35 Burst results for "princeton university"

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:02 min | 2 weeks ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike. Yesterday's purposes sabine. Kastner was professor of psychology neuroscience at princeton university. The golden goose such damage. The victim stand Network operate during mission with that particular. This own interactions. The days end the panama's consider thank you for having me gal. Yeah thanks. I love to start one of your papers at extend interesting so a plea from nineteen th the make clearly of attention you say. A decent evidence has stated that end wiedeman assembly is a fundamentally cross sensitivity Co speech that tension and the probably of covert Expertly movements are tethered. Two feet of bad activity at legally hood's in detention network. I always wanted about this so in the greatest obviously a complex computer some states a quantum computer therapy evidence for that but Homeless effectively do of his toughest actually quite Flexing right And so and wind sampling. Seem sort of sense to me Do you wanna you wanna capacity you sort of figure out your house without kind of going to the entire design space. What might be happening a sample rate. So so what's the what sort of the team into stable teary tension. So the paper deals spread has a cognitive function it. I studied for almost my entire career so for about thirty years. And that's what we call attention foundation so let me try to focus and to die rag. Our you know resources that have to a certain goal. We are to out a lot of other stuff that you're doing. So for instance. We have behavioral goal. And say you know we want to know. Listen and few. There's there's video cast here then. We can't go to dinner or do something really opposite to it and the resources that yo you used to basically focus on something that we want to pursue right now and then all the other competing ideas out there. That is part of attention. Function and attention. Function can be best or easiest. Let's put it. That have studied when me. Just look at our environment. Our environment is very cluttered. And if we want to focus on something in our typical environments that may have to basically blend out all the other thing all these distracting information needs to get filtered away and so these set of problems. What is the comment of network our brain. That accounts for our ability to focus and to blend out everything anything that may be distracted to us that has occupied me for really really long time. And what fascinates me so initial steps. Bobby did using brain imaging in adult human brains as be just wanted to see the not for that is engaged by me do something very simple so he could do something very simple like just focusing on a particular person in the crowd that is fun of us in our new visual in our new zoom world. Steady live and a little bit more difficult. But if you just do that if you just focus on the person you know Crosswalk for instance. You can do..

wiedeman assembly Kastner princeton university panama Mike Bobby
Supreme Court Ends Biden’s Eviction Moratorium

The Takeaway

01:48 min | Last month

Supreme Court Ends Biden’s Eviction Moratorium

"So now the by administration has been extending a federal eviction moratorium to protect tents struggling to pay their rent during the pandemic but now the moratorium is over really truly over. That's because the supreme court ruled last week. That the cbc has overstepped its at and that the moratorium to continue congress. We'd need to authorize it but that's unlikely to happen as house. press secretary. jen psaki told reporters on friday. What we're trying to do here is prevent people from being evicted from their homes. If there were enough votes to pass an eviction moratorium in congress it would have happened. It hasn't happened and while the white house says it's working with states on solutions. hundreds of thousands potentially millions of tenants across the country are now at risk of losing their homes including tenants in the state of new york. We're more than eight hundred. Thirty thousand households are behind on their rent. We're joined today by sia weaver campaign coordinator of housing justice for all in new york. Sia welcome to the takeaway. Extre having me also with us. Peter hepburn assistant professor of sociology at rutgers university newark and part of the eviction lab at princeton university. Peter welcome back to the shell on sia from your perch. What's the significance of this supreme court ruling. Well that's really just devastating as you said eight hundred thirty thousand households are more really are behind on rent in new york and seventy seven percent of them are people of color. The thing that's most painful about all of this as our state also has two point seven billion dollars in rental assistance. Money meant to solve this problem and we've been unable to spend it so this is a a real wave of addiction. That should be preventable. But for some reason has not been prevented.

Peter Hepburn Peter Congress Last Week New York Friday Hundreds Of Thousands SIA Seventy Seven Percent Jen Psaki CBC Seven Billion Dollars White House More Than Eight Hundred Today Eight Hundred Thirty Thousand Rutgers University Thirty Thousand Households Sia Weaver Millions Of Tenants
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:46 min | Last month

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"How <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Male> <hes> <hes> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> we <Speech_Female> can <Speech_Female> target <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> treatment <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> some working a lot. <Speech_Female> Now in the in the field <Speech_Female> of computational <Speech_Female> psychiatry <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> psychotherapy <Speech_Female> so targeting <Speech_Female> treatments <Silence> for mental <SpeakerChange> health <Speech_Female> issues <Speech_Female> for addiction <Speech_Female> as well <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> According <Speech_Female> to the needs of different <Speech_Female> people. <Speech_Female> I hope that in <Speech_Female> i've been fifteen years. <Speech_Female> We will be somewhere <Speech_Female> else there. And <Speech_Female> you know <Speech_Female> that depends <Speech_Female> on <Speech_Female> understanding <Speech_Female> the brain <Speech_Female> but not necessarily <Speech_Female> understanding <Speech_Female> the neurons <Speech_Female> in the brain <Speech_Female> sandy. How the <Speech_Female> brain interacts <Speech_Female> with the world. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So yeah <SpeakerChange> i'm <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> a who <Speech_Female> can predict five <Speech_Female> ten or fifteen years. <Speech_Female> I mean honestly. Fifty <Speech_Female> years ago there was barely <Speech_Female> any internet. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Maybe not fifteen years <Speech_Female> ago but like twenty <Speech_Female> years so <Speech_Female> it was barely <Speech_Female> any internet. <Speech_Female> I remember the days <Speech_Female> an awful when <Speech_Female> we do not have email. <Speech_Female> I <SpeakerChange> had like a <Speech_Female> joint email account with <Speech_Female> my boyfriend. That i think <Speech_Female> now. Like what <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> so fifteen <Speech_Female> years. A long <SpeakerChange> time <Speech_Female> i have no idea. <Speech_Female> I feel that. <Speech_Female> I have learned <Speech_Female> over the years <Speech_Female> more. I feel like i <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> personally. <Speech_Female> I remember as an <Speech_Female> undergrad thinking. All <Speech_Female> learn everything they know <Speech_Female> about the brain <SpeakerChange> contain <Speech_Female> from there in <Speech_Female> orlando is like oh my <Speech_Female> god they know almost nothing <Speech_Female> about the brain so <Speech_Female> i now after <Speech_Female> all these years feel <Speech_Female> like i have <Speech_Female> a better idea <Speech_Female> of what the brain is doing. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Female> as a field. We <Speech_Female> have a lot <Speech_Female> better ideas <Speech_Female> of what the brain is <Speech_Female> doing. And <Speech_Female> when i say as a field. <Speech_Female> I'm not saying necessarily <Speech_Female> neuroscience separate <Speech_Female> from psychology <Speech_Female> or psychology separate <Speech_Female> from neuroscience effecting. <Speech_Female> The combination <Speech_Female> is very powerful <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> and. I'm sure <Speech_Female> in fifteen years <Speech_Female> will know a lot more <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> hopeful <Speech_Female> you know. <Speech_Female> I hope other things <Speech_Female> don't overpower <Speech_Female> that way <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> know catastrophes. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> I'd just thought of something <Speech_Male> that actually <Speech_Male> quite to <Speech_Male> what you're saying so <Speech_Male> i did some work a few <Speech_Male> years ago in behavioral <Speech_Male> health. <Speech_Male> So be used. <Speech_Male> Em <Speech_Male> medical <Speech_Male> records of <Silence> behavioral health <Speech_Male> therapists <Speech_Male> and patients <Speech_Male> and bless. You devastated <Speech_Male> this that weekend. <Speech_Male> Using addi- <Speech_Male> match <Speech_Male> if <Speech_Male> patient therapist <Speech_Male> optimistic <Speech_Male> matched <Speech_Male> if patient therapist. <Speech_Male> And if <Speech_Male> you do. This systematically <Speech_Male> began with outcomes <Speech_Male> that are better so <Speech_Male> let's to stay and <Speech_Male> the and the <Speech_Male> cost of an episode again <Speech_Male> to substantially reviews <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> and so <Speech_Male> so <Speech_Male> being not <SpeakerChange> still <Speech_Male> be techniques. <Speech_Male>

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:25 min | Last month

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Not be like okay. I'll just go to work as normal like what's happening or there's a hurricane warning. Okay where do we right so so again. That's a way that we can benefit from social away of social learning basically. I'm thinking Yale yesterday sorta define communities mood like you say early on. There could be you know. Hundred fifty people clients. There's declines mood was important so the plan leader perhaps plan leader who has a higher probability of being in a good mood Averaging over time might be considered a good leader race eleven. Bbs similar sorts of things going on in modern context People are optimistic. Generally optimistic than to be better leaders and so on so what they are in some sense affecting. The communities mood are the company's more organizations mood that has a net benefit right. You leaders pessimistic all the time. You know you destroyed fancy discipline you can see your person who is in bad mood defects you credible making me think about again that other side. That leaders who invoke fear control. He pulled a lot more so what. What's considered a good leader. The leader that we want or the leader that action he leads us all could be off a cliff but literally we follow that person And we've seen around us a lot in the last few years and it's not new it's always been the case that her is a way to control people and so sewing fear you know goes together. It's like selling fear saying. I'm your savior so follow me because all those things are so scary. Turn up all your fight. Flight responses amendola as i say Which is kind of cynical manipulation of people's tendency to be more affected by negative moods and i mankind to move but actually just to be to have much less free choice when they're afraid so we'd lose We you're talking before about what we think about consciously what we plan and make decisions to halt. We kind of respond automatically under fear. Responses are mostly automatic and to putting people in that state. And then saying here's your automatic response. Is the only thing that you can do than people just do that..

amendola
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:15 min | Last month

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"That's our memories and our expectations are always coming in and the specific representations. I was talking about in order. Frontal cortex when you're performing the task any task. You can think of it as again. You're playing a game playing monopoly or playing go or playing checkers chess or whatever or you can think of it as a task in real life like you're getting certain real life to you're crossing the street you're ordering in a restaurant in all of these situations. There's a lot of sensory input. Most of it is totally irrelevant for the current tasks that you're that you're saying that you're trying to solve your ordering in a restaurant doesn't matter what table you're sitting at. What your waiters wearing. What things that matt are. Some of them are on your menu. Some of them are not like what jeff is on holiday. Now and who has who's shift is a. Did they get fresh fish today. Look you don't know these things but the quality of your food depends on so the representation with which you make. The decision doesn't need to have everything that you see. It needs it. Should it can have just a subset of that and it also might want to include. Thanks that you don't see for instance. Today is monday. I know that you know. They order fish on monday because on sunday there's no market and whenever i can't remember exactly how it works but there's no fish market. I am usually the fish. Monday are not fresh so you might want to take that into account so they is the from our research also based on other people's research that we analyzed recordings from rodents from jeff schoenbaum slab. Yuji takahashi is work Our hypothesis is over. Frontal cortex which is very frontier frontal cortex. It's like for people who are listening to your podcast. The more and go up in front of the brain the more kind of higher level ignition functions. There are and you can think of the order. Frontal cortex Frontal of the frontal cortex. It's like a high highest level and so we think that that's where you have the distilled like this is what's relevant for this task right now. It's a subset of what i perceive and other things that i've added from my memory from knowledge from expectations from the fact that i know what day of the week. It is all those things but kind of a distilled like this is what you need to know how to make this decision and for my next decision there will be something else. And that's what we call the state of the task. It's it's the task is in this state chinese restaurant and blah blah blah blah blah blah versus in a different part of the task. Now that the food has arrived and now my task is to eat not to order. The state is completely different. Still in chinese restaurant. But that's not so important. What's important is amusing chopsticks. A fork the Nice and so. If i understand this correctly yeah so did they do things they wanna serve the Problem it's not a beta coming in you can focus on what is most important a hand and other letters. Fm said aesthetically is it's also sorta predicting wipe a small lightly So that your actions are appropriate to think about it. I think if i were to divide it into two things and two out. I suddenly lost your image converter. I just got off okay. So if i'm thinking about two parts of this problem i would say the first one exactly like you said filtering the second one i would say augmenting so mentioned from memory from knowledge from expectation. That's maybe what you're saying..

jeff schoenbaum Yuji takahashi chess matt jeff
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:31 min | Last month

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is purposive. Bushman with assistant professor of psychology neuroscience at princeton university. He's wizard james to understand. How breen accomplishes intelligent rational behavior by guiding or actions towards a goal. Welcome thank you. Thanks for having meets. It's great to be here. Thanks for being a so. So i was speaking at all your papers team. You appear to be really productive beauty. Depending on many many papers coming out clinically. One to start with the of view. Peoper balancing flexibility get into firms in working memory working memory. Send a commission flexibly holding the right. Your cars needed for complex behavior yet despite its importance. Lucky.

Bushman princeton university breen james
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:59 min | Last month

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest is. Janet corey was economics and public affairs at princeton university and director of princeton's center She also directs the On families and children at the national beautifully economic again. Thank you thanks for being so you had a testimony to the house. Select committee on economic and centers. In goat. I speak not photographic nancy by the way. Could you summarize your moss to the committee. So my remarks focused on the effects of inequality on children. And i was trying to make too broad points so the first point was that poverty is very damaging to children and that may seem obvious. But there's always the argument potentially that you know. Well maybe it's not poverty per se. Maybe it's something else. That's related to poverty family background or something but i think there's a lot of evidence which was summarized actually in a national academy report recently that yes there's a causal effect of poverty on children and conversely if you give core families money adept that helps so that was kind of the first point and then the second point was said a lot of the social programs that have been implemented in the past twenty thirty even forty years have had tremendous effects so we always hear about how basically everything is getting worse or in poverty doesn't change overtime but in fact in the us it's changed a lot So some of the things that i would point to and i did point to in my testimony are the effects of public health insurance for children which people think immediately about the affordable care act in two thousand ten. But i'm talking about things that happened thirty years before that covered pregnant women amd awkward children. And that's just had a tremendous impact not only on saving lives but preventing disability and making people into more productive adults similarly early childhood. Education has really spread so we have the federal program had start but we have lots of state and local programs as well which really make an impact on poor children. And then the third thing i would point to his nutrition programs like Snap which used to be constant stamps or the supplemental feeding program for women infants and children or school lunch..

Janet corey princeton's center Select committee on economic a princeton university us
Coping With the Reality of Climate Change

Environment: NPR

02:12 min | Last month

Coping With the Reality of Climate Change

"The un said that it is unequivocal that humans have warmed the earth in that the scale of the changes is unprecedented and the predictions are dire more drought or fires heatwaves. If we don't change our ways and is not the first time we've heard it. Though the evidence linking human behavior to climate change is now stronger so that got us wondering how does such overwhelming news effect us in our desire to do something about it. We're joined now by dr elke weber professor of psychology at princeton university and she also contributed to the un's latest climate report. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for having me. Increasingly people are dealing directly with the results of climate change. Right record heat across the country. How do people respond when they're confronted with the sort of bigness of the issue of climate. Change what kinds of emotions can that out. It can be incredibly overwhelming especially among younger people. And so there's no question that climate anxiety has gone drastically up i- contemplation about sort of what kind of world full of and and what kind of world we we might leave to our children and grandchildren so it's very debilitating symptoms that oftentimes have to be treated with medication or psychotherapy from psychologists point of view. How can the threat of climate change be communicated in a way that reaches people that also convinces them to act so we have a study in the field for the last year and a half. We've been following five thousand americans across the political spectrum on issues related to covert but then also in parallel on climate change and as you know both covert and climate. Change are highly politicized in this country. But what we find. Is that when you see. People who have personally experienced is a covert symptoms or extreme weather events. They are equally concerned about the issue and equally willing to take action regardless of the politics for better or worse effect that we're seeing climate change hitting all now hopefully as a way of bridging the current gulf to political ideology because people want to protect their loved ones and when they see dangerous in the front step to actually much more to do something about it.

Dr Elke Weber UN Princeton University
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:07 min | 3 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I think we need all of those sorts of global institutions And you know as far as religion is concerned I'm an atheist and i find it extraordinary. The religion does Extent that it does. But again. I see that as simply something that people want to believe that i have evolved with this tendency to believe in in god something beyond nature that we can observe. I think richard dawkins wrote about that quite well. so Extent i mean agreement with you but i also And here i guess i am an 'incrementalist. I think that For a politician to advocate. I've been botas would be disaster because than the opponents would seize this advantage A exactly as trump did. Do you want to be swamped by all of these people who are different from you in would say worse things. Of course were different starting off with the fact that they were ripest is trump did So it's to actually advocate this By a serious politician. I think is just a recipe for handing over power to the On the unscrupulous people who will stir up racism and that is a disaster was a disaster for four years on the donald trump. It's being very bad. In some european countries like hungary and pollen where order crafts have applied the same kind of xenophobic cod have retained power and to some extent popularity. I think you know we can only do what we can. I think my goals and yours are probably the same. But i see it as necessary to not get too far ahead of where the electorate is on these issues. Do you see difference. The knicks generation. you know One could argue out. Generation has really done sufficiently Hasn't done enough to actually make a difference but you see a difference. The next generation of the employees phones. No not really. I mean i think you know people keep saying this right You could say well. The the generation of germans who voted for hit let Was you know. was racist generation and subsequent ones are not And sadly germany has done more to eliminate that kind of racism than most countries in the aftermath of the war and the catastrophe that meant for gemini. But does that mean that. Racism is disappeared in the current generation in germany. No not really when when i gala michael I've been the borders to syrian asylum seekers refugees that was a backlash There are still some people who are hostile to accepting non non-germans in into into germany and Even cheap right woman as she is Had to pull back to some extent so i don't see as the next generation as being the solution may. Hopefully there will be a little bit better than past. Generations hopefully will make progress generation by generation but but will these xenophobic impulses have been eliminated in the next generation. I see that changing so rapidly. Yeah as i sometimes wonder You know so. You have the social media days by facebook later lincoln and salon Would become position that we will have graces. You have a tweet. Raised releasable crease. And so on you know Because that's fair that's all the people and that's where the people i bet. In fact i then segregate themselves they..

botas richard dawkins donald trump germany gala michael hungary knicks lincoln facebook
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:16 min | 3 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"You know people people seize on them and suddenly they beat them up into something much larger and more significant but my And that is a factor in terms of racism in the community I see this. You were talking about evolution and what it's given rise to I think it has given rise to a certain kind of of xenophobia. That is to the idea that people who look like me looked like my my parents I'm more likely to think positively of than people who look different from me and that can be combated socially of carlson that should be And when we used to diverse societies with people a lot of people look different and we much less likely to have those sorts of attitudes but the problem is that unscrupulous politicians can appeal to them. And they're still there and sunlight and foam and we've seen that so often. I mean obviously. Hitler came to power by appealing to this xenophobic reaction against the people who were part of the german community had been for hundreds of years the jewish people but he was still able to appeal to that and stirred up in in germany and donald trump was able to study this against Immigrants against a mexican food. He said rural ripest and so on the that seemed to get some residents mike. Some of the american electorate incredible as that my same so said that's the problem. I think that That this is not that. There's nothing there it. There is something there and it's affected by the society and we need to have a positive environment to minimize it and come as close as possible to eliminating it but it's it's therefore People to stir up. I see an advantage duration. So i mostly what scientific basis feeder so A race as we see it is fairly tactical thing grade. So my understanding is that that opens. Cps lend to a bottleneck we had at some point or fifteen thousand samba's left on earth And so we wind time bag sufficiently long from a scientific perspective that it's no difference but he eats the difficult for people to internalize because the surface features that the assigned so much importance to all highly tactical. But that is what we see out but that is what actually prescribes policies. We help two hundred different countries. I would ask this on on on you. I think the slightly different opinion on this. I consider myself to be a universalist. I will say. There are no needs for countries Companies that really is sort of a segmentation scheme that is no reason for religions that some of the segment he invented the segmentation schemes assault of segment solves into into something that has had no real meaning or relevance i was. He gives an opinion on this. Well i'm look. I i agree that It would be much better if we could have. I've been borders and Not have countries. So have. Not as i said i write this book. One world which really is advocating global governance. I thought it was premature to say a world government but more institutions of global governance like Strengthening the united nations like the international criminal court alike your ways of making reaching agreements and enforcing agreements on climate change..

carlson donald trump Hitler germany samba mike international criminal court united nations
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:44 min | 3 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Have more children themselves so We do might those choices individuals all the time and we also might be choices as society's way tend to be a kind of in pure nike system. Would would suggest in a way read. We help people who i wake. Who have problems with Reproducing And we help people who are old in longo reproducing to have better lives and we help people who don't have Share as many of our genes as others on strict evolutionary tons. We would help those who are kin and we would not help strangers but in there are a lot of people who do help strange's and That also goes country. To the system that you're describing. That's but again from a total system. Perspective billion people. Earning less than two dollars a day be spent domestic that Actually plus learn because you cannot get do a herd immunity as they call it. From a scientific perspective get about six billion people vaccinated so it is really a naughty conomic nonscientific process to get two hundred different countries and every country for those you know its own policies and some county say to get to sixty percent. Seventy percent of their own is never going to help us manage pandemic. that's would white problem. And so you know. So maybe talk about all these things. But it seems to me that vietnam p set out to solve systemic problems to the world Be smooth rounded talking on that Politicians get directed Or not get elected but under the day a superior to be the same all around the world. I think that's true. I agree with a lot of what you said that we not set up to deal with global problems I write a book back in two thousand and two zero one world which had been a new edition one world now just a few years ago in which i was exactly making that point that we have global problems and we have global institutions to handle oh and the pandemic is certainly one of those global problems but before the pandemic climate change as one. There are several. And i talked about in the book and We we do the best. We can On climate change obviously the effected president biden replaced. President trump has been a big plus. Because it's taken the us back into these discussions of climate change in into the paris agreement. And i'd say there's a glimmer of hype that we will get control of climate change before it's catastrophic and the. I'm not saying more than a glimmer on. The trump seemed like comas. Now so I think there are prospects of making progress on the pandemic while. I think we will get there. Of course you know vaccinating. People is one way of getting hurt immunity. The other of getting hurt immunities. You expose the whole population to the virus And many of them get ill and some of them die on some of them recover so i think we will eventually get a to clearly could do better if we had Strongest libel cooperation and if the wealthy nations provided the vaccines that i needed for of poorer nations So i i do see some changes and you know you mentioned a billion people living on less than two dollars a guy in fact before the pandemic had got dan seven hundred seventy six billion according to the world bank's estimates and so that was considerable progress. It was actually if you go back twenty years or something. It was what one was. I've been one point two billion so it was coming down. I think that..

longo President trump nike vietnam biden comas paris us dan
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:51 min | 3 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"I do think a lot of you know. Thinking about ethical issues is better. that is For example as i said we officially allowed slavery and its things were exposed like what the rim selves did to the mac of gada That would then lead to some discipline against the soldier as just as when police brutality and police motor in fact a against african americans is captured on video and exposed then the judicial process comes into action on at least Now it seems like it deals severe sentences to the abuses in the murderers Which i don't think you know would have been very likely to happen in in in those times even from the fact they didn't have video cameras of goes so I think i think to some extent. Yes we do might progress An otherwise i've already mentioned But you know definitely there is human being today. Who if they were not in the public if they could get away with it would do things to the groups Justice just as burj as people doing in roman times. Yeah he seems more sophisticated but I the heart of it at least from my perspective. It appears similar In the us. You know corruption. I if you really doing doing corruption than you div millions of dollars but thousands of dollars because that is to get caught up under something against corruption And so in some sense most sophisticated. It's it's highest. Ko a problem. But i if anything really s changed unted You know be have some cosmetic aspects around Talk about it And sometimes catch some people doing bad things but but there are hundreds of those things that go on caught. Nobody was around with a video camera. Yes that's that's unfortunately true. Yes we still have a lot of problems and they're certainly plenty of people who do bad things when they can get away with it all the time i think and in fact it's interesting reading the golden you..

rim us
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:57 min | 3 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is perfect. Peter singer whose professor by riddick's at princeton university. He was mostly in practical ethics and is best known for animal liberation and poets fighting goat politics but competing. Thank you thank you. It's good to be starting to you. Thanks for doing this early in the morning and belvin So i wanted to start in possibly slightly different of point and we want to talk about different things. Done all your career But you have collated text of don's to it knows on butane or something. I guess coming out you save is coming up next month. Ease ability elder discounting out. Now it's coming out in july dissolved in july. I'm not quite sure. What date in july but northern wanted to bring it out in july so that could still be used for courses beginning in north america in september. Okay okay so and you know. It's a common theme in media. I that have done So because the help you define you the tuna some in in in common terms pito for the audience utilitarianism is the view that the right action to choose of any actions open to you is the action that as far as you can tell. We'll have the best consequences or put more technically the action that has the highest expected utility. Because obviously the probability is of any particular consequences will vary so you to discount. The ad comes by the chances that you will achieve it. The other thing that should be said is when utilitarian stalker by best consequences they main best consequences in terms of the wellbeing of all of those affected by the action. So no classical utilitarian is talked about happiness in the prevention of suffering. Oh misery pleasure kind yet you can think of wellbeing indifferent wise but if we say wellbeing a good general term for what utilitarian talking about and they do mean all beings affected so that includes of course old humans living now but it will also include future humans insofar as we can predict tara our actions affect them and very importantly it includes other sentient beings who are affected by our actions so any being who can experience pleasure pint of their places in pines can't in the calculation as well. Yes it's one of the aggregate metric is under so if you look at the system as a whole and if you an objective function due to maximize utility me my team. He sought an aggregate measure. Right so. I given blend your books..

belvin Peter singer riddick princeton university don north america tara
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:37 min | 3 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is perfect. Peter singer whose professor by riddick's at princeton university. He was mostly in practical ethics and is best known for animal liberation and poets fighting goat politics but competing. Thank you thank you. It's good to be starting to you. Thanks for doing this early in the morning and belvin So i wanted to start in possibly slightly different of point and we want to talk about different things. Done all your career But you have collated text of don's to it knows on butane or something. I guess coming out you save is coming up next month. Ease ability elder discounting out. Now it's coming out in july dissolved in july. I'm not quite sure. What date in july but northern wanted to bring it out in july so that could still be used for courses beginning in north america in september. Okay okay so and you know. It's a common theme in media. I that have done So because the help you define you the tuna some in in in common terms pito for the audience utilitarianism is the view that the right action to choose of any actions open to you is the action that as far as you can tell. We'll have the best consequences or put more technically the action that has the highest expected utility. Because obviously the probability is of any particular consequences will vary so you to discount. The ad comes by the chances that you will achieve it. The other thing that should be said is when utilitarian stalker by best consequences they main best consequences in terms of the wellbeing of all of those affected by the action. So no classical utilitarian is talked about happiness in the prevention of suffering. Oh misery pleasure kind yet you can think of wellbeing indifferent wise but if we say wellbeing a good general term for what utilitarian talking about and they do mean all beings affected so that includes of course old humans living now but it will also include future humans insofar as we can predict tara our actions affect them and very importantly it includes other sentient beings who are affected by our actions so any being who can experience pleasure pint of their places in pines can't in the calculation as well.

belvin Peter singer riddick princeton university don north america tara
Prof. Peter Singer, Professor of BioEthics at Princeton University

Scientific Sense

02:37 min | 3 months ago

Prof. Peter Singer, Professor of BioEthics at Princeton University

"My guest today is perfect. Peter singer whose professor by riddick's at princeton university. He was mostly in practical ethics and is best known for animal liberation and poets fighting goat politics but competing. Thank you thank you. It's good to be starting to you. Thanks for doing this early in the morning and belvin So i wanted to start in possibly slightly different of point and we want to talk about different things. Done all your career But you have collated text of don's to it knows on butane or something. I guess coming out you save is coming up next month. Ease ability elder discounting out. Now it's coming out in july dissolved in july. I'm not quite sure. What date in july but northern wanted to bring it out in july so that could still be used for courses beginning in north america in september. Okay okay so and you know. It's a common theme in media. I that have done So because the help you define you the tuna some in in in common terms pito for the audience utilitarianism is the view that the right action to choose of any actions open to you is the action that as far as you can tell. We'll have the best consequences or put more technically the action that has the highest expected utility. Because obviously the probability is of any particular consequences will vary so you to discount. The ad comes by the chances that you will achieve it. The other thing that should be said is when utilitarian stalker by best consequences they main best consequences in terms of the wellbeing of all of those affected by the action. So no classical utilitarian is talked about happiness in the prevention of suffering. Oh misery pleasure kind yet you can think of wellbeing indifferent wise but if we say wellbeing a good general term for what utilitarian talking about and they do mean all beings affected so that includes of course old humans living now but it will also include future humans insofar as we can predict tara our actions affect them and very importantly it includes other sentient beings who are affected by our actions so any being who can experience pleasure pint of their places in pines can't in the calculation as well.

Belvin Peter Singer Riddick Princeton University DON North America Tara
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:33 min | 3 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Water Strategy and Future Thinking

Future Cities Africa

01:16 min | 3 months ago

Water Strategy and Future Thinking

"Michael waste is executive director for water and waste at the city of cape town will be discussing. The city's water strategy. They thinking and future plans but before we get into that mike. Welcome give us a briefing action to your role and background. Thanks a lot dan. it's great to be with you when free said he's africa. This is the topic. I care a lot about something. That i've with unprofessionally for most of my career i'm currently executive director and water and waste for city of town and i've had that johnson's December the twenty one thousand nine hundred prior to that. I was director warren sanitation. This makes me accountable. The which and sanitation department is whether the southern waste department in the city. It's a big department. We've got four million customers of cape capetown. Twenty thousand kilometers of pipeline of the four thousand stores seven ran budget a prior to this position. I worked for the world bank for sixteen years in Eastern europe saab asia. Africa have twenty five years experience in the sector But originally a civil engineer from uc team with a postgraduate qualifications from left brand the uk and princeton university. And the us.

Michael Waste Cape Town Cape Capetown Mike Africa Johnson Eastern Europe Asia UC Princeton University UK United States
The Second Kind of Impossible

Science Friction

02:06 min | 3 months ago

The Second Kind of Impossible

"Heard the beginnings of a saga and we met the maverick mind behind it. Paul steinhardt theoretical physicist and albert einstein professor of science at princeton university. Great job title. Well today he gets another title indiana jones. You know irish Sort of learning science type is here and as theoretical physicist. I never had to go out on an expedition before except to sign a piece of chop. Hell you'd never lights up a pair of hiking boots little build a campfire. No but you were the mission later. Did people think you're mad. Well anyone who had volunteered for this trip. I guess accepted that we were going to go on this mad trip with very little likelihood of success because they hunting for the equivalent of a needle in a haystack. A tiny speck of crystal with a very big story. It's invisible to the human eye. But had his mission crew will have to cross miles of remote wilderness in far east russia in search of it but the whole story is a series of long long long shots. And so by this time long past the point where you would hesitate. Poll is no hesitate. And if you missed it you definitely want to start with the podcast of last week's episode or catch it over on the science fiction website right now. Paul is about to become an unlikely expedition later. In search of a forbidden idea. One that violates would have been the accepted laws of nature where you just knew it was history in the making so we heard that thirty years of detective work had thai. Can paul from a wacky idea to a box with a mysterious labeling contents in florence museum to chasing down a suspected kgb. associate in israel. A romanian mineral smuggle like cold team a dutch widow with not one but two secret diaries and then finally to an incredible discovery. Something that we had thought was first of all is

Paul Steinhardt Albert Einstein Princeton University Indiana Jones Russia Florence Museum Paul Israel
Carbon Dioxide Levels Hit 50% Higher Than Preindustrial Time

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 4 months ago

Carbon Dioxide Levels Hit 50% Higher Than Preindustrial Time

"Scientists say the annual peak of global heat trapping carbon dioxide in the year has reached a dangerous milestone scientists from the national oceanic and atmospheric administration say the average carbon dioxide level for me was four hundred nineteen point one parts per million that's fifty percent higher than when the industrial age began and the ten year rate of increase is also set a new record coming out of ice age it took six thousand years for carbon dioxide levels to jump about eighty parts per million they've already risen that much since nineteen seventy nine Princeton University climate scientist Michael often Heimer says the world is approaching a point where exceeding the Paris targets entering a climate danger zone becomes almost inevitable I'm Jennifer king

National Oceanic And Atmospher Heimer Princeton University Michael Paris Jennifer King
How to Promote Genuine Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:18 min | 5 months ago

How to Promote Genuine Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace

"Guest is michelle silverthorn. Michelle is a recognized organizational diversity expert and the founder and ceo of inclusion nation where she works with fortune five hundred companies tech startups nonprofits and universities to design authentic inclusive spaces designed on equity belonging and authenticity. Michelle is a graduate of princeton university and the university of michigan law school. She's also a ted speaker and author of the book. Authentic diversity how to change the workplace for good welcome to business confidential now. Michelle thank you so much for having me. I'm so happy to be here. One happy to have you because the subject of diversity and inclusion is more important than ever. And i'm so delighted to have you join me today. Because the idea of diversity being a good thing in business has been around for decades but when it comes to making things happen to delivering on the goods on the promises it feels like they're still so much room for considerable improvement. Why do you think organizations keep failing at diversity and that's a really great question. I think the challenge for a lot of organizations. They don't prioritize it. You know they say that ben prioritizing it they say that it's important to them but one of the activities typically have folks do when i'm doing my training with them. Is you know you think of a problem. I whatever your challenges when it comes to diversity in you know i tell. I've talked a lot about black people in the workplace. One is we don't have enough black executive right until you think that's your challenge. The reason is because there's a broken pipeline right. But then what i asked my attendees to do is to ask why five times so there's a broken pipeline wise and then ask why again because we're not recruiting at the rate schools because our executives think that you'll never recruit that these five schools because they are only comfortable hiring people from these schools because they only work with the people who attend these schools and by the time you get to the fifth. Why then you get to the underlying issue. That's really underlying all of that. But for a lot of people are going to get to that six or seven played the because our leaders don't prioritize it. They aren't willing to commit the resources. They aren't willing to commit the people they aren't willing to take the rest and when we aren't willing to do that. We're just gonna keep on falling behind on birthday and inclusion

Michelle Michelle Silverthorn University Of Michigan Law Sch Princeton University BEN
Kaley & Nate Klemp - How To Be A Good Partner

Untangle

01:59 min | 6 months ago

Kaley & Nate Klemp - How To Be A Good Partner

"Two wonderful guests for you today. Not one but two nate and kaley clump. They're an amazing couple. That together co-authored the new book. The eighty eighty marriage a new model for a happier stronger marriage. Both of them are also incredible in their own. Right nate is actually one of the founders of a company that's partnered with mindful dot org. He's a phd from princeton university. And is the author of start here. Master the lifelong habit of wellbeing. So he's deeply steeped in mindfulness. Kelly is an amazing expert. On small group dynamics and leadership development her books include the fifteen commitments of conscious leadership. The drama free office. And let's say you could make a drama free office. You can probably make a drama free marriage and she created the thirteen guidelines for effective teams so between the two of them. They're here today to talk about the amazing power of bringing mindfulness into your relationship and how to have a happier one. Welcome nate and kelly. Which for having us here so happy to be here. It is my joy and pleasure. Let's start by talking first of all about what it's like to work together as a couple. You guys wrote a book together. You co create. tell me about it. It's a funny thing. Because i think initially. We had a semi conscious agreement to never worked together. We have created separate worlds as you described each pursuing our own areas and then it was really this project around marriage that clearly. We're doing as a joint project and our life and recognize that. Initially nate was going to write this book as a solo author which we thought was going to be really interesting but thought that it would actually be more powerful to do together so now working together living together parenting together being married there is a lot of together and i think that makes all the tools we talk about even more

Nate Kaley Clump Princeton University Kelly
George Shultz, Reagan's longtime secretary of state, dies at 100

Chris Douridas

00:56 sec | 8 months ago

George Shultz, Reagan's longtime secretary of state, dies at 100

"Reagan's longtime secretary of state, George Shultz, has died. He was known for his efforts to boost US relations with the then Soviet Union and to forge a course for peace in the Middle East. NPR's Barbra's front looks at his life born in New York City and 1920 salts enlisted in the Marine Corps shortly after his graduation from Princeton University. He went on to hold a string of high profile positions in President Nixon's administration, including Secretary of Labor, the first director of the Office of Management and Budget and Treasury Secretary. Schulz served as President Reagan's secretary of state, playing a significant role in the easing of tensions between the U. S and the Soviet Union. In 1989. Reagan awarded Schultz the Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor. In a statement. Schultz, his wife says he died Saturday evening and their Stanford home He was 100 years old. Barbara Sprint NPR NEWS

George Shultz Reagan Soviet Union Office Of Management And Budge Barbra NPR Princeton University Marine Corps President Nixon Middle East New York City Schulz President Reagan Schultz United States U. Stanford Barbara Sprint Npr News
Powell signals Fed will keep aiding economy with bond buying

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 9 months ago

Powell signals Fed will keep aiding economy with bond buying

"Share Jerome Powell says the federal reserve will keep taking steps to support the economy during the pandemic there were worries the fed may start to pull back but Powell says they are not even close to reaching economic recovery goals were strongly committed to our framework and using our monetary policy tools until the job is well and truly in a discussion sponsored by Princeton University the fed chair says those goals are maximum employment and stable two percent inflation when the time comes to raise interest rates you know what will certainly do that in that time by the way is is no time soon Powell has high hopes looking forward once right now is taking care of the vaccines go and we get covered under control there's a lot of reason to be optimistic about the U. S. economy and Donahue Washington

Jerome Powell Federal Reserve Powell Princeton University U. Washington
Law enforcement response to Capitol breach questioned

Morning Edition

00:53 sec | 9 months ago

Law enforcement response to Capitol breach questioned

"About how the pro trump rioters were handled by law enforcement after they breached the U. S Capitol, breaking down barriers and smashing windows. Versus how protesters against police brutality have been treated around the country for people died in yesterday's insurrection. Eddie Glaude is a professor of African American studies at Princeton University. He tells NPR's morning edition. There's a difference between how police interact with white and black protesters. Woman was shot and then they just walked out some of them right. On, but I could hear all across the country at least a. My Twitter feed people just in amazement. Not that they wanted the police to be violent in their response, But it gave evidence to the fact that some people are courted. The benefit of the doubt are given certain kinds of leeway. Our space and other people are not. In the summer

Eddie Glaude U. Princeton University NPR Twitter
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

08:58 min | 11 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guests. Today's dope josh mccown. Who is a physicist and as roma at princeton university switch goals have to explode the properties of planets around other stars understand how planets form and evolve and may. Nba pufus on the age. Old question of that are other planets capable of supporting life. His group uses optical telescopes to study exponentially systems especially those star and planet eclipse one. Another belco josh. Hello having sure. Yeah so i went to a used one of your papers. Do of the context for our conversation. And it's entitled the oakland's architecture of excellently systems in which you say the basic geometry of the solar system the shave spacings orientations of the plant. We orbits kessle long been a subject of fascination as long as Well as inspiration for planet formation theories for excellent systems those same properties have only recently come to come into focus. So you know this paper in twenty fifteen And i think there has been a lot of exoplanet discoveries right so what. What does count now. How many exoplanets have you flown. So far the closest thing would official count we have has about four thousand five hundred extra planets. Four thousand five hundred and it's all over the place And in general that would imagine that some limitations beyond which we cannot really find them. So could you could you sort of set the Set the context for that. Are that three different methods by which we find them Could you describe those at webster. Sort of the maximum distance we can target fight it exoplanet. Yeah you're right to begin with the technology because this is a very technology driven field yet there have been speculations since the ancient greeks about whether the other are like the sun and whether those stars have planets and at seemed increasingly plausible as the centuries went on and we learn. More and more strongly would really wasn't until the mid nineties that this field of x plant science scott going and that's entirely because of limitations in our ability to measurements yet answer. The measurements are well. The first thing you might think of doing if you wanna find a planet coming around another star is to use some big telescope and make image of the art and then look for the little dots going around start at the very direct method. Fortunately it's also extremely difficult and it has worked but only barely in a few cases. You actually see the planet has a little dot of its own. Watch the Blocks distance approximately bear. We can actually actually image planet the distance from from us from our scale so we reckon distances we one way to measure distances in light years. Yes That light travels in a year and the nearest stars are few. Let's say or tan light years away. And most of the exoplanets we know about our within a few thousand light years and with with with the more being on closer to us that far away and that's again for practical reasons. It's much easier to perform the necessary measurements if you have a star and then it a nearby star so we clearly quickly lose the ability to detect planets. If they're all the way across the galaxy we were really exploring our tiny little neighborhood of the galaxy but even Even thousand light years so you can actually a planet at that. I think the ones that have been emerged are are closer than that. Mitt me maybe fifty two hundred years ago. I would have to look it up to be sure. Maybe maybe several hundred that sounds like a lot or a little too you to to most ordinary non-scientists. It's distance louis mentioned bodily distant. Yeah stronger that is really next door. There are astronomers who study things that are name many times yes so so. I was just sort of looking at the finding an image at that distance from an earth based oath based Is now the biggest issue as su- is the stalled itself like star so bright anything around said Becomes difficult. So i know that there are some techniques that allows you do actually actually fee doubt the light coming from the star to to actually see the planet's Is that possible. Yes so the basic problem is that we cannot focus oranges as tightly as we might want and some of his make into the to the laws of optics that is this phenomenon called. Diffraction that whenever you interrupt a lightwave with a telescope then lightwave develops curvature of that is boring of the image in your camera and so that's kind of an irreducible problem. And it means that if there is a tiny little dog right next the star than the blur of the star will overlap the dot from the planet. We won't be able to see it so one approach is to just make tighter entire images in one way to do that is to have larger and larger telescopes because the blurring factor in principle those down with large telescopes. Another way is to put your telescoping space where is possible to Make sharper images on the ground. Because on the ground in addition to the problems with optics and fraction the atmosphere salih messing up. The path of libraries and causing additional blurring are images. But then when you alluded to there are special cameras you can build that manage to zero out. The light from a very specific point in the image which star and thereby allow the surrounding area to be searched without the severe problems of the glare from the star. Those instruments are are very advanced and finicky and high tech they go Most of them go by the name of corona graph because these same kinds of instruments were originally used to image the corona the outer layers look blocking the sun's glare and they basically work by putty carefully designed obstruction to obstruction of different shapes with immolate. So as to block the light and direct flight from star to to other areas of the and prevented from reaching the detector right yummy the beauty of seeing an exit planet actively walls around the star itself as a is a magnificent day But we have a couple of other other techniques. Do not to see them but at least to Sort of Speculate the excess. Do say exists. They did this before we leave. The topic of i want to direct your your listeners to particular video that i think every human being should watch you need to look up. The name of the star. It's age are eight seven. Nine nine does very glamorous name. I use a new tune elsewhere. You will find a movie of four planets as tiny little dots circling around of a small portion of their orbits around this nearby star. So that is greatest success of this tanking method so far and how flawed As.

josh mccown Nba princeton university oakland physicist Mitt official su louis
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:55 min | 11 months ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest. Today's episode edvin toner. Who's a professor of astrophysical sciences at princeton university. He also serves as co chair of the innate. Oj princeton astrophysics collaboration council. He gets carried out extensive as phenomenal observations at mount. Tabor surgery lucky. Peak national observatory. Nra ohs video large array at eight point The nationalist cups away to the of japan subaru telescope and with the hubble space telescope. belka med. Happy to be sure. So i i want to start with one of your earlier papers. And it's entitled basic analysis of the astro biological implications of life's early emergence on earth. Invite you say life arose on earth sometime in the first few hundred million years after the young planet had cooled the point that it would It could support what water-based sounds on its surface. The early emergence of life on earth has been taken as evidence that the probability of biogenesis is high. If starting from young like conditions now justice had the context So the solar system about five billion years old the earth itself about four point five billion years old and and i guess we have some evidence that life originated around three point eight billion years ago. Some something along those lines. Yes that's low. Those numbers are all roughly correct. They're they're not absolutely certain. But the The general consensus view. Is that as you said. The are formed about four point. Five billion years old but a a rain of of so-called heavy impacts meaning objects meteors and asteroids and small objects in the early solar system. Not every much a much greater abundance of these objects still crashing into the planets and helping them form Probably heated and perhaps reheated the earth's surface these were huge impacts Deposit energy that was you know. Millions of times like the energy of all the nuclear weapons people have ever built an vaporize the ocean and probably sterilize the earth if if life had gotten started by that point all of those statements are you can look slightly different scenarios. The evidence for them is not. I would say incontrovertible that that looks like the best we know so about three point nine or three point eight billion years ago said call it three point nine billion years ago and the early evidence earliest evidence of life that we have is. Your site goes back to about three point eight billion years ago. It's fairly uncertain might have. There's i think uncontroversial evidence at about three point five billion years ago so we don't know exactly when life got started but of course it got started earlier than evidence in another words the very first life must have appeared in a long before while not long before but before You know there was something that left a record of the fossil or chemical signature. Yes that we can identify so we don't know how early it started but it was certainly within say a couple of hundred million years possibly much less than great so a few years give or take But but the but that's really really quick so the puzzle That human scabs struggling with is one of the the flu be paradox..

princeton university princeton Peak national observatory professor flu Nra subaru mount japan
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is Mike Straws. Who is the chair of the Department of Fast Physical Sciences at Princeton University he uses large scale imaging and spectroscopy surveys of the sky to map the universe but the particular focus on studying the large scale distribution of galaxies to address questions in cosmology and galaxy properties in evolution. He's also particularly interested in quasars powered by supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies. Welcome Michael. I'm very happy to be here. Thank you so much. Thanks for doing this so I want to start with. One of one of the papers a little bit older papers talking about costs logical parameters from SDS W map. So, you say the measure cost logical parameters using the three dimensional power spectrum from over two hundred, thousand galaxy in the slow in digital sky survey SDS says in combination with Wilkinson Microwave and isotope. He prob- W map and other data. So esky says is something from the ground and w map is something from from a I against that is correct. That is correct. And both of these. Have Produce Lot of data SPF started sometime in two thousand, two, thousand trend. Had A long tenure, twenty years with multiple upgrades to it. Ended W map sort of overlap with it between two thousand and two, thousand ten or so before Branca's satellite, kick them right after that. So we have. Two sets of data and and really kind of combining these two data. Looking at. Some of the. That are being more accepted nowadays. So talk a bit about the type of data that we got and. You know what hypotheses we could create some that. Okay. So perhaps, I can just say in general terms what the what the scientific program there is and what are. Just to try to explain how W MAPPING SDSS connected. So what s Tsn let's start with SDSS. So what SDSS? Was designed to do and did was to measure the distances and therefore well to measure what are called Red Shifts. which is a shift in the spectrum of a of a galaxy caused by the expansion of the universe. By measuring these shifts, which is straightforward. If you can measure the spectrum of of the galaxy, you can determine how far away that galaxy is and so one needs to remember that in when one looks at an astronomical image or looks at the sky in general, you're seeing everything as a as it appears in two dimensions. It's all in projection in you. Okay and if you see a star or galaxy or anything asteroid, you don't know. At first glance, which is relatively nearby, which is far away..

Mike Straws SDS Department of Fast Physical Sc Wilkinson Microwave Princeton University Michael Branca esky
"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"princeton university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guess today's purposes Danny. Green who's a professor of physics at Princeton University. Could broad research interests include measurements of black masses the connection between supermassive black holes in galaxies stellar and gas kind of matic's Golf Galaxy Nuclei and diffused light in galaxy clusters. she also serves leadership comedy of the prison, teaching initiative at Princeton University. Jamie. Thank you. I. Won't. Start with. Something that topical and that's the Nobel Prize for physics this year. that shared by Roger Penrose, Ryan, Clark Gentle Antea guests. and. They have all worked in this idea of black holes and that is that is You are associated wall I wondered if you could briefly talk about their contributions to this idea. I think I can I can focus mostly on the work of of Andrea Gezim, Reinhard Gonzo. Their groups and they have really been zooming. Into the very center of our own galaxy at the Milky Way. And painstakingly over decades taking pictures of stars right at the center of our galaxy and then piecing together the orbits of those stars. And finding that they move much faster. Than they possibly could if there was not a dark mass sitting right very much exactly at the center of our galaxy. And so these measurements taken over a long period of time and I could at least bit of what anti had talked about this and she has taken this measurements from Hawaii understand lanes, right the cats telescope. Okay. Okay. So over what time period is. An anti like ten fifteen years. I, think, right. I think it's more than that more than that, and so this is basically looking at an area that we be sort. Of thing there is a supermassive.

Princeton University Andrea Gezim professor of physics Nobel Prize Clark Gentle Antea Danny Roger Penrose Reinhard Gonzo Green Jamie Hawaii Ryan
How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

The Model Health Show

04:44 min | 1 year ago

How Social Media Affects Our Psychology & Why Our Phones Are Becoming Irresistible

"Our guest today is Adam Ulcer and he is an associate professor of marketing at New York University Stern, school of business, and then affiliated professor of Social Psychology Nyu's psychology department, and in two thousand twenty he was voted as professor of the year by the student body and faculty at Nyu Stern School of business. He's a New York, times bestselling author of two books including the book were diving into today irresistible the rise of addictive technology and the business of keeping US hooked his one of the most popular Ted talks. Ever with millions of US talking about this very subject. They were diving into today. He's been featured everywhere from the New York Times to the Atlantic wire popular science and Adam also has a PhD in social psychology from Princeton University where he focused on how people reach the judgments and make the decisions that shaped their lives, and now we're gonNA dive into this awesome powerful important conversation with Adam Alter Adam. Welcome to the model show. Thanks for hanging out with us today. Yeah. Thanks for having me Sean, good to be. So I've got to ask you first and foremost I want to know your superhero origin story because this topic is so palpable. So important but how in the world did you find yourself interested in this domain with tech in how it's kind of relating to our lives? I think the super the Superhero, the super power for an academic is that when we get interested in things that other people get interested in, we can actually studied them and that's what happened with me. I I. Think a lot of people were talking about tech, the encroachment of tech in their lives especially that personalized know I was sitting on the couch next to my wife, we'd spend two hours on our phones. We wouldn't be interacting with each other I remember being on a flight between New York and La, and I don't even remember the flight because I opened a video game on my phone. was an APP plated six hours landed and was like what just happened time melted away. So I think a lot of people probably millions of people who are experiencing some version of that in the roughly two, thousand, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen. But for me it, it was something that I had the capacity to actually study to investigate, and so I did I started to look into it and had a few critical questions like am I the only one experiencing this? The answer was very clearly no What what else is gripping us this way in what should we do about? It is something to be concerned about and that's how I got interested probably six or seven years ago. Yes and it through even through that time. Can you talk about first and foremost for us? Like you said is not you're not alone by a long shot but how has our investment in our time grown from? Prior, you know somebody just here in the studio, one of my guys and he wants to get a flip phone now since the flip phone to now, how is our investment time grown over time to getting on the Internet in in Tech? Yes. So we spent we spent about eighteen minutes touch to phones before the first iphone before two thousand seven. So you gave up like a stood of an hour everyday to your fun, which is not that much time some time but it's not that much time. Now today the average for an adult in the United States and it's very similar across the. Developed world is about four hours. So it's it's increased by a factor of about twelve thirteen fourteen and if you if you imagine that being expanded across the lifespan, we're talking between ten and twenty years of your life depending on whether you're alive or heavy user of the fun. So you're giving up effectively one or two decades of your life to this device. Unbelievable and the thing is even when you say that number I bet so many people like well, that's not me. How can you quantify that because a lot of people feel the same way until they get tracked, they think that they may be fifty percent of the time that they actually do. It's true in two thousand fifteen reached out to this guy who created now colt moment and Marmon was one of the first really sophisticated track is that to what you were doing on your phone how much time he was spending occasionally you get these Ping, sang a you happy with your engagement right now and he he said to me. Before you use it before you install it on your phone and tell me what do you think how long do you think spending on your phone and? He said to me most people have no idea and that was true for me too I guest and so I guess like. I thought an hour but just to be concerned about her I said, how about ninety minutes I'll say ninety minutes a day and I started using this track and was three three and a half hours a day. So I was I was under estimating by more than half and I said to him that's crazy that I have no idea how much time I'm giving up and it's such a lot of the white indict and he said it's totally typical most of us are using twice or even three times more than we think we are.

New York Adam Ulcer United States Nyu Stern School Of Business Professor Of Social Psychology Sean New York Times Associate Professor Of Marketi Professor Marmon School Of Business TED Princeton University LA
Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

BrainStuff

03:44 min | 1 year ago

Can Simple Fruit Peels Revive Dead Land?

"Of IHEART. Pay Brain Stuff Lauren Boban here with another classic episode from Erstwhile Host Christian Sager. This one has to do with some awesome environmental research almost never came to light. I'll let Christian explain. Stuff, it's Christian Sagar. If some of Earth's most barren wastelands could be transformed into dense productive forests by the most unlikely of helpers discarded fruit peels. It sounds like wishful thinking but that's exactly what happened in the nineteen nineties during promising ecological experiment orange juice manufacturer del Oro plunked twelve thousand metric tonnes. It's around thirteen thousand, two, hundred, twenty, eight tonnes of orange peels on top of bleak Costa Rican Pastureland eventually transforming it into a lush fertile forest but it's a success story that almost wasn't told del Oro donated a seven Acre or three. Hector plot on the edge of the WANNA cast t conservation area after being approached by University of Pennsylvania researchers, Daniel Johnson and Winnie. Hell walks who wondered how the company's discarded appeals could benefit the soil in one, thousand, nine, hundred, Ninety, eight, the company deposited one thousand truckloads of orange skins onto the degraded land as part of the agreement but rival Orange Squeezer tico fruit sued del Oro a year into the contract claiming the company was defiling National Park Costa Rica's Supreme Court agreed, and after only two years, the experiment came to a halt. That could have been the end of the story. Were it not for Timothy Truer a curious ecologist at Princeton University in two thousand, thirteen truer and a team of researchers traveled to Costa Rica for unrelated research and decided to look up the orange peel plot. The site sign was so covered with vines in the land. So densely filled with trees that took the team years and dozens of site visits to discover it the team sampled and studied the soil at the site and compared it to samples that were taken in the year two thousand. It also noted tree diameter and species from the Orange Peel site and that of. In Year by pasture that wasn't treated with peels, the researchers found that the treated area had richer soil more tree biomass and a broader variety of tree species including a fig tree with a circumference equivalent to three arm spans. The precise reasons for this one, hundred and seventy six percent increase in above ground biomass are still being investigated but the researchers contend dumping massive amounts of nutrient. Rich organic waste had a nearly immediate effect on the land's fertility changing its lifeless soil into a thick rich loamy mixture. The researchers proposed it's also probable that the orange peel suppressed growth of an invasive grass that was keeping the forest from flourishing. The rediscovery of the experiment, a boon for barren landscapes and agricultural waste, but it also could have a major impact on earth. If more companies institute similar, environmentally friendly solutions to waste the resulting richly vegetated land could help isolate harmful carbon dioxide in the air and improve Earth's polluted atmosphere. So

Del Oro Earth National Park Costa Rica Costa Rican Pastureland Christian Sager Lauren Boban Christian Sagar Timothy Truer Hector Plot University Of Pennsylvania Princeton University Daniel Johnson Supreme Court
Buckle Up

In The Thick

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Buckle Up

"Hey. What's up? Welcome to in the big this is a podcast about politics race and culture. From a POC perspective I'm mighty at Sam and I'm Julia Galleria joining us today. All of us important team separate going crazy. We'd have to return all stars from Princeton. New Jersey is Dr Eddie Claude Junior James. S Mcdonnell Distinguished University professor at Princeton University Hey Eddie welcome back rose more pleasure. excited. We are so happy to have you so happy and joining us from Boston Massachusetts County. Crossley. She's host of W. H is under the radar you're on the radar for here Kelly. Welcome back. I'm so glad to be back and we're happy to have you back so. It has been a minute since the both of you have been on the show it's the first time that you're on the show in two thousand twenty, which is honestly like, wow, I know and a lot has happened since you were on this show, the coronavirus pandemic I became a survivor of the corona virus myself the movement now to defend black lives this extraordinary reckoning that's happening all across the country young people really turning up, and now the twenty twenty presidential election officially heating up amidst all of this it's been intense so Kelly start us off just what's your temperature check? How are you doing like for reals? I'm exhausted I'm exhausted physically and emotionally, and as I wrote about recently I have outraged fatigue and I'm trying to fight it Eddie. How're you doing? I'm holding on I'm just barely holding on actually it's just exhausted like Kelly. Trying to hold on tired of looking at this damn computer screen and really just trying to figure out a way to step away from this moment. You know because I'm drowning in it it's been pretty intense. It's crazy Julia for two people who feel exhausted and kind of drowning in it, I. Mean. We turn to Kelly and two Edita to help us to give context but I appreciate and this show who that we do we do let it all hang out as we used to say back in the nineteen seventies. But the point being about exhaustion I think it's important to recognize that and. Unfortunately, I feel like this level of exhaustion is going to continue because here we go twenty twenty election. And there is now a zoo meeting called the Democratic National Convention DNC which starts this week we. The. People. We the people call the forty eighth quadrennial Democratic National Convention to order. And it goes through Thursday, all our listeners. We're recording this conversation on a Monday afternoon so that you know, but you know the DNC I actually saw this video i. don't know if you saw it on twitter from Nineteen ninety-six, the DNC is starting in everyone's doing the Macarena. Acquit. On. Putting You this big Joyce Event and I remember that actually so it's going viral on twitter. Clinton's yeah yeah claims and ninety six. Oh I saw that. So anyway so they're doing them I got and I was like I remember these conventions and it's supposed to take place in Milwaukee. Obviously because pandemic, it's turned into this entirely virtual format talking about computer screens, Eddie? I'm like, oh So. What we do know is that on Thursday Joe Biden is scheduled to officially accept the nomination from his home state in Delaware on Thursday. On Monday night, the virtual convention featured speakers from former first, lady, Michelle Obama let me be as honest and clear as I possibly can. Donald Trump is the wrong president for our country. He has had more than enough time to prove that he can do the job, but he is clearly in over his head. He cannot meet this moment. He simply cannot be who we need him to be for us. It is what it is to Senator Bernie Sanders at its most basic this election is about preserving our democracy. During, this president's term, the unthinkable has become normal. He has tried to prevent people from voting undermined the US Postal Service deployed military and federal agents against peaceful protesters threatened to delay the election and suggested that he will not leave office if he loses. Is Not normal and we must never treat it like it is but you all know and we have people here who are critical of the Democratic Party like we are of the Republican Party. You've already heard the critique right that a number of the speakers like including Sanders and club HR, and Buddha judge and cory booker, all of them former candidates. So we've heard a lot from these people and one twenty twenty candidate was clearly not invited guests that was Oh let's see Mexican, who represents the largest non white voting block potential voters yes. That would be Latinos and Latinas and yes, they did not invite Julia Castro. Who is the only Latino candidate in the primaries so I mean look there are literally only a handful of Latino or Latina speakers. There are no Muslim speakers scheduled.

Kelly Dr Eddie Claude Junior James Donald Trump Senator Bernie Sanders DNC Twitter Democratic Party President Trump Princeton New Jersey Crossley Julia Galleria Julia Castro Princeton University Julia Boston Massachusetts County S Mcdonnell Distinguished Univ SAM
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 1 year ago

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
New Jersey's Princeton To Remove Woodrow Wilson Name From Public Policy School

ABC Perspective

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

New Jersey's Princeton To Remove Woodrow Wilson Name From Public Policy School

"Princeton University's removing Woodrow Wilson's name from school of public and international affairs because of what the school called his racist thinking and policies. Wilson was not only the 28th U. S president he was Princeton's president, but during his tenure there, he barred black students.

Woodrow Wilson Princeton University Princeton School Of Public
Princeton University to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from school

Dave Plier

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Princeton University to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from school

"It Princeton University has decided it's going to remove former president Woodrow Wilson's name from its public policy school because of his segregationist views reversing a decision made only four years ago the university statement says Wilson's racist views and policies make him an inappropriate name sake for our school of public and international affairs as well as the residential

Princeton University Woodrow Wilson President Trump
Princeton to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from policy school

Frontlines of Freedom

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Princeton to remove Woodrow Wilson's name from policy school

"Princeton University is removing the name of former president Woodrow Wilson from its public policy school the Ivy League school says it's reversing a decision made four years ago to retain the name in a letter to the university community president Chris eyes Gerber says the board of trustees concluded that Wilson's racist views and policies make him an inappropriate name sake for the public policy school he says he revisited the issue following the killing of George Floyd the move is drawing criticism from some alumni one Princeton grad wrote to fox news criticizing eyes Gruber for not standing up to a leftist mob and said Wilson is synonymous with academic freedom

Princeton University President Trump Ivy League School George Floyd Woodrow Wilson Chris Eyes Gerber Princeton FOX Gruber