google linked in Microsoft reddit twitter and Youtube all released a joint statement about protection. Canadian Music Week has been postponed to September the eighth to the thirteenth podcast news. Podcast Junkie has interviewed editor. On what podcasting can learn from radio too wide ranging interview with lots of a loop British? How's your heart? Moved up their launch date by a week because they felt a time when we all need some laughs in our lives. It's a hilarious vulnerable and unapologetic podcast about dating sex. Quantum all those feelings and more crazy town unexpectedly cheery podcast about the climate emergency and human unsustainability launched. Its second season last week. Their eight things that they learn to making it links to from episode notes in our newsletter at America dissect it corona virus launches today. It's about some virus or other and there's plenty more and all the links in our newsletter subscribe poppies dot

Apple Cupertino Sean Howard Paul Jobs Justin Trudeau California Nick Craw Brandon Authority Product Manager Pauline Kerekou Vancouver America Amazon Facebook Kennedy Stewart Editor Youtube
Corporate Fitness Challenge: From Illness to Wellness, Building a Proactive Approach to Employee Wellness

Living Healthy Podcast

04:32 min | 4 months ago

Corporate Fitness Challenge: From Illness to Wellness, Building a Proactive Approach to Employee Wellness

"Today's episode. We're going corporate that's right. I'm dressed up in a suit and tie. I got my briefcase full of protein bars. And I'm ready to ask the tough questions like Britney. Did you forget to put the letter on those TPS reports? Yeah I'm GonNa need you to do what we're talking about today Yeah are you sure? Did you get the memo? There was no memo Andrew. This isn't a movie office based and we were talking about the corporate finish on. Should I okay all right? We'll do that. I think we know anyway. Core finish challenge basically once a year or the course of a month. La Fitness does something called the corporate fitness challenge where corporate employees are placed on teams and they participate in daily health and fitness challenges to earn points for their team. So there's a lot of fun and it's one of the highlights of the year round here so we thought we'd pull back the curtain a little bit and talk about what goes into the event what employees get out of it and how you can be a little more active in your workspace if you work in the office but before we do all that. I sent myself out into the field to participate in one of the events. All right so. I'm walking over right now. To the next event in our corporate fitness challenge which is a volley ball game This is GonNa take place on the basketball court at the LA fitness near us so none of us play volleyball as far as I'm aware But we're going to give it our best and engage in a little friendly competition with our co workers. So let's see how it goes. Have you ever played volleyball before like in high school? We Oh that's something. We got some experience. How about you know I mean it except for this? Hey captain strategy here for volleyball yes. We're going to win win. That is a great strategy. The ultimate strategy. It's huge the cord and then the net itself is like we'll wait to hi point. That was amazing. I think somebody legal touches but who cares I who won that one excel one thirty nineteen? Wow Wow that's a high scoring affair. Who's a great game game Little Miscommunication Little Miss Community. At least they didn't run into each other. They're working on their communication. Wow she laid out for that and almost got it. That's going to do it out here at the volleyball tournament for the corporate fitness challenge. Everyone had a lot of fun. I'm not going to tell you who won. We're GONNA reveal that later in the episode but I will say everyone had a great time so back to you in the studio Andrew. Thank you Andrew. Now to help us understand the challenge better. We'd like to introduce our guest this week. Her name is Deanna Mercurio. And she's one of our product managers here at corporate but she's also a health and fitness. Not An she helps plan and create the challenge for the month. So please welcome to the show. How YOU DOING DNA? Hi thank you for having me. Yeah it's great to get you on. Finally I know we've kind of talked about this for a little bit but It's good to get you on so let's get started getting to know you a little bit. In the first piece of information I want people to know is that you just got back from vacation. And what did you do on your vacation? I went snowmobiling snowmobiling. Which sounds super red? I've I've never even. I don't even know if I've considered that like that. Sound Super Cool. So where do you go to do this Minnesota because Minnesota has a lot of snow lot of are you from Minnesota? So I'm originally from Minnesota. Okay and I grew up snowmobiling so every year. I take a trip back home. And there's about four hundred miles of snowmobile trails right out the back door hop on a sled which is what we call him and you just go for a ride all day. That's awesome and you do that. How do you do this for Lake? Like a couple of days at a row or is it like a trip to try and get to somewhere or is it just like you just. Kinda go round and mess around so the trails Goto resorts and Lakes. And you just stop off. Have a bite to eat. Get back on the trail cool. Yeah so you make your way back home you do a loop like renting a Vespa and just kind of cruising around snow. You pull sweet tricks. I get the X. Games the winter x games. I know

Deanna Mercurio Volleyball Minnesota LA Britney Andrew
Trend Forecasting - Connecting the Dots Around Us by N26 Head of Product

The Product Podcast

09:44 min | 4 months ago

Trend Forecasting - Connecting the Dots Around Us by N26 Head of Product

"So dual-track discovery and delivery. This is probably familiar to many of you. The Concept Being Donald Track. Agile the idea that we in product need to not only focus on how to prepare teams for one step ahead for what's coming next in the next sprint or the next quarter but also keep an eye on the horizon. What's further out there? That's going to affect us that we might not know how to make tangible today. And I don't know about you but I found myself more times and I would like to admit with the distribution. That looks a little bit more like that. Not only does it not feel good. It's dangerous and the reason can be exemplified with simple Eisenhower Matrix for things. That are urgent and important. It's not to get buy in from stakeholders or to convince her team. We need to work on something or for you to even figure out what has to be done. These are your incidents for what you might need a post mortem. These are your releases that are coming up and you've got to make a deadline in order to get something through your APP. Regression test not easy to get buying and pretty clear that top priority list for things. That are urgent but not important. This is where the classic product skill delegation comes in is another team equipped to do this better than us. Doesn't their service handle something like that? We try to delegate as much as we can for things that are neither important nor urgent. We tried to get rid of them all together and we might mark them in. Jura ticket as won't do and comment. Please talk to me if you have any questions but for things that are important but not urgent. We don't always take the time and carve the space to focus on them and this is bad because when we don't know what's coming on the horizon we might actually find ourselves working on things that are neither important nor urgent just because they're quick winds and they're easier to understand and to articulate to our teams and so I want to focus today on the upper right quadrant how to carve space for things. That are urgent but important. But not urgent. I believe that product managers can focus on that urgent but not no important but not urgent work by carving space and using trend forecasting tools and techniques in order to future proof their products at Lisa the Barcelona School of Design Engineering where I studied a program on research for design innovation and a cornerstone of that program is in trend forecasting and before. I started that programming. I thought that trend forecasting was basically something like this little more than reading into a crystal ball. Or maybe shaking tea leaves or coffee grounds things that you do on holiday because they're exotic but not necessarily a way to make a case for what you should build next but quieted my inner skeptic and I started to dig into the curriculum and what I found was that the reading materials and the coursework and the projects that is doing in that program or not on the Typical Products Circuit. These are not books that you find tons of medium articles that the tech community talks about all the time. These are things that are a little bit more fringe in nature. And I like to. I found because I realized that trend forecasting is inherently evidence-based with the balance of quant. And I thought that's Kinda like product. Maybe there's a common denominator here that I wasn't expecting and so before we dig into trend. Forecasting tools and techniques that product managers can use. I wanted to share with you. Three things about trends. These are the three things we should know. I don't mistake. Trend with trendy cabbage soup. Diet might be something that you find on a morning talk show but it's probably not here to stay because the next time that some other fad diet roles in this one will be old news not a trend fashion choices. That seem like a great idea in the moment but upon reflection a few years maybe months later you look back at photos like what was I thinking why did I wear that. Not a trend and toys that spike into popularity. Actually the fidget spinner debuted in the early nineties but it claim to fame was in two thousand seventeen in the middle of the year around. May and it didn't even make it through the holiday season. 'cause was old news by by Christmas. Not a trend so don't mistake trend with trendy so what is the trend? Then if it's not the things that capture the headlines of best friends of twenty twenty well it's a manifestation of change and this makes sense when we consider that we would call this a trend line. A trend line moves in a clear direction. And we know where it's going. It's something that articulates to us where things are headed as the impact culture and society and certain industries. And it's no surprise that we'd then would call fidget spinners not a trend that doesn't look like a trend line to me what is a trend. Then looking for a recent example to understand the local market here in the UK is the love for slurp Vietnamese soup. We can see here a steady trend. Yes there are seasonality dips from May to August make sense. You don't want hot soup but FAA shows us that over the last sixteen years. The demand is on the rise at least by search query people being interested in expressing their interest so trends are the sustained manifestation of change and we can notice trends if we look out a bit more carefully for signals signal. It's simple it's an indication of a situation and they can take many different formats. We'll go through some examples. Here's a way luggage. They raised one hundred. Eighty one million bucks through their suzy round so far and they came out founded in two thousand fifteen. They're designing travel luggage for the modern traveler. Smart Design and sleek years later. We see a kickstarter campaign for nomadic backpacks. It raised forty four times. Its intended goal. Sneak on the exterior. You have no idea the functionality. That's hiding within it and Kara sport the pioneer of Ath Leisure bags which are convertible to help people. Mostly women go from gym to work to dinner two drinks. Now what are these things have in common well? They might seem very disconnected but if we look a little bit closer we can tell that these three examples although at different points in time over the last five and a half years show us that there's huge consumer and investor appetite in hyper functional but really elegant products. You would have no idea what's inside because it looks so nice. And so back to the Great. Formatting how can we use trend forecasting tools and techniques at twenty six to make sure that we we build important but not urgent work at an twenty-six so I'm not going to walk you through all of the different frameworks. We use many of them. Should be familiar to you here. In this room marking jobs to be done understanding them through hypotheses. But what I will talk you. Through is five tools and techniques that we used in trend forecasting and the first one is sorting out those signals. So if we receive signals from all these different places around us. If you're slack looks anything like mine in my teams. You're constantly sharing articles things interesting. Check this out such and such just raise money or such and such just got acquired. It's hard to capture that and make sense of it and if we want to be present in our meetings and dive into our focused work then we can't just read everything that comes to us right away but it's not just about what share with you. It's also the things that you go out and find for yourself so looking what's up. What'S UP ON PRODUCT HUNT? What's gaining traction there or even traditional publication? What's the headline news today? The market's hit a record high. These are all signals. And if we aren't careful they can become noise so we use a pretty low tech technique here which is just creating. Trello board organized by Category. Where we store what's going on so in the actual truecard. We have links so we can go back to it and find the details but we organize them by their headlines and this is great because we can go back at will. We don't have to scour the internet or review. Which Slack Channel. Did Somebody share that with me. We can just take a look here and easily. Organize everything now that we've gathered those signals and we've organize them a bit more systematically. We can identify relevant trends. I'm going to walk you through some examples of the things that might seem tonight. I are focusing on right now. Last Fall American Express released. Its new green card packed with a slew of new benefits. It's also made of recycled ocean. Plastic at least for the most part and for that package of new benefits. They've raised the price fifty percent for the subscription month later bunk out of the Netherlands. They launched their own green card ninety nine years a year subscription and for every hundred bucks you spend. They plant a tree within two months. They planted forty thousand trees. Really Cool and the most extreme example up here is a carbon control. Card launched a think tank in Sweden called economy in partnership with the UN climate. Change Secretariat and Mastercard.

Donald Track Mastercard FAA UK Barcelona School Of Design Eng UN Slack Channel Netherlands Twenty Twenty Sweden Kara Ath Leisure
Choosing the Right Tech Stack with Dave Paola

Ruby on Rails Podcast

11:31 min | 5 months ago

Choosing the Right Tech Stack with Dave Paola

"It's so great to talk to you again. Dave thanks Brian you hello from South Lake Tahoe. Awesome Dave what is your developer. Origin story developer. Origin Story I am one of those weird people who got into coding. As a young kid I I started messing with Ms dos batch files on my parents. Samsung three eighty six When I was in middle school probably fifth grade. Or something like that Dos Batch files quickly led me to Q. Basic so shout out to all the old school basic programmers listening Then I kind of throughout high school Expanded my programming knowledge again. All for fun Just Doing things visual basic six Eventually progressing to Java and then I was lucky enough to really awesome university the University of Illinois Indiana Champagne And I was involved in the group there where I met just a bunch of world class. People who really kind of added rocket fuel to my programming My programming experience Yeah that's pretty much. That's pretty much. How did that? And then after after college I moved out to the bay area to pursue the proverbial startup the startup gold rush. If you will so David. Such an interesting question. Because I spent a couple of years in San Francisco and I'd love to get your take on this. Do you feel any more. That potential founders need to move out to the bay area well so I do have a new startup in South Lake Tahoe. Um and so I I lived in the area for about eight years. Six of which were at block So most of my tenure in San Francisco was at a start up and I'll be honest I think I did leave San Francisco and I left for a variety of reasons that we can probably guess what they are but I do think that. The one thing about Doing a startup in particular outside of the Bay as I think that the most difficult part there will be finding investors. I still think that the the the money that is available in the bay is unmatched anywhere else in the country But I think barring that I see no reason we've been perfectly successful. Jelly switch Without being in the bay near the of course so I can go down to the bay whenever I want but I actually haven't been there in many many many months So I definitely don't think you need to move to San Francisco to do a start but you'll definitely need to spend time there. I would imagine If you want if you're interested in raising money from a VCR or a group of angels such good insight so how much has ruby on rails made an impact on your career Yeah that's a good question. While I was first exposed to rails in college there was another student who was just getting into it and this was probably this was two thousand. I WANNA say two thousand six two thousand seven and so I'm not I don't remember if it was rails one or two at the time but we kind of went through the the d. h. h build a blog and ten minutes built a blog and five minutes with the rail scaffold command and it really opened my eyes at the time I was really knee deep in in skull. I believe Doing doing kind of exploring the the the world of the JVM and the whole world and the thing that really struck me about rails. I was introduced to like many people imagine introduced to Ruby at the same time and I remember trying to get This is I think before her. Roku was even around. I'm not sure I remember trying to get a ruby on rails a rails to project running on using passage. Gi under Apache on a on some kind of a A digital are some kind of a cloud host somewhere I really liked coming from both the python world and the world of Java. I really like the the emphasis that Ruby has on on programmer productivity and I have all sorts of thoughts and opinions an an a hobby explorations I've performed in the small talk world and The lineage between Ruby and small I think is fascinating but the thing I love about rails in particular and the thing that the the biggest impact that it's had on my career is that I like I really liked doing big things with small teams and I think that's one of the one of the philosophies if if not explicitly mentioned I I took that quote From Sam Stevenson. Who's one of the developers of base camp? So that's that's my favorite thing about rails and I found this really allows me to do is move really quickly on things like side projects rapid prototyping and now for probably the third or fourth time. It's been possible for me to move really quickly with a really small team moving from the prototype into an actual product that can be sold in the real world as a business and I. I'm not sure I'm not sure that there is another framework out. There that is as tuned to that objective as rails. I completely agree so we met when I was first a student and then an instructor a block which of course you founded and because of that and all of your experience around boot camps and watching the evolution of them. I wanted to give you a space where you can just kind of. Tell the listeners about how you feel about boot camps at this present moment yes so that could be a really long topic I was not the sole founder. I was a co-founder actually. We had we had a couple of other folks Involved as well gosh that the journey occupied six years of my life in my in my mid to late twenties and we we grew the company from basically for people to over one hundred hundred ten or maybe a hundred and fifteen people When I left in two thousand seventeen and in between two thousand twelve and two thousand seventeen. the bootcamp world just kind of exploded There was a there was a huge amount of interest In that in that industry. So I mean if you want my thoughts on on boot camps in general I've been fairly unplugged from that industry for the past two years But I will say that I believe that. The rising tide lifts all boats I think it's great that there are young talented resourceful people doing their best to change people's lives. We had A. We had a phrase that block. I don't know if you remember this or not. But we phrased that. We saw that all too often when capitalism and education meet that the result is exploitation. And we really didn't believe that that was an inevitable thing so we really really tried hard not to not to have that happen at block And for me personally. One of the one of the unique things about block. It's been awhile since I've been in touch with anybody there but so I'm not sure if this is still the way they do it the way we always try to structure. Our programs was very different than the classroom And the the word that we chose very deliberately and thoughtfully was the word mentor and so we wanted to every student to have one mentor that they had that was an experienced practitioner in the field That could help them learn and the reason for that was because first of all for me personally. I know that I've learned the most by just working alongside really talented people who are much more experienced than I was and so. I don't know that there are a ton of programs out there that think about it. That way There might be a few of them out there now But I do know that for the first couple of years we were the only ones That was really fun. the other the other thing. I don't like about blue camps honestly and this is something that we kind of discovered later on block and attempted to to kind of course correct With kind of attenuated succession. I say is a lot of times employers very skeptical bootcamp Grad sometimes. It's sometimes it's unreasonable skepticism or unfair skepticism. And other times. It's it is reasonable skepticism. There's only so much you can learn in three months and employing a bootcamp grab junior developers a very different thing than employing a potentially someone like a college undergraduates. Coming out of a computer science degree and so a lot of a lot of programs aren't really that well equipped or experienced and employing people like that but I know from a management perspective it is it is different it is different so I on the whole though. I think I think. Boot camps are a force for positive change There's always going to be a bunch of bad apples. That kind of ruined the The phrase they ruined the much of bad apples ruin the whole thing for everybody even just a few of them but I think overall it's been a positive positive movement. What about you? What do you think about boot camps? Yeah so I. I don't know what I would have done if I didn't have block because I had moved to San Francisco discovered that I couldn't be a technical product manager without learning how to Code. I needed to take a job as you know. It's so expensive to live in San Francisco and so I needed a boot camp option that I could do at night and block just seemed like the obvious choice and I really loved being paired with that mentor and learning quickly and you know that mentor encouraged me to go out to meet UPS. And that's how I found my first technical job and really haven't turned back to have been a developer sense and really loved being a mentor block. Some of my students are still people that I get along with today and who still reach out to me with job Updates and whatnot. Which is terribly exciting. I I think for a lot of people will join a boot camp because they hear that you can make a lot of money. But they haven't proven that they actually enjoy. Coding and I think it takes a somewhat special personality to really enjoy coding. And you have to make sure that you know that before you get into the boot camp because I certainly had students who just really never really clicked with it and then I had students that were just amazing prodigies who were a goat farmer in Florida I had a Barista in Seattle. They were just incredible students. And if it hadn't been for a boot camp they never would have gone down that path. So you see these bootcamp starting to close down that over promised and under delivered and I got to. Your point is the world kind of course correcting but for me the boot camps a really special because a lot of them taught ruby on rails. And we're getting to the point. Now that those students who came through and learn ruby on rails maybe five to six years ago which is how long it has been for me are now in those intermediate and senior roles and really keeping the ruby on rails community alive so I think boot camps actually played a big part of that. I think that's I think that's well put us especially your point about kind of first generation or second generation of bootcamp. Grads are now far enough along in their careers that they can certainly influence the hiring decisions now at companies So I think I think you could see a catalytic effect here. I don't I don't stay in touch with the industry as much as I used to. So I don't know if this is the case but we. We always kind of look forward to that at block where we could Face less of an uphill battle to get our grass hired So yeah I think we're getting the point though like where the HR person might see a resume with a boot camp and be like. Oh no we we don't hire from boot camps and then someone say actually did you know that Suzanne like one of our best engineers came from Goo camp. I think we're starting to get to that point. Which is fantastic. That is outstanding to

San Francisco Developer South Lake Tahoe Samsung Dave University Of Illinois Indiana Roku David Goo Camp Co-Founder Programmer Brian Instructor Sam Stevenson
Product Managers for the Digital World

Spice Catalyst

03:47 min | 5 months ago

Product Managers for the Digital World

"Product managers for the digital world the role the product managers expanding due to the growing importance of data. It decision making in increase in customer in design focus in the evolution of software development methodologies like Agile according to Mackenzie and company Mackenzie says has product. Managers are the glue that binds the many functions that touch a product engineering design customer success sales marketing operations finance legal and more. They not only own decisions about what gets built but also influence every aspect of how it gets built and an launched. They wear many hats using a broad range of knowledge to make trade off decisions and bring together cross. Functional teams ensuring alignment between diverse for what's more product management is emerging as the new training ground for future tech. CEO's and now as companies from outside outside the digital world go through the digital transformation. They need product managers to get the product right also but Kenzi argues the product manager thinks like a CEO. But there's a problem there. Unlike procter and gamble's brand manager whose model HP copied to create today's product manager the brand manager at P. and G. had budget authority. They paid for the market research that is needed and for the advertising. So it's hard to think like a CEO when a product manager does not have control of the budget. That is why I argue elsewhere in this book that the product manager should have budget the thirty over marketing and market research. Data's becoming even more critical and enables the product manager to monitor a product success across crossing gauge moment really conversion usage and more product management is also becoming more agile planning for the next feature release and and long term product. Roadmap Mackenzie writes. The products are becoming more complex. Thus making the product management role. More difficult customers are looking for new features frequent improvements and upgrades after purchase product. Bundles are happening different. Pricing Tiers Dynamic Hamic pricing upsell opportunities in pricing strategies plus identifying in owning key partnerships. But Kenzi says there are three three types of product managers technologists generalists and business oriented based on their interviews. In my experience I agree. The technologists type of product manager has to be involved in back in platforms or highly beat Abi Products. In my opinion they tend to lean towards being the products architect act. The generalist is more customer focused. The business oriented product manager tends towards BTC products as the digital transformation accelerates rates reliance on data analytics become increasingly more important. Add to that. The fifteen perfect storm technologies discussed elsewhere in this book. These technologies will produce a lot of data figuring out what it all means also challenged product managers product. Managers of the future will apply. I machine learning and art official intelligence to understand the data gathered. Mackenzie the says the future product managers must have a computer science foundation design while this is true for some products overall. I think it is wrong. If the time and the effort of a product manager is pulled into the direction of architecture and design nine. Who's going to do the other thirty two things that must be done in the product market strategy for products

Product Manager Abi Products Mackenzie Brand Manager CEO Kenzi HP Procter Official Gamble
The many ways professional organizations help product managers  with Mark Adkins

The Everyday Innovator Podcast

09:32 min | 5 months ago

The many ways professional organizations help product managers with Mark Adkins

"How pita evolving to keep up with the Times. So it's funny because the one thing I in kind of full disclosure sure is I have two sons I four children. Two sons oser product managers. Not that I made them do that. Once a senior product manager at Google the other one is a product manager for ten cents the Chinese company that owns we chat but they also own riot games. James and he's part of the League of legends brand so I have these two sons who think they invented product management right. No no no no. Oh No it's been around a long time. I can't remember. I don't know who to ascribe it to a friend once called it the accidental profession. That's right and I. I've always loved that term. Although it's changing right I think that's what we'll talk more today about it. It really is a legitimate profession Russian. If you will but twenty thirty years ago it was you're tapped on the shoulder you know you're working at a company and you have an engineering degree or Marketing degree or finance degree. Somebody says hey. Atkins I want you to Ron product development in like what really and boom you're a product manager and that's part of again my history with PD was when I was tapped to run a product development program. I'm like who do I return to. How do I learn it is a profession? How do I become better at it? And that's where we are today. The role of product manager product owner her and so on his exploded and I think pedia may as well position to be the keeper that Professional Association for for this community. Because the other thing I would like to add is product. Managers are in corporations. Say We're practitioners but we have a great great history with academics. We welcome service providers so one of the very unique things about PD. Ama Professional Association is we include the entire our community so it it yes. It's people incorporations is people in startups doing product development. But it's the academic people that give us the foundation that we need to be he great at innovation and it's the service providers market research companies. The the design firms that are instrumental in doing great product Komo. Yeah I think that that Nicks is really key to PD me. And what I find so appealing about it and I was having a discussion with someone. This wonderful experience. I got to train in their product managers in this large organization and the guy that brought me and it was senior director of product management for them and he was talking about what we did for the training raining. My group is all based on. PDA's body of knowledge and put my hands around that. And the reason why I chose that is instrumental in the work that I did that. I successful and it's also grounded in research every what four five years. There's this study that does about what are the best organizations doing in the space. And how does that compare to everyone else and it gives you a real appreciation for what you need to be doing right. The distinction there and his reflection on this. Was You know Chad. Yeah I've done training from all the different organizations right. I've been in product management longtime. I've never seen something that is as wide breath and as integrated as this Body knowledge that covers all the things that you really need to know. So what I'd like to do to build on that there's two elements one is going to be China. Our Program in China is going to be teaching at the University of Pittsburgh Environ January. So let me let me start with my personal program. I teach a course I in the technical title is managing medical device. RND right but I use the PEDIA may body of knowledge approach as my textbook. Because when I looked at what I'm trying to do with these graduate students who are pursuing a master's of science and bioengineering. I I I WANNA give them the full breadth of understanding of what it is to develop new products and the PDA body of knowledge is the guidebook is as a wonderful resource. So I use it personally might textbook as far as China. There's not a better example when you were talking earlier about. PM Am I and project management and Pedia. May We have a wonderful program. I've been twice to China to be representing Pedia. May It was is our former chair. Alan Anderson it really got the program going and we are certifying thousands of Chinese folks who have a PM so they were project managers but now literally the government of China wants to move up the value you chain. They WANNA be innovators. They don't WANNA be simply low. Cost manufacturing companies in a country. That just can only make cheap product. They want want to innovate and so they've turned -pedia may as their partner in developing a certification program. So if you WANNA be a product manager in China China you need to get your n. p. which is our revocation and we have literally trained thousands and thousands of Chinese and it grows every a year so I think it's a wonderful example of this differentiation and the move up if you WANNA call it. The value chain from project management into product management innovation. And we're doing it in China in spades. I think it's really interesting. How PD may is in? A sense has always been international nationalization but exporting what has been known as the US has capability dominance in product management to other places and China paid attention to that right an open the doors to this just as they did two PM. I sometimes goes well. Can I also add the global nature on our former tair. He's a key week he's from New Zealand. So for the last three years our chairpersons been the New Zealander so I agreed read the PDF roots are in the US but it would be complete underestimation of us to think of us as a US only organization. Yeah I I do. Think the recognized dominance in at least the area of product management has been kind of US base. Because when I talked to other people in other countries they talk about well. You guys have so much experience in that. How do we get that experience to? And this is one way. And that's awfully kind of a wakeup call. I think for product managers. If you're listening to this now certification. Should I think historically has not made a big difference in our industry frankly. I very rarely see job. Announcement saying some kind of certification is desired but if if we have thousands and thousands every year of product managers in China getting certified. It's going to start making more of a difference and it's something just to look into frankly clearly the value to me. The value of many people that have helped train for specifically for the certification isn't really getting that certification right. It's not the piece. The papers not magical but learning that body of knowledge learning the framework man if there was big light bulb moments. That went off for me as I was doing that personally. And I had the pleasure of helping to co train on that body of knowledge at last year's conference of you and I were that and I assured just my journey with that too and said when I learned about this. That was huge. I suddenly put together the pieces that I've been doing for the last ten years that I didn't really know how they fit and there were other people in the room that came up to me afterwards and said you know. lightbulbs would offer me too during the training today that I never made these connections before it was just really powerful. Really good so let's talk about the benefits associated associated with a so if people want to check out the professional organization lots of free resources available and of course it is a professional association. If you're a paid member when you get access to other things to just what's involved in those benefits I really WanNa go instead of going down into the dark details of everything everything when I reflect on my time with. PDA In this recently yesterday. On a link to impose it's been a couple apple decades of meeting fantastic people so whether you volunteer for DNA or you're just see participating or online or as part of a chapter after I can guarantee you're going to meet some of the smartest most interesting most dedicated people you'll ever meet you'll meet them through pedia and that's pretty priceless kidding. It's very priceless. And then the second thing is what you learn right. Yeah so like to your point about body of knowledge right. I tap on the shoulder twenty years ago. It's like you're in charge of product development. Oh man what does that mean. And the ability to go to the website the body of knowledge all of the books we published all the webcast we do. There's so much you can learn is part of PDA so rather than going down into the weeds of benefits in listing a dozen. You'RE GONNA meet great people and you'RE GONNA learn a lot. Just become become part of our community and I can guarantee those benefits you'll get

Product Manager China Product Development Pedia Senior Product Manager United States Senior Director Of Product Man Times Professional Association China China Riot Games Google James League Of Legends Ama Professional Association New Zealand Nicks University Of Pittsburgh
Overcoming the Impostor Syndrome

The Product Podcast

08:40 min | 5 months ago

Overcoming the Impostor Syndrome

"Everyone my name is kwami. And I used to work in Mexico in product and I recently joined Verizon media about three months ago so putting you to the bay area objects just moved Jeff So the topic that brings us here. Today is a side. Just I used to be something engineering. I moved from sucking can humans product so What brings us here? Today's topic so comments up big from engineering to product overcoming the impostor syndrome Come out generally like to be a conversation on talk so I tried to prepare a few slides as possible so that it can be more conversation. input as well so going forward. This try do that. It's It's going to be a fun all right. So the agenda sell I I. I'd like to talk about next contacts about me What is product management? My jeans product Imposter Syndrome can start Just taking game looking what it is in in some fact surrounded and then some challenges I face and then five issues. I've picked up as more by on the issues that I picked out just Regards which gusset imposter syndrome and then how. I overcame IMPOSITON. Hopefully it'll who can it. It will be useful to you and then some key takeout takeaways that out like you to Renewed Aachen in Tacoma right. So start right with some fun facts about me So I'm originally from Ghana West Africa and I I actually grew up in South Africa. Small country called Swaziland. The Kingdom of size is one of the last remaining market in the world And it has about one point. Four million people so from very small tastes in Africa so I grew up in a family of entrepreneurs by parents. Aaron started off as teachers and I had the I guess I was fortunate. Watch them set up the own businesses whilst they were teachers indeed My Mom's side of the retail business. My Dad started my dad and my mom together started a consulting business in on. I was the African parents that to gifted children involved in your businesses so I I was involved in various aspects sometimes running by MOMS retail business. When shows away in my dad's business As dry vice over as Within the office realm so give me some good experiences. I was growing up so that I started my sneak of business so my mom used to as to start her business she should bring home some goods loss us as you said. Travel there on Welsh because back in she brings him good spots in for me. It was necas most of the time and I used to go to school. So Primary School in high school in I'll be walking. People become mention my sneakers and it took me a long time. Jackie free to create. That can actually make a business again. Why I'm wearing? I can actually bring to the people make some money so I sent it to source some sneakers locally inside. I got them for about twenty dollars. I got the start up capital from my mom I got them between Dawes. in-and-out seldom for about sixty dollars. So I mean some good profits in good the public money off that business I did that for a few years. And then I ventured into music so music writing music producing music. And I'm I'm doing the Polish Abang concerts and stuff like that so Figuring out how the music business works in that giving another arm armaments to learn how to build a business to learn how to make money radium. Each I moved here to the US. When I was nineteen I move for school? ooh And I studied computer science It was very interesting because I actually. I wanted to study business but I remember one time whereas Doing my assignment a friend of mine. Who Mentions me till this day your side Vm? He he told me hey. I think you'd be really good at computer. Sciences should try it out and I tried chided up and I never looked back. Site initially went there to study business and I change into computer science I studied in the smell coach. Westminster College in Fulton Missouri every small casing but again heavy time. GimMe opportunity to focus and to build myself as an engineer Either back on payments in the payments industry so I started off my sophomore year. Interim Mastercard work through software engineering in Minnie eventually a fulltime start working for them within biometric authentication. So that's been my core experience in fulltime. So that's been fun and lastly ask you Just recently moved to the bay air so the months ago I moved here actually three days ago as exactly three months. Oh still new to the area. I'm looking forward to exploring the era meeting more people right so this is just like A visual of my journey so the first one obviously a very happy mander was a struggle. School is struggling computer science met. That's what I studied in the struggle by that was the stock to Mike On right side Suicide my former company mastercard. I was basically working with the team on pitching a new product. And then on the bottom. NAFTA's about two weeks ago at my company Verizon media where I was lunching my product media commerce across Fanti company so that was finding new and in the middle was before I left mastercard. I didn't own your career panel where talking about the importance of knowing you are in making taking that risk to do exactly what you'd like to do in which for me was moving from software engineering product which is really fun. And then on the Bottom Reich. Mike is Me and Harvard. Business School with few Khalid's their house. Basically doing some diversity recruiting which something really passionate about in I still I don You're doing that for her as needed right so started. So what is product management. And so this is the industry definition. I have watched hundreds of Product School Jones and I always see this. Come up all the time if you go if you do a quick. Google search is the same as an intersection said a defining part on the intersection of US tech and business and then in the middle of magic you there. That's what they call the product management. What I agree with this Sunday by actually like using take a few aspects is a big element that's missing so this stakeholder management basically between us experience on January and business which could be marketing in sales and so forth? But there's no immensely add tate's the product manage. I feel like being being a product manager. Also it means that you need to manage yourself so I think that's using here so my a different version. I think it's missing you as a product manager. It's a big element there and you'll see wise relates to imposter syndrome and then there's some other Aspects that could doesn't actually say what you do as a product manager doesn't indicate why you do what you do and then how you GonNa do those things knock greedy evidence within the diagram so wise park management so I think I believe park management basically communists to things. So it's the why and the watts. That's what the product manager owns to the Y.. is going to be the traffic strategy. And then what is is going to be the product roadmap that you define based product strategy And then basically across this you're GonNa define what commensal wet solvent that always problems to solve in product management by product manager. It's your job to kind of define on actually decide what's important to solve in prioritize and in all this is brought together by the product. That's the bottom so this is my definition of park measuring

Product Manager Verizon United States Business School Africa Primary School Swaziland Mexico Aachen Jeff Impositon Ghana South Africa Aaron Nafta Jackie Google Mander
The Minimum Effective Dose of Product Management

All The Responsibility Podcast

08:50 min | 6 months ago

The Minimum Effective Dose of Product Management

"The minimum affected dose is a concept that comes from a book by Tim. FERRISS called the four hour body. Now you might know Tim Ferriss. He's most well known at this point for his podcast but of of course he's written several bestselling books at least four or five. The first one was called the four hour workweek great book. It's very inspiring. Although most people it turns out in reality can't really have four hour workweeks much as we would like. He followed that with the four hour body. A really good and interesting book focused on fitness and health more your personal well-being thing whereas the four hour workweek was focused on your income and lifestyle. Both books can kind of change the way you think about things. Like in common entrepreneurship fitness and health in the four hour body. One of his most important concepts are one that I took away. That was very important is what he calls the minimum effective dose. What's the smallest amount of work? Mark Treatment Activity. You need to do to get most of the benefit for example. If you want to build muscle you can vote a lot of time to like a bodybuilders regime and eventually get your body to an amazing state but it turns out that to get kind of an eighty percent of a bodybuilder state you become very strong you become very fit. Your body changes shape shape in a noticeable way. But you aren't ready to compete. It turns out to take a much much less punishing less time consuming and less rigid regime. Then the bodybuilder has to go through like it's a lot less so applying the same idea to product management. We want to think about so. This is kind of a thought experiment as much as anything. How much do we really need? In terms of structures are in terms of activities to be able to make some effective changes as as product managers in other words. What's the minimum you can do to get the effect that you want? Or as I mentioned I like to think of it in terms of how much do I have to do to get eighty percent of the of of the total effect that I could get and sometimes eighty percent is enough versus perfection. What's the least you can do for the most effect so I came up with this idea idea? I'm not sure. He invented it from medicine and sports physiology and I mentioned the idea of the eighty percents bodybuilding. It also happens with things like medications and supplements if you take a certain dose. You get the effect if you take any more. The effect doesn't change. You've already gotten the full effect in some cases. Maybe there's a problem you know for example. If you think about vitamin D you can go out in the sun for fifteen minutes a day or into the daylight for fifteen minutes a day and your skin will make enough vitamin D for You. I mean unless yes. You have a serious condition related to Vitamin D. That's the rule of thumb if you live in a temperate climate if you go out in the sun for longer than that. There's no reason not to accept it's not going to help you get more Vitamin Vitamin D. Your body has made much vitamin D as it needs in fifteen minutes now you can also overdose on Vitamin D. You can't do that by going out in the sun but you can do it by taking supplements supplements and that's the flip side of this minimum effective dose idea. You have either the eighty percent idea what. What is the minimum I need to do? Or what is the amount actively I need to do to get to the eighty percent result. And you also this other idea of more is not better. I can do a certain amount and I get really everything. I'm going to get from the treatment. So let's now apply this idea of the minimum effective dose to product management. Since that's why we're here and there's a few good examples. I think actually some of the practices that were starting to do. An Agile and other areas of software product development are kind of examples of the minimum effective dose for example you can maybe think of stack ranking your feature backlog as kind of a way to implement the minimum effective effective dose of features. I need to think about right now constantly. Paying attention to your whole backlog. All the time is kind of like doing that bodybuilders workout. The hard one. Even if you have no plans to go into bodybuilding. It's kind of a huge waste of time and so the minimum effective dose is. Let me focus on the features that I can deliver the next month month or the next quarter and I'll forget about all the features just aren't GonNa make it and I'm going to remove those from my cognitive load and that's a way to achieve uh-huh minimum effective dose of features another good example against something that's becoming more and more common. Nowadays in in software companies are two things that are related to roadmaps roadmaps. The first one is the idea of the now next later roadmap where you talk in some level of detail about what you're planning to deliver right away. That's that's the now portion us much deal you use much less detail about items that are in the near term but not coming immediately. And then maybe bullet points points are tweets about the ideas and themes that you're looking at for later so that's the now next later roadmap. I'll put a link in the show notes to an article about about the now next leader roadmap concept and how to build one a related innovation and roadmaps is the theme based Roadmap instead of going into great detail about the features are delivering. We'll all the attendant risks that entails and unintended expectation setting you focus on the themes of the work you're planning to deliver and often these. The ideas are used in conjunction the now next later roadmap and the theme based roadmap the less risky an upcoming feature is which usually means. You're nearly ready to deliver it the more detail you can provide and for things where there's a lot more rescue provide a lot less detail you'd think about things just in terms of themes also linked to an article that I wrote wrote about roadmaps it. You might find interesting. That kind of goes more into some of these ideas but I also have another sort of richer and longer example apple of how to think about the minimum effective dose of product management and. So let's go on a little boat trip and you'll see why say that in a minute so first of all a reminder I talk about a framework for thinking thinking about product management overall. Our job is product managers is to find invalidate market problems. Drive the creation of solutions to those problems and help take. The solutions is to market that encompasses really the full life cycle of successful products. There's somebody out there that needs some problem solved or some opportunity enabled we can create some technology. That will help them do that. And then we have to make sure that those people can find out that we have the solution and that our solution is a a better alternative than there a better choice than their other alternatives. So I also have another little saying that I've sometimes said there's always product management and what I mean by. That is that we're always building something and there might have been a well-considered decision on what to build or someone might just said. Hey this would be cool to build an all build it now. I really think that in one sense. Product management is at root level. The Art of making a good decision about what to build in fact. I don't think anybody would disagree. Disagree with that so the idea that you're going to build something. Somebody's going to make a decision or not. Make a decision and something's going to build anyway. That's sort of the the background of this phrase. There's always product management because there's always something being built and did somebody make a good decision about it or not so. Let's tie this all together so consider a small startup company so small that it doesn't have a product manager on staff because it's not big enough which means one of the founders is making these decisions or something like ah a metaphor that kind of like especially for a startup is that you have a boat and it's got a big engine. which is the team in a lot of startups? It's all DEV team. You know. There's very little other people very few people in the organization. So it's like a boat with a big engine and if you turn that big engine on the boats going to go forward. It's going to go. Oh somewhere. The problem is if there's nobody standing at the Tiller at the steering wheel the boat my go around in circles or a my crashed into some rocks or Michael out to sea never to see land again without someone at the Tiller. It's probably not gonNA take anyone to a destination that's desirable there has to be somebody who's done some amount of steering in order for the boat to be an effective way to get where we WANNA go. Okay so let's move back to. Let's move back. To actual product. Companies software startups startups and other kinds of startups are kind of the same thing. There's always going to be some amount of product management. That's the person at the Tiller making sure that you're generally going the right direction but when in a little start up you have to think about. What's the minimum amount of product management? You really have to do. And so that's what we're GONNA talk about. Well if you go back to my model you have to be working on solving a market problem. You're creating a solution with your developers but if you're solving a problem that nobody cares about that's not gonna be very successful in the end and that's why you need to at least have done this piece of will let me find a market problem and make sure that somebody will pay for a solution to that.

Tim Ferriss Product Manager Tiller Product Development Apple Michael
Consumer Electronics Show Highlights Internet-Connected Gadgets

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:00 min | 6 months ago

Consumer Electronics Show Highlights Internet-Connected Gadgets

"A lot of the companies that showed up at this year make products that are hardly known for technology. Eh grills mattresses. So why does every product today need to be smart or connected. Some people here at C. A. S.. Tell me it's about using technology technology to free ourselves from technology. Eighty percent of consumers bring a phone into the bathroom. We're trying to reverse a little Jonathan Bradley product manager at Kohler earlier which makes bathroom fixtures. We want the bathroom mistake a place of rest relaxation common recharging in technology when you actually need at Cs the company is showing off. It's new shower head Moxie. It has a removable waterproof speaker. Right in the middle where the water comes out. You operate it through Amazon's Alexa Voice Assistant or Your Phone's Bluetooth. Connection moxie joins other teke fide fixtures in colours connect line. There's a mirror you can ask to Brighton or lower the light or play your favorite radio the station. The American even tell the shower turn on and off at least when the Wi fi at cs collaborates Alexa. Ask connect to start my shower. Sorry something went wrong. Please try again try turning it off. Alexa ask connect to stop my shower. Turnoff shower Kohler is not the only company I run into. That thinks technology can even save us from our bad tech habits at another booth. There's a line to try out muse. It's a headband. That gives voice guided meditations. The sounds you hear. Change depending depending on your brain activity heart rate and breathing co-founder. Reo Garden says using her product to meditate has given her some distance from smartphone. I can sit with a little bit of discomfort. I want to check my phone and say nope. That's okay move my mind away onto something that matters to me so it's a little bit ironic that we're using technology to disconnect from technology. But it really he works. It sounds tempting. But the line is long and other gadgets Beckon

Alexa Kohler Jonathan Bradley Product Manager Reo Garden Brighton WI Amazon Co-Founder
Bathroom Tech At CES

Morning Edition

01:06 min | 6 months ago

Bathroom Tech At CES

"Little Jonathan Bradley as a product manager at Koehler which makes bathroom fixtures we want the bathroom is there a place of rest relaxation common recharging in only have technology when you actually is at C. asked the company is showing off its new showerhead moxie it has removable waterproof speaker right in the middle where the water comes out you operated through Amazon's Alexa voice assistant or your phones Bluetooth connection Marcy joins other testified fixtures in colors connects line there's a mere you can ask to brighten or lower the light or play your favorite radio station the American even tell the shower to turn on and off at least when the wifi at C. S. cooperates Alexa ask connect to start my shower sorry something went wrong please try again can I tried turning it off yeah I like that ask connect to stop my shower turning off shower older is not the only company I run into that thinks technology can save us from our bad tech habits at another

Jonathan Bradley Product Manager Koehler Amazon Marcy Alexa
Tips for Building a Compelling Product Vision by Amazon Sr Product Manager

The Product Podcast

06:59 min | 6 months ago

Tips for Building a Compelling Product Vision by Amazon Sr Product Manager

"So tonight I want to tell you how to create a compelling product vision and a little bit about myself. I'm a senior product manager at Amazon I am the The technical variant. That just means I. I don't code every day. I like coating sometimes but I typically work on a more technical product so for me that includes is a lot of real time systems that includes machine learning that includes a lot of algorithms and data science And also thinking about technology patterns that would scale across the world across a variety of features. So that's me. I also worked at Microsoft before I worked on a thing called Hololens. It's like an augmented reality helmet that you put on your head kind of cool but I was very something. Different and customer reviews is all me now all right. Let's get right into it. I can guess actually which product is reviewed. Right here has forty two thousand reviews and he guesses no not me I hope by rating is that good but any idea what this is saying. It's the echoed dot actually and it is one of the most reviewed but not the most reviewed brock on Amazon so yeah and pretty good star rating all right so this is what I'm talking about. Today I broke it down to five topics. So here's we're GONNA do. Why chose this topic? This one's a little bit Near and dear to me as well L. Among the many other topics I chose. I WanNa talk about what it means to be a visionary There's this mean about what it means to be a visionary that I just I wanNA on a day so I wanNA talk a little bit about that I'm GonNa talk more specifically about how you create a compelling productijn and what that looks like in a very step by step process us in a talk about how to communicate your productijn which a lot of people forget about but it's actually really important. That product vision is worth nothing. If it's only in your head talk about communication and I'm also GONNA talk about how to make it a reality I'm GONNA spend a little bit less time on that because today is all about the vision but if you can't execute get your product vision you know you're not going to go anywhere alrighty. Let's do it why I chose this topic so last winter I met with one of my peers at work and and I'm gonNA keep them anonymously. I've been really tough day. And I said Hey will accumulate a coffee talk about something and I could tell something was wrong because I like didn't look very happy And you know maybe their dog died you know. Maybe they had a tough conversation with their manager. I really don't know but I need to talk. And we went to starbucks blow my building and and this is what she said to me not the exact words but basically this she said. I can't come up with any good ideas from my product. I'm not a visionary and I'm not creative how do you come up with their product vision. I feel like giving up as a product manager every day because of this and I didn't really know what to say to that actually I it took me a while to think of like. How do I actually do that? Like I knew in my head how I did it but I had a tough time really describing her in that that moment so I decided to talk today because of that conversation that I had and I realized that my own career. I wish someone had given this talk to me before I started because I made a lot of the mistakes That many people make when creating PROC vision and these are. This is a struggle. I think many product managers go through in in their career. And I WANNA help everyone here or who watches online or or anyone who gets exposure to this in some way Not have to feel like this. You know being tears feel like they can't be a product manager So here's why here When I worked at Microsoft this is the new hot thing And just to put it really simply. Here's how you might think about growth mindset with respect to a product vision the fixed mindset and the other hand is like I'm born with this ability or or you know I I can't learn you know I'm stuck. I'm not creative. I'm not a visionary. I'm not going to be able to come with the right ideas to leave that to someone else That is the mindset that my friend had when she came to me at starbucks and told me that she couldn't be product manager and I think a lot of people in here like to say that they don't have that mindset and you may have a growth mindset in other areas of your career but when it comes to being a visionary I find that many many people actually have this mindset and they may not realize it I say you know what I'm not a visionary. I'M NOT GOING TO BE Steve Jobs. I'm not going to be on And it's good to check accu self and say do I think that way. Or do I think I have the potential to be a visionary on the other hand we have the growth mindset and you can guess it's the opposite of the fix mindset. Basically you believe that you can overcome any challenge by working at it the potential to do something not something. You're born with the F. to stick with it work at it and then you can choose whatever you want So growth mindset is a is a great way to think about any problem in your career but for being a visionary. I think there's a really important concepts concepts and you should check yourself and say which. which viewpoint do I have And I think of you are here at this talk today. I hope you have the second one. The growth mindset. Because you're the first I want I'm not going to be able to help you honestly So please think about what it means to have. A growth mindset. Does anyone you know. Put on their Lincoln their thought leader. Did anyone give a huge talk. About what their their next big idea was. Anyone might be an aspiring visionary. Nobody okay I expected zero for that one too. Oh Yeah so not. Many people describe themselves as a visionary I think are some very good reasons for that and part of that is because a lot of who who we think is a visionary are people like this so i WanNa know all six people here. I'M GONNA get zero people now six but some people might know five life. These are some things that I hear a lot about what a visionary is and I would say. They're all wrong so one of them. I'm is that I can't say visionary 'cause I just don't have those crazy ideas. I don't know the Moonshot. I'm not making flying skateboards or self driving cars And there's this out there that in order to be a visionary you have to have these wild outlandish ideas and you have to go on a long walk on the weekend by herself and come home and have his is magical idea that you've come up with And we just keep perpetuating that music over and over again but in reality like coming up with the vision really doesn't work that way. Another one is that visionary seemed to know everything about the future you know they know it'll happen and one hundred years from now fifty years from now even ten years from now and the reality is is that humans are really really bad at making predictions about the future So most successful visionaries aren't actually that good at predicting the future future because nobody is So if you thought. That's a visionary. was I encourage you to check that one out And reconsider

Product Manager Senior Product Manager Starbucks Microsoft Amazon Hololens Steve Jobs Brock Lincoln
Securing Oracles for Smart Contracts

Insureblocks

05:55 min | 6 months ago

Securing Oracles for Smart Contracts

"Riggan discuss how to secure articles for smart contracts with special insights from chain link. And I'm very pleased. Used to have yuan product manager and evangelist at chainlink John. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give our listeners. A quick introduction on yourself yourself. Hey thanks for having me Yeah sure side. Jones space a few years ago origin so I was always presented by Bitcoin by Theam wasn't relating to the topic of interoperability. When Jennings channing basically made a lot of sense to me fill? Did the gap for me. We take this space. which is we have so many ambitions than such a great vision for the Bloodshed because stem which is three plays the real work right. But in order to transition you need to be able to connect the rewards to some blockchain and two blocks networks. I think a few the months ago now and yet it's been three working on this project which basically for me is filling a gap user industry. And I think we're making huge. Basically big strides rides towards creating more connected word through blockchain technology. Excellent accent so thank you very much for that. So as it has caused me here injure blocks. Could you please explain explain to our listeners. What is blockchain and how does it work? Yeah sure I mean luxury very simply ledger right. Ledger is basically a records of transactions. Where basically you engine ducts balances of every addresses on the network right it? So it's basically a decentralized ledger which people from over the words can update experimentation nece. It's transparent everything. Everything is public right like Bitcoin so in its current very simple in concept right displeasure like ledger is exist everywhere. Liking banks for instance banks today keep track a few JR ledgers huge databases recording transactions. Right the big did the selling point of ructions that it's fully decentralized and it's free public and it comes at the points in our than the word food where centralization transparency yet Burma can have tremendous impacts in the way people interact between one and the nicer Sir right so basically. We started out with Bitcoin and away. With your address you can create so much choosing basically the simple concept of of distributed ledger. You can create an revolutionize the way people interact with each other using disconnect checked and using what here mattered to the basic concepts of bitcoin. Great great thank you very much for that. So since you've already given us a few definitions I'm going to ask another one. which is could you give us? A quick definition of what is a smart contract it's key properties and how they differentiate themselves from traditional shnell contract. Yeah sure I mean contracts contracting the real word right. Let's start by this. Is People want to interact his each other. They don't trust each other because why would say people tried to basically each time right so they. They give dressed with archie rights and third parties to enforce that contract executes as it should now. He's third partisan today's Dan Edge. Our our banks are huge institutions which basically has accumulated power rights. And these are people who basically enforce Zicklin trucks trucks after. Today's society. Now what smart. Trump's at of you to do is to embeds allergic and Tang Soo enforcement for contract on Puzo blockchain rights so whenever contract into executed if it's if contract or if it's an insurance contract thanks to properties of bloodshed and to the priorities are smuggled trucks talks which are basically deterministic outputs. Whatever input you get you get the desired output right output chicken project and you can have basically trust less contracts from people who don't know each other from one part of words to Yaser so to that could get into twit agreement with someone in China or someone in Malaysia or wherever and trust disagreement will work? Because it's enforced forest. Both my contract and just Markham product is based on hysteria or any uneasy as which is basically public trust less and Ike interest entrusts message of course now if smart contracts servewell revolutionary secure and useful earned being used regularly by enterprises around the world? It's a great question. I think it takes a lot of time to basically adopted Right so in. Today's skin through damage enterprises whenever they get something which is working are which is hard for king which is a current system. Today is a stick to its rights So I can do the same situations as we have today. Where basically enterprises we probably start with? UPS Markham threats Wednesday. Start seeing to be fed yours. There's current system produces and I think. Actually we're getting some really was jim results from enterprises Google and other like minded businesses which she's revolutionary power is at smartphones and are starting to work towards them basically are searching to other than to start in tweets. It takes some time for the full switch but I think we really answer right where it now

Bitcoin Ledger Theam Product Manager Chainlink John Jennings Channing Burma Puzo Blockchain Google Allergic Jones Dan Edge Archie Yaser IKE Donald Trump China Malaysia
"product manager" Discussed on The Everyday Innovator Podcast

The Everyday Innovator Podcast

10:25 min | 11 months ago

"product manager" Discussed on The Everyday Innovator Podcast

"Can't speak with an english accent problem for you. Now you have a framework in place to lead directly into. Where do we not have evidence. And what do we do about that right. Okay so tell us what happens next then so now it's about running your first experiment in making that repeatable oh process and and so there's almost levels here that's like we'd never ran experiment before so we knew one you know and then it's okay. So how do we keep doing that over time based on our cycles what and then it's while we need to get multiple teams working this way and eventually you know your company's gonna buying in this idea you know entrepreneurial earl <hes> entrepreneural way of working. It doesn't mean you have to experiment on everything. That's why we do the two by two because some things are off the table something you don't need to generate the evidence on <hes> by it's <hes> it's really getting through that loop so basically the we lay down the book in which is not based on my confusing and workshops is once you get that to you by two. We give you an option of okay here your area ways you go about this. Which one do you think would fit often. There's a conversation there of <hes> me giving advice based on what i've seen in the industry but also then like you said bringing their domain expertise and they may know the market really well because i'm not an expert on all these different businesses i advised so how do we marry that up and and so basically conversation and then we agree on okay. Maybe there are a couple couple experiments. We went around and it's really interesting because you start building. This discovery backlog goes okay some activity we need to do to uncover. Are you know our risk and basically shape what we're doing in our roadmap in our in our plan so it's it's really getting that first one in oak nope through and then managing that process through okay to make this repeatable thing we're gonna have to integrate into how he works at the ceremony is like if you're doing stand ups you talk about the experiment discovery work in your stand up with everything else <hes> if you're doing planning you plan your experiments as well <hes> when you do your views as you share out what you learn right <hes> so what we've done is going to lay out the ceremonies. We've seen happen that actually work. You know it doesn't mean you have to buy the book but <hes> i've learned over the years. We don't track this work where you track all of your work and if you don't integrate this into kind of how you're working already a team you kinda gets pushed off and it may or may not happen or it may happen in isolation and that's not the goal the goal is to you know for people be really connected to the y. The work and everyone to understand risk and how it contribute and pay that out so <hes> yeah so it's really about getting through that loop once and then making a reputable process okay so he's become kind of part of the culture at love that aspect because because things that we don't practice regularly you know don't become part of the culture and i'm trying to remember the context was talking with someone recently just about this notion of needing to change the culture to adopt more of an experiment mentality that we sometimes these conversations come up where we are just going to blindly go down a path launched into the marketplace and then we'll judge if we're successful or not where along the way there are some things that we could have done and they were probably some quick easy low cost experiments experiments. We could have done to better gauge if we're going to be successful outright so building that attitude just in that expectation like we should be testing as we go is really important. I agree and it's you know if you're a startup or your corporation. I think what's interesting is the dynamics behind that incentive. There's incentives to to experiment so for example <hes> i spend time silicon valley right work ear and doing a lot of advising that accelerators and startups. It's really interesting to me because when you raise a bunch bunch of money you're not very incentivized to experiment. It's more like we're gonna spend that money and we're going to build the best thing if we get it right. Look like geniuses. Get it wrong cultural heritage such as like well people congratulate you for creating your company civilian and you raise more money and do it again. It's really interesting. Isn't it. The culture uh <hes> is super interesting however when i spent time kinda like in the middle of the country right or in more rural areas they don't have the access to capital though i watched them and it's amazing thing to me like it's been a lot of time in the last couple of years and they bootstrap throughway using experiments they get to the point where they feel like they need to raise two to scale and then they go raising the order company but like the incentives air right if it's your if your bootstrapping or you're putting your own money <unk> you're not gonna usually just build forever. Launch it and hope the best like it. It's really interesting because we frame entrepreneurs being really risky people but mostly out for as i speak to are not rescued all right very good on my risk. I have really risk averse but i think this is a good idea. This halloween address ahead now. Look at corporate side. Same thing happens if you give twenty engineers to a team and a bunch mentioned like runway they're going to build like that's what they're gonna do and they're going to build like really elaborate things that maybe people don't care about versus. You incrementally funded team. <hes> <hes> and you have a cross functional team this product design engineering whatever you need to ship learn at the market together. They're just going to be much more methodical. I think about it and and more incentivized the test because they know they need to help the share progress to say okay we get more funding so it's really a threat and the incentives behind this behavior and how you build all this culture i think sometimes we unintentionally undermine it by saying we're gonna give you like this to go do this thing and we're measuring kind of the outputs of the thing and it's just really tough for me to show the value experimenting when it's like what what's in it for me to experiment. I already have this money or i have this big team. I just going to go build. These become a value of the people doing the work and hopefully of the organization to make this more practical for us. Can you give us a specific perfect example of made that link between a high risk no evidence situation in a test that was chosen for that and then how do we go about <music> out conducting that test in and collecting data analyzing the data yeah one of the case studies we have <hes> in the book is started by really love which which is called apology. They basically have an app that measure face <hes> we will wear glasses so this applied field us <hes> you customer glasses specifically measured to your face sounds. Thanks mike getting something. It's kinda bended and everything else <hes> but i happened upon them because we kept going to meet ups together and i've never really officially advised them racing and we just kept ending up at <unk> ups and and learned about how they worked. It was really fascinating me because there is a big inherent risk and building a business like that they know near the product manager of okay people have to trust this app works when you take virtual southeast at measures and then will they pay you know several hundred dollars for glasses that fit really well or really not and then how do you manufacture those winter and so what ended up doing was pop up store and i really i wish more of like at least physical product companies would try this out because she it's not necessarily about scaling and distribution right away. It's about okay. Does anybody have this problem problem and we've learned by the boots on the ground and so they had a pop up store <hes> they intercepted people that were walking down the street as hard talking to them about era glasses and how they fit and whether he had the problem <hes> when they started kind of responding well they they can lead them into the store and he had the glasses kind of behind a case they had the app and everything and kind of walk people through this very concierge experience of of what it would be like to use the app and you know that whole time they're taking great notes outs. They're seeing like <hes> qualitatively. What are people saying <hes> would have found out that basically the colts that they received they now have on their website and their ad copy basically voice of the customer you know that they gathered in curated themselves <hes> they had some people willing to pay so they said hey awakened go by this now like i want a pair of these so they're able to get pre orders and everything even though that wasn't specific content of the test and so it's it's something that it doesn't you don't run very long reigns pop up store retail store but you know it's something where you as a team go out together and learn first hand like not through layers and layers of abstraction. What customers are really saying and you know. Is there any signal whatsoever so it was very risky because you know all that cost to non technology investment of just making something that measured your face virtually else is huge and so if you and even beyond that all the things you might kit ron and doing that right the path you go down might still be the wrong path right there. There's lots of all the problem so like what people are fine with glasses. Maybe like complaints. It's you know it's really interesting so that does one where <hes> we talked about in the book but the idea of a pop up store have because you <hes> there are other retailers have done that in the past where they do published within their like nordstrom used to do this all the time at northern labs where cray i'm disappointed. They're not around anymore me too yeah but i think they were on the right track with regards to what kinds of experiments should we run to learn from customers and then we'll do an experiment experiment in a store right over the course of a week and develop have a working prototype at the end of the week from real interactions with customers kind of like this pop ups right the whatever what about this idea is when you first talked about this. There were several kinds of risks that are involved in that. Do people care about this. People likely to go through this effort. Effort is how they want to buy glasses you know things investigate and they can all be solved through that personal experience from the pop up store. I happened to be a fan of the <hes> t._v. Show the prophet ever seen this with marcus marcus leaks. He's the owner of camping world world and on the show he goes and decides to or not to to invest in small businesses and make them work better right. It's great to watch because all businesses have problems. They no doubt highlight the really big problems and for the sake of the t._v..

marcus marcus nordstrom product manager colts mike ron hundred dollars
"product manager" Discussed on Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"product manager" Discussed on Slow Flowers with Debra Prinzing

"No. So for for every crop. There is a product manager who manages sort of the. Or overseas. The overall goals, and the sort of commercial aspects of managing the sort -ment. And then there is a trials technician who sort of carefully organizes plants and monitors and evaluates the trials along with support from the farm team does all the sort of regular, maintenance and care. So I mean, just knowing what the various events that you, and I have run into with one another across the year year, physically not able to always be even be in Maine, you're out at conferences or gatherings. And so you have to have that support of daily support for those flowers, and then you race home and go check things out. That's right. Well, we'll let's talk about the new seat introduction. So this is sort of a ritual that happens every year as you were saying of valuating. Have things kind of. I mean, it seems like the the flower gods are shining their light on you. And you're probably being asked to. Fine. More varieties for customers than ever before. It feels like there is a bit of hunger. There that's driving demand. And that's creating a lot more work for you. Yeah. Yeah. I think you know, it's it's sort of obviously important that. As there's a growing market for local flowers that and there's more growers. They need sort of more things to differentiate their business and reach different markets. I would say, you know, maybe fifteen or twenty years ago of the sort of average Janis customer for flowers was a diversified vegetable grower with some with some flowers at farmers market. And now, you know, I think more and more. A local flower has maybe a farmer's market and some wholesale and possibly a florist that they're servicing and then events, weddings, events and those. The needs of a customer of growers serving a flower sorry, serving farmers market is very different than one serving a florist or doing weddings events. Right. Right. So the diversification is more on the in the the sales channels than just being at one sales channel with a diversified offering. I mean, you you you're all of a sudden have Hannity things you have to satisfy. Yep. And so that is led you to have a lot more. Consequently have to kind of mirror. What your customers are looking for an in your search for new flowers or colors, or whatever. Yeah. And and filling the season I think to with you know, is not always easy to do. Seated annuals, right, right? Like, what would be the earliest crop? That people would be sewing like sweep ease or. Yeah. Peas and other things we've been. The last few years we've been experimenting with overwintering flowers sort of in tunnels getting the start getting them started in the fall and overwintering young plants through the winter for a really early season crop. I think that's probably going to be unimportant area to extend. And so those cool season annuals that Lisa Sigler writes about yeah. Yeah. Exactly where she is. You could do it outdoors here you need a tunnel. And then and then extra layers of protection. Oh, I see you're you're like emulating..

Lisa Sigler technician product manager Maine Janis Hannity twenty years
"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"Management roles are available and multiple companies, usually they require computer science degree. But not always. And they're really for people who are one to two years out of school. Good news, though, MBA's come to school. So if this is your super excited about that's one way to to switch careers and get into this this profession. While you're doing your apprenticeship you'll probably find that you have some gaps to fill. They might be technical day might be on the design side of things or you might be lacking some business chops. There are so many books that are committed for product managers, literally, Google product management resources product management books. You will find all of these state, they tend to repeat themselves, but they are they're very good resources. And I think everybody should read them at some point. I didn't put it us here, but strategic ary is a blog that pretty much like everybody was worth their salt reads. This means everybody has very similar opinions. But it's still good free to know. What those are you conform counter opinions to them also. Yeah, if you're not familiar with designing systems this first book is phenomenal. If you interview for a product rule at Google, you will have technical interview that will ask you to design a system, which can be. Absolutely terrifying. And this book is a great great source of preparation. And lastly, you've done all of that. You're getting ready for interviews. These two books really really hopeful there. Also, lots of online resources that ask PM interview questions. I just have to pieces of advice. The first one is focused on the user. It's it sounds a little trite the focus on the oil spill follow. But if you go into a product interview, and you're not your first point is not let me think about our users. Let me talk about what our users look like and define their problems, the rest, whatever else you say won't matter. And Secondly when you practice answers to these questions set your dog down your cat, like your spouse and just talk at them if they're not interested. I mentioned the cat particularly won't be super interested. But don't just read the answers practice actually going through the answers. And if you have. A way to find a whiteboard. Try to whiteboard your answers because that's a really good way to keep the interviewer aware of your thought process. So how has my life changed now that I'm a product manager versus a data analyst, lots of emails, lots of meetings. No, more spreadsheets very little sequel, despite the fact that I was saying that you can do your own hands on stuff. But most of the time you don't actually have time for that. I wish that I said that I spent a lot of time white boarding, these blue-sky, visions that happens every every once in a while of but most product managers will tell you we're drowning in Email and talking to people because once again our role is to Vangelis of product. The areas that I make have changed. And so has their impact before maybe would make miscalculation in a big spread sheet. And it would take you a while to track down, and I suppose, maybe sometimes it wouldn't catch it, and it would lead to real business business impact. Now, the IRS that you make strategic say not. You're working with cross functional partner. They don't seem super interested. They don't have a lot of time. See go and you develop a feature on your own that incorporates their products. And then you try to watch this feature. And at the last moment inevitably they will come in and say, you know, what we want you to do that differently. And you're gonna have to scrap that launch which is super not fun. And you never know when a small strategic mistakes that can really cost you, months and months of development. Before people were asking me favors. Can you run this analysis? Can you do this really fast? I needed tomorrow. Now, I'm the one asking everybody favors. Hey, can you make sure that my engineers have this thing? It's it's a very different mindset. We have a system of something called peer bonuses at Google before not trying to get a fair share pure bonuses..

product manager Google IRS Vangelis partner analyst two years
"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"Offered as well as the functionality. So while the previous diagram is really good at showing how to build in terms of functionality to satisfy customer requirement this states that in order to build an MVP, which is the dark red section of your ideal product, it needs to also be usable and delightful, and because of our work at dollarshaveclub, it compels us to build products in this way. So that we're not cured building functionality. But we're also building products that are delightful for customers use. And that requires in my mind, building, with empathy so to kind of go back to the basics here. What is busy? So empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another literally defined in this case, we need to able to empathize with customers needs in order to build a successful product something that's going to satisfy their requirements, but I would say that it goes even farther than that. In that empathy needs to be fostered with the working team as well. The squad that consists of the engineers designers the product manager of the stakeholder they all need to be able to empathize with the customer. But they also need to be able to empathize with each other. So what I've illustrated here is kind of the way of building a product a stakeholder has a KPI a requirement in idea, and they work with product manager and the product manager takes these ideas, and then maybe works with the designer or the lead engineer comes back with all set of requirements, and then they go over to the team, and they tell the team what to build. Again, I stress this is an empathetic way in that the squad is only interacting with the product manager. And the stakeholders only interacting with the product manager and. You don't have a sense of empathy between them. How many times is it come up where you've heard questions? Why are we doing this or deadlines are purely arbitrary or the one that I love is? When the stakeholders has you just make your engineers work faster. It doesn't work that way. Right. That's coming from a lack of empathy within the team. And even though the squad in the sequel PM might understand customer needs. Are they're not working in sync. And so when you actually have a team that has empathy with each other as well as the customer requirements, you end up with something like this and to get to this system or this way of working to me, the most important point is that the role of the product manager is not to tell your team what to do the product manager needs to act as a catalyst to empower inspire. Your teams to do their best work to provide customer success and hopefully release an MBP or final product that's going to measure up to what the customers need really are. So how do we get there? How do we build with them? How do we take those previous diagrams which are good at telling you what you should do how you should build out functionality or what needs to comprise an MVP and actually take your requirements or your idea and actually release that maybe with some tight deadlines or hard requirements, or whatever other circumstances come up as they always do. So we tried a new process, and as I said, this is an experimental work in progress, but we kicked off the project with a project charter, some of you might be familiar with this some of you might not be I I was not this was a new thing to me, and what we do in the project charter, and this is actually the real charter that we did with with the project that we're working on right now. This is all based off of we had all of our engineers from the squad squads are generally a little smaller. Maybe six engineers. We had our QA engineers we had designed we had product. We even had product outside of the team in other areas of the business, and most importantly, we also had the stakeholder..

product manager MVP lead engineer
"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"I'm a product manager designer at Tinder with Sam who you heard from earlier really happy to be here in share some of the insights that I've learned over my years at Tinder and working in product. And also some of the ways I've been thinking about product as of late. So a bit about my background. I didn't always start out working in software. I've been working on designing products and building things that I really loved since I was in high school and in college. I started up a fixed gear bicycle company with my friends that's still going on called Sola bicycles. A very different kind of product design dealing with hardware manufacturers overseas in China dealing with products that we didn't have in hand when we started selling them and ecommerce at the time, I moved on to work on performance apparel projects other lifestyle brands and eventually made my way into mobile apps. What's awesome? Obviously about software is the rapid iteration delivery and feedback immediately get from your consumers from your users. So the first product I worked on in. This base was called human in twenty thirteen when I graduated college. We ended up launching on IOS and Android. We were building this contacts platform for about three years until we were acquired by tender in twenty sixteen. And that led to a whole new breakthrough in the way, I was working on product features the amount of data and analysis tools resources antennas testing methodologies that I got to use. So that was a big step up. And I want to share a lot of that with with you today. So what I'm going to be talking about today ways to add value? I think is something that we've talked about in here about a lot in product. It's pretty much the core of our job is we look forward and think about what to build next mostly we're gonna be talking about how we set rules and limitations in our products and win to break them and a little bit of a case study in Tinder gold. I know we're getting close into the lunch time periods. So after that instead of the questions at the end, I'd love to talk with you guys about some of your products in the limitations you've built in. Also before I really jump in here. I'm curious who in the audience is working as a product manager or in the product space right now by show of hands. Quite a few for the livestream. That's probably sixty percent. And who are here. Just learning about the space interested in breaking into product and are not yet product managers. Rizza Hans came a little more sheepish hands. But I think probably ten percent fifteen percent. Anyway, I'm excited to hear more about your guys experienced backgrounds in what you're working on after this. So adding value, this is pretty obvious. I mean products these days, add value in the number of different factors. It doesn't vary. Much in terms of the ways in which they add value efficiency, pretty obvious doing more with less time resources energy resources in a lotta ways product schools in efficiency product in that we can learn about how to become product managers how to operate on product teams develop these skills in a much shorter timeframe, maybe it works around our schedules..

product manager Tinder Sola Rizza Hans Sam China fifteen percent sixty percent ten percent three years
"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"And usually when you compete, and you're trying to be different in the marketplace with your. Product you'll find a combination of all those traits. Not just one all of those three work in tandem to really establish a sustainable. Differentiation over time. Right. So the third thing don't be afraid to be different. And I think today you see a lot of seamless in the marketplace of products find that aspect that the customer cares about and go to the extreme on that vector. And I think a great example for that. If you think about slack slack. I hope everyone is using slack. I love that product. And what a about product if you think about it, the working that indication and calibration space. Right. And then that space there are a lot of other competitors. Your the at Skype and gout you gotta hip chat from task that you should expect that it will be the defacto standard in the space since working Jiro ready. However, that's not the case right came along slack. If you work with slack experience to get the ease of use of that thing that -ffective nece the quality of the service. They're all on an extreme vector to sell the exact same point. When in a way that no one else can replicate and. And you know, it's evident by the huge gross spur ender utilization than ever now. So don't be afraid to be different. So we're talking about three ways three things. Talk about three things on how to do action text action and reduce churn. Now, I wanna kinda rep everything together in a one use case that his cracks businesses such engage everyday. And the funny thing on my way here today. I actually got an Email that talks about the scenario. We'll talk about right? And I called the high m are dick amount. By anyone wants to guess as the product manager in December. Yeah. This is you this is your customer. Right. And the reason is this your your rockstar PM? You did everything we talked about created up sell flows. Add ons, you were able to increase our customers that are five x then x ever Jim aria customer base and now up for Newell, and they come to and they tell you. Hey, you know, if I only if you want me to keep staying with you I wanted to build me those features. I wanted a month. And this is not a fantasy narrow had customers. Come to me and says build this thing in two weeks. My sprint is to start. Every now I won't be able to ever make customers, you know. That's their progress to be a bit on rational sometimes and this narrow is wise of predicament. It's a self made predicament self because we were able to create that scenario, which is good for business. But if they live the two key metrics, we talked about get hurt. Right..

Newell product manager Jiro Jim aria two weeks
"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"Along the give me before they kicked me out of the stage. I'm going to share with you guys and discuss product management in the context of SAS, aka softwares of service, which is basically just fancy term for software. That is hosted on a cloud, and is being rented to your customers paying for it on a recurring basis. Right. We'll talk about a few things that keep product managers awake in companies. And we'll also touch about one rather common yet, very challenging predicament. L let. To wrap everything up that Brock managers and get you know, have to deal with on our regular basis. So before we start I think the first thing would be let's put some finishing in place. You know to kick things off and lay the groundwork for our discussion. So let's talk about you know, I thought this is conference. The probably a good place to start is the role of the product measure, those seem appropriate. I guess, and there are a lot of really a lot of good deficient for the role of the product manager outer and I brought this one we'll Gobert in a second. Because it did. So well with me, and the reason that resonate. So well is because it's a generally applicable, and it's encompassing. It turns applicable in the sense that is applicable to any business model any product any industry in any market and compensate in the sense that it touches upon all the this product managers engage with their job, or at least should be engaged with solit- salutes, true debt, and I'll expand on the few words highlighted here. So the role of the prog manager is to deliver measurable businesses. Alz true product solutions with meet.

product manager solit
"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

04:01 min | 1 year ago

"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"So even though engineers might make fun of them not to take any credit from engineers. I think marketing also important so all these five if you can balance a good amount of expertise, and all these things you don't have to be an expert, but if you can balance it, well, I think you'd be based out for the product. So this is where they come in with customer service industry. What do I mean by customer services industry? You know, we've all heard this customer's always, right? And we've all kind of I think you've y'all probably seen because some of the most of the time is wrong. And and then they ask you questions. You never know what they're talking about. You know this. They might say things like you go to a customer, and he says I want this to be smart. Oh, you want prior to be smart? No, I won the product manager to be smart. You never know. So. Understanding the customer. Means that you need more experience with the customer, and you need to clarify as much as possible. It's it's better to get awkward questions out of the initially and make sure that your requirements are, but a SEIs then actually building the product and then going back and giving a prototype the product which which they did not want, and that's going to be an even both meeting than than a customer meeting. So work with the customer initially trying to make sure ask multiple questions. I said that have been times that they've just used words like I want a in this like, what do you mean by you want a, and this can you give me more of you know, if I'm building let's see onesie for the baby baby monitor. I want this to be smart. What do you mean by smart? Give me more. Do you want this to be, you know, compatible, but then I an Android app is that what you mean by smart, do you want this to have an AI engine, which is talking to an computing device? Go that far. They're like, no, no. I wanted us to just about because my phone. So if they say smart, don't write it down and then go back to the engine, and it looks the other way around also sometimes when you go to engineering teams, and and then you say this is what you do. They might just listen to you and start building something. And it might be from what you wanted. An and you have to go back and be like did you build it? Imagine the customer giving you something like I want this bulb to work on a recipe by and then you see the engineering team later in the sprint and the cafe digging to Aspen, and you're like what the hell are you doing man? And it's like you asked me to build this. So book engineering team to understand what I mean by the recipe by worked with them to at least understand this is what is it? A quiet. This is the specific data that they've given. I want you to work on this. So that's what I mean by clarify as much as possible, although mentioned customer engineering cloudy with the customers as the what? They mean by requirements, but the engineers other than what they understood have you understood that equipments if so can you it back to me so books both ways. And sometimes I as I said customers, not right, but you're not right either. So that's there, you know, treat everybody like allies book with them to at least understand what is the mission of the product. Is that going to be any value read that you are giving to the customer? It can be to be all be to see is there going to be value. Add finally, you just giving them whatever they asked or are you actually making better for them? I'm pretty sure a customer would be more happy if there'd been found to be long, and you're making it better for them. Obviously don't face an empathize. I said you're the most empathetic people in your group, so empathize with the customer whenever they say something I said smart reading between the lines. If you had not asked them, and this is bad. It gets interesting sometimes customers say something. You look at the market trends, they're not the same..

product manager Aspen
"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"And let's say if you're in the starting of the products likely, you're working with and marketing to understand the customer better, they're the closest to the customer. So if you already have customers go and say, hey, are that other customers that I have that I can potentially get for this product or it was the end of the product cycle. You can again go to marketing and see how you can market your product. And what is the place point if your product these discussions have so. Yeah. Depending upon which face I'm always doing the cycle in reality. I am sleeping. So. So yeah, let's dive into what do I mean by multidisciplinary product manager. I mean product management is multidisciplinary. So, but my doesn't doesn't mean you're asking, right. You will be you know, obviously doing things based on the face of the product and so doing that venue doing documentation, nobody's asking you customer visits and nobody's talking to do market analysis. Then when you know, you're you're probably working on product support. So it's it's not a multitasking game. So if it's overwhelming, it's probably because you don't know the face of the product and probably you should work with the customers and engineers in a little bit better way. And I think those are the main two stakeholders more than you know, your own leadership. I think if there's one place where you can be motor Certa than any other places. It should be within your own management and not with engineers and customers because they kind of because the engineers doing the product for you making the product. And the customers giving quite a bit. So those are the places where you should listen ask questions. Those are the constructive meetings. So. And yeah, nobody's expecting a product manages to build an entire product from idea to end the plunge and support from that on it's it's not going to happen. And I'm pretty sure as a I'm seeing a lot of the conversation that I've had a lot of experience product managers here. I'm pretty sure you've all been part of some joke. Some joke that engineering his putting on you're the design team. You know,.

product manager
"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

The Product Podcast

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"product manager" Discussed on The Product Podcast

"And it was a great I opening experience for me. I started working with ice fees. Also until this is a great position where I was on create vantage point, I could see the product in different angles, and I loved it. So the next position I took a course obviously product management, and I was a necessary. I'm still in office. Oh group. But I work a lot with diarrhea customers have been in not. But then, you know, it's a big company the happened. And right now as I said when I'm talking to a lot of customers, they put this down. I wanna smart something or I want my product to have an AA feature. So yeah, I'm focusing on trying to understand what the customers the saying and making the best out of the IOT infrastructure into has. And also using the AIP group that we also have. So this is going to be the agenda the night. I'm gonna talk about my team expedient. So it's going to be kind of broad, and we'll narrow it down to, you know, specifically, the as I said my UTA customers, and so I've talked about my team expedience. And then I'll briefly talk about what it means to be multidisciplinarity in in being a product manager. You know, what what that necessarily means is not to be kind of Mostra everything, but kind of jack-of-all-trades, and then the lotto touch on what customers mean, you know? And they they ask for the quite Amin's. Sometimes they'll be how is it to get rid of quite customers? And then go back to juniors and sorted out. So we'll talk about that. And how sometimes customers can be wrong from the industry. The market trends are going the, but the customers probably asking something. In line. Let's discuss about that also. And finally, you know, I said, I don't specifically product management in the domains that I've been focusing on. In the meanwhile, if you have any questions, I was just telling him this can be as informed as possible. So please interject ask questions and can also do I know a final f- acu- if you have any questions, so you've probably seen these van diagrams before you know, what why be a product manager. Because it's frankly awesome. You know, you if you're the person who has good technically ability, you have a chance to now be creative. You also have a chance to know hone your business skills until you kind of have this flexibility. And especially if you're if if the person with ADHD, you know, focusing on something, and then you interest changes, and you can go on something else, and you can still be some use. So yeah, I if you're if you have technically bag on, and if you if you wanna be a product manager, it's it's obviously possible if you've been in you ex boss, if you're if you I don't think leadership person would wanna. To be a product manager, but to manage it can get this. So that's the reason why I want to be a PM. And as I said more expedients with customers gave me a lot of manage finds. And that's the reason. So I typically day for me, you know, it can range depending upon the face of the product that I mean, it can range from you know, I'm doing customer to. So I'm looking at market research or I'm working with the consulting company. Who's doing market research getting information that I would require and documentation. Oh, good, Lord documentation. And then obviously working with engineering, you know, looking at the PR de converting it to things that they want, you know, actionable tasks, and if you're, you know, one of the many giant focus companies, you're probably doing all the scoping and retrospective and sprints and everything I was the other day talking to a friend, and he was saying an JiJi joke. It goes like knock knock. Who's there caddy caddy who caddy over the next burned? And so this is people people have been abusing this. But anyway, this is also part of the job..

product manager Amin diarrhea AIP ADHD Lord
"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

"We talk a lot about over communicating being a great thing is a product manager but it's even more than that you're super over communicating to a lot of people all the time in identifying those stakeholders i think goes hand in hand with that because to your point whatever the format of your training or you're learning weather informally reading books and listening to show are actually going through some type of program there is a degree of a simulated environment and although it would be really fund to bring in sales and marketing people into that roleplaying nixon's it had to go meet these people happy in their only happy when they're selling but exactly that like showing up day one in saying do i know who my stakeholders are do i know how decisions get made within this organization and am i making sure to have the right conversations with the right people at the right time because you're interaction designer your developer their your closest allies but everyone else has their own objectives that they're trying to achieve exactly so that's as part of the fun so if you like that kind of thing you should be products manager at that or it will would you ever go back do you have any regrets no regrets because they feel like i'm still doing corporate communication every day i mean you know meal chimp has this image of a finger like sweating when you hit the send button to a massive mailing lists an at that's how i feel all the time sitting like a all company emailer submitting my weekly report two hundred p so yeah i feel like i'm still doing it yeah you definitely do a thing that so great what would you go back and say to all of the software engineers that you interviewed in your thesis now that you've been a project manager and really lived into the challenges of the role to help them empathize better with with us first of all i would say thank you for letting me know keeping your real with me what this is really like and giving me that incite to prevent me from doing things wrong.

product manager nixon developer project manager
"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

"Becoming a product manager you know from a developer roller from a designer all i think we have a lot of entrepreneurs listening in going somebody told me i need to learn in thinking do like a product manager until i can afford to hire one so what's this product management things and i hope we have a lot of listeners out there who are not product managers are not developers are not entrepreneurs but think this could be a role for them think the product management could be a job for them they been hearing these stories kind of weak over week and given that you were not a project manager and given that you were non in a pm adjacent roll what advice would you offer to somebody's sitting in exactly that position who wants to make the leap i would say initially put yourself in the way of product managers that you admire and build that relationship and from my experience the best mentor that i've had in my career never knew there my mentors we never had a formal congress asian like will you be my mentor it's a matter of observing closely building that relationship in sort of sneaking in questions at don't waste their time once you have that relationship it for me my network that i've built over the years is everything from you specially 'cause i'm just me right now so when there's a hard question i can say he what would you do in the situation in the may because they're amazing people will ask me questions that give need where i wanna go without telling me what to do yet i think that's excellent advice for the reasons that you gave it and then also for you know we talk about getting out of the building that kind of classic phrase which really refers to going out and talking to real people but i think when we are product managers ourselves we can become very used to how we do things at our company and if we are prone toward selfexamination and i hope we are you talk about being introspective than at some point we think are we doing.

product manager project manager developer
"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

"This until were working on the next thing and we know that we've got could flow exactly i know when i when i joined by this is crazy how do you live like this but now it's superefficient and having a team that that communicates along the way really supports that structure so do you used travel them for ticket tracking a you have a manual board how does it all we use jira you used euroyen we're in the combine configuration s correct sarah cool okay what is a day or week in the life of you look like in your current role some could be so many different things at the things that i do any given day be scheduling usability tests conducting these abilities has distilling as insights presenting it to multiple teams it could be roadmap being for the next month the next year it could be road mapping feature specifically and all the communication work in alignment that even gets you to that point which is the harder part of that it's not just putting items onto a timeframe our calendar view interviewing customers how what else 280 do right user stories all the time this just me it's i'm kind of that mix of being super tactical in super strategic at the same time which we all are ways product managers but i'm writing the stories for all the teams and ensuring that they can ton do you cover a process that you use for cut of generating stories or or running them by folks i mean one of the things that is a challenge is not being a bottleneck to the team rate that if if you as the product manager are kind of owning the users stories that israeli incumbent upon you to make sure there's always a healthy batch of stories of vailable so that as the team starts picking tickets up they can work on them grant but one of the challenges of course that that presents especially when we talk about product managers not necessarily you know going.

product manager
"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

"Exchanger jump board and what i find so interesting is that if you ask either side everybody has a problem everyone is looking for work is saying i can't get a job as a product manager and then there's all these companies years included that are looking not just one multiple product managers right what do you think is the problem here what is the problem this is something i've thought about a lot because product management is the most in demand hottest job you see it in harvard business review and mckinsey reports it's the job of now when job in the future but it's so competitive at the same time okay i don't understand why i think people perhaps have different ideas of what a good product manager looks like different companies care more about being humancentred in your way of thinking i've seen other companies that want you to be scrums certified really are care more about process it's the agile versus waterfall thing well it goes back to another thing that i talk about a lot which is when you're looking for a job it so important to be connected to what kind of job you want because all product manager positions are not created equal i mean in in large part it's why this show exists is to say product management can look very different if it's b two be if it's be deceived depending on the business model of the product itself depending on the vertical that its ends so the more you hook into something that you're excited about the clearer it will be in you know if you don't want to be technical you don't consider yourself technical you're not really particularly passionate about learning code do not gone would apply for a job at a company like ends on which requires a deep level of technical expertise or google there are lots of organizations who as you say one a different type of product manager who shines well in in other areas of those skills so it's important to know your mix and lead with that rather than always sir framing it up in terms of inadequacy we.

product manager harvard business review google
"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

"One hundred pm is the show we're we're interviewing 100 expert product managers across five great cities to bring you all the actionable advice you need to succeed in product today's guest is vera ruehe well bunch director of product at audience view if you'd like to learn more after the show be sure to visit our website at one hundred product managers dot com the webs fastest growing resource for hot topics recommended resources and online learning i'm your host suzanne about tape product coach founder of the development factory let's dive right in and say hello to vera hi i'm vera well once and i'm the director of products for audience view of excited that you're here in particular because your story into product management everyone's got a different story into product management but your story into product management is one we don't hear let which is a very deliberate pivot into product management are you were not a product manager for most of your career and then what woke up one day and said i want to be one kind of okay so my master's degrees and corporate communication and i had to do a thesis ticket this masters degree and i wanted to find a novel segment that had been under appreciated by academia before so i choose software engineers and a married to a software engineer so it was an easy end to tickets now some thought leaders in the community and one of the questions i asked them was what's the hardest part about your job and they complained about product.

director suzanne founder product manager software engineer director of products one day
"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

"Activities of a product manager changes as the company moves through at its life cycle and this is interesting because i would imagine services much earlier in its life cycle than many of the clients that that you served in their own way maybe will come back to that but what i'm word i'm interested in is the clients that you're serving there at scale you're talking about you know at minimum revenues of ten million and probably exponentially up from there in in that world it's a game of inches one insight that could help you increase lifetime value by a month's could translate to millions if not hundreds of millions more in revenue are there are some universal questions that companies are asking themselves irrespective of scale or does it simply become every situation is going to be unique wipers sweaters is very much will the universal side i think that's effectively companies are are trying to answer to two three basic questions especially doors that our b to c dealing and even be to be to a extent accepted the beatasikh dealing with consumers is that you are looking for new customers uraga working to get your existing customers to spend more or you are looking to keep your existing customs in across lows three kind of business problems you have them within they of the different tactics can tax for example wish i have my new stals how can i get you customers with new solar occasions what deal should i send to people to get them to come back to my sites how can i ate increase the share all of wallet win with regards to either food purchases or or would you detect impressionists or wherever it happens today and those rule pretty standard business problems if you take the now it is launch comes in and where where we can help her where the kind of work that we we package job if you take a look at coach and analysis or.

product manager
"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

100 PM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"product manager" Discussed on 100 PM

"Activities of a product manager changes as the company moves through at its life cycle and this is interesting because i would imagine services much earlier in its life cycle than many of the clients that that you served in their own way maybe will come back to that but what i'm word i'm interested in is the clients that you're serving there at scale you're talking about you know at minimum revenues of ten million and probably exponentially up from there in in that world it's a game of inches one insight that could help you increase lifetime value by a month's could translate to millions if not hundreds of millions more in revenue are there are some universal questions that companies are asking themselves irrespective of scale or does it simply become every situation is going to be unique wipers sweaters is very much will the universal side i think that's effectively companies are are trying to answer to two three basic questions especially doors that our b to c dealing and even be to be to a extent accepted the beatasikh dealing with consumers is that you are looking for new customers uraga working to get your existing customers to spend more or you are looking to keep your existing customs in across lows three kind of business problems you have them within they of the different tactics can tax for example wish i have my new stals how can i get you customers with new solar occasions what deal should i send to people to get them to come back to my sites how can i ate increase the share all of wallet win with regards to either food purchases or or would you detect impressionists or wherever it happens today and those rule pretty standard business problems if you take the now it is launch comes in and where where we can help her where the kind of work that we we package job if you take a look at coach and analysis or.

product manager