24 Burst results for "print magazine"

Chicken Nugget Money

Pop Fashion

05:16 min | 4 d ago

Chicken Nugget Money

"Her magazine is going further into membership. They've been doing membership for a little over a year and small pockets of their publications. The concept is they want to rely less on advertising and create more of a revenue stream that isn't reliant on that. The latest is cosmo unlocked. From Cosmopolitan magazine it's unlimited. Digital Access adds an exclusive newsletter for two dollars a month. They said it's cheaper than chicken nuggets. That is true. I appreciate that that's a good reference point for me. I detect zero lies. For Twenty dollars a year, you can get access to the website, the print magazine and the Newsletter Sarah for twenty dollars they throw in the print version to without any membership you can access up to four free articles a month, and they've put the rest behind a firewall. So you could still access some reporting, but they're starting to kind of go in this general membership direction not across all their banners they're just kind of experimenting with a few. Lisa. Is this a good idea? I hate it. Oh No tell me why Well look if I'm thinking like a magazine executive I, love it because in the olden days like twenty years ago you would just by subscription to a print magazine and that was it. I mean this is a similar price point. This is not offensive in terms of. Your pay walls that I have seen right so that's fine. The problem is that me as a consumer, I'm getting totally subscription to out like the biggest part of my budget in terms of just simple line items is just like subscription subscription subscription it's the music streaming it's the TV streaming. It's you know the tech tools that I use online it's the publications that I subscribe to and. I think if you can get people and have them forget that they're paying every month and it's just a little bit like two dollars and it dings and it just goes through I think you're GonNa get a reasonable amount of money. But? I don't think it's. A replacement right now for finding advertiser dollars because I think a lot of people especially in this economic environment right now don't have a lot of. Emotional bandwidth to be tracking all their subscriptions. I like us idea I disagree with you. Because I went journalists to get paid. That's true and I hear you that all of the subscriptions were kind of subscription. Doubt Idea agree with that but they're kind of getting more into a few youtubers have patriotic levels and I've been thinking about subscribing to that because I think that they're putting out great content and there is I, think an advantage to being a member where you get closer to those creators you get just more of what they're putting out because it does something really great if phil something or it. Gets you excited about something or you just think about this great people doing like time management projects that help keep you on track but the thing is the membership has to be worth it yes and I'm personally going to be very selective about. Who I want to latch onto I don't know personally if cosmo appeals to me to be a member, I really want to latch on to a personality versus a corporation. I would like to support an independent artists or a group of artists that are putting something out to the world or some. VEGGIES and entire company that I do not know. Yeah. You you make an interesting point there because I do want to clarify that I. Don't hate this because hearst is doing with Cosmo I hate it because it's hard to manage for me as a consumer but use something interesting, which was you're supporting several creators on Patriots and Patriots a platform that aggregates your subscriptions. So you make one payment amount which I appreciate I do and I think I think the I think what publications should be doing. Working with other publications to build a platform to manage to bundle my subscriptions and be able to buy one off articles for the ones that I don't subscribe to all time bundle that. That is a free idea. Also, why didn't they start this ten years ago like the seems like such low hanging fruit that. Two dollars a month you're a member you get exclusive whatever why wasn't this happening ten years ago I don't understand. Like late teens, early twenties. Lisa it would have been a really easy birthday or. Whatever gift to give me the cosmos subscription to the exclusives Done Twenty Bucks I don't think it's a bad idea. I think it's a good idea but people are going to be selective about who they want to align themselves with or spend that like Doug it money with which I understand I get it. We only have so much attention. We only have so many dollars especially right now

Lisa Print Magazine Cosmopolitan Magazine Cosmo Phil Patriots Doug Sarah Executive Hearst
Creativity in lockdown with Dan Thawley

Fashion No Filter

07:03 min | 2 months ago

Creativity in lockdown with Dan Thawley

"Name's done thoroughly and I am. The editor in chief of a magazine curated by fashion and odds journalists based in Paris mistrial like I was born in Sydney and moved over to Europe in two thousand nine. And I've been working on this magazine since two thousand nine is its digital editor in two thousand and ten. I became the editor in chief. It's a magazine that was started in Antwerp in two thousand one with the mission of creating Belgium's first name fashioned title and it quickly became something quite different as the concept is to invite one fashion designer to curate each each issue of the magazine at say cut blonde to them to express their interests their that loves their obsessions and all about the universe in around two hundred pages and it is something that has really done a a world to a in nearly twenty years with designers from France and Italy from Japan from England and from the United States and really a covering a very very broad aesthetic scope as well so it started with designers like Martin Majella and had Iraq common and alleviate tastes skins people that were really based in that late nineties Belgian aesthetic And then moving forward. We've we've worked with the many many different types of designers like Alexandra mckelway at Gucci. We've worked with Palo Pitcher Lee at Gallon Tina and almost issue which is just about to hit newsstands. In the coming days and was announced last week is with. Luke and Lucy mayor who are the Co curated directors of Joe Sanders Milan. I'm such a fan of theirs. I'm really excited to read this. But I'm I'm wondering Dan. How how. How do you put together a print magazine while in confinement? How did you make that work? We're very impressed so we have. I mean it's always a long process in this initiative. We've been working on for many months. So certain parts of it were very luckily finished. Just before legal confinement and other parts of it was still in the process as we as we were shutdown lockdown here in France so I was very lucky to have program this issue more or less to come out around this Around this time but it was slightly delayed. But I'm what we don was actually done most of the physical productions in the months of January to March already. So what was the biggest challenge for US was That we usually design the magazine together without team in Cologne as we work with a wonderful office codes Marais and Mirae in a column and so usually we would have gone there with looking Lucia and whichever designer we were with the time for a couple of days and we sit in the office with them and we design all the pages and we go through all of the process of of the structure and putting everything together in person. And this time we were unable to do that. As actually there was a case of covid nineteen in the in the office in Cologne in the earlier. Part of of quarantine. It was really off the table before travel was actually Was actually restricted. So we were forced to do everything. And and work from home as as were everybody else. What we were lucky was that we'd had most of Al Photo shoots finished so I'm one of the challenges was that we had photographers rushing to their lab. Zola the All over the place to get prints developed in time and we did shoot Many different cities New York Bacelona Paris. I slammed we. We really were all over the place. Summer talk of traveled others were in their in their hometown during their own country where they could drive and and do something locally which was nice. It wasn't all baked productions Anyway but it was many small things happening at once and and so we did have the risk of getting some of our images in time and then everything was luckily through except for one or two things that we really had too late by the wayside and we set to work designing the magazine from fall which was very challenging. Because we had people in time zones on my colleagues Blake was in Vancouver with his family so he was able to come over for the design periods so we had people working from Vancouver to France to Cologne and Milan only lockdown so it was quite a juggling act but al lost real stroke of luck in the middle. That was that in fact we would for the first time printing with an Italian printout because they work with a special technique where the side of the magazine is actually invisibly bound. So it's bound with stitches. Which then all these small booklets stitch together and then glued on the side so you have this invisible spine with the stitches showing through and they were actually considered an essential service in Italy. Even though they were northern Italy area that was very very heavily affected by the virus and Due to their Status as an essential services provider we were able to print in April saw so that was really interesting and as I said a very serendipitous experience. The putting the print magazine together nut time of course like putting any media together in that period. It was something that had to be done very sensitively. It had to be done with a lot of thought to the well that we were living in at a particular time as well as The That we're going into and We were also very prescient with that because Lucy and Luke's same for the issue that was decided last. July was the idea of human nature and Mother Nature and the interactions between those things that have been decided way before because I feel it so APP. Yes so we've found ourselves with the same that we'd already been working on for months. It was already very much connected to current events. In a way you know we're looking at indicted environments. We were looking at different kinds of architecture that was linked to people's domestic lives the process of them creating work. We were looking at also different elements of of race. We were looking into also things that sort of pivoted around the way we deal with nature and environment. It was something that I of course have to think about when riding my editor's letter which is one of the loss things that goes into the magazine and A very timeless publication. We're not the kind of magazine like You were discussing earlier. The whether it's vogue or New York Times it has to be on the on the point of of the actually of the news and really making strong statements Thereabouts but what we did have in wanted to do. He was still a really acknowledged the fact that we were coming out in this time and in this year Wanted that we will never forget in our in our

France Print Magazine Editor In Chief Editor United States Italy Lucy Luke Cologne Alexandra Mckelway Paris Europe Belgium Palo Pitcher Lee Antwerp Vancouver Martin Majella Gallon Tina New York Times New York Bacelona Paris
BREAKING NEWS: Asia Spa Magazine Is Open For Business - Again

Trent365

01:03 min | 5 months ago

BREAKING NEWS: Asia Spa Magazine Is Open For Business - Again

"May recall back in October last year. I let you know that ages spy magazine have announced. They closing the doors as at the end of October pretty abruptly too but they've just announced that they've got new ownership and the print magazine is relaunching. May Twenty twenty maybe. She is the launch date for the New Asia. Spa Magazine. The social media channels have been activated already so you can follow online with their social media. Channels you can subscribe to the newsletter and you expect to see the magazine on shows in. May Two thousand twenty so great news for those in the spire and wellness business in Asia in general. Because there's lots of interesting updates and articles from that particular magazine. It's always been a pretty high quality magazine and I'm sure it will continue to be the same. So good luck to the folks at Ages Zine. I think a lot of people are going to be pretty happy to see these back. A lot of people were pretty surprised when they announced they were shutting down so quickly. And so it'll happen. This year May Twenty Twenty Ages Bama gazillion open for business

Twenty Twenty Spa Magazine Spy Magazine Print Magazine New Asia
Time President Keith Grossman on Display Ad Revenue

Digiday Podcast

12:28 min | 5 months ago

Time President Keith Grossman on Display Ad Revenue

"Up to the digital podcast. I'm Brian Marcy today. Joined by you've guessed a few times. Keith Crespin President of time Have been on here before your Bloomberg. You've now been at time since July. I want to get to the decision to go to time because I think it's really interesting because you were at engine very briefly and all of a sudden. I was shocked. I was like you're at time Explain making them. I'm sure this was like a unique opportunity but at the same time I'm really interested from a career perspective about you know. There's probably pressured like pass it up now. No actually it was interesting when I loved my time at Bloomberg. I was there for five years. Yeah and every year we were there. We grew double digits and in the final year week. We launched tick tock which now quick take You know timing. By the way David I just in You know launch to the New Economy Form. We had really successful year. We ended the up sixteen percent and for me like what I was. Struggling with personally was My entire career. I was very much in the revenue track and The advice I kept on getting was in order to one day ultimately become a president or CEO. I had to diversify myself. Move myself into a horizontal sort of role coo role and the opportunity to engine presented itself. And I thought that I was going to be there for two years or so And really begin to understand how to think about Bringing together thirteen disparate companies and and really sort of turning it into one cohesive unit and I was talking one day to A Greg set lock over at Spencer Stuart and this just goes to show how weird and serendipitous life can be at at. I asked him his advice on something and at the end of our conversation I was walking out and I turned around and I said to Him Greg. Thank you. That was really helpful advice. Like how can I ever return the favor? And he said to me. Do you know anyone who wants to be president of time and I said what are you talking about? And he said well you know mark and Lynn bought time back in November. And they're looking at how they want involve evolving and where they want to invest in it and They need more than just a cro and building up the team and They're they're just looking at the marketplace right. Now do me a favor. Send me the JD for it. I'll give you some people who I think might make sense. And that night. He sent it to me and I read it and I sort of was like Whoa. I've done everything here. Other than run consumer marketing and I went to bed and I woke up the next morning and I couldn't stop thinking about it and I wrote Greg a note and I said Greg if I wanted to throw my name into the game for this would you Allow me to sort of Be considered for the role. If not no worries I'll send you some other names. And he said let me speak to Edward Edward dealt with the CEO and Next thing you know Edward Said Let's meet on Friday. We had half an hour and the half an hour went two and a half hours and Edward at the end of the meeting. Said what are you doing a Monday and I said well? I'M GOING TO LONDON. And he said it's a shame if you're free Monday at heavy meet with mark. I said Benny off said yes. So I said we'll get meeting with Mark Benny off a Monday. And it was Friday at five thirty. I go I will I'll move my trip to London and so Edward takes out his phone any texts mark and gets back. He says Cheryl on Monday I think it was nine. Am and so. I changed my my trip around London Monday morning. I met with Mark coincidentally was the day that salesforce bought. Tableau so the nine meeting moved to twelve because he was on on the news and everything and three and a half tests. I is right. I mean that's not like a small deal no not not in the slightest right I was I was blown away. The then he's still kept the meeting but it was an amazing Do some multibillion dollar deal like before lunch and then and then you know I. I don't know how to respond to that regulate from from my end but I It's like how was your day. spent a few billion But but then You know he met with Lynn his wife. And you know everyone at time and and You know the Family Office. Because we are privately owned entity any offs and So what attract? But what attracted you to the opportunity? Because I mean I think a lot of people would look time as a quote unquote legacy publication. Obviously having A billionaire benefactor. Maybe we can talk about whether it's a benefactor or like an owner wanting to make like a real profit is an advantage but you know from the outside it would seem like a pretty challenged brand went through a several Tough years shirts changed hands. I think the answer to that is how I think I look. Industry is I look at the Industry. Ultimately is it's it's an amazing industry loved this industry. I think that more people should come into this industry as as people think it's a scary industry I remember we talked about one time. Doing like a confessions of an optimist. I love like these like distraught. Well it's all anonymous pessimists and I'm going to go on the record optimist and you know like Warren. Buffet has a great quote of you know. Be Fearful when others ingredient greedy when others are fearful and. I think that this is a great moment. Where if you have the support And you know the intent of time is to be a profitable business ended is moving in that direction and we are up in Q. One and we are. We're up in January. We'RE PROJECTING UP IN Q. One we are going to be. We're aiming to be profitable this year from a cash flow basis but And that's our intent is to run a responsible business but If you look at my career I went to wired and I started at wired the week after it was about to be closed for the DOT COM bubble. That was my first job. As a sales associate I worked on the launches I work on turnarounds and I work on saves right so like like I like the idea of If the business is ultimately debate called Meets Investment Advisor. The time brand is one of those incredible brands. Incredible Ninety seven year history it actually has great foundational elements of it. But it's gone through say ten years of neglect Through mismanagement through transitions of owners. And now that it has dedicated focused resources. I think that we're in a really strong position to Evolve the time brand to really capture the attention of of the next generation of consumers and from my perspective as I kept on looking at the deck and assessing this opportunity would I really saw was the challenges at the end of the day was evolution of Time magazine to Time. Right because everyone. We'll call it. Time magazine and you have to sort of evolve to the time brand and then is it relevant to the next generation of consumers. Yeah right and when you look at the second part I and you look at all of the hard work that Well that's critical right to the strategy. Because I mean you can milk legacy brands. That means something to a certain demographic I mean like good housekeeping is a fantastic. It's a good business That doesn't mean it. It's gotTA challenge so. Let me ask you a question. Who Do you think reads? Time magazine from Demographic Perspective the magazine itself Give me the most general demographics. You could possibly imagine my mom really seeing. It's an older female. Yeah okay so I either get older female older male right If you look at time on its social feeds right on twitter. We have sixteen and a half million followers on instagram. Eight and a half million followers on facebook twelve and a half million followers linked in two million magazine hold on. I'm going to second the demographic of that sixty one percent under the age of thirty five Fifty two percent female and thirty three percent non Caucasian. And so what you find is is that you have this entire aspect of the time brand not the magazine that reaches a completely different demographic that is showing the value to the next generation. The issue has been that none of those areas have been productized. None of them has been marketed as time. The brand is always been sort of presented as Time magazine. And so when you think about it you don't want to discount the magazines value. The magazines values tremendous the reason that we have such huge footprint socially is because of the history of ninety seven years that we have is the magazine but The brand has evolved to a new generation to mean something totally different. But I guess how do you square both sides right because when I think of of time the end from the outside Lake I think of two halves there was like these sort of d day commemoration issue half and ensure that is like outrageously profitable Which is obviously for a different generation. And then there's a kind of like I like time went into that sort of viral content sort of thing where like ton of facebook friendly fair and and Social content that gets gets big numbers and a lot of people. Got Those kind of big numbers but mostly on differentiated. Kind of stuff that You know it just. It's it's feeding the Internet beast. Now I think that that's a fair assessment of the marketing industry of the media industry. I don't necessarily agree that that's where we've gone with time on social but I think that what's happened if I can sort of step back for a second is is if you look at sort of the industry at large Historically a brand Served as the demand within the marketplace in the supply was the consumer right and that was when time was just a magazine. That's when everyone was just magazine prior to the Internet prior to the equity of connectivity of all of these devices when all of a sudden everyone is connected. I'm really interesting thing happens. Which is that. The supply becomes the brand right like time becomes a supply and demand becomes the consumers time right And that's the only thing that everyone is sort of focusing on is is like. How do you capture consumers time? Now what's interesting against that equation is is that when a brand is. The supply and supplies ultimately unlimited. Like your job is as you have to think about. Sort of. What's the value that you provide them? What's The utility you provide? But it doesn't mean that you have to do that. Holistically across everything in a In a synergistic way what it means is that you have to think about what is the experience that the consumer wants and then how do they actually perceive your brand so in a world of infinite choice? You think that's actually dream. But what actually happens? Is that the consumer with their timers paralyzed because they have like unlimited selection. And so we're the time brand actually presents a tremendous amount of power is in this red border now. The red border for some people manifest itself as a print magazine right and that's one way of experiencing sort of the red border for others just manifest itself as as online video right we produce four hundred digital videos a month For some people it is how we do our twitter handle and how we give will sort of information and news in that area. In some instances it's digitally in some instances like we will move into to the audio space. But I think that for us what we WANNA realize is that people don't have relationships with platforms anymore. They have relationships with how they want to experience the content and then secondarily Certain Demos are going to experience the contents completely differently. And it's an advantage to say. Well we know that the magazine reaches an older demographic and we know that time for kids is a younger demographic why wouldn't if we ever consumer is D- And productized time for kids in a manner that can be sort of a a toy for a child or a kit for child's surrounding education. Why wouldn't we promote it to the older demographic that's probably the parents or the

Time Magazine Mark Benny Edward Edward Greg Twitter Facebook Bloomberg President Trump London Lynn CEO Brian Marcy Keith Crespin COO Spencer Stuart David Family Office Cheryl Buffet
NBC extends exclusive ad sales contract with Apple News, to expand to Apple Stocks

Mac OS Ken

01:22 min | 10 months ago

NBC extends exclusive ad sales contract with Apple News, to expand to Apple Stocks

"And NBC universal or getting a little closer axios says the peacock network has extended its partnership with Apple News to now be the Gustav Seller of ads in Apple stocks as well as apple news assuming the platform staying power it's a pretty good deal while each publisher apple news can sell ads paired with their own content NBC universal will be able to sell ads paired with all of it on both the general news feed as well as the feed for stocks how much does NBC make from the deal a meaningful amount is the most one exotic would say Sean Bhatia NBC Universal's executive vp of business operations and strategy wouldn't give hard numbers though he did say it's a very meaningful Lee sized business compared to what we do on Youtube twitter or snapchat if you are an Apple News Peru's earlier you're of a rarefied apparently according to the Peace Bhatia has found that the verticals that sell well on Apple News or the same that ten frequent print magazines like financial Sir pisses luxury and entertainment. You know what doesn't work well on apple news perfume samples the technology is just not

Apple News Apple Nbc Universal NBC Peace Bhatia Sean Bhatia Peacock Network Executive Vp Peru Publisher LEE
Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

Digiday Podcast

14:08 min | 11 months ago

Being Multiplatform Is the Only Way to Stay Alive With Fader's Andy Cohn

"Welcome to the digital podcasts and brian morrissey this week. I'm joined by andy kern andy as president and publisher of the feeder which is celebrating its twentieth anniversary serie any welcome. Thank you for having me brian. It's great to be here okay so twenty years. You're not a failure at the time though you were at spend competitor right. Yes i was at spin and then i was at the source magazine yeah right around the time. Is this a different era for magazines right. It sure was so lots changed since then but the fighter has continued right and still magazine bimonthly but now i would guess it is a multi-platform brand. Yes it is multi platform because that is the only way for us to you. Know stay alive okay. I think i got there. I've been there sixteen years now. <hes> and came up through the more traditional you know the time period of print magazines were revenue was essentially if not a hundred percent ninety percent an advertising supported through print advertising and then maybe some events here and there some newsstand sales for some of the stronger newsstand publications ends and that was really the beginning of the end of it <hes> from a revenue stream standpoint and it was a boom period <hes> especially in music because as you head spin and vibe and the source and brands really starting to embrace hip hop as marketing platform and vehicle so <hes> <unk> brands as big as you know general motors ford coke and pepsi it wasn't just the street where brands anymore that were starting to really embrace that culture and <hes> to leverage you know the those that genre of music for marketing advertising so <hes> i think for those publications and what ended up happening is they became so heavily driven by circulation and celebrity and who was on the cover and had to just be as big possible artists as you can imagine the other you know jay z on the cover of the source or your radiohead and coldplay on the covers of rolling stone and the fader and <hes> the bigger the circulation got the more you can charge for advertising pages so zaveri simple business model you know at the time which <hes> changed as we all saw <hes> you know especially <hes> brown two thousand eight so it was two thousand eight the big inflection point yeah i. I think it's interesting because coming over to fater <hes> i came over in two thousand three at the time it was a quarterly publication which is what we're actually back to now <hes> and they the guys that started it were from the music industry so they started fater more out of access to music because they were doing a lot of non traditional early early day street team digital marketing for record labels for specific releases so they would have the first outkast album before it would be serviced to survive vibe or a rolling stone or is it then they didn't have print or journalism or magazine experience but they had this access and felt like they needed the document cemented so that's how feeder started <hes> was based on this early access so started as an emerging music magazine where it was artists that you weren't really that familiar with yet which called plan cover no coal plan the cover at the time it could have been at some point at some point so what what was interesting to me because i was a journalism major in college i grew up with my father was a newspaper editor at newsday and a writer you know for forty six years and i was obsessed with <hes> you know just music journalism and when i came out of college i got a job at spin on the business side of the magazine and you know it was. Was it like you said before. It was a very different time is very circulation driven. The whole business model was based on selling ads growing your circulation and your rape base so for me what happened was is because of that. I was at points in time at both of those publications where they were either sold <hes> quincy jones and and the people <hes> bob miller bought spin and brought it into the family with vibe and the source hit such a big mass kind of mainstream removed that you know to go up from there is hard and you have to really do things that weren't in your dna and your original mission statement so what happened was isley. Spin spin is an example is where it was the quote unquote alternative to rolling stone. They were putting artists like p._j. Harvey and tori amos and you know rage against the machine on the covers when rolling stone was now starting to put david letterman and buffy the vampire slayer as they were trying to become so big and more of like and entertainment weekly than an actual music and cutting edge lifestyle magazine which was in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight and for its earlier years so i think the example is when spin got sold. They started putting a lot of pressure to grow the circulation because it wasn't an independent privately held company any longer by bob optus tony junior who is a big music fan and believe in you know promoting these kind of upcoming artists they started putting kid rock and creed and natalie attlee imbruglia and really experimenting with very mainstream things that never fit or seem to fit with the original mission statement was for spin <hes> so you know you can call it selling out but i think what it did was alienated. The core audience of those music publications that came there for something in the first place and then those magazines evolved because of the business pressures so you know put became much less of a challenge much more predictable like you knew jay z. He had an album coming out he'd be on the cover of the source you know so that's like and then in ninety nine ninety eight you started hearing things like lime wire napster during the internet and all of a sudden those long lead publications couldn't really compete with the discovery nature of music anymore so they by the time these the longley publications came out everyone already listened to anne knew about a new of everything that was going on through the internet so you know when i was growing up as an older person had to go into record stores to find you know different genres of music and it was very intimidating. If you hurt someone talk about dancehall you're like dance all for for that now. Dancehall type it in two seconds and you're listening to dancehall like through napster and lime the accessibility to music and all of these genres were so far reaching now that it usurped. I think the purpose of the longer lead you know print titles so when fader first came out was really interesting and caught my eye was that the first issue i saw was the third issue had had most f- on one side and back with the angelo together on the other side and and i didn't really know of who those people were and i thought it was really interesting so i think that around ninety nine when fader started hit this inflection point where the kids were now growing up with accessibility to every genre of music there was not like spin the alternative music magazine ad source and x._l. The hip hop magazines you you know it was here's something that's really reflecting of. What's kind of going forward you know and in multiple genres of music like someone even myself i was i call myself from the walk this way generation which is seeing you know the convergence of rap crossing over into the the mainstream and i think you know starting to really get into music in nineteen eighty six in one thousand nine hundred seven all that just became like second nature to when i was listening to led zeppelin classic rock or public enemy and rock him and you know the fat boys and the beastie boys and run dmc. It was all l. cool to me. It didn't matter it wasn't segmented so i think when failure came out it kind of like captured this moment in time that was really well well timed <hes> because it was speaking to people that had that accessible so it had some kind of advantage over some of its bigger competitors that had gone very broad. Yeah i think what fader was at that. Moment was what was kind of a combination of the best of all of those other publications from when they first started and with what their original missions were when you look at spin starting in nineteen eighty five and rolling stone starting in nineteen sixty eight they were counterculture. They were edgy. Spin was writing and hiv aids column which it was crazy at the time you know very alternative rolling stone. Had you know a crazy investigative journalism pieces and p._j. O'rourke and all those hunter thompson awesome you know the things that they were doing so i think it just you know fader came out with this like fresh voice that was speaking like a and not to sound cliche but he was speaking to this new new generation of really hardcore music fans but the same kind of secular pressures i guess as they call them in the business world you know were exempted right. I mean in two thousand and two thousand nine <hes> if particularly if it's print advertising driven <hes> music industry's gone through a lot of changes <hes> explain that inflection point and sort of how the business needed to pivot because a lot of a lot of competitors didn't really make it as they were or made it in in shrunk informs ripe right. I think being that failures mission was to cover kind of what's next in music and knowing that we weren't going to be able to rely on celebrity for any kind of real scale or mass reach. I think early on <hes> we were very <hes> very interested in doing events and like not only just putting an artist that you've never heard ever seen before on the cover of national magazine but also like doing events bringing those artists out to perform live and finding ending ways obviously early days internet to continue the conversation online so it wasn't just like you were an emerging print magazine and then had to move onto the next issue you talk about a whole new host of people you're able to like start building the brand in other ways and be a little bit more diverse so i think because we did events early on and it gave us a like a real strategic advantage in that everyone then started to do events and i think we had an expertise and ability ability to do events that became a huge ultimately a huge revenue stream for was his fader fort back fater four was just eighteen years gold <hes> and i think that's become you know it's become a one plot digital platform for us like almost like a second brand go to to the fader <hes> but in two thousand eight when print advertising was decimated we were able to kind of lean lean more on these events and really lean on the fact that the events gave us a little bit more of like a multidimensional approach because we couldn't we wouldn't wooden of survived if it was just the print advertising or just going online or going online because there was display advertising even at that point in time was <music> very you know <hes> is very <hes>. It was unknown territory. The dollars were like pennies on the dollar versus what that the meaningful meaningful print advertising before collapsed was you know so like from a c._p._m. Standpoint from a total gross revenue standpoint it didn't it's not like one. Just filled filled the gap on the other side so for us. I i do point to the fact that we did tons of events and were able to really like you know you get brands involved on a multiplatform level <hes> so i guess like ten years ago or so probably ninety percent print right y- yeah yeah so what is it today. <hes> percentage wise print is probably i would say in like the twenty to thirty percent of the total revenue pie. <hes> experiential is probably the biggest experiential in video because through video. It's that means not only only us creating our own proprietary fater video but we also do a ton of white label video content for big brands so that come to us for ours boris that iq our ability to understand how to work with artists so companies land access to the art and i think that's the the real like magical thing about failure of over the years i think when you strip everything away is the artist access that we have because we have double down on these artists so early on in their career when no one else is giving them that type of platform yet that we've been able to establish these you know great long running relationships with both those artists and their management and not not have to go through agents or middle middleman like give an example of that an artist the the stuck with for i mean they were smaller. I guess when you started working <hes> i mean artists like i think drake is a great example <hes> just because of how he is and how big it's gotten he did make it. I think it started at the bottom apparently <hes> no but drake used to come up to our office and plus music and he was a great guy and very humble <hes> and you know he almost kind of sold us on you know <hes> on his his skills and we started we did a blog post you know of one of his early songs and it did really well and then <hes> and we put him on the cover in two thousand nine. It was his first. I ever magazine cover. We went up to toronto. You went to the nursing home with him to see his grandmother mother. We spend time at his house. <hes> and we just did like a lot that i think no one had done with him at that point because he wasn't really anyone yet and i think that's what our dna really is is like kind of curated and identifying people that we believe in their music and their longevity of

Still Magazine Source Magazine Jay Z Spin Brian Morrissey Napster Music Magazine Andy Kern Drake Toronto Quincy Jones Rape David Letterman President Trump HIV Bob Optus General Motors National Magazine Longley Publications Publisher
For Netflix, what's old is new again

KCRW's Hollywood Breakdown

04:25 min | 1 year ago

For Netflix, what's old is new again

"I'm Matt Bellamy filling in for masters, and this is the Hollywood breakdown joining me is Lucas Shah entertainment reporter for Bloomberg news and Lucas this week. We are endlessly talking about Netflix. But Netflix, again, did some interesting things this week. They are buying a movie theater a famous one. They're in talks to buy the Egyptian theater in Hollywood. And that is seen by many as a way for Netflix to debut its films and TV shows and very splashy setting and make talent feel very comfortable. And we also learned through your reporting this week that Netflix is launching a print publication. Call it. Netflix magazine, whatever the name ends up being and they're doing that for the same reason to tell talent we can showcase you and your shows in a glossy fancy print magazine and make you feel good about working for net. Flicks. What do you think about these moves hemming in the past few years ever since net? Flicks made house of cards, and it's very early original theories. It has prioritize. Is winning awards as a way to signal to consumers, and perhaps even more importantly to the industry, the entertainment industry that it serious, and it is a place that you go to be seen as the best. And so it has spent a fortune over the past several years on campaigns to try to win Oscars tried to win Emmys if had some success got the most EMMY nominations of of any network last year, it just won best director for its its movie Roma. It hasn't won the top prize at either one, but this is still such a priority that you know, what's what's old is is new again, it's buying a movie theater. It's starting a magazine. And it wants the us these so that it can control the messaging around it's a ward and really make the campaigns pop in a way that it might not if it has to to rely on another people. Yeah. I mean, the magazine is interesting. It's not the first time. Several others studios have done. This kind of thing Warner Brothers has put out promotional magazines. About its content. CBS has done something similar, but you make a good point there. These might seem like they are moves to try to win over awards voters and convince them to vote for their projects, but they are more likely trying to make the talent in their projects feel good about working for net flicks. And that is the interesting thing here because the the the knock on Netflix is that you put all your heart and soul into this project. And it goes direct to the service and disappears. And nobody, you know, they don't tell you who's watching you may or may not get feedback from the public. It's not like when you release a movie in theaters, and you know, what the box office is. And you know, you know, what the marketing campaign is. And all that other stuff, you know, Netflix. It's less transparent. So they're trying to make talent feel good about the experience and say, you're on the cover of Netflix magazine. Congratulations. I don't know how much that's going to matter. But at least it's something it is something, especially because Netflix approached a promotion and Mark. Eating is so different from traditional networks and studios with a big movie release. You see trailers for months leading up to its release. You see billboards everywhere, especially if you live in Los Angeles or New York, Netflix has biolog- avoided that because there's a huge up front cost, and that's wants to wait and see what works when it releases. So I remember listening to the creators of stranger things, which is which is far away net. Flicks is biggest hit show, and they were talking about how nervous they were ahead of the show's initial release because they didn't see any promotion for it. But then once it started to be popular with fans, then Netflix flooded, the zone with magazine covers and promotion and all that. And so that has been hard for producers and writers and other folks to adjust to because it is so different. Netflix says tried to educate them in its ways. But having something kind of more normal tactile that they can feel like a magazine may help however in however small away. Yeah. I agree. But there's still going to be that talent that lives for that Monday morning when the box office results come in. And you've got the biggest hit in America. Or you've got the most watched show in America. And everybody knows that in talks about it. And you know, I don't know how much this is going to actually win over talent. But we'll see. Thank you Lucas, thanks about that was Lucas Shah entertainment reporter at Bloomberg news. And this is the Hollywood breakdown.

Netflix Netflix Magazine Lucas Shah Flicks Bloomberg Hollywood Reporter Matt Bellamy Emmy Warner Brothers America CBS Director Mark Los Angeles New York
"print magazine" Discussed on Bigmouth

Bigmouth

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Bigmouth

"Him i think he needs some actual proper help there were some of this machines on it though i mean you know goes tons very good and let no mistakes those where you get it was a bit early proper kenya at that sort of you know soil samples on an capanna codes on a little bit of full sets the middlesex adams good yeah but it's sandwiched between these kind of so mumbling mental confessionals which are quite hard to like listen to what point do we say about enough of you hip hop marcy ten away in keep going because also if he has if he's going through some things i don't think he's there to be mocked don't know any other woke of life whether we'd go hello your mental this goes back to my fame should be banned theory collided actually should be banned and you know mental health experts say it's no good for anyone it just really isn't helping him out in the most closely controlled substance okay let's move on for god's sake yeah if you like big mouth can we interest you in another podcast that were put together with the high end danish loudspeaker manufacturer dali it's called be there with dolly and it ties in with the new print magazine that's also called either that both about the backroom talents and studio geniuses behind legendary recordings in the first issue we talked to the game changing rock producer john leckie about everything from pink floyd's radiohead we look at five records that definitively changed recording and drudges meets the most in demand woman in the mixing business extraordinary mater salani you can get the first episode of be though with dolly on me big mouth facebook page or at audio dot com slash channels slash beater or just such my name in the apple podcasts store here's a clip of journalist i'm past big mouth guest james med talking about torek studios where rock and roll went back to basics he's a producer and he's famous as a full running a studio that recruited in sixties style you know effectively he's considered.

kenya print magazine john leckie torek studios producer facebook apple james med
"print magazine" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"So i think that's one of the things i'm pushing the team exclusives on original reporting i am asking more and more in probably a way that they hadn't heard before what's the video element so when we're in we're talking about something for print what is the video ad on that we can have for digital or social when we go in and we shooter cover sirs that we never go in without a video concept now right so yes it is a cover story for print magazine but we're going in with a video concept for doing a story for the site of a given week i'll ask what the video concept is it doesn't need to be an expensive video concept to could be as simple as here's what we're doing on instagram stories with it and what we're shooting but i want that team they really are stepping up to the plate be thinking more than just words i want them to think about how does this story look across all these different platforms for some of the platforms video is going to be important but you don't have a quota the says thirty percent of our contents going to be video but no we know i think i really want to i want to i want to kind of change the habits i want on i wonder audience to know when they come to glamour dot com or even when they come to the magazine that they'll be the added video component where they can the second screen experience for them it's almost like you know i think we have to retrain our audience of what they're going to get when they come to the site as well i'd have a quota of video but i do i am really interested when we talk about metrics on time spent inhabit they're the ones i care about a loss so how much time people are spending with us it's not a one and done and in and out and that's what you get from them pink haired kim kardashian story but that's not what you get from a deep dive.

print magazine instagram kim kardashian thirty percent
"print magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Zero thirteen ninety two two zero hour i am richard rj at scallon i always look forward to speaking with our next guest about stuff which is pretty much i think what we'll speak about now but we'll speak about stuff that matters nathan j robinson is quickly becoming king of all media he is the editor of current affairs magazine to which i subscribe that i strongly recommend he is also now part of the current affairs podcast which has just launched from we will talk about that he is in addition to all this is a phd student in sociology and social policy he is author of a couple of books including trump anatomy of a monstrosity and super predator a book about bill clinton's relationship with the african american community in the us and he joins us now so first of all nathan thanks for coming back on the program nice to be on the program and secondly i thought we would start out by welcoming the current affairs family to the community of broadcasters this show is radio tv but we also have a podcast you guys now have our cats and tell us about it well it seems obligatory for any print magazine you to podcasting sooner or later so but also with the you things you can do with with the medium there also we wanted to do interviews and conversations and and so we we've we're branching out and we've got a biweekly it's every other week and it's going to be sort of discussion show with our editors we're gonna take topics in the news articles in the magazine things across our minds we're going to pitch ideas how to make the world better we're going to draw attention to problems that we don't get enough attention and just have got a good thoughtful and provocative sometimes discussions about them so we're lucky we just launched on itunes and i think we're going to spotify a couple of other mediums and we also.

richard rj nathan j robinson current affairs bill clinton spotify Zero thirteen ninety two two z
"print magazine" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

Digiday Podcast

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Digiday Podcast

"Yeah i think it's the right i think it's the right question and i would say very honestly we're that's what we're trying to figure out right now is exactly the number of resources the amount of resources that we put toward it and i think you'll absolutely continue to see that growing i mean we're growing that side of the business more right now from a talent perspective than the advertising side of the business terms of just adding sheer number of people to to that portion and working on products based explain the product explain the subscription so right now we have we have a membership program called the masthead you guys wrote about it not too long ago and what it is subscribers we'll pay for their subscription they get access to the access to the print magazine they could get a digital copy of it and then they get access to more things across the portfolio so that's everything from articles that we will publish on the site where only members can get access to it so you start reading the article on it's if you want to continue reading this article you become a member if you're not content is only for members absolutely absolutely we have weekly conversations with editors and writers whether it's on the cover story or just a single topic i mean people who love us most are the ones who so far have committed and said we want to be members we want more from the atlantic so naturally they're engaging more with our writers and our editors in ways that they couldn't before the same is true of of coming to some events and so we'll invite them to events that they would not prove they have been invited to or have had access to and then another example of that is we published a special issue which came out i think in february on the fiftieth anniversary of the assassination of martin luther king.

print magazine martin luther king
"print magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Article which is like how how you know how many times do people say that today read the print article and then was still not available online because they hadn't concurrently published so it seems like you're sort of very carefully metering out what is free and what is not and what you have to wait for when we actually we don't have a pay well on the site itself and i like the sometimes to be honest it's not even that well like the system is not that professionals the we try and get the stories up on the from the magazine within like within the month that the magazine hits newsstands sometimes we'll just like delay a little bit and that's not intentional so nice it's intentional offense just like we're a little bit slow to be honest but we are like just we are rethinking that strategy of like maybe we get those all of the stories from that print magazine a couple of weeks before it hits newsstands just so it's a little bit more systematic interesting okay because a month is like it's like dog years and i know it's so so so but but i mean it's interesting because so my intention with going looking for that article after i read it was i'd like to share it because i know ray and i think it's a it's a pretty good profile of him and so i'll share it to my twitter feed and then maybe other people who know i've i'm obsessed with wearables where we we'll read it to be interested in it as well and i just couldn't find it at i you know i even wrote to read i said hey is your article online yet and he said no i don't think it is and i was like this is so interesting to me because i actually thought it was an intentional window to try to drive people in some way to pay for the content but it turns out it's just a matter it's a it's a kind of haphazard approach to like all right well i think we could be a long figure something out.

print magazine ray twitter
"print magazine" Discussed on Book Marketing Mentors

Book Marketing Mentors

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Book Marketing Mentors

"If you're an author or plan to be one get excited because this podcast is for you book marketing mentors is the only podcast dedicated to helping you successfully market and sell your book if you're ready for him powering conversations with successful marketing nathan's then grab a coffee or tea and listen to your host international bestselling author susan freedman welcome to book marketing men to the weekly podcast where you learn proven strategies tools ideas and tips from the monsters every week i'm reduce you to a marketing malls to who will shed their expertise to help you market and sell more books today my special guest is a get you focused expert and coach doctoral net ryden is an awardwinning entrepreneur and bestselling author for over ten years she ran a multimedia publishing company growing a small quarterly publication to a monthly magazine with a circulation of fifty thousand copies a month she made the leap from print magazine to digital in two thousand nine optus successfully selling advertising face to face for decade learning to sell online was a challenge one she's been continuously studying and practicing ever since she and her husband now run a successful coaching and training business from their home in santa barbara california so monette welcome to the show and thank you for being this week's guest expert and mental ross's thank you so much for having me i'm super excited to be here today and i'm super excited to have you here monette as you will know being an author sometimes you can also be creative entrepreneur the same time and as an entrepreneur with full of great ideas but sometimes time management not all hayes the best and i'm speaking from my own experience to to spout how we can do a better job of managing our time so that we can be more productive.

nathan susan freedman monthly magazine print magazine optus ross santa barbara california monette ten years
"print magazine" Discussed on Download

Download

01:43 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Download

"Would come much later or it would be like a hobbled experience so i feel like it's apple kind of doing like what happened with with beats where you know it's like hey like we're good people with give you the money let's like get closer help us make apple news better so i feel like it's more for that for sure it's i want to ask before we move on about what since this is about paying for content digital content alex you mentioned that you pay for the new york times any other digital content subscriptions you've got going oh i mean well in in regards just to news i have nearly lamb so near times six colors of course next stories which club mech stories which is an excellent newsletter people should check it out what else strategic corie in a lot of these things are just like one person their sites that either don't have ads or have very few ads i think that might be it oh and wired which had a promotion of like give us five dollars for a year of wired i was like oh cool and it's nice to have not only unlimited access to the magazine but they give you a pdf every month however i did not realize it was also getting the print magazine and like james says i've already read the stories or the time it gets here and i'm like can i give you another five dollars to not send me this they want to they're sending it to you because they want to prop up the print circulation rate because that's.

new york times print magazine james apple five dollars
"print magazine" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"It comes to real estate investing because one wrong move in the beginning and it could totally be a deflating for somebody that's new whether it's a veteran in the business world that's just not that he he he or she dominated the equities you've done well you have a nice retirement account but now at the end of the day you're looking at real estate you wanna get and you want to have some fun but you really need to understand what that entails so i agree i think finding the right partnerships as important we you and i also for the longest time where at whichever conferences that we we attend together we also talk about education right and that's what i that's what i love that think realty is all about having the right edge occasion so outside of the videos outside of the print magazine that you can pick up at barnes and noble shameless plug by the way i know outside of the rate of outside of the soon to come podcast outside of all the things that think realty can offer you from an education perspective and a one thing lord that you've been a huge proponent of is actually getting your real estate agents a license and working with real estate agents if you're just starting out can you talk about can you talk to that a little bit because i think you are a thought process on this is just stellar and there's been a an overall misconception of quote unquote wheels horrors are um in real estate agent in market because honestly you do have to be prepared um with the right information to ask the right questions so that you know that you're working with someone who actually has a knowledge base that can be helpful to you um because not all agent are equal uh that's actually the theme of my brokerage firm um agents have different special teams uh they're good at different thing e e whenever you get your real estate likes as you can do any type of real estate that.

print magazine barnes
"print magazine" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

Grumpy Old Geeks

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Grumpy Old Geeks

"A lot more than twenty bucks five dollars that's it gus five bucks to to subscribe to the print magazine every year i have i have a what i heard print magazine subscription in a i that last year i gotta for five dollars that's crazy is that one of those last offered through like some third party things so they'd slash prices level i gotta it was in the mail from wired and because i used to be subscriber and they they found moved in they sent me one thing and it was 5 bucks but either way it's like even if for twenty bucks i'll pay twenty bucks a year for wired because i like wired not like to support them even though they're owned by you know another corporate behemoth but i don't know i don't know if they're still with continental they're not um because there was a that big shakeup is read it i read it and wire got bought by county nasdaq around the same time but i don't know if they're still with them but i dunno i can write that up but either way they're stolen by now the corporate behemoth but i still like wired articles for the most part they been we made fun of one last week of the week before where they really shit the bad but added the not all great but did general they did a really good time i i'm fire down 20 bucks a you know how much i mean i'm smith to eighty bucks a month on the new york times just for the sunday paper so that's going out the window now that i am uneasy an unemployed but up a wire definitely i get more more value out of the twenty bucks a year in the eighty bucks a month ago from the new york times right and speaking the new york times their digital pay while business is growing as fast as facebook and faster than dougal lau apparently people like to pay for news the publishers online subscription business which they began in two thousand eleven has now cultivated over two point two million paying readers and additional four hundred four hundred thousand or so pay for the time.

print magazine smith new york times facebook dougal lau five dollars
"print magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"In the especially in some verticals where we perhaps don't have as much advertising weight as we shut so this was a very natural fit for us to be clear you're still in the magazine business ride sometimes a title like again by the time is comes out some one may may have bought rolling stone and when when a title i bet comes up her a forbes or maybe in the future fourteen people say other brand has a lot of value and i could see taking this to other territories and we could do something than online and maybe there's a rolling stone hotel we could do in malaysia but you're still in the business of of first and foremost creating in magazines selling them selling advertising actual print but print a in the us to take our us business for example our profits are twothirds printed onethird digital and so we want to be good at both nwc digital as a very important driver of profits and uh i think we're uniquely profitable in the digital space and so if you look at what we've done in the in the last six months we've announced new digital partnerships with sean to rhymes ish shwee she took her oliver content and she's working be building in your digital channel it we've want a new print magazine with three drum and call pioneer woman that was the bestselling magazine in the united states when eliza on sale and while he will listen to this show won't know who reached roman yeah so i bet if you can stand on the roof in see the ocean you probably will not appreciate re but um uh certainly in walmart's and other locations in the middle of the country we sold over three hundred fifty thousand copies of the second issue for the first issue we had to go back on press that the demand was so gracious kind of a martha stewart but not instead of being waas being connecticut shoes middle america an well she's based in oklahoma and socialist louder in so she's got a huge fan base and so she in a shelter brand the old fashioned way great content blogger tv show books and so by the time we came out with.

malaysia united states eliza walmart martha stewart oklahoma sean oliver six months
"print magazine" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"But back to starting over again right so we have to uh we have to we have to like do this stuff that we did in the last eight years all over again so on one hand yet it i mean the the you know the the tv stuff i think is really promising uh i think there's a possibility of doing more uh with television which is sort of weird because we came up out of internet and now it's just because of the nature of the business linear tv is is worth more because it's a smaller it's kind of a managed it's like a know supplyanddemand it's like a manage supply so it's worth more you go on the internet and there are a million things and it drives the price of advertising dan whatever internet's others there is currently a race to the bottom happening right now it's live on bailing out of youtube before we actually hit the bottom i mean that's really sad ran out i mean that's like this is where we i mean and and people don't really understand that they don't care like they just want to watch leo eye on both been now part of three racists to the bottom of the first was the death of print yes for you with zero to sixty right which for me was what i graduated a college with a degree and photography and film right and then that dsl are and craigslist elevated that and then for you it was the print magazine and then the race to the bottom round two was starting over after next through networks to shit and then rain the bottom three right now is the the volume uh you know the guys who are really cleaning house on youtube are these unwatchable daily bloggers that are doing seven day they're doing 300 via videos a year and some of them are i try i tried because there's a reddit thread about what one of a makes ninety one a fucking say the person's name or how much it was it was so much money that doug bureau called me.

youtube print magazine leo craigslist reddit doug bureau eight years seven day one hand
"print magazine" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Revision Path

"Arbor we're getting the first version of the ipad and thinking that same thing you know because you would by a print magazine subscription which at this rate is now like dirt cheap you can get like three years for twelve dollars or something like that and it comes with like this corresponding digital addition but then it's like if i'm reading a magazine i kinda want to detach myself away from the screen in order to do something else you know and depending on what you're reading it on it might just be cumbersome like the first ipad they came out i mean it was nice and handheld but she didn't want to hold it forever and you certainly didn't want to hold it over yourself in bed here because you could very easily drop it on your face you know what i mean yeah you might want to take it into the bathroom or take it on the subway but really do you want to take a five hundred dollar piece of software hardware like that everywhere if you just want to read a magazine or read the papers something i mean i still subscribe to a few magazine just because i want that that analog i guess this diversion for all technology just recently i picked up an issue of bus company which years back when you were a kid was like this big thick magsi nexy in the subscription now is a year buying dollars jobs a singleissue 750 on the new standard or you can subscribe prove year five dollars like oh my goodness that makes me sad sills like i will subscribe to you but they you know they have their presence online now so late they sort of found a way to make it work than the print becomes henzler a piece which is.

Arbor print magazine five hundred dollar twelve dollars five dollars three years
"print magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

Recode Media with Peter Kafka

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Recode Media with Peter Kafka

"Was making piles of money on a print magazine which you know probably one of the last serb mary in the 2000s when that store you shouldn't be launching news successful magazines but tackling normalcy success will gin hardened remember eugene at shielded his company from the rest in a rolling stone from you know decline in a way because it was underwriting rolling stone after his after a time again there's a quote in there he just says off handedly about the first editor who made that a magazine risks as will bonnie fuller yeah he's talking about the the back and forth because she sorta wanted to go after stars and he line the stars being his body and he's now she didn't like anyone attractive her successful and she's the most unattractive pursing river meth us gutted he's telling you this rush sus the guy who says this to you in real time knowing that you're writing a book yeah that someone who lose a data's janokovic bubble that's jahn that you know i told you at the outset he has this sort of like raw kind of like on refined quality about it well that's how on can be he has this sort of like barbarian gut thing and he has gut reactions to people in gut responses and at one time that was his genius he knew what people wanted and what was good and what was bad and he could make you judge moroka few eggs on the processor broke all the eggs apps find out it worked out and and people who are upset with you eventually and this is another party group the monterey the mick jagger's matter to make the comes back and yet in john lennon's mad at him if they come back very not buddies but at least they do business irving as off who was the manage the eagle says something to this effect in a like yeah there's the falling out but there's always the makeup now because we gotta do business here right and they would just do business again but then yawn would complain about irving oh everything outdo with him turns out screwed up and they are always complaining about each other because somebody somebody's always feeling like the got the better of the.

eugene editor real time monterey mick jagger john lennon bonnie fuller jahn irving
"print magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

Slate's Double X Gabfest

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Slate's Double X Gabfest

"All close in to sell advertising and with with you know fancy advertisers this is just how they connect with people and the sort of ici you know inaccessible you can't live in this british countryside houses no longer such a um it's it's no longer aspirational for by all but but to live in in ah you know more perfect world more free world is all of a sudden the aspirational quality and so i think they are tapping into that in a way that's smart and not just about social justice right is this like they they seem to be talking about things that they genuinely believe in and or you know suddenly the pieces read that way but at the same time it's a business that is using this as a strategy to both serve its readers and to keep the magazine going um i think a lot of the surprised that you're talking about isn't only that it's vogue the cold fashion magazine but also because khandan asked for many years was kind of terrible on the web um in all of its uh brands um and has really started to focus time and attention just in the last few years long after you know the immense in what is is either like the third or the fourth of the fifth wave of of web magazines um and several of the pieces about team vogue and the new or the softy on the unvarnished emphasis on social issues in politics stress how that it's been good for web traffic um you know that apparently the web traffic is up to 100 percent in eighteen months subscriptions to the print magazine have gone up even though the frequency went down to four per year um so my question is like it doesn't surprise me that this stuff is good for web traffic i wonder if it's good for the bottom line i mean these are publications their businesses publications survive on advertising you know suddenly the thing that i've.

cold fashion magazine khandan print magazine social justice eighteen months 100 percent
"print magazine" Discussed on The Giant Beastcast

The Giant Beastcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on The Giant Beastcast

"And it does confident listen we want to get stuff as early up as we can yeah both because we think of as a service for the people who need it and also because it is good for the website right and it's good for us we gotta do as woodland heard a print magazine to get everything way earlier news all right lasarte at long lead time the you to start writers articles and we will have to lay off workers are actually pivoting to abandon are actually working on the giant bombs zina rugeri handing it out at packs there's only gonna be about a hundred copies and about fifty of them got misprinted but you know just bear with our such a role mule graf golan's but up but up bob bob abby okay can you take this next email from is about hello beast cast i don't usually take advantage of amazon's preorder price cuts but my wife is a wrestling fan and i went to get her the newest wwe easy as it has preorder dlc and we have prime i noticed amazon only has the digital version available and at full price will the standard is currently unavailable why that while in while the standard is currently unavailable i found this odd and noticed that sister game nba to k 18 also had a full price digital preorder option almost every other game has a physical option and a preorder this camp at to k only.

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"print magazine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The print magazine to give it more substance heavier premium wait and feel and we're adding where lerian several digital products as well and we're moving straight into our events aces while the heart and soul of what we do a bloomberg on the economy and every day bloomberg surveillance is the guess matter are your guest report has been i remember when when of might make the decision to to to acquire bloomberg business week begging people to retain peter quite is that this guy is absolutely original is your qualities the reporters is a common teary what is the so peter has to great khan's out today one on fat fine bind but i wanted just give you an example cam simpson business week reporter for has been reporting for years on efforts by the tech sector and whether or not there protecting female workers from exposure to toxic chemicals that could because birth defects and were willing to invest years of timing of that kind of journalism and what chemists found out that in american tech manufacturers yes they might even radicati their exposure these kind of toxic chemicals but what happened on wednesday was outsourced to asia and that as recently as 2015 female workers who work in plants producing champs may have been exposed to chemicals that were known for twenty years to be potentially lethal causing them to add to not be out have children miniature then we believe that alludes david to the work of elizabeth economy the oversee a for how do you begin to judge how we consume information we read a magazine in the year two thousand seventeen you came in here and thomas crowing.

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"print magazine" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

Programming Throwdown

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"print magazine" Discussed on Programming Throwdown

"People who enjoy making things with their hands not just buying things off the shelf so putting together electrical kit sore making circuits three d printing making their own quad copters adjust the whole gamut of sort of mixing are in technology and coding and electronics and they cover all of those things in the magazine itself is just sort of i think really well done i don't often do projects that i find in there but it's still inspiring even if i don't to sort of read through it and see the way they've described something in the cool stories that have in there the tools they recommend and learning about sort of you know hey what our people would doing what they're doing knows these days or with wireless sort of little pc bs and so if you have not checked i'm sure most people have probably heard about it but if not and you feel like you're into that kind of do it yourself crafting trying new things experimenting definitely check it out cool so this is key get electron iq version or it's only my pleasure i i so i have the print version i guess i i just think it's a really weldon print magazine but i know they also do have a digital version cool very cool yes a you can definitely get you know one of patrick's mega millions our audio books or you get the us cut adams audio book which is eight hours eight hours because they are dayem commuting for me notice elena article so you can go to ardabil trial dot com slash programming throwdown all one word now we have a link to the show notes and get started on that on i thought it was great it's it's got a pretty cool interface a one thing i noticed is.

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