35 Burst results for "producer"

Substance abuse linked to COVID-19 susceptibility: Study

News, Traffic and Weather

04:08 min | 1 d ago

Substance abuse linked to COVID-19 susceptibility: Study

"The pandemic, There's been been an an increase increase in in substance substance abuse. abuse. It's It's also also had had significant significant impact impact on on mental mental health health and and is is impacting impacting communities communities across across America. America. ABC ABC News News producer producer Jenny Jenny Goldstein Goldstein has has more more on on some some of the steps being taken and is part of the ABC News turning point. Siri's were focusing on how addiction affects communities of color. He was Jenny. September is National Recovery Month an entire month dedicated to educating Americans about substance use disorders, mental health treatment and services. I am a woman in long term recovery from alcoholic drug addiction. Paddy McCarthy is the CEO of the organization faces and voices of recovery. I have overcome challenges with my own alcohol and turkeys and now then in recovery for over 30 years this year marks the 31st anniversary of National recovery Month. This year's theme joined the voices for recovery celebrating connections. Recovery is a journey. We want a path to a better future. Martine Hackett is an associate professor in the master of public Health and community health programs at Hofstra University. She says, the first step to recovery is acknowledgements. You really cannot attempt to solve that problem or to even begin your recovery until you acknowledge that jacket says racial disparities exist in the process of recovery. This is in part due to the barriers that hinder minorities in particular from getting the help. They need some of these barriers that minorities face when it comes to identifying help. Have to do with the even their perceived need for treatment, Recognising that they might not want to have help from official means and might be more comfortable seeking help from family or from religious institutions. Another obstacle, health insurance coverage or access to behavioral health services. Trauma and racial stress can make minorities more susceptible to miss using drugs or alcohol as a coping mechanism. Some of this has to do with concepts around trauma. And the the experiences of trauma clearly in an early age people who are exposed to stressors there's research that talks about the stressors of racism. And how those stressors can cause behaviors that you know people reach to to be able to deal with those stressors. Hackett says. Native Americans are the most affected by these disparities. They have a higher rate of addiction, but they also have a lower rate of recovery and being able to seek recovery. As for national recovery month McCarthy says Connecting in 2020 will be a little different than previous years. You know that we can't do it alone. So that's why the theme of celebrating connections is so important, especially right now. During Koven 19 when connecting with people has become a whole new challenge when we're not able to visit people in person or tender, usual gatherings to support recovery. McCarthy also says the language and terminology we used when referring to those in recovery is an important step. No longer use words like addict. We no longer use the word drug abuser. We have to remember that these are family friends, sums of daughters we have shifted. Two person first language such as a person with the substances disorder, Hackett says the stigma can make it more difficult for those struggling to seek help. This is especially true for minorities, the idea of stigma that there are certain Ways of different cultures view addiction and that people might not feel comfortable being able to even admit that they have a problem. Faces and voices of recovery has a website where resource is accessible both during Andy on National Recovery Month National recovery Month that order so visit the website you can find out where the events are happening and stay up to date as the month of September comes to an end the fight for recovery and dismantling research All barriers continues. Ending the stigma and making resource is available to all is a step in the right direction.

Jenny Jenny Goldstein Goldstei Martine Hackett America Paddy Mccarthy Abc News Producer Siri Hofstra University Andy CEO Associate Professor Official
‘The Simpsons’ Season Premiere: Here’s Who Took Over Carl’s Voice From Hank Azaria (EXCLUSIVE)

Radio From Hell

01:44 min | 2 d ago

‘The Simpsons’ Season Premiere: Here’s Who Took Over Carl’s Voice From Hank Azaria (EXCLUSIVE)

"If you're a fan of the Simpsons, you'll probably notice your he might notice. One character will be sounding a bit different in the season 32 premiere on Sunday. Kelly collision. Homer Simpson's nuclear plant co worker and Lenny Leonard's best friend. Why didn't realize it was Carl Carlson and Lenny Leonard? Yeah, there are a couple. Yeah, they they will not be voiced by Carl will not be voiced by hankers area. At least in the season premiere episode, Karl will be a voiced by actor. Alex Desert or deserved award. According to Variety, although it's unclear whether it's a permanent replacement, Mr Desert or Desert also voices Swarm on Disney Ecstasy, Spiderman maximum venom. Mr Bo Jenkins on adult Swim's Mr Pickles. You can also be seen in the flash Becker better close also around for why that one character because Carl is African American. Carl's blacks. Oh, that's something hankers area, said that he's not going to do any more is not going to do a poo. He's not going to do car always not going to do. This actor. Also, by the way, is in a school band called Hep Cat. Have You ever Heard of them? I have heard of hepcat. Yes, well, he's in that band. The switch comes as the producers for the Simpson said earlier this summer. That it will no longer have white actors. Voices on white characters makes this area has been the voice of Carl, who's black since the beginning of the show, except Carl's first appearance, where he was voiced by Harry Shearer. Sharer previously said in an interview. I don't care, Val voice

Carl Carlson Lenny Leonard Mr Desert Homer Simpson Mr Bo Jenkins Alex Desert Mr Pickles Kelly Sharer Hepcat Harry Shearer Karl VAL Becker Variety
Washington, DC's New Area Code Will Be... 771

Toby and Chilli

01:46 min | 3 d ago

Washington, DC's New Area Code Will Be... 771

"The DMV is getting a brand new area code specifically D C. It will no longer just be 202. It will be 771 because they're running out of the 202. So they're going to faze those three new digits in over the next 13 months. 771 just doesn't sound fun. When it comes. It's on ly to 02 for me, just to 02 for me when it comes to DC It is weird how we get attached to area codes like producer Kayla, You're much younger. I know that too, for O was added to the 301 back in 1997. Did you ever know it to be 301 yet? Yeah. My house number when I was younger was a 301 number. What three wanted to 40 has been around all my life I was born in 90 for so this is the first time I've ever even been introduced to a new area code in my lay and silly year from here. So you've always been one with the 703, right? Yeah. The three originals was to 02 for DC 301 in Maryland and 703 in Virginia. And I kind of have a weird attitude about the other ones. I got to be honest, I mean, don't you get attached to certain area codes? Oh, no Chili. I got over area code's a long, long time ago. Because I had bounced around so much in my career. I've been in multiple markets and and then moving from Texas. So finally, I was like, you know what? I was in Tampa? I got my phone number. That was my phone number. I decided that I wasn't going to change my number again. Period. I was going rock with this 813 area code. And that is still my area code to this day. Yes, And that's what cell phones have done to us. Now. You can never assume you know where somebody lives based on their area code. You don't know, based on that area code. That's right. So get ready to owe to you're about to become 771 fun.

DMV Kayla Tampa Producer Maryland Texas Virginia
Documentary Explores Emancipating From Foster Care System

Morning Edition

06:39 min | 3 d ago

Documentary Explores Emancipating From Foster Care System

"Some some point, point, older older kids kids in in foster foster care care become unadoptable. There are three factors at play. How the foster care system seize the child, how potential parents see the child and what the child wants in a new documentary called UN Adopted No Elena interviews, kids who were in this position. It's a position that he was in. Not that long ago. In one scene, and I asked his lawyer when his caseworker changed his status to long term foster care. Long term Foster cares with the system cause it when they stop trying to get two adopted Instead, the plan is that your age out of the system this looks like 2007 is when it moved over from a plant of adoption. Think you might have been 11. Yeah, you were 11 at that point. It means I was in Six rained on, says one reason older foster kids don't get adopted is that they come with some baggage really, or perceived its no surprise that every team comes with another teen angst and all of the Joys of being a team. But like also, I think most families don't want like this kid is forever gonna want to know about his biological family or her biological family, you know? And I think it could be a little bit intimidating, or it could seem as if That family is competing. I think most people don't want to find out or they don't possibly want to get hurt. In the documentary. We also meet a teenage girl named Sequoyah, who is incredibly honest about how badly she wants to be adopted. And at one point, she says, something so striking trying to be a part of their family the first few months. Was really hard because I had to figure out how they worked. Spoke. Let their minutes were how to talk to then this's a teenage girl who You would expect to be the one who has moods herself that adults have to get used to. And instead, she's saying I need to get used to their moods. The idea that teenagers view adoptive parents as people they have to impress. There is also something really telling and really sad about that, too. I think for Sequoia. Like so many other foster you there at emotional crossroads and They're confronted with what may be the most important decision of their lives, whether to reunify with their biological family of possible which in her case is not Or opt into extended care. Or the third choice to pursue a forever family. And she is very keen on getting a forever family. She, at one point says she does not even know if her mother is alive. And if she is, Sequoia says, Well, good for her. If she's not. I wouldn't be surprised. Um How frequent isn't for kids in the foster care system to be so alienated from their parents that their attitude is? I don't know if this person is alive or dead. I don't want them to be dead. But if they are okay. The foster care system definitely does. Desensitize people. You know, in another NPR story I did I mentioned there's like little to no emotion. Kids often mirror their role models. And if you have role models, a k a. The social workers and judges, lawyers, etcetera being so gray with them then You know you're going to get the same results. You mentioned this NPR story that you did, for all things considered a few years ago, an award winning story in which you tape part of your own courtroom hearing and the thing that stood out to me. Maybe because my name is Noel is that the judge who had dealt with your case for a while called, you know. And you corrected her and said, Actually, it's no well and then you note. The frustration of my fate is in this judge's hands, and she doesn't even know how to pronounce my name or has forgotten how to pronounce me. Yeah, um I thought that was so shocking because she's been on my case for so long, you know, and she has My brother on her caseload as well. So my name you know, would bleed into his case file. So for something so simple as a name. Is really bad. And Ms Schwartz, if you're listening, I think we should have a sit down, talk and reflect from that because I think simple things like that can get corrected and they should be. There seems to be a push. To instead of taking Children away from their parents and putting them in foster care to leave them with their parents if they're not in immediate danger and helped the parents improve. You at the end of the documentary make clear that you are in touch with your biological family and seem happy about that. You also have nothing ill or bad to say about the foster family with whom you spent your older years. You're older, teenage years. Do you wish that you had been left with your biological family and that they had gotten support? Or do you think it was the right move to take you out of their care and put you into foster care? I shouldn't be a CZ well off a Zai am and I don't know if that's the survivor's guilt talking. But I've had to endure so much. And I don't You know, Foster care is supposed to be temporary, and it wasn't temporary. I was bouncing home to home. I was in multiple families, and it did take an emotional toll. I'm not going to say that it didn't I just think I had The willpower to, you know, push through and I still don't know. What the answer would be, But I would say, you know, I don't want to say this because I don't want it. Let the system win. Think they won, you know, but I would rather not have gotten adopted or reunify with my biological family because I did that on my own terms. I reunified with my bio family. I accepted my Foster family as my chosen family. But I did that, not the system. So I don't want to say one way or the other and think the system one because they didn't They have a bigger job to do. Noel and Naya. He's the co producer of the new documentary UN Adopted, which is now on the arts YouTube channel.

Foster UN Noel Sequoia Sequoyah NPR Elena Youtube Ms Schwartz Producer Naya
Bren Brown gets two Spotify exclusives

podnews

02:56 min | 4 d ago

Bren Brown gets two Spotify exclusives

"Time everyone I'm Bernie Brown, and welcome to my new daily podcast on spotify spotify car cost has announced a new partnership with Brennan Brown. Current show unlocking also become a spotify exclusive from January to lead is another exclusive which launches next month. She's also collaborated on a yacht rock playlist. If you like Christopher Cross and Toto Africa that you'll love your brock NPR has released the NPR podcast reports containing data and case studies about the broadcasters PODCASTS podcast uses up twenty percent year on year downloads up twenty six percent can podcast from NPR public radio account for thirty two percent of time spent listening to podcast us. spotify testing listener polls. The features live on spot exclusive shows like the re watchable 's like video and sharing cards. It's another proprietary feature for spotify shows only had him. Curry's no agenda disappeared from spotify earlier this week I never submitted our feet Adam says last I checked it was not associated with my email or my account. After leaving spotify September nineteenth after to our rent on his show earlier, Joe Biden has announced the Joe but a network, the first non button show will be see the thing is hosted by Bridget Kelly. Mandy be Livia dope quote not what they'll say because I'm staying out a women's business lull says button. spotify has also launched your daily in the UK content in there from the time talksport in the evening standard, the BBC global and Bauer taking part later today the rain Digital Canada Twenty twenty summit is taking place. The event is online and free our editor James. Credentials. Moderating the opening session. Hey, that's me. It's at rain digital candidate twenty, twenty dot com if you want to go. The Australian podcast cost awards is giving you extra time to anti. You've now got until midday on. Monday. Blueberry has a fancy new website design, which is nice John. McTaggart's the president's and see of APM, is to step down. The company has been criticised recently for race and gender issues for target claims. His decision to step down is unrelated Pierre Remix of PODCAST radio station in the US is celebrating ten years on Air who knew during that time it said one thousand and eighteen audio creators. The first producer was Roman Mars and podcast movement virtual has announced Mark Cuban as a keynote speaker in conversation with the newsworthy is Erica Mandy. And Infocom News, the former host and producer of the ABC's in this podcast. Australia is now making at home with Brie away for kids across the country to connect. When life gives you. Parkinson's is back for a third season Larry gifts to his diagnosed three years ago hosts the show the season includes the collision of Covid nineteen and Parkinson's disease

Spotify Erica Mandy Christopher Cross Digital Canada Twenty Twenty NPR Brennan Brown Bernie Brown Joe Biden Brock Npr Parkinson Bridget Kelly United States Host And Producer Australia Toto Africa Curry Covid ABC Brie
Ellen DeGeneres addresses toxic workplace allegations in season premiere

Sarah and Vinnie

01:15 min | 5 d ago

Ellen DeGeneres addresses toxic workplace allegations in season premiere

"Too generous. Ah! She responded to the accusations of a toxic workplace environment as she did the 18th season premiere of her talk show yesterday, Bryn, I know I sent you the whole monologue. We able to pull some parts that you liked. I sure was here. She didn't rule it. As you may have heard this summer, there were allegations of a toxic work environment at our show. And then there was an investigation. I learned that things happened here that never should have happened. I take that very seriously. And I want to say I am so sorry to the people who were affected. I know that I'm in a position of privilege and power, and I realized that with that comes responsibility and I take responsibility for what happens at my show. This is the Ellen DeGeneres Show. I am Linda. Generous. We have had a lot of conversations over the last few weeks. Aboutthe show our workplace and what we want for the future. We have made the necessary changes. And today we're starting a new chapter. Good for her. She mentioned that her d j slash Sidekick Twitch has now been promoted to a co executive producer position. I want to say the other is three top producers at the show were blown out a month or so ago, and we had talked about that a little bit. And she said, things will be different going forward.

Linda Bryn Ellen Degeneres Executive Producer
Ellen DeGeneres begins new season taking responsibility for toxic workplace allegations

NPR News Now

01:00 min | 5 d ago

Ellen DeGeneres begins new season taking responsibility for toxic workplace allegations

"Comedian and TV host. Ellen Degeneres has apologized on her daytime talk show addressing allegations that her staff endured a toxic workplace NPR's Eric Dagens reports her monologue was also crafted to assure fans she's not a phony. Inner Fall. season. Premiere the generous told viewers she was taking responsibility and starting a new chapter but her monologue also focused on rebutting allegations she failed to live up to her own shows mantra to be kind being known as the be kind lady is a tricky position to be in. Let me give you some advice out there if anybody's thinking changing their title or giving yourself a nickname do not go with the be kind lady too generous. Didn't go into detail regarding the allegations that some staffers had been subjected to sexual harassment intimidation and racism. She also didn't mention three top producers have been fired noting only that quote necessary changes were made. Degeneres did not specify. Would run differently for two hundred and seventy staffers.

Ellen Degeneres Eric Dagens NPR Harassment
Ellen DeGeneres makes on-air apology, vows a 'new chapter'

NBC Nightly News

01:43 min | 6 d ago

Ellen DeGeneres makes on-air apology, vows a 'new chapter'

"Ellen DeGeneres. Began the eighteenth season of her talk show today with an apology. Here's Cathy Park. Everybody summer good yeah. Mine was great. Ellen degeneres kicked off her new season with more than just laughs. I. Learned that things happened here that never should have happened. I take that very seriously and I want to say, I am so sorry to the people who were affected. I know that I'm in a position of privilege and power and I realized that with that comes responsibility and I take responsibility for what happens at my show her on air apology in front of a virtual audience address allegations of toxic work culture at the show reports published by Buzzfeed this summer allege senior managers engage in ramp rampant harassment and sexual misconduct. We have had a lot. Of conversations over the last few weeks about the show place what we want for the future, we have made the necessary changes and today we are starting a new chapter. The changes following an investigation by Warner media degeneres was not part of that review. Three of the shows top producers were eventually fired. Now, her longtime DJ twitch will help lead the daytime series, my co executive producer. The host also addressing claims that she hasn't always lived up to be kind mantra. Means that truth is I am that person that you see on TV I am also a lot of other things I. Sometimes I get sad I get mad I get anxious I get frustrated I get impatient and I am working on all of that. I am a work in progress today generous acknowledging Joe is to

Ellen Degeneres Cathy Park Harassment Warner Media Executive Producer JOE
Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

All Things Considered

05:01 min | 6 d ago

Autopsies Show Inmates' Lungs Filling With Fluid As They're Executed

"In a high security prison in Terre Haute, Indiana. Two federal inmates await their executions when tomorrow the next on Thursday as they wait. Their lawyers are asking the court to intervene because they say The drugs used to kill. The inmates will cause their lungs to fill with fluid as they die, and that in their final moments, they could experience the sensation of drowning. Those fears aren't unfounded, and just a quick warning for listeners. What you're about to hear may be upsetting. In the spring of 2017 on Arkansas inmate gasped and choked as he was executed the following year. In Ohio, an inmate heaved against his restraints struggling for air and a few months after that, in Tennessee, once again on inmate gasping for air and convulsing. All of these inmates were later found to have lungs filled with fluid. Now we can't ask them how painful their executions were, whether They amounted to cruel and unusual punishment, But what we can do is peer inside their bodies. For the past two years, a team and all things considered has been investigating the autopsies of inmates killed by lethal injection. We've obtained the largest collection of these autopsies ever assembled in the U. S. This collection spans decades of executions across the multiple states, and what our findings reveal is evidence of a death far less peaceful than what states promised when they adopted lethal injection decades ago. We begin the story in Atlanta, where I went in 2018 with producer Noah Caldwell to meet a doctor who made a startling discovery. Joel Zip. It works 80 hour weeks at Emory University Hospital. He's an anesthesiologist checking in on patients in the ice for you. So if temperatures is looking a little grade, and did you get to say, perhaps Mediate those? A few years ago, federal defenders in Georgia hired zip it to review a few autopsies of inmates executed by lethal injection. What I was asked The address was the blood levels of certain kinds of medications, but something else caught his eye and recognize that something was amiss. What did you see in the autopsy? So I began to see a pattern of organ failure instead of what I thought would be pristine findings instantaneous death. I began to see a picture that was more consistent with a slower death a death associated with suffering a painful death in autopsy after autopsy. What zip it saw were unusually heavy lungs, lungs swollen with fluid, which surprised him. It's not a common finding in autopsies. It's something you'd see in cases of, say. Congestive heart failure or sepsis, neither of which were happening here. He wanted a second opinion. So he contacted a colleague at Emory, a pathologist named Mark Edgar. I said I want you to look at these documents and just tell me what you think you see here because I think I'm seeing something here. That is a surprise to me now. Zip. It deliberately did not tell Edgar what had surprised him in those autopsies. But anger. He zeroed in on the exact same thing that zip it did. Lungs filled with fluid. He noticed frothy fluid in the nose. Same word kept popping up frothy material in the main bronc I the word frothy, frothy fluid in the upper and Lower airways. What they were seeing was a severe form of a condition called pulmonary, a Dema. Presence of froth was a troubling clue because it meant that inmates were still alive and trying to breathe as their lungs were filling with fluid. Xzibit and Edgar got a few dozen more autopsies from other states just to see Was this a fluke and similar words like frothy and fluid kept coming up to describe the lungs. It was a stunning finding, because here was some physical document that could answer a question that could otherwise not be answered, which was What exactly is the experience of a dying inmate? Ziva brought these findings to federal court in multiple states. It's evidence that is now at the forefront of legal challenges to lethal injection. For the past two years, The team at NPR has undertaken its own investigation. We expanded the scope of the data significantly, we obtained more than 300 inmate autopsies through Freedom of Information Act requests. They cover executions in nine states dating from 1992 2019. And what these autopsies show is that when inmates lungs or examined after their executions, pulmonary oedema occurred 84% of the time that was consistent across states. Medical experts say these findings are troubling. Because they mean it is very likely these inmates experience the sensation of drowning or suffocation before they die, and that many inmates were not being properly anesthetized.

Joel Zip Mark Edgar Terre Haute Emory University Hospital Indiana Sepsis Arkansas Ohio Atlanta Tennessee NPR Emory Noah Caldwell Producer Georgia
Emmys 2020: Who won big at the first virtual ceremony

Sarah and Vinnie

19:20 min | 6 d ago

Emmys 2020: Who won big at the first virtual ceremony

"Emmy's happened last night. The last couple days I want to say like through last week, there was some of the you know, technical Emmys and Creative arts Emmys and they've all been I've been seeing like the results of those, but these were the actual Actors and actresses and shows and You know the hole, but it was It was virtual, right? Yes. So every I think that they They actually put a show together to do the Emmys. Um But the other ones that I think we're just getting. I'm sure there was some kind of ceremony on zoom or something. But I don't know that those ones were televised. They might have been. No, I mean, look, I didn't I Maybe you mentioned it. Maybe I read. Maybe I didn't. It was a shock to me at whatever time nine o'clock last night when I started seeing the news roll through, and I was like Emmys. You talked about it a little remember? It was, you know, because Jimmy Kimmel was hosting and so there was some talk, but I play police. Li forgot about it and the whole thing so I didn't see one second of it. Oh, yeah, no. And, frankly, these days because of you, Khun DVR things I'd never sit and watch things in real time anyway, so Because who wants us in just to put the others on When I organize S O. The big winner last night is Schmidt's Creek. It's not the name of the show, but right The clothes. They were saying it on TV because I did see a clip after that. They were saying the word, but I don't want you don't want no trouble with you. Just don't I considered it. You know, it spells have pointed out that every time they say it, they had to put the actual words upon these people can read it with. Oh, right. You see, It's not what you think There's an extra tea and they've thrown at sea in there, okay? So I'm just gonna say Schmidt's creek because I'm with you. You know, whatever. I just guess Monday's gonna be hard enough, right? Yeah. What's our theme? We don't want to. We don't want no trouble. That's right. I keep forgetting the better. That's our theme. Well, since I should write that down here, put it up with all my little, you know, daily affirmations. So the Emmys was virtual And Schmidt's Creek swept in all this is it's actually quite amazing because it has never won an Emmy in any other season. Currently they're grand total of Emmy's up till this season when they took him all zero. It doesn't It seems to be a show that we used to have a million of them. And not that, you know. Ahh, that name in particular is obviously means that's a cable show, right? I mean, it's just It's not your Big four or whatever. But it's just a sitcom, and it's fun and it's and it's not that You could miss it, and you wouldn't care. But you could also sit down and watch four episodes on any given night and be like, Wow, that was light. It was easy is their thread that you follow along with? Yes, it's the family that has moved. Uh, I won't tell you the whole story. But yes, there's a story behind Why they're in this motel and Right off super rich. It's only that I find a just a life. Oh, poor things. Is that a Netflix show? It doesn't even say here. Oh, yeah, It's a Netflix. Yeah. So they won nine Emmys for their sixth and final season, including best comedy Siri's. It's a new record for most wins in a single season for a single comedy. Marvellous. Mrs. Mazel had had the record. They said it in 2018 with eight and then they got eight more in 2019. And I don't know if this means that Mrs Mazel was just completely shut out. Oh, end because all the comedy awards seemed to have gone to Schmidt's Creek. The cast swept the acting categories, and that's the first time a comedy Siri's has done that Eugene Levy and Catharine O'Hara won best actor and actress and Daniel Levy and Annie Murphy, one supporting actor and actress. And they're saying here that's never happened. So congratulations to them. Daniel Levy also set a record for most wins for an individual in a seat in a single season with four because he also got trophies for writing and directing and Best comedy Siri's because he's a producer. So he actually technically that four Just for himself personally. Zero m. He's heading into the night. They never had any kind of incredible. But I guess you know, with my cell dominating in the last couple of seasons would be hard for anyone to rack up any numbers. They also set a record last night at the Emmys for most wins by black actors, including Regina King and Yaya Abdul Mateen. Ah, The second for watchman. Ouzo Duba for Mrs America. And Zendaya for euphoria. She's also the youngest Emmy winner in this category. Outstanding lead actress for drama. Stop me. If you have pulled any audio for any of these things in particular, I pulled some furs and die a winning it Isa from Oakland, apparently which is why we wanted to make sure we've got her on. So here she is reacting. Yeah, it is her reacting and she says a couple of things, but just there's there's a party behind her. So I know that I just want to say thank you to the TV academy to all the other incredible women in this category. I I admire you all so much. This is, um Oh, this is pretty crazy. Didn't really crying, Okay? I know this feels like a really weird time to be celebrating. But I just want to see that there is hope in the young people out there. I know that our TV show doesn't always feel like a great example of that. But there is hope in the other people, and I just want to say to all my peers out there doing the work in the streets. I see you. I'm are you I Thank you. And yeah, thank you so, so much. Um, this is thank you. And, of course, is through zoom. So right. Well, everyone was zooming in S O. She's the youngest any award winner for outstanding lead Actress for drama. So congratulations, Twos and Dia. And I guess I assumed that that party was happening in Oakland flatter know about that, But I do know she's she's pretty accomplished for such a young lady heard she's stars in Great America, the greatest showman Ohio. I want to say the great American hero. I don't know what she's in the great American. Ah, SOS and Dia. Congratulations to her. Eddie Murphy and Maya Rudolph one for Saturday Night Live, I guess for guest appearances and Ron Cephas Jones for this is us Eso Black actors Big night of record for most wins by black actors at the Emmys last night. The ceremony itself was obviously very different. Jimmy Kimmel hosted in an empty arena. Tried to fool us with crowd reactions from past ceremonies. Was anyone some of that? Yeah, sure. I'll watch a little of that. Oh watchmen. Also what Jerry Falwell Jr was into Flashing people appreciating and there's a flash of him in the audience. Then how much hilarious here that would mean that no one is in the audience. That would mean that I'm a lump here all alone. You'll see them. They turn the lights up. Just of course I'm here all alone. Of course. We don't have an audience. This isn't a mag a rally. It's the Emmys. Instead of a live audience. We took a page from baseball tonight and we filled the seats with cardboard cutouts of the nominees. You can see we have. Regina King, Hugh Jackman, Jason Bateman. Wait a minute. Go back one. Jason Patient, He's really hilarious. Yes, they did move. Mind your business Camel Big night for May. I know it's a big night but you can't be in here. We have very strict safety protocols. I'm clean guy. OK, I'm a big big washer upper always have been smell my hands like a garden. No, thank you. I'm sure you're clean. That's not the point. We just have a limit on how many people we can have in the building. So you really need to go? No, I don't. I don't. Okay. I haven't left the house for six months. Don't send me back there. I want to be here. This isn't a ritzy You know, I mean, I wantto eat shrimp with the cast of the crown. All right, I'm gonna want Mario Lopez asked me about my pants. Let's go. We don't have any friends that you could stay as long as you promise to laugh at my jokes. I'm out. I'm gonna call the car Loved Jason Bateman. Job. Good job s O. He reveals he's alone Except for Jason Bateman. Jimmy Kimmel. Continue with the show and some presenters did join him live. Jennifer Aniston was there. Did you grab that? I did here. Let me just pull that up. On the video. I said. I said, thanks, Jimmy. Other all across the stage from each other, Never, Never mind. It? Yes, I'd love some wine. No, I I said, Never mind. Oh, why are you standing all so far away from me, Dr Fauci said 60 ft. So 60 ft. No, isn't he said 6 Ft. Thank you. You also have sexy feet. Okay? Here, and that's it. Hilarious by the way. She then got in her extremely fast car lives right around the corner from there, and ah, she she made another appearance from her house later. So right? Yeah, but we're here. Oh, okay heads and there's Courtney Cox, Courtney's there. Of course I'm here. We live together. You do know there's a lag. Yeah, We've been roommates since 1994. But I don't know is it is this live TV? Both of you very well done. It's super cute. But the awkward, you know, three seconds of science, retired ruins everything before it does. We're very well acquainted with the awkward three seconds of silence, ruining everything. That is the life we're living right now. Anyway. Jennifer Aniston and Courtney Cox and Lisa could row whether she just jetted home after 60 ft. Away appearance on the show the awards, though, as they handed these out So I'm not sure how exactly this happened. If only the people who were actually getting the awards had people in has Matt suits outside their homes. No, it seems that Ah, they had everybody on standby like you'd have somebody in front of your house and has been with the award, but you might not win. So that way, everybody still kind of Were they holding? Just like a box. So you didn't know if there was any in it or not. Or that there were things that they were popping out of boxes, too. And that no one boxes that seemed really mean That was a really when I think, John Oliver, go when I have that mean here and you just pulled it up for you, too. Barrett. It pops open and there is it Pops open and and some confetti sprays out. Although that is right on the desk of his HBO set. Although I assume that that desk is in his garage, no, right. Cause that's where he's doing it from. So anyway. Nominees were all it remote locations, many in their own homes. Ah, they were doing the awards were delivered to those locations by people in has Matt suits, and they say someone had to be on hand for every so there was a guy hanging out in Has Matt suit whether you won or not, Some people actually took a visit. Do you have the Remmy use of dew? So this guy did not win in his category. Vinny and Ah, and there's the guy who has He's he's holding the little trophy. He's got the ones walking away having Oh, my God by you didn't win. All that's so sad, right? Well in some categories, all the nominees were given a box and then the winners boxwood Spring open and a hand holding the statue would pop out some They? Obviously a lot of people had to know that they did or didn't when I had a time. Other highlights her H e r her belt it out. Nothing compares to you. During the Emmys in Memoriam segment. Here's a little Since you've been gone ever. I can see whoever dinner in a fancy restaurant. Nothing can take away these blues. Come So she's playing piano, too. Way link that up with the Facebook page that people can see that isolated. Thank you. Ah, David Letterman got kicked out of an uber before presenting an award. I'm sure that wasn't set up. Celebrities revealed what they've been doing during the pandemic. Stop me if you have any of this stuff, Bernie Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington tried to skip 2020 skip to 2021 by ring in the New Year's Belle and her here. I watch Dave Letterman thing doesn't translate actually, wasn't it was? I don't know. It's the The New Year's party just wasn't I don't know It was well, you know, New Year's party with only two people is just not Doesn't feel New Year's Eve. They're saying The emotional highlight of the night was Tyler Perry's speech while accepting the governor's award. Um and then let me see if there's anything else here that I want to make sure that you I just have you have any questions about any categories Have all the categories here, I should, say Dave Chappelle, one for sticks and stones, best pre recorded variety special. Um, yeah, I don't have any questions, but I do. Look without trying to sound like I'm patting ourselves on the back because I'm not trying to do that. I give credit to anybody who's trying to do a show right now. Absolutely. It's a pain in the butt, and you'll see why they could absolutely see why they went through with it. But I could also see if they said not this year, everyone where does it go ahead? Mail you your prize and Here's the announcement work and that and the example the best example of it is that three The five second lag between the friends and less like Jesus. What is that? That's that's live. That's national TV. That's international TV right now. Well, that's you know, that's the world. We're living in pin, right? Everything sucks. The best variety sketch. Siri's went to Saturday night live and actually have a little bit of news about that. The full cast from last year is coming back this year. Usually there are at least some changes, and there were rumors that Kay McKinnon was going to leave. And she's got a career outside of this, but season 46 is starting October 3rd. And it's coming back to Rockefeller Center studio for the first time since the shutdown. They are going toe put all kinds of safety protocols in place, but it looks like we're going to get actual I'm sure will be no audience. But it will be live apparently, and that will happen there at their normal studio. So they say. The last time there was no caste turnover between seasons was 07 when the 33rd season began with the ensemble intact, So everybody who you liked last year and everybody who didn't like last year We'll be back. That season 46 in playing Joe Biden. On Saturday night Live will be Jim Carrey. Oh, wow, really adding a big name to play one of the candidates. Ah, it looks like You know, they're saying it's gonna happen Ah for the for the debut, but they're basically safe in the 46 season, which debuts October 3rd. I I I'm guessing that he's sort of signed on to participate this whole season. There's going to be a lot of Biden this season. So maybe they said we, you know, and we'll pay you and we'll put you up and you could be alone. Fancy shmancy penthouse in New York City. So they are adding three new featured players to their cast. They'll have a limited studio audience for the coming season, but it's going to it's going to happen. And Jim Carey is I'm looking at a side by side of the two of them with a little make up, I think Kind of like, I think his teeth are going to work. I think it's going to work October. 3rd is when the new season starts, and we'll get to see how Jim Carey does plan Joe Biden's I Love So It doesn't matter to me before you a break, sir. Do you want to hear Because the texture of accident about hers performance saying that you check out her guitar riff in the end? Oh, she jumped up from the piano and gets on the guitar playing the cameras. He had a guitar strapped to the back of her so Oh, Here we go. This's the show Chad with the, uh that was beautiful. I really like her. Yeah, That'll be a pithy ceremony. Facebook page. She played guitar when she came in and saying for us, right? She did. Yes, she was. That was that was lovely. Only her Her is her

Emmy Jimmy Kimmel Schmidt Jason Bateman Facebook Jennifer Aniston Siri Regina King Saturday Night Live Oakland Matt Netflix Joe Biden LI Rockefeller Center Daniel Levy Mrs. Mazel Jim Carrey
Washington DC - Here Are the 2020 Rammy Awards Winners

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 6 d ago

Washington DC - Here Are the 2020 Rammy Awards Winners

"Brunch spots to best bruise. Some of the top restaurants in our region will recognize last night during the Ranney Awards gala. Our restaurant is up for best service program of the year. Best new rush on your program, the Grammy Awards gala hosted by the restaurant association, Metropolitan Washington took place last night, and for the first time ever it was completely virtual. One of the top winners of the night. Alice Brew works taking home the regional food and beverage producer of the Year Award, a crazy year in a terrible time for industry and all of our bar restaurant partners, But it means a whole lot to be honored during an upscale brunch of the Year award goes to Trumpers and a few casual brunch spots to add to your list from this year's ceremony. The winner all purpose, Shaw Liberty Barbecue and Pearl Diver. Oyster Palace, Melissa How GOP news and coming up

Shaw Liberty Barbecue Grammy Awards Oyster Palace Pearl Diver Alice Brew GOP Metropolitan Washington Producer Trumpers
Kim Cattrall, actress and producer: I have self worth. And Im expensive.

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:11 min | 6 d ago

Kim Cattrall, actress and producer: I have self worth. And Im expensive.

"CAM drawl joins us on skimmed from the couch. She needs no introduction we are geeking out, but we will introduce her anyway she is a Golden Globe winning actress and producer you know her from her role as Samantha Jones on sex in the city and. She's The star and producer of the new series filthy rich on Fox which premieres on September twenty. First, we are so excited because we need some new shows in this Cogan, Environment Kim. Thank you so much for joining us today. welcomed the skimmed from the couch. Thank you for inviting man. It's good to be here. I will just say I'm geeking out 'cause I've loved you since Mannequin. So this is just So we're going to start the first question. We ask every guest, which is skim your resume for us. Oh my gosh. You know when I first started as an actress I was desperate to get credits and now I'm trying to eliminate. Oh well, you know they say don't have any regrets and I don't because even from jobs that I didn't particularly feel good about in retrospect I learned something it starts off with, of course, theater credits and commercial credits I remember getting a job on a lob laws commercial this Toronto. Before I came to the United States studied in the United States but then I went back up to Canada. And I had a clerk in a grocery store and William Shatner, he was sort of the MC selling the product and years. Later when I did a star trek movie with him, I said I. I, know you definitely don't recognize me I was shocked in. Clerk. Needless to say that's not on my resume anymore but. At the time I was doing a lunch hour theatre Gig you know and was making about one, hundred, fifty dollars every two weeks. So those those little jobs meant so much because I could I could keep in the theater I keep working as an actress and I was very grateful and when I brought it up, he simply smiled and said I don't remember. At least he was on. Yeah. So walk us through what was your big break? How did you go from the shopping clerk to being able to pick and choose what credits you have I did a show called scruples. First of all, I did a Columbo episode, which was kind of it was the hot hot show to to watch never mind beyond and they were waiting for another actress who just had dates and I was there I was told later on I was the first choice but they wanted to have some unknown entity is as an actor as one of the guest stars. And it was a really fun little role on this sort of passionate young girl who was in love with his older man. In a she was kind of nympheas but was very soulful. I got that job and Dan they were auditioning for this movie called scruples and that was really got everybody excited. It was based on a judith krantz novel was very soapy and fun and passionate. Packed with all kinds of wonderful personalities and actors and it was about Beverly Hills and it was we shot in nineteen seventy nine even before the glove, the eighties and more is more I played this kind of trouble Starlit who is bisexual and not that they really touched on that. You know very gingerly of course at the time, but it introduced me to a different level of just struggling and making due to being brought in the room because I had done that and and people like what I've done. So that was a marked difference, and then shortly after that, I did have a film called tribute and ticket to heaven and a lot of sort of films. What's one thing that we can't Google about you there's so much out there. But like what's the one thing that people would be surprised to know I think one of the things that people are surprised to know very recently is that I I am now an American citizen I think a lot of people associate associate me with being American and being a New Yorker of course, but I have just taken the plunge. So I can vote

William Shatner Samantha Jones Producer Cogan United States Judith Krantz Google Toronto Beverly Hills Canada DAN
Final Fantasy 16 Revealed At PS5 Showcase Event

DLC

03:44 min | Last week

Final Fantasy 16 Revealed At PS5 Showcase Event

"They started off their event. Sony did. With a pretty big reveal and that is the next main line final fantasy game final fantasy sixteen, which looks like a return to sort of more medieval ask a look. Out of the car with the boys and we're into more of a Fantasy you know real fantasy setting. What did you think Tom of what they showed for final fantasy sixteen I'm I'm never been like a huge huge final fantasy nut. I'll say that much but I'm. Definitely. Intrigued by this like it. It looks cool and fifteen was a really fun cool game and the actually the most exciting thing to me like the trailer itself was. Cool. But didn't tell me a ton right because firefighters has been and can be so many different things that I didn't get a ton of vibes off of it more than like this is neat. Right The thing that excited me most about it was hearing after hearing afterwards at nayek Nokia Yoshida was GONNA be directing the game 'cause he's goes by colloquially named known as. and. He was the director and producer of fun finished fourteen and has done such an insanely good job with that game that hearing that he's being given the reins to the main series. Next main series game is. Really really exciting. So I think that there was a there's a lot of potential here and I'm very excited to see what they do with it but also this trailer didn't immediately make me run out and pre-order necessarily if that makes sense Christian, what did you think of it? Yeah. I like the direction they're saying it's going. I find interesting. It seems. To put this, not more combat focused because they've always been a lot of combat and final fantasy games, just kind of how that combat is delivered and I'm not sure. But I kind of got the feeling that. It's maybe embracing more of that final fantasy seven remake real time and I you know there have been so many final fantasies and so many sub fantasies of final fantasies that it's hard for me to keep track of them. It's like I know what original seven was. I. Know Tactics I kind of remember. A, and then I don't know anything else after that. But I'd like that they keep evolving with implying within. I. Think Though the people they have working on this thing. One I. Hope it hits a date. And too I think it looks really interesting. It's a big it. That was the other thing that was rumored I had an last week hill gets to see but an exclusive final fantasy the big that was a big stage moment for Microsoft when they were able to walk that out, say like coming to xbox final fantasies in in Sony's pulling it back seven, and then now this one is well I. Don't know final fantasy is has the brand cachet at once did but I still think it is a another Arrow in that quiver. You fifteen of course had. Real time action combat as well. and I think that that's just what squaring does now that they've. You know there is a way to kind of finesse turn bass fish in seven remained but not really. So I don't I just that's just what they do. Now, a much to my chagrin because I'm a fan of turn based off. But you know I miss I'm with you missed the turn based too. I think what they're doing with combat stuff especially, seven remake seven remakes combat I think is phenomenal but I just missed the classic a little bit too. Yeah. I do I do I mean I'm a big fan of based stuff Anyway so fun fantasy sixteen. I thought it was A. Pretty. Cool way to start the show.

Director TOM Sony Microsoft Producer
Celebrating Indigenous filmmakers at TIFF

Unreserved

03:37 min | Last week

Celebrating Indigenous filmmakers at TIFF

"For people who aren't familiar with Thomas King's book the inconvenient Indian, how do you describe it? It's a difficult book to describe because Thomas covers so much ground but really it's the history of colonization in North America but told through his lens so he uses humor I. It's funny. He says to me he always disarms people with his humor, and then he pulls out the knife and. I really feel that that expresses the book in the best way because there can be a moment where you're just running along listening to historian. He's a fantastic storyteller, and then you're laughing and next thing you know it's a Gut Punch and I feel that capture the spirit of indigenous people we go through a lot of things and it can be really tough but we always have the ability to laugh at it and we have such a good sense of. Humor despite some of the atrocities we end up living in our lives and I feel like, Thomas Really encapsulates Ivan this book and do you remember when you first picked up the book and read it and you know what impact it had on you I do I read it around the time it first came out and it was not long after that that I ended up going to standing rock to document the occupation against the Dakota access pipeline there and I'd never thought about making the book into a film but when I was in standing rock, I saw a lot of those ideas that are in Thomas's. Enacted on the ground in the front lines and when I came back from standing rock. I guess that was when I really started to think about making it into a film and the book the inconvenient Indian it's pretty genre defying. It's you know unconventional in so many ways it blends history and humor and personal narrative from Thomas Kings perspective. How did you approach adapting all of those things from the book to the Big Screen? Yeah, it was actually very intimidating in the beginning when Jesse, Wendy and Stuart Henderson the producers of the film when they approached me to adopt the book. My initial reaction was I'm not a historian I'm not an academic I can't do this, and then on the publisher sent me an illustrated version of the book and those illustrations spanned everything from Thomas? King's own photographs in his travels to old posters from the original land settlement posters when candidate was trying to entice settlers to come here and occupy lands and I think that got me really thinking about the history that. Media has played in the misrepresentation of Dennis peoples in this country. One of my favorite moments in the film is a hunting scene, and early in the film, You bring in a clip from the nineteen twenty, two movie nuke of the North, and that movie represents the Innuendo as primitive but you show us a contemporary hunting scene So you kind of flip the script and Wayne. Can You? Can you tell us why? Was that important to show contemporary hunting nook of the north is an interesting film because when that was being recorded, it was considered one of the first feature documentaries and and it was recorded from Robert Flaherty who was asking people to hunt with spears, and when at the time they were actually hunting with rifles and so he was actually setting them back in time and this is where I think this. This perpetuates the stereotype that. People are stuck in the past where this nineteenth century representation of a dead Indiana's I use those words meaning the Thomas. King words from his book dead Indian or we're stuck with leathers and feathers, and we're a stereotypical romanticized version of ourselves but we exist in the now and many of our cultural practices and traditions are existing with us right now

Thomas Thomas King Thomas Kings Thomas Really North America Wendy Robert Flaherty Indiana Dakota Publisher Spears Stuart Henderson Wayne Jesse Ivan
The Emmy Awards will be 'live, live, live,' and expect things to go wrong

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:32 sec | Last week

The Emmy Awards will be 'live, live, live,' and expect things to go wrong

"And the Emmys Air Sunday night on ABC, the first major awards show during the pandemic, Jimmy Kimmel is hosting. So what could go wrong? Executive producer Iain Stewart says any number of things the good thing about that is that we've got Jimmy Kimmel, who loves live TV and loves Chaos, Live T. I think I think he's actually hoping things do go wrong To tell you the truth. It makes my sweat makes my palms sweat. Just thinking about it. The biggest hurdle will be having feeds from all the nominees Holmes coming in live on Sunday night, which Stuart says could be a logistical

Jimmy Kimmel Iain Stewart Executive Producer ABC Holmes Stuart
Who Does the Cooking for Cooking Shows?

BrainStuff

03:09 min | Last week

Who Does the Cooking for Cooking Shows?

"A smartly dressed woman sunlit kitchen gushes about her love of ricotta cheese as she blithely scoops ingredients including the cheese into a skillet warming on the stove she ticks through the dishes. She'll prepare today right before your Eyes Warm Rubella Salad with Walnuts Baked Ziti with butternut squash and desert a simple yet decadent twelve crisp layered with raspberry compote and Marse. Capone. Her thirty minute cooking show is one of your favorites and for a moment you consider recreating this exact meal at home. But Mike most things made for TV. The delectable spread has a secret ingredient. You probably don't have on hand dozens of behind the scene hands that crap and stir proverbial pot. Traditionally all the cooking shows you'll see on TV begin with onsite chefs who prep food in advance sometimes as many as twenty people will chop whisk and season ingredients in a full service kitchen before a cooking show is recorded. The Food Network Kitchen. For example, has included five separate kitchens that each has stove oven sink and refrigerator. That way chefs can prepare food for several cooking shows in advance. These prep kitchens as well as the made for TV, kitchens on some cooking shows require fully stocked pantries to. A for example, competition cooking shows alike, my personal favorite iron chef may require pantries with hundreds of items for each participant. Iron Chef America stocked two hundred fifty items per chef including nine types of flour seven vinegars and five kinds of salt as well as thirty types of herbs and spices. Along with having the right ingredients on hand chefs, an off camera kitchens prepare swap outs which are dishes at various stages of completion. The can be used during a cooking show the next time you watch an instructional cooking show. Note the carefully orchestrated actions in specific segments, introduction preparation of ingredients, stove, top cooking seasoning, adding extra ingredients to the dish and plating. Dealing any of these segments you're likely to see the work of people in an off camera kitchen. Of course, even with all this help, it doesn't necessarily mean that the host of a cooking show has it easy. Especially, if they're recording with a live audience, the host still needs to cook and speak to the audience often while producer communicates by phone and Studio Director gives silent instructions from the floor. Cooking competition shows can be a challenge for the contestants to although perhaps not in the same way. Take Food Network's chopped. For example, a contestant on this show are tasked with creating edible dishes from a basket of mystery ingredients, and it can take up to twelve hours to film a single episode. Often. Contestants aren't even cooking. They're being asked the same on-camera questions again or waiting for the judge's decisions. Whatever the format instructional competition or a hybrid of both understanding the way a cooking show works has a lot to do with uncovering what's going on behind the scenes. There's simply some things you can't fully understand by watching the end result.

Iron Chef America Capone Food Network Mike Studio Director Producer
How the North Bay Became 'Wine Country'

Bay Curious

03:48 min | Last week

How the North Bay Became 'Wine Country'

"To answer Michael's question about when wine country got start and how it became. So popular, we brought in reporter Christopher Beale Hey Christopher Hay alluvia. So let's start with when wine grapes were first planted in the North Bay. When was that all the way back in eighteen twenty three the Spanish created a mission in Sonoma's. It's the first place where grapes were intentionally planted in wine country but the wine made from these grapes was Sacramento Kinda like alcoholic. Grape juice used in church, not what we would recognize as wine, and then in eighteen thirty s some of the early European settlers in the NAPA sonoma valleys would have grown some basic wine grapes as well. Now, when does the wine country that we think of today start to take shape for the sake of the story let's start in eighteen forty California is ten years from entering the Union and this guy named Charles Krug arrives in San Francisco. Crew was a German after the revolutions of eighteen, forty eight in Europe the comes into San Francisco. It was the editor of a German language newspaper in San Francisco. That's Jim Lapsley he managed agricultural continuing education at UC Davis for more than thirty years with focus on wine-making. Now, after a few years in San Francisco Charles Krug gets married and ended up as a dowry getting quite a bit of land. This is the area just North of Santa Lena where the Charles Krug winery is located considered. It'd be the first commercial winery in Napa Valley. The wine country story is really one about marketing and innovation, and this Guy Charles crew gets credit for a lot of the early innovation and wine country including being the first to use a cider press, which is kind of like a slotted barrel to press wine grapes before that grapes were generally crushed by people's feet. When California entered the union, it was a place where we could grow grapes because the climate was quite similar to the southern Mediterranean. It was dry during the summer it had wet winters and differ grew very well here in California. For, is a species of grapevine. It's used to make wine after the early success of pioneers like Cruyff people began to plant grapes and produce more wind and the NAPA and sonoma valleys. But this was still considered low quality table wine and it continued to represent only a fraction of the US market mainly because it was still cheaper for east coast consumers to import wine. From Europe by boat, then from California by train. But that all changed in eighteen, seventy five, the US government stepped in and increase the tax on imported European wines to twenty cents a gallon which leveled the financial playing field for California's wine producers, and as a result, the wines dig it imported from Europe can be much more expensive wines and oak wine that was everyday drinking. That became the from California. Now. It wasn't a linear march from this moment today. The wind industry suffered a few major setbacks over the years but one way or another managed to survive them. Here's a few of the important ones I wine country was almost destroyed by bugs in the eighteen seventies. This is a microscopic bug that eats the roots of wine grapes. It's related to an eighth fit in it's called. PHILOXENIA. And when it arrived in wine country, it destroyed the vineyards to kill the vineyards and the only way could really come up with a solution was to plant on grafted vines the bottom, the rootstock would be a native variety and then on top graft with Vida's Benifica.

California San Francisco Charles Krug Europe Napa Charles Krug Winery Union Sonoma United States Guy Charles Napa Valley North Bay Christopher Beale Michael Reporter Jim Lapsley Christopher Hay Santa Lena Cruyff Vida
Podcasts on Amazon Music - all you need to know

podnews

03:07 min | Last week

Podcasts on Amazon Music - all you need to know

"He, James. Alexa Hay. Day yesterday yes. A Big Day relaunched podcast. Amazon music. who were who indeed where did you launch? We launched podcasts in the US the UK Germany and Japan all the countries in the world. Alexa, how many countries are there in the world according to Wikipedia? There are one hundred and ninety five countries in the world and how many countries have you launched podcasts in all four of them We make a good point I suppose yes. Well, anyway, no show notes at our newsletter. We have all you need to know about podcasts in Amazon music. Audie a significant new podcast studio launches in the UK The companies founded by global media executives and commissions made by journalists, directors, and producers. It's partnered with DAX for ad sales looks big. NPR is now. Schools Smart adds attribution joining over eleven thousand podcasts doing. So the technology helps advertisers understand how well that podcast answer doing. audio. Now, a PODCAST APP has launched in France. The free podcast APP will focus on local podcast content aiming to share data with podcasters. It's owned by prisoner media and M six RT L. They reached ninety six percent of the French population. Each month and eleven publishers have joined launch audio nares already leading podcast in Germany. With six million monthly users it's seen by some as an answer to American platforms. Diese I'd say selector feature which allows you to switch the editorial content of your APP to the country of your choosing maybe or break but you live in Australia you can get highlights of the latest music and podcasts from whatever country he wants. podcast movement virtual has announced a third round of speakers and speech text is a new podcast transcription service based in France. It has a free trial and a pay as you go pricing plan instead of a monthly subscription. Thank you to Amazon music who become our latest gold supporter? They've helped us get our email look Nice on outlook twenty sixteen for which we pay to hire a machine. Tam Amazon clearly how it works anyway, you can support us to at pod. News. Dot Net slash support. And Impalas News CNN and iheartradio have reached election one it's a new co-produced podcast that demystify mystifies the American Political System Good luck with that. Anyway it's hosted by CNN correspondent, Kristen Holmes distributed by the IHEART podcast network and hosted on megaphone plus month short-form podcast from CNN was launched on Omni Studio. Too. Much. To say with Kaley Shaw launched yesterday I may well have pronounced her name wrong. She is a country singer songwriter and she's launching this new podcast. We've bobby bones is Nashville podcast network

Amazon Kaley Shaw CNN Alexa Hay France Alexa Tam Amazon UK Germany Bobby Bones James NPR Audie United States Omni Studio Wikipedia Australia Kristen Holmes Iheartradio Japan
"producer" Discussed on Vamily Show

Vamily Show

05:04 min | Last month

"producer" Discussed on Vamily Show

"The audio from that edited edited out May sound better and he could make a podcast out of his morning show. and. I know a lot of youtubers ages take their feet Just you know pull on video rip out the audio cleaned up and then put it out on her as a podcast because. It's just a different medium for people to listen to your contact right in a lot of people listen to podcasts their car. You know right now our cars driving work, but they won't be getting soon that you know people just like that. They listen to podcasts like the listened to radio. So it's just another way to get your stuff off their. Finale out all morning shows back in the day right And I know I asked you for fifteen minutes in the fifteen minutes is up. So I do appreciate you being here off my pleasure Bob. Hopefully. We can do this again in the future and. And maybe I'll see you when I come through New Orleans there. Yeah please do. Make sure. We'll definitely balk for adult beverage Bob. Banking. there. Thank you. So there is David the producer I hope you guys enjoyed his show Please please go in. And check them out. Over there. say hello to all you guys I haven't for fifteen minutes so. Low construction crony. Thank.

Bob New Orleans producer David
"producer" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

Reality Life with Kate Casey

03:26 min | 6 months ago

"producer" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

"And off the track and the Docu series gives viewers exclusive really intimate to the people in one of the world's greatest racing competitions. I knew Jack Squat about Formula One. I stumbled across the show and I have to tell you. I got sucked in quick. I'm totally fascinated by this business. Now I love shows that kind of peel back the layer in a world that I don't know anything about and MRS PERSONIFIES THAT SO FORMULA. One drive to survive reveals the true story of this high-octane sport which goes beyond just the fight to be number. One there's also a battle for the heart soul and direction of the multibillion dollar business storylines include changes that a team under goes after an ownership change and the pressure felt to outperform other drivers. They follow some incredible drivers. You kind of get to go home with them. And to see their extended family for one of the racers. He is a second generation. He shows us his family and Spain. His cousin is his manager. So they're all these great personal stories that are tied into it. It's sort of like hard knocks on. Hbo which is for the football industry. American football this is kind of like their version. And I have to say you're gonNA walk away feeling emboldened by this knowledge about this incredible sport and touched by some of the personal stories. You're gonNA find yourself wanting to follow them on instagram town. You it's a great show for couples if you've got boys at home that are really into car. Racing was actually thinking about my son in kindergarten Yearbook the boy said what they wanted to be an I. Now that I think back to my son had said soldier but there were like three boys that wrote Formula One race car drivers and I kind of just didn't even think about it. But now. In retrospect and like totally get it. These are really incredible athletes and I was really interested in the workouts that they have to do because they have to have the best hand eye coordination of any athlete and then I had no idea but Lewis Hamilton. Who's one of the drivers? He is the highest paid athlete in the entire world. Apparently so it's a great show and I asked Travis Clark Executive Vice President of Action Sports at Wasserman Media Group to to Kinda give me insight into this world. He loves the show too. So if you're like I don't know I'm not totally into this yet. I don't know he is going to. Kinda give you the lay of the land so you can start watching it now. The other show. I'm crazy about is a six part documentary series from executive producer Mark Wahlberg mic millions. Chronicles the stranger than fiction. True Story of how? Twenty four million dollars was stolen from McDonald's monopoly. Game of the nineteen nineties. The mystery master. Mind behind the scam and the intrepid FBI agents on his trail. I'm sure all of you have at some point played that monopoly game. I used to Babysit for a family and they were so crazy about that. Stupid Game Am I. I have to go out and get you like. How many happy meals to get you some points. Paul turns out all these people had been playing and there was no chance that they were GONNA win. So for over a decade McDonald's fast-food Empire ordered prizes in its monopoly promotional game-tying on aware that the biggest.

Lewis Hamilton football McDonald Spain instagram Executive Vice President of Ac Mark Wahlberg Wasserman Media Group executive producer FBI Paul Travis Clark
"producer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:01 min | 7 months ago

"producer" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Producer Harvey Weinstein has been hospitalized as a precaution after being convicted of sex crimes correspondent bridging grasses guilty verdict bringing redemption for the two women at the heart of this case and likely for dozens of others who accused Harvey Weinstein of unwanted sexual acts over decades the disgraced movie mogul handcuffed and led out of the New York City courtroom after a jury convicted him on to sex crime charges it's a busy week for Congress the house votes this week on a measure to make lynching a federal hate crime also on the agenda is a bill to ban the manufacturing and sale of flavored tobacco in the Senate members will take largely symbolic votes on two anti abortion bills one would ban late term abortions except in cases of medical peril for the mother the other bill would penalize doctors who do not provide adequate care to babies who survive abortions the votes are largely symbolic because they are not expected to reach the sixty vote hurdle required to proceed they come as the conservative political action conference holds its annual gathering starting Wednesday Linda Kenyon Washington investors around the globe are nervous as a number of coronavirus cases now top seventy nine thousand this is a classic selloff in financial markets it was triggered by emerging markets particularly in Asia who are exposed to the downturn of China this spread to the commodity markets like oil with a drop of four and a half and five percent and even to Europe after seeing the cases from Iran to Italy that was perhaps the most shocking sell off of the day John the Farias Riyadh on Wall Street the Dow Jones industrial average fell one thousand thirty two points the S. and P. five hundred dropped one hundred twelve points the nasdaq fell three hundred fifty five points that's declines of three and a half percent for all three indexes I'm in case do you have concerns about mild memory loss related to aging and have you thought about taking a supplement to.

Farias Riyadh John Linda Kenyon Senate New York City Producer Harvey Weinstein Italy Iran Europe China Asia Congress
"producer" Discussed on Podcast Brunch Club

Podcast Brunch Club

12:27 min | 8 months ago

"producer" Discussed on Podcast Brunch Club

"Today we'll be speaking with Raina Cohen the producer on the hidden brain episode fake news and Origin Story from this month playlist the episode we feature this month featured Andy Tucker a professor at Columbia University who shares the history of fake news and objectively in the media. The besides her work with hidden brain rain aucoin worked at ABC News this week with George Stephanopoulos and her writing has appeared in the Atlantic and the new republic rain. Welcome to the show. Oh thanks for inviting me to talk. Yeah I'm excited to talk to you. So he told me a little bit about your role a hidden brain a little bit about the team behind the episode. We listen to WHO this month. Yeah so I am an associate producer and as a producer. It means kind of doing everything from start to end with. I think about it is essentially that I I'm involved in all parts of the process minus the business and the like actually being on air part and I'm on a team where there is the host a supervising producer and then and five other producers. who kind of had similar roles to me? You know what I get to do and the rest of us get to do is pitch stories. We do a lot of reading to figure out WHO's going. CBS on the show. You know once story is in process we are setting up interviews getting to prepare shocker for the interviews which means reading the books six or doing pre interviews or reading someone's journal articles so I'm a nerd. I'm just GONNA leave that out pretty early. So this is it's very fun for me that that part the refund for me and we have hours of tape in hand we get to start scripting and we go through collaborative editing process and then there is all the audio media production work and I've been on hidden brain for about three years and I think as time goes on we've played more and more with sound design so that is also sort of a fun rich part of the process to think about how to use music to tell the story and other forms of sound design that can bring ideas alive so kind of from from conception Shen to the actual execution. That's that's what a I get to do and the other producers on the show get to do. Yeah as a producer you might be the host but it sounds like you're really in the trenches. Yeah for sure I mean that's the that's the fun part is how long does it take from beginning to end for an episode like that too. I mean from what we hear listeners. It sounds like an interview with Andy Tucker sure seems like maybe the host and her sat down and they did over the weekend and the show went out on Monday. Yeah no not not that quick at this was actually a quicker turnaround one just because the way that ended up working in our schedule but that was first trying to figure out. Who are we going to have on the show and then Andy has more than one book? Could you know other articles so I remember trying to figure out. How do these different things that she's written out about over the years you know fit together and figuring bring out like how do you convey ideas through a story arc where each segment of the episode feels like? You are traveling somewhere you know if you listen to a lot of the questions shins and on on handwriting. They're kind of driven by stories. So then. There is the interview with Andy which meant some logistical setup. And then the interview I you no. I don't know what the raw interview was exactly somewhere between an hour and an hour and a half. I'm sure and that episode is about a half hour so we cut things down considerably and that that means trying to figure out what what is essential. How do you keep the momentum? Have to find music. I had to search for tape and that can take a very long time to find the exact thing that you're looking for four and they're all sorts of other things involved like making everything the right volume and sort of finessing so those are the parts of the process and it's usually happening over the course of of months while people are working on multiple projects. But yeah this one. I think we were able to turn around within several weeks. Yeah and it was done so effectively. I mean you really followed the human in Germany of news and how people interact with it over a hundred years really well done team. This month is fake news as someone who works Islamic widely respected new source such as NPR. How does this current era of fake news shape your reporting there are organization in wide standards? So the first thing that I think of is our beloved former standards and Editor of standards and practices Mark Moment. He had add a memo. That was about it truth Sandwich which I think actually is something that other journalists have written about as well but the idea is I mean no this from the kind of psychology research that we've shown that if you just tell somebody something that's false and then afterward you tell them that the thing they previously heard was wrong. It's not really going to be very effective active in debunking the this false belief. So what meant suggested. was that people who are presenting something that you know one person said that was false. Is that you start with the truth. And then you say the thing that is that is wrong but his new newsworthy. And that's why you're there to talk about it and then you reiterate that it was wrong. So they're kind of fun. Example that he had in this memo was despite the fact that Korva Coleman has accurately said mark commits name all the time he falsely claimed that she mispronounced it by you know emphasizing the wrong place and we looked back and she said his name correctly seventeen eighteen times on the air like that kind of idea. Have the truth as your bread and the thing in between to be the the the false belief so I think that's like a organisation-wide idea in terms of hidden. I mean we have the luxury of not having to cover the news as it's happening and that allows i. I saw things like we have. We have a very thorough fact checking process which newsroom has to do with a much quicker way but it also means that it affects what we get to cover so you know besides this story on Fake News. We've also done other stories that are about how people come to believe things that aren't true. So there's an episode tally Sharon about the psychology of false beliefs. And I think it's pretty humbling to think about why we are are are drawn to ideas that are not true and we also had an episode around specifically false beliefs in science and even even among scientists how these ideas spread so even if we're not covering what politician said that was inaccurate. We get to step back and give people information that allows them to maybe reflect on whether they believe something that isn't really accurate and so I think that's the way it kind of comes out most prominently innately in in brain. Well it makes sense that your practices at NPR hidden brain would be so granular seeing as you're so respected. I would just say you know this whole episode had to was just talking about objectively in reporting and really there was a lack of objectivity throughout history. I mean it seems almost like our modern beliefs of fact checking is a little bit of an outlier in terms of what people have been consuming for so long. I mean I'd be interested in hearing how the hidden brain team the values I mean. Is that part of your process. I think the way that we you know the way that objectivity comes into the work that we do is We are interested in ideas that make us uncomfortable and instead of turning away from them to try to understand them and to try to get them from different vantage points so I think really obvious example of this was there is an episode about explanations for why White voters voted as they did in the two thousand sixteen election and they were two different scholars who had different arguments that were in conflict with one another to quite an extent and about why white voters had gone for trump. And you know whether this was like basically whether you want to emphasize the class part or the or racism in their behavior so you know I guess the way that I think about hidden brain is that it is a show that is interested in investigating all sorts of ideas even ones that make us uneasy. See you know to do it with a lot of nuance and to not be pursuing controversy but to shed light rather than he and I think about this with the episode in the air we breathe breathe which was about the implicit association test. So it's Y- vary widely used to kind of determine someone's level of implicit implicit bias. So like sort of bias that they would not themselves maybe even be aware of. We were focused on race. But it's a test you can do for all sorts of prejudices and there are pieces in the media at the time that we're kind of very negative on the Iot because there were issues with how much it was actually able to predict people's behavior and people sort of saying well. This is useless and I think the you know the episode turned into wasn't just basically a hit job on this. I'm really really important task. But instead was an investigation into A. What does this test explain? And I think we got a much more interesting answer from that so I think maybe like geico willingness to look at all corners and not do a very simple story is part of what it means to. You know to be objective like I I think there are. There are other things that reported on about implicit bias. And maybe we could just not report on the problems with the you know the debate over the problems with the test because is it would undermine other things that have come on the show. But that's not the way we go out things well. I really appreciate you taking the time to explain that to me. I feel I feel a little guilty that the episode that bringing you on is about fake news and objectivity and I am really grilling you hear practices as a journalist. I hope that's alright. Alright yeah I mean. I think it's important to have a lot of integrity and I I mean actually this story behind how Andy Tucker got on is is is related to journalism practice because I encountered her work through fellowship that I went on that was about professional ethics and I was specifically in the journals and program and she she was one of the leaders of it so she gave this presentation on the history fake news that was pretty extraordinary and when we were thinking about people to have on the show that she had she'd come to mind mind but anyway that's just to say that I'm interested in thinking deeply about the ethics that go into how journalists carry out their work and a lot. The stuff we do can get into tricky territory. Even if you're trying to be careful well and I would say we're very interested as well at least me personally. I mean as a podcast consumer. I think I'm someone who's yearning for information so the Morgan here about your processes excellent but I'd like to move on a little bit past this topic here about what you working on now. Like what are you doing personally. Or what is hidden brain rain doing that. We can look forward to so I am at the early stage of several different episodes. So yeah one. I'm excited about where still so figuring out exactly the you know the angle. But it'll be related to anger in some way and I am pretty certain we're GONNA have on this philosopher who I I've disliked adored her work for a very long time. So that's pretty exciting to get You know be helping with an interview with somebody who's WHO's working like. I you know in my outside life fine really interesting people working on all sorts of things. There's an episode. That's coming out in a couple of weeks that I am really eager to hear from my colleague Laura and it has been in the works for a while but the general idea as I understand it is that you know well past the period when people have imaginary friends we actually are kind of communing with different people Mentally so whether it is like a celebrity or the author of a book or somebody who you kind of feel like you know and you're in conversation with even though you actually don't know them she's sort of looking into what those sorts active relationships look like and I think the some of those sort of interesting psychology around so It'll be it'll be new to me once once I get to hear it. Abbas she she is in the trenches right now trying to Produce that episode and there's also there is another one of my colleagues has an episode. Kosovo coming out. Soon that I like for me has changed the way the I think about political activism and yeah has made me observe certain.

Andy Tucker producer NPR supervising producer Columbia University George Stephanopoulos ABC News Raina Cohen aucoin Atlantic Shen CBS geico professor Iot Germany Abbas Editor Kosovo Laura
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

01:57 min | 10 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> this is <Speech_Music_Male> Lowell. Bergman <Speech_Music_Male> investigative <Speech_Male> journalist <Speech_Male> and former producer <Speech_Male> for sixty minutes <Speech_Male> which <Speech_Male> was the basis for <Speech_Music_Male> Al Pacino's character <Speech_Music_Male> in <Speech_Music_Male> the insider. <Speech_Male> I'm recording <Speech_Male> from a beach in <Speech_Male> the Caribbean <Speech_Male> where. It's almost certainly <Speech_Male> nicer than <Speech_Male> wherever you are <Speech_Music_Male> listening to this podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> And I'm going <Speech_Music_Male> to read the credits <Speech_Music_Male> now. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Catch and killed. <Speech_Music_Male> PODCAST <Speech_Music_Male> is a production of <Speech_Music_Male> Pineapple Street studios <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> Ronan Farrow. <Speech_Music_Male> It was produced <Speech_Music_Male> by Sophie. <Speech_Music_Male> Bridges Serena <Speech_Music_Male> on <Speech_Music_Male> Janelle a <Speech_Music_Male> Piper <Speech_Music_Male> Bluejean Lee. <Speech_Music_Male> Laura Dodd <Speech_Music_Male> our senior <Speech_Music_Male> producer. Is Eric <Speech_Music_Male> Mental <Speech_Music_Male> editing <Speech_Music_Male> by Joe Level <Speech_Music_Male> Executive producers <Speech_Music_Male> at Pineapple Apple <Speech_Music_Male> Street or gender <Speech_Music_Male> wise. Berman <Speech_Music_Male> Max Linski <Speech_Music_Male> reduction. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Help from emily. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Becker Maddie's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> tyzzer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> newer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Abraham and <Speech_Music_Male> Alex Patrick's <Speech_Music_Male> Kovic. <Speech_Music_Male> Back <Speech_Male> checking by Sean. lavery <Speech_Music_Male> music <Speech_Music_Male> in the episode from <Speech_Music_Male> Blue Dot sessions <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mom <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> said and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I com- <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> special. Thanks thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to John Lovett. <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Next week. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We're going to hear the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> story of the secret <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> recording <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> that helped Undo <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Harvey Weinstein <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> from the woman in <Speech_Female> who made it <Speech_Female> and so <Speech_Female> I thought that <Speech_Female> it <SpeakerChange> the <Speech_Female> heard it <Speech_Female> I was saying <Speech_Female> the truth <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and instead they <Speech_Female> they ask. Ask <Speech_Female> Me <Speech_Female> Ambra. <Speech_Female> Could you <Speech_Music_Female> do <Speech_Music_Female> something for us. <Speech_Music_Female> Oh and he said <Speech_Music_Female> yeah absolutely <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> they said <Speech_Female> Would you want onto <Speech_Female> meet them <Speech_Music_Female> tomorrow <SpeakerChange>

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

09:05 min | 10 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Silence and when I kept banging on doors asking for answers I was finally told that the matter was under review even higher up the chain by our parent company NBC Universal and its CEO. Steve Burke a few days after that I was told by Noah Oppenheim to pause are reporting he said the company was worried about the legal implications of me talking to sources who had signed nondisclosure agreements with Weinstein he cited an illegal concept concept tortuous interference with contract. It refers to an someone deliberately tries to mess up a contract between two parties usually to gain some kind of business business advantage. If you remember the phrase at all it's probably from a movie is a legal concept that has been getting some new attention. Recent tortuous interference appearance. Yeah that movie the insider about CBS News as parent company shutting down. Its Big Tobacco reporting using this same mm-hmm specious argument. Does he go on television. And tell the truth yes is it newsworthy. Yes are we going to air it. Of course it's not it was baffling because it was like it was like the script of the movie playing out for us in slow motion. I remember Jonathan May partner at one point just through shouting outing. Frustrated like has no one in his building seen the inside your questioning our journalistic integrity questioning your hearing Here's what I can tell you. Now that I didn't know was happening at the time as I was working on this story three top executives executives at NBC conducted. At least fifteen secret calls with Harvey Weinstein in some according to records and sources who listened. They had assured heard him that the reporting had been stopped before I knew it had been Weinstein. Also later claimed in legal threat letters to me that NBC had given him written assurances that they'd kill the story. The network has denied reaching any agreements or making any assurances to Harvey Weinstein or his legal team. Almost all of this had been concealed from me and rich so I'd kept pushing as NBC. Kept stalling as the network continued to drag its feet McGowan facing increasing pressure from mounting legal threats sent. NBC season desist. Letter over her interview. We still had a lot and even gotten legal to sign off on a draft of the script But the decision would ultimately fall to the executives. Then on August Eighth I went into a meeting with Oppenheim after the meeting grabbed rich and found a side room and thirty ready rock to hop into I turned on the recorder on my phone. We were doing that a lot by then so at three. PM I went. In with Noah Oppenheimer's concerns weren't always coherent. He would go on to argue. That the story wasn't news pattern. He's like my view. Is that the tape and Harvey Weinstein Gene Grabbing Ladies Breasts a couple of years ago. He's like that's not national news and he said that we didn't have enough like look we have. There's animus sourcing in here in any seemed to slip up saying Harvey says and then walking it back. And saying he'd been told Harvey said that there. It was a bigger issue that because of my sisters assault allegation against Woody Allen had a conflict of interest I also and then you know he said Yeah but you wrote that Hollywood reporter order piece a year ago in that conseco slash and like the public narrative is going to be terrible on this that like you know. You let Ronan Farrow. Who just you know came out as this kind of crusader Seder on sexual assault issues? You know hating his father so he's likely that you let him do this. You know this reporting You know despite the fact that you were aware that the guy that he decried in this Hollywood reporter piece Woody Allen have you know fruitful business relationship with Harvey Weinstein to be clear. Caring about an issue is not a conflict of interest I had no animus against Harvey Weinstein. My sister's allegation wasn't related to him in any way At the outset of the reporting Greenberg even sat with rich and me and we gould and checked out any contacts between Weinstein and my family turns out both of my parents worked with him like most people in Hollywood. I'd had only a friendly cocktail party interaction with him. Anyway we all agreed not a conflict of interest Oppenheim told me the story was dead that day at thirty rock rich and I struggled to make sense of what was happening was continues to get off good. God it's amazing can win by or at least hold this off and get an organization journalists and producers to story. This is amazing over the following days. There was some effort to put window-dressing on the decision decision with the network briefly saying they're going to review the evidence but the kill order held firm and when I secured another major interview that one in Los Angeles I mentioned and Oppenheim mortared me and Greenberg ordered mccue to cancel it Oppenheim told me. NBC couldn't have anything to do with the story after NBC killed. The story got a warm email from Weinstein burying the hatchet. He mentioned how Great Megan Kelly show US quote. I'm GonNa send you a little gift to celebrate. They wrote then Weinstein's staff got the email they typically got when a gift was mailed out. Update it read. No Oppenheim received a bottle of grey goose so I took the evidence to the New Yorker and they looked at the same reporting. NBC had sent away and ran on all cylinders to to build on it. And get it out. You'd be surprised. How many leads start to pan out? Once you aren't being told to cancel interviews every time you reveal their happening. It took a little more than a month to go from green-lighting the the story to publishing it rich had encouraged me to take the story elsewhere. Even though it meant he couldn't be a part of finishing the reporting. I was a contractor who worked in print print occasionally he was still fulltime employees at NBC and add to keep his job to support his girls. He felt conflicted about staying at the network other journalists suddenly NBC Investigative Unit did two in the same way that we were asking you know victims of sexual assault to come forward and tell their stories like we had a responsibility then on what was happening at NBC. The day the story broke. I went on the Rachel Maddow. Show joining us. Once again. Is Ronan Farrow. He's a contributor for the New Yorker magazine Zine who broke this explosive story today about further revelations concerning Hollywood mega producer Harvey Weinstein again the NBC executives asked me not to talk about why the the story didn't run on the network. I told them I wouldn't bring it up but also wouldn't lie but let me tell you folks that Rachel Maddow. She's got a nose for we're good story outlets. NBC says that you didn't. The story wasn't publishable that it wasn't ready to go by the time that you brought it to them but obviously is ready to go. By the time you got got Anthony Yorker I walked into the door at the New Yorker with a explosively reportable piece that should have been public earlier and Immediately mmediately obviously a New Yorker recognized that and it is not accurate to say that it was not reportable in fact there were multiple determinations that was reportable NBC. After the show I texted rich. I was was out celebrating my wife. Dini's birthday We are at restaurant and you send me a text in the middle of it saying Boom you know I told the truth I I guess that's former. NBC correspondent now. That was my last appearance on. MSNBC for a while rich however are still had to go into work the next day he and the investigative team more called into a meeting with Oppenheim where Oppenheim largely went on the defensive. We tried and want to correct the noise out there and we supported the story in Romans. Jones you know we've been putting him on our air he. He tried to go down this road and I literally. It was like the second most mad I've ever been in my life and and people in the room described it like we could feel like the back of your neck getting red like I was like. I'm witnessing a cover up but I mean there's no other way to I was it's like I'm witnessing them rewriting my history. There was a point where I was like. You know what I'm Gonna I'm GonNa just bite my tongue or or I'm going to have to actually confront this in this meeting and it was terrifying. 'cause I was like the sky's the president and I'm you know a senior Peru or supervising producer. And so I said I just went in. I was like you know what what forgive me but I have to correct you on some things and It got it got messy a lot of the members of the investigative unit like like really got upset and ask some really tough questions to the point where he was like you know.

Harvey Weinstein NBC Noah Oppenheim NBC Universal Harvey Weinstein Gene Hollywood Ronan Farrow Rachel Maddow assault Harvey CBS News Steve Burke New Yorker magazine Woody Allen Megan Kelly
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

02:52 min | 10 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Rich and I were both worried. We decided we needed to work quietly without alerting our bosses and come back to them with a story so locked down. They couldn't tell us to keep it on the back burner so for the next few months we scheduled Weinstein interviews around trips. We had to take for other stories like we were shooting the story out in California we can sprinkling doing some interviews around that. You're keeping some of the files associated with the story in a folder associated with an another earlier story that we had been working hon. Called Poison Valley Valley is about Dow in Shell Chemical Putting toxic waste in California farmlands it just seemed fitting in some way. The reporting was getting stronger and stronger. I was getting more and more interviews with women with allegations and with people around Weinstein who had seen abuse. But I'd heard about one piece of evidence that might blow the whole thing open an audio recording of Weinstein made by an Italian model named number Gutierrez who was wearing a wire and she'd managed to capture this moment where Weinstein appeared to confess to repeatedly assaulting women women Gutierrez had been assaulted by Weinstein the day before he grabbed her breasts without consent. Here's what I'll say about this recording the actual story of how it was made and how eventually got a hold of it got it is truly surprising recording and I will tell that whole story in the next episode this podcast but for now just know I got the recording. Look the audience. Come on and rich was the first person I wanted to play it for. L. Never forget the first time I heard the audio you walked into NBC and we want until aside room and he played it for me. I'm counterweight to shower. You sit there and drink water on. The bar must have unit. I I remember thinking of the time like his voice was like so monstrous and chilling moment. You saw at least I heard for the first time. What all these other women had talked about to be one of the most damning portion of the recording comes when Gutierrez asks asks Weinstein why the day before he touched her breasts and Weinstein says? I'm used to that. It was the first time in my anything that fear Kinda just all of a sudden when injected itself into it. The thought I had that moment was this is the beginning of the end of Harvey Weinstein.

Harvey Weinstein Gutierrez California Poison Valley Valley Rich NBC
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

07:45 min | 10 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Almost one billion people worldwide lack access to glasses which is crazy because glasses glasses were invented seven hundred years ago. We should be on top of this so Warri Parker partners with nonprofits like vision spring to ensure that for every pair of glasses sold a pair is distributed to someone in need worby. Parker believes that everyone has the right to see. And if you need help picking out glasses you can take their quiz wiz. Answer a few quick questions and they'll suggest some great looking glasses that are totally personalized to fit your face and style glasses. Start at ninety five dollars dollars. Including prescription. Lenses lenses include anti-glare an anti scratch coatings and blue light. Filtering lenses are also now available. have an iphone ten. Make sure to download worby Parker's APP where you can use their brand new virtual try on allowing you to try on eyeglasses seeing the realistic color texture and size of each style style using just your phone and more Parker has a free home triumph program. You order five pairs of glasses and try them on for five days. There's no obligation into by it ships free and includes a prepaid return shipping label so had to war parker dot com slash. Catch to order your free home. Try on take a quiz to find in a pair that is perfect for you today. Hiring is challenging. But there's one place you can go where hiring is simple fast and smart and we're growing businesses can connect to qualified candidates. Kotal co-founder Gretchen. hubner experienced. How challenging hiring can be after unsuccessfully searching reaching for a new game artist to grow with her Education Tech Company but then she switched to Ziprecruiter and saw an immediate difference? And you can too by signing up for free at ZIPRECRUITER DOT com slash. Catching kill Ziprecruiter. Doesn't depend on candidates finding you. It finds them for you. In fact Gretchen said Edgy hired a new game artist in less than two weeks with results like that. It's no wonder four out of five employers. Who Post on Ziprecruiter get a quality candidate within the first day Ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire see why Ziprecruiter's effective for businesses of all sizes trust Ziprecruiter for free at our web web address ziprecruiter dot com slash catch and kill that's ziprecruiter dot com slash C.? T. C. H. A. N. K. I l.. It was April twenty seventeen about two months after we first interviewed rose McGowan. I got a phone call. I called rich to tell him about it right after. Hey there you governor so I got another call from another I'm Harvey's interlocutors this this guy the call was from a guy named Matt Hilt Sick. Hilton is a PR strategist. He's pretty well. Known in celebrity and political circles works with a lot of clients. I I know for time. He was Weinstein slack. At Miramax he was at an event called women in the world being headlined by Hillary Clinton he was calling. I'm from backstage. Hillary speaking you know Blah Blah Blah schmoozing smallpox. And he said so. You Know Hillary here and Harvey here who have worked for years. And I'm like Oh okay. And and he was like a harvey just walked in. Actually he said you know He. He said he who says Ronin guy laughing question investigating I told held sick. I don't do ambush stories if this were to make it to air. At all I'd be calling Harvey Weinstein for comment or an interview long beforehand and then while I was relaying all this rich perfect just texted me again now staying up Harvey. He has sort of Larrea. Dave your message. He asked me to call you back. Right Merrill Yeah. He's put you on the phone with his. I don't know I think the possibility he's at this. I I just quoted. You attack gave your message. She asked me a call you back. I haven't responded and That sound from rich by the way It'll be hard to overstate. How much of being journalist comes down to that sound My Golan's situations is always to be as fair as possible. Talking with Weinstein early might help him realize that it might make him feel less under siege. I mean I could see arguments on both sides of that like if you're gonNA spend a Pi to go through my trash and try to build a narrative against me I don't know a UAB Either the kinds of things people do in there. I don't know I know on the other hand. There were risks. The more Wednesday new the more opportunity he'd have to move the chess pieces around trying influence people involved in the story. I think if they know that it's a long way out and they'll just try to go all about US eighty to try. Chill it in some capacity Right I'm just GonNa go to somebody else not you you know. Some some MHM Konczal. He's just going to try to find ways to sabotage it and now she's GonNa probably do anyway Shit I duNno confusing won't rich and I went back and forth like that for about twenty minutes. We I decided I should just text back sick the PR guy. Put The ball back in his court. I'll just I'll say always happy to talk. Okay are you gonNA be around. I'm driving okay. How she did heal sick did call me back later? Though not with Weinstein the line he said Weinstein was upset. Agitated that he dealt with this kind of reporting before he also implied that Weinstein eighteen would likely be taking some kind of action though. It wasn't clear what that meant. I could hear applause in the background. It was for Hillary Clinton who had just stepped on stage. She'd been in the Green Room talking to Weinstein the very next day. I got a call from my boss. US Richard Greenberg the head of the investigative unit at NBC. He started off with small talk asking about another book. I was working on. I called rich again. Stop Date Him Anyway then he goes to what I assume. It's a real conversation. He was sort of like you know so. I think you know where where we stand now is lake. Let's just Kinda give it a rest like you know I'm not saying don't work on it but like keep it on the back burner. You have so many other promising things or working on you. Know what what they don't have to necessarily focus on this. I just find it. Ominous is a long and short of it. I don't know you know me I'm sick or cynical so And soon rich was getting the same signals. He'd raised the Weinstein story got a suggestion that he should focus on other things. It was hard not to speculate hard not to ask ourselves. Do you think Weinstein reached out to NBC. Tried to get around us. We both knew the decision about whether to put this on air would ultimately be no Oppenheim again. The president of NBC News. The Guy who wrote Jackie him decry the art by. You're more likely describe screaming black. My husband was a great man I wonder where no relief on this. I believe that he would not ah back down to pressure. You know just from what I know. A guy.

Harvey Weinstein Hillary Clinton Ziprecruiter Parker Warri Parker NBC rose McGowan US MHM Konczal Gretchen UAB NBC News Larrea Richard Greenberg Hilton Education Tech Company Kotal Oppenheim Miramax
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

04:05 min | 10 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Natalie Portman and if I don't demonstrate but my silence however they have brow furrows eh children. She heard back it is but she can't get up and I also heard about the tweets and so we we kind of left there with Not The mandate but like the blessing of wellbeing. Get rose McGowan to do an interview. Then you might be a good idea. Yeah it was a very casual interjection and and you know ultimately obviously proved to be something of a Pandora's box so very quickly. It became apparent that I would have to make these calls. Because you had just written this article and now you had some credit in in the space and it might be good coming from you as opposed to some unknown producer sitting in New York. NBC and that proved to be true on a lot of those calls. Also the name Harvey Weinstein came up. Weinstein had kind of reinvented the business model for the independent film. He knew how to turn them into events. Sex Sex lies and videotape pulp fiction. Shakespeare in love. His movies had earned more than three hundred Oscar. Nominations at awards shows. He'd gotten literally more. Thank yous used God Meryl Streep once even jokingly referred to him as God I met up with The source again. Rich and I would debrief after my reporting calls or he's GonNa find a way to talk to and think about it a little more but you know. She seems like she's still in. She's not freak out. In February twenty seventeen to executives who had worked with Weinstein and seen abusive behavior went on camera they asked that we obscure their faces and shadow shadow. Which is a pretty common technique used sensitive investigative stories and I also got a firsthand account one with no shadow at all leading up to it? We we're not Sheriff Rosewood talk and if anybody else would talk and then rose you know. God lover decided to do it. I don't think it's is possible to overstate. What a risky move? This was from a gallon. She felt her career had already been derailed. After the initial incident further exposure hoosier could make things worse and she knew Weinstein had a reputation for using elaborate tactics to intimidate those who spoke out against him in mid-february rich and I headed up into the Hollywood hills. To See McGowan. We brought a camera crew. She came to the door to show us in. She was wearing a floppy sweater only a little makeup makeup. Her hair was bust. Rich helped set up the lights in our living room. I sat across from her and we turned on the cameras. I thought I was for an hour. Four at a meeting and then on the way out it turned into Nada meeting McGowan wept recounting are allegation at all happens very fast. And I'm very slow. I think any survivor can tell you and again you separate from your body and then all of a sudden you have no clothes on. Was this a sexual assault and this was a rape. What's I mean I've I've been through probably hundreds if not thousands and thousands of injuries over the course of my career? It was not like any other interview I've ever heard it was gut wrenching. I remember at the end of it and after we talked to her after for the interview I thought to Myself Holy Moly this is real it got real right there at that point. She was identifying defying Weinstein. Clearly without naming him referencing his movies describing specific wards heat one asking people to connect the dots soon after she would name him fully on on the record and volunteer to do so on camera McGowan told me she was worried. NBC's leadership wouldn't see the story through half the lawyers. Watch this. Yeah Oh they will be but not just read it and I hope they're brave to because I tell you what happened to their daughter their mother their sister.

Harvey Weinstein McGowan Natalie Portman Rich NBC Meryl Streep Shakespeare New York Oscar Hollywood hills assault rape
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

10:50 min | 10 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"This is the catch and kill. PODCAST I'm Ronan. Farrow much of my reporting on Harvey Weinstein has become synonymous with the New Yorker magazine. That's the story ultimately ran and they're the folks I've kept reporting with in the months and years since but what's not as well known. Is that much of the reporting actually started at NBC News an outlet that decided not to run the story. Now stories get killed all the time. Sometimes you just don't have enough reporting. Don't have enough evidence but that wasn't the case with the Weinstein story worry at NBC. We had a lot and plenty more promising leads. We could have pursued and the fact that NBC passed on it the fact that they it didn't let us pursue those leads. Raise a lot of questions. Both outside of that building and within the network zone ranks the story of what unfolded at. NBC is a case study in the power of news organizations to safeguard the truth and in how devastating the consequences can be so when they do the opposite and nobody had a clear view of that drama or was placed in a more difficult position because of it. Then rich McHugh admin. We're GONNA probably get fired today. We're going to tell you that story how it happened in real time when you couldn't go to L. A. That one really got me right. The cutoff offer. That really infuriated me which lives in suburban New Jersey with his wife. Dan and their four daughters two sets the twin girls and you deserve some crazy metal for just surviving. That rich grew up in the suburbs to outside Chicago. The youngest of four kids Irish Catholic Catholic family to Jesuit schools played ice hockey like a lot of hockey. He drove himself to Detroit for Games even went to a special school for it. He was still playing when we worked together. He'd limp into the office with all sorts of weird injuries but riches dreams of playing in the NHL didn't quite pan out. He wound up studying English in college. I never actually thought about being a journalist and tall. You're gonNA find this interesting I Columbia and I watched the insider if you got vital insider stuff the American people for their welfare really do need to know you feel impelled to disclose it and violate major agreement doing so. That's one thing if you haven't seen it the insiders great journalism movie. It's a dramatized version of a true story. Al Pacino plays as reporter Lowell Bergman a sixty minutes producer. Who convinces a big tobacco whistle blower to go public about a massive cover up at his company and break his nondisclosure Russia Agreement Bergman's problem though is that executives at CBS? Do not want the story to air on sixty minutes. They're worried you'll get sued and end so Bergman winds up fighting his bosses at the network since when has the Paragon of investigative journalism allowed lawyers to determine the news content on sixty minutes. You won't be satisfied unless you're putting the company and win. What are you are you a businessman or are you a newsman? And I was is like low Bergman that that guy's amazing Sir Richmond into broadcast news. He started out producing at Fox. News than MSNBC EH. Then he spent nearly a decade at. ABC's Good Morning America. When I met him he was trying to settle into a new role at the investigative unit at NBC News? You know I was trying to find my a my spots. I was working with several correspondence. And you know enjoying some of the work I went overseas and did some crime stories about the NYPD. The but I hadn't found a lane at didn't have a correspondent that I was gelling with particularly you know there wasn't somebody that we haven't Egged with and then and then we met and then you come into the picture. What was your well? Tell me your side. First impression of you was watching you on under cable show. Hello and welcome to Ronan Farrow daily. I'm Ronan Farrow. I'll be here daily. And as it turned out briefly my own career was pretty up in the air when rich and I met I was in my mid twenty s I've been hosting this midday show on. MSNBC got some bad reviews news at the start some good reviews by the end and pretty much know. Viewers throughout pay. Cable is tough enough about me. It's time for today's headlines. So it was cancelled I got bumped and I became an NBC. Investigative correspondent. I was working with a rotating cast of producers on stories. That's when rich and I got assigned to work together. We weren't exactly Ham egg ourselves. If I'm being honest I was like I. You know I'm I'm not sure I'm going to like this guy. You asked me to be honest. I just remember I you were you. Were texting all the time. Like what is this right is what are we doing and I was like I. Ah Haven't hadn't been used to that level of hands on. I'm sure that the producers were here on this podcast to have any experience so far Are laughing at this because my my worst is very much like I am so invested in every aspect of it and like very controlling and I love to be collaborative and bringing other people but I also so demand a lot of involvement one text. Like yes you'd send me like seventeen more texts like okay. Now that you're listening. Okay like home. Yeah thanks for putting up with that literally. Everyone I've ever worked with I actually wondering retrospectively thought we would just cancel each other out and like the problem would be solved and they could just put us over like okay McEwen Pharaoh. They're done on the next problem like did they think we would actually develop some good work together. I I honestly don't know. I don't know what the expectation was but I doubted that we would develop good work together and they're always been unspoken norms about how mainstream outlets cover wealthy and connected men accused used of sexual abuse like when I try to cover the allegations against bill cosby on my show. I sometimes push back from veteran producers. It was is old news. It wasn't news but things were starting to change. In Spring Twenty sixteen. The Hollywood reporter ran glowing profile profile of Woody Allen glossing over a long standing allegation. My sister Dylan had made that. He molested her when she was seven years. Old and for the First Time Time magazine got a lot of backlash for not asking harder questions about it so they asked if I'd write something about the media's responsibilities when it came to this issue as you for most of my adult life I'd avoided talking about the allegations at one point I even told Dylan to basically quiet down about it. I've been trying to build my own career on my own merits but now I'd basically been cornered into confronting it. I'd begun interviewing my sister and Looking Ping through court records and I realized that this was something credible backed up by a mountain of evidence even eyewitnesses. So I said said I'd write the article. Farrow wrote very often women with allegations do not or cannot bring charges very often those who do come forward pay dearly league facing off against the justice system and a culture designed to take them to pieces by this point rich and I had been traveling the country and rental cars together for about a year working working on stories often in the middle of nowhere. The story came out as we're sitting in line at some fast food place and I remember we go to sonic and go to sonic. You had told me that this article come out and I remember reading it. That was a real turning point for you. Everything we've done prior was good but I felt like there was a little bit of a change in you that you realize a need to cover stories were victims need to be heard. We got some stories Green Greenland that we're about sexual abuse one of the interesting ones was about How sexual abuse allegations are handled on college campuses? I did everything a rape victim supposed to do. I reported it allowed the rape kits taken. I gave a statement Eh. I learned a lot in that process for sure. I remember talking to that Harvard student and she. She didn't WanNa go on camera. She didn't want to go on camera and for days and then finally as you said you know what I'll do it because it's important and I was like whoa there. Is someone out there who had attacked me and we'll probably attack someone else flying with that. Do you blame Harvard for that. I do that was my first experience with that story. I don't think he'd watch that piece. And not have a different opinion on the matter after it there was a precursor to the the Weinstein story for sure that year I pitched a series about bad behavior. You're in Hollywood. And for months I got a crash course in how hard a sell. The topic is a story on. Pedophilia was deemed. Too Dark. One on race was dinged because her bosses said no one would care hair but I held onto a green light on one tough story. I pitched casting couch the casting couch. It's a euphemism in the industry. It's when powerful people seek sexual favors from newcomers trying to get a foot in the door and that fall the term was coming up again because of something. The actress interest rose McGowan had tweeted. She used the Hashtag. Why women don't report and wrote quote because it's been an open secret in Hollywood slash media and they shamed me while agitating my rapist? She said she'd been raped by a powerful studio head and that when she'd looked into reporting boarding at lawyers had told her she would quote never win because she done a sex scene before the tweets came up in our planning meetings we went up to Know Oppenheim office and pitched kind of the the the the stories that we wanted to go in on no Oppenheim again is the president of NBC News. He's a former senior producer. Chris Matthews and for the today show he also had a career in Hollywood where he wrote screenplays including one on for Jackie. Kennedy bio-pic starring.

NBC Ronan Farrow NBC News Lowell Bergman Harvey Weinstein Hollywood MSNBC hockey New Yorker magazine rape New Jersey Detroit NHL Chicago Russia Dylan First Time Time magazine
"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

01:37 min | 10 months ago

"producer" Discussed on The Catch and Kill Podcast with Ronan Farrow

"Now on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. Hey we're going to be talking a lot about sexual violence in this series. There's also some language if either of those things are upsetting for you. Please take care while you're listening. So it was a couple days before we were going to go to L. A. to interview a woman with a credible allegation of rape against Harvey Rich. McHugh is a news and documentary producer and back in two thousand sixteen and twenty seventeen. He was my producer at NBC. He was alongside me. While I was reporting on allegations against Harvey Weinstein the Hollywood executive and we were about to book our flights. I think you might have already booked your flight or might even been in route and the the decision was handed down to me by virus. Greenberg Rich Greenberg runs the investigative unit at NBC News. He was our boss and just below the president of NBC. News is Noah Oppenheim. I'll never forget it. He said Knows very very clear you are to stand down. You know done. We're done here. I don't think I've ever been more angry my life than I went back to my desk and I wrote you in myself. An email about what what was said to me in that meeting. In in that moment I realized a couple of things one the story was added. NBC For all intents purposes for me but also there was another story right now that that I had a certain responsibility to pay attention to at the very least like pay attention to which is the NBC killing the story..

NBC Greenberg Rich Greenberg Noah Oppenheim Harvey Weinstein Harvey Rich Apple rape Hollywood L. A.
"producer" Discussed on The Critical Path

The Critical Path

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"producer" Discussed on The Critical Path

"Producer that that creates the raw, you know, the beef patties in the in the in the freeze dried fries in all those things are also made in factory settings that are that are distributed to some degree not as much as the stores, but then the distribution of the the the inputs that go into burger those those are also standardized globally. So what you end up with his light. You have a pipeline. You have you have into the pipeline. You you put in some raw materials, but you also you you replicate this pipeline everywhere. And then you decide centrally how to adjust the the recipes in to adjust the menu. So that you can pump out the same stuff global. So it's a it's a manufacturing business and the distribution business and what you're offering is for the franchisees. You're offering basically you can plug into this. Enter this pipeline for for an operate. The the local outlets that that take the output from this pipe in and give them to the consumer. And so this is very very sophisticated when you look at it on the grand scale, and you realize what happened in the restaurant business to enable this this broad distribution of of of consistency across the world in terms of food production, which was a revelation. I'm sure probably fifty sixty years ago. This was finally perfected. It was. It was a breakthrough that enabled again tens of thousands of of restaurants globally. It's not just McDonalds, but everybody else replicated this process now, I same thing. And we have to stand as as a process what it is I ki- as again manufacturing of typically, you know, furniture, some woods some glass to some plastics and those are made probably with contractors, but they're also made in a consistent manner. Her the the also have to have a high degree of precision. Because these these things have to screw together. Very very very precisely. I haven't example, though, they don't always pretty good pretty good in my opinion. I haven't example, I once I bought something from the same store, but there were multiple the nightstand or something like that. And when I opened it up like one was made in Poland and the other one he's always identical was made in Thailand. And or maybe I forget, maybe it was somewhere else in the in south southeast Asia was, but it was like a you couldn't tell them apart. They they had designed for the the the I kid zainur in presumably in Sweden, the they are sitting there, you know, trying to figure out. Okay. What would what the what tools that we need to cut this wood than drilling than all these things to it? And and then, you know, get those get that done. Globally, and then have those shift back throughout the globe in all directions? Having them be so consistent. So both was I the I can't McDonald's do exactly the same ways as managed consistency at scale. And so so even though it's a distributed network. Things are done globally sourced, globally, the operations are global. So that the store in in here in Palo Altos gonna be more or less the same as store in a motorcycle Spain L or or or Helsinki Finland. Right. And that's okay. So we kinda really got off the off the apple threat. But but in in many ways when when you look at these two franchises make Alden in I ki-, you people aren't saying there might be some differences in. Yes, I do know for example, difficult by Kim to operate in. Let's say Russia or maybe in the. Middle east. I don't know depending on on the country that, but usually it's a permit process that they they are unwilling to let's say situate the locations in the they have to have some location decision making about you know, the land has to be cheap. But it has to be kind of within reach of a city..

Kim Producer McDonalds Middle east Asia Palo Altos Alden Sweden apple Thailand Russia McDonald Poland Helsinki Finland fifty sixty years
"producer" Discussed on /Film Daily

/Film Daily

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"producer" Discussed on /Film Daily

"Do any of you guys have any differences I may have missed in what? What's the difference between a producer and executive producer on the film, get the the bulk of it. The one thing I will note though is executive producer means different things for television. TV tends to be the creative hands on type. And so what Peter said is very comprehensive for film, but once you start branching out into small screen, it's completely different thing for sure. That's usually the Showrunner, right? It's the, yeah, usually, yeah. Okay. Let's move on to Damon p from Saint Louis. Missouri writes in, he knows that a lot of our team reads books and he wants to know if we believe that breaking up a film into multiple parts like deathly hallows or mocking Jay, to make the book more the movie more complete. Like the book is a good thing. So many times we hear the book is better. Why is that? Is that because the movies are limited by time to incorporate additional pop points or anything like that? What do you guys think? I'm guessing the person who reads the most books here is who Jakup maybe I mentioned me or t. but I'll chime in real quick, then I'll I'll pass baton to her since I've been talking too much, but I think that the splitting a book in the two movies has never been crave decision. I don't believe anybody who said, I think it's always been a financial decision to make more money because w hollows in mocking, Jay are books that do not demand to movies. I like both books. I like both movies were all four movies even. But there's nothing in that narrative that demands those additional hours. I think that both of them could be improved even if they were sharper. More critical adaptations when that knew what to pick and choose a new, what was important? I think a better adaptation is one that isolates the feeling of a book Riceland towards important and reconstructs it into a film rather than trying to our laboriously recreate that feeling because I think that a book and movie are so different things that trying to just say we need more time to do more events is not as good as let's find a brisker way to recapture that feeling in a new medium. But what do you think HD actually agree with most of what you said except for the splitting of deathly hallows locking. Jay was definitely a very financial decision. Thusly hallows actually provided a good splitting point in which you they gave kind of two very different films out of this very gigantic, very dense book. And I will say deathly hallows part one is my favorite book because favorite movie. Sorry, because it is so. Limited in that sense to to this one adventure in this one story that we're telling. So I think that actually works in that kind of felt like it came from both financial and creative decision, but anything that came after that such as mocking Jay, the hobbit trilogy, which was like the dumbest leading of of a book ever definitely felt more financial than anything. And as for that common phrase, the book is better than the movie. I don't fully believe that either. I think that people who who like to spout that off often are upholding the movie to different standards than the what they should. They are wanting to see their favorite parts of a book adapted and thus want that laborious that stilted at uptake to take place which don't doesn't suit movie making at all. It's something that is a very medium. It's if you want something that's closer to that feeling of the book or whatever you wanted to see from a book adaptation. Often mini series is better and. That also is a very different medium than film as well. I kind of wish that they're like filmmakers. I know that this does not make sense, but I wish film makers were given the Rome, kind of like Peter Jackson with given on the original Lord of the rings films to shoot a watt more of the book in included in a director's cut or an ultimate cut later on, like I would've loved to have seen more scenes in the Harry Potter films, you know, added back in to the the movies. I mean, I guess I guess as a screener, you have to, you know, cut it down to the the story that you wanna present onscreen, but I also see that holy Hollywood could make money by these, you know, ultimat- cut free releases and whom video Ben..

Jay Peter Jackson executive producer producer t. Missouri Damon p Saint Louis Hollywood Rome Harry Potter director
"producer" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:18 min | 2 years ago

"producer" Discussed on Toure Show

"You have a dream career, but one that most people don't understand what does a movie producer actually do. That's true. Everything he said is true. Edit is a dream is very, very hard. But so here's, here's say, you Oscars, and you have all these various categories right best director and best costumes and score cinematography. At the end of the night, the final war goes to best picture and the producer gets the award for best picture because producers responsible for pulling together all those other categories. All those are the elements, all that other talent in order to make the total film the best picture. So and that's true, whether it's movies, TV of the content. So my job is put it all together, fine script project manager get the are yet the actors to sign on. Right. Get right to radio to thing. Yeah. If it's independent gotta find you should be getting the money. Yeah, that's the number one thing. Yeah. Well, I mean, you know. In in order to get the money needed town Italian needed money. So it's kind of neat distribution for any of that. So I don't know that there's a number one thing that all is important all goes together. You know, you can have money, but without like talent distribution, I'm not sure how valuable that is. Right. You can have a great project, but if you can't finance it and you just got a great project, you know, completed movie. Are you tinkering with the scripts? Oh yeah. Yeah. I'm a creative producer so I'm not just a business producer that like goes and like talks the banks financing and walks away. No, I'm very involved with coming up with, you know, concepts ideas, I don't, right. I don't direct, but I'm involved with the creative process and I support my writers and directors developing this are. So are you a big part of what produces as developing? Somebody told me that casting is critical. That is it's it's ever not. I'm not gonna not to you. I mean it cast, listen, you know, you take a, you pick a movie and you you. Change the cast elements out, and that's going to be very different movie. So there's no question. I have had a fair amount of success with on Sambol pictures and ensemble movies, rushing on samba comedy. That's very intricate, delicate balance because you've got a lot of different skill sets that you gotta bring together. You gotta have him all kind of we've together seamlessly, which is very difficult thing to do comedies harder to John. Anyway, I think the hardest, but we got on SABA comedies even harder. Well, one of the things that you do this really intelligent, I think, is that you are aiming at a niche audience. And so many artists and creators say, I want everybody to like my product. Whatever that product is, you understand, I'm gonna make this product for a certain group of people and they will love it that will make a success. I think that's, I think that's a true statement. I would just add some flavor on top of it. Right? So I don't know that I am making a project that is solely aimed at niche audience. However, in today's ecosystem, there. So much accusation that unless you have. One of those projects that really works across all, you know to call four quadrants of the demographic spectrum. That is really for everybody, marvel movies and star war. What are the four hundred? It is actually not sure exactly. It's it's, but it's like male, female young old, right? And so basically you, you divide them up and so it's like for older males and females and young young female. So that's basically out is. And so when you think about a project that is for everybody, very few projects actually appeal to everybody. So I think that what you have to content today, make something that definitively appeals to somebody yet. So I'm not going out saying, I just want everybody. I'm going out saying, listen, this is for you know, housewives and Tacoma between ages of thirty and forty, right? Hopefully we're not that narrow. No, but I'm saying it's for that audience if nobody else comes, they're coming. And I hope to make the movie in such a way. Way that audiences outside of my core audience also will come and enjoy the picture. And if I pick the right Corradi, it's one that is persuasive one that is when it is loud one that is influential that I have a better chance of expanding my audience beyond the core..

producer project manager director Tacoma Corradi Sambol
"producer" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"producer" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Org, slash hot dates. That's a great website and you can look out for the final episode of the series on September. Fifth, they will check in with the summer daters to here where they've landed, and you'll also hear some terrible dating stories that other listeners were inspired descend in. All right. Again, find the series of death, sex, money, dot org, slash hot dates. There are not a lot of women producing Rb or hip hop or anything. In that vein, did you like in your production in your work? How many times have you cross paths with another woman? Female producer enough you? I know quite a few nowadays. Yeah, I run into more songwriters that are women in a couple of female engineers now too. I'm trying to advocate for more of that kind of stuff. Why do you think has been a lag to get women into the production engineering side? Not so much the writing singing side. To be honest, I think a lot of it is interest, general interest. I don't think there's as many women interested in that career path. It's maybe it's a nurturing thing. You know how it is when you grow up, not thinking that something is possible because you don't see it as something that's common. So maybe there's that. I know my mom wanted to be a producer really? Yeah. So I find that out there at already started doing it, but I always knew she loved music and for her, you know, she's, she's just like, yeah, it's a man's industry. And she would say that, well, a man told her that like when she was coming up and like she was sitting in on some mixing sessions. She told me that once one of my mentors actually became one of my mentors for a little while later on, but she told me that one time he told her like MRs industry really. So. And I don't know if he said that to mean like you don't belong or just to say, look, there's mostly men in here. Just a fact you wanna do this more. No. The driving force behind might desire to to make beats is just being able to take credit for for fire beats. I wanted to ask you about your influences because there are sometimes when I hear you saying when I hear the songs where I'm totally hearing channeling one in particular, can we hit no. I get a lot. That sounds like a leader. Everybody says that crazy that I'm flattered a lovely voice. Would you into her growing? Yeah, I got her greatest hits CD from the swap meet when I was a kid. It's amazing. Like even her just like even her stuff with genuine, like final warning. All. Yes, the static major background arrangements. Yeah. We add. Snow. And you can hear it so like she's singing size fairly at your sing. Like about you and Eliya is that like there can be these moments where you're singing very delicately. But I can still hear that you're in total control of your voice. Do you know exactly what you're doing? There's some people where they sing a little down because they don't because they can't do more put like you're doing this on purpose. And I, I don't know. It just works for me. It's interesting. 'cause like I'm, I'm not definitely not the best singer. I started late and I know a lot of singers who can only do one or the other like they can't either can't use their false settle or the head voice where they can't use their chest. I'm better at the delicate stuff.

producer Eliya
"producer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"producer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"There are people who who exist in that space doing giving the advice you're looking for and really those are sales agents in festival publicists so the full tida questions so let's say that you are a person who loves movies and loves minute film but you're not ready director yourself how does one become a person who's making films is it what what you're describing where you're you find a filmmaker you like at a festival in like hey i wanna help you make your next thing what is the process of becoming a producer upcoming producer becoming sort of like what you're doing yeah you know what i actually do think that if you if you live really anywhere in the world and you want to be a producer i do think your best that forward is to go to your local film festivals and i i'm where ever you live there's probably one within driving distance and see what the local talent bases like and see if you can build a local make community of some sort and make movies that way i don't think that that is necessarily a path to financial success and kind of success within the larger industry but it is a path to working within the arts and making making movies in the same way that i think if you want to do feeder you can go be in your local theater production you don't you shouldn't have an expectation that that's gonna lead to you starring in a play on broadway i don't think there's anything wrong with making regional cinema i think that's actually a great way for people to to spend their time and i think you can you can do really cool work that can expand way beyond that but.

director producer
"producer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"producer" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"The sales agent because especially if you're making your first movie you you don't know how to a manage the the sort of market process of getting distributors to show up screening but certainly you don't know how to manage the process of handling proposals in how to counter the proposals in win and went have went to have filmmaker meetings in when not filmmaker meetings and there's there's a whole rigmarole to selling movie at a festival that you just won't know how it works on your first movie or probably your second movie either and then with the publicists and there's a lot of things that you can do as a as a savvy producer to help promote your movie but the publicist while the better sense of how target it towards critics how how which critics again to which screenings a lot of the times they'll be helpful thinking about sales strategy but they'll also give you good advice on what not to do so they're simple things that that i would advise filmmakers not to do when premiering a film at a large festival and a lot of those things go against what the festivals encourage you today so i think that you don't want to release a ton of still images i think usually would wanna release one maybe two and i don't think you should be putting up your own trailer and your own promo and i don't think you should be releasing clips for the movie and really all things that on the surface seem like really logical things to promote your movie i would advise against so why i think that that if you have a movie that has intimidation where either it seems like it's a commercially minded movie or it seems like it's a real the launch of a really interesting film maker or interesting acting thailand and you have a good a good screening slot in the festival i think you have to have confidence in your movie and confidence in the festival you're in that people will want to come see it and i think that the more materials you release the more you're potentially seeming desperate which i think doesn't help the market around your movie and i think the more that you are.

thailand producer