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30 Burst results for "preneurs"

Under Fire, Shake Shack Returns $10 Million in Small Business Funds

Business Wars Daily

03:45 min | 2 months ago

Under Fire, Shake Shack Returns $10 Million in Small Business Funds

"Big news yesterday. Burger chains shake shack is returning. It's ten million dollars. Pp loan that people of course is short for the payment protection program. That's part of the Federal Government's cares act. It was touted as a bailout for small business. The low interest loans forgivable if at least three quarters of the money is used to keep workers on payroll but a number of large publicly traded companies including certain shake shack managed to get multimillion dollar loans before the program ran out of funds last Thursday that angered millions of owners of considerably smaller businesses. Who were locked out of the program? Here's what happened. The PPI was intended for businesses with fewer than five hundred employees. The Small Business Administration's definition of small business but it included a clause that allowed companies with multiple locations to apply as long as there were fewer than five hundred workers at each location shake. Shack is public company. Employing eight thousand people across close to two hundred stores in the US. It's valued at one point. Seven billion dollars according to Forbes but fewer than forty five people make burgers and fries at any single shake shack store that's far below the PP's single location cab. When the program was announced the company had already furloughed or laid off about one thousand workers so shake shack applied for the P and it turns out. They weren't the only multimillion dollar company to do so other applicants included. Ruth's Chris Steak House. Three hundred million dollar cruise line and four hundred million dollar data storage company and that's created a big problem for small businesses. According to Bloomberg two percent of the firms approved for loans got thirty percent of the total funds Solo preneurs and small businesses faced with the prospect of going out of business permanently. Were furious to learn that more than a dozen public companies with revenues greater than one hundred million dollars had received portions of the funds leaving little for them according to Bloomberg four inches. Ruth's Chris employs almost six thousand people. It's sales topped half a billion dollars. Last year. It received twenty million dollars in P. Money. Four hundred million dollar pot belly corporation chain of sandwich shops also employs six thousand people. It received million dollars in the low interest funds. Bloomberg's Ed but shake shack has since apologized for applying for the loan in an open letter. Sunday. Owner Danny Meyer and CEO Randy. Rudy said the. Pp's initial guidance was confusing. They wrote quoting here. The best chance of keeping our teams working off the unemployment line and hiring back are furloughed laid off employees would be to apply now in hoped things would be clarified in time close quote. They were losing more than a million dollars a week. At that time last week the company was able to sell equity on the public market and raise one hundred fifty million dollars as a result Meyer. Garate decided to return their peop- funds quoting again so that those restaurants who need it most can get it now. They said in a statement. They acknowledged their good fortune and having access to other funds and said until every restaurant that needs it has had the same opportunity to receive assistance. We're returning hours. Well responses ran the gamut from laudatory to highly critical some observers praised owner Danny Meyer is noble and pledged to be lifelong customers others were livid saying restaurant. Chains should never have applied in the first place. It'll take time to see whether public opinion will tilt toward shake shack or against it. However the company's actions received a hearty congratulations in one place by Monday. Evening it stock was up seven percent. In contrast. Ruth's Chris fell seven percent. Potbellies was also down by yesterday afternoon. No other major restaurant chains or public companies had stepped forward to follow shake shacks lead

Shack Bloomberg Danny Meyer Ruth Small Business Administration Chris Federal Government Chris Steak House United States Forbes Potbellies P. Money Garate Rudy CEO Randy
How to Become "Data Rich" and 10x Your Business with Data with AJ Yager & Meaghan Connell

Entrepreneur on FIRE

02:58 min | 4 months ago

How to Become "Data Rich" and 10x Your Business with Data with AJ Yager & Meaghan Connell

"I have always been data person of always been a numbers person I love analytics and these to rock the world when it comes to this stuff as I share with you in the intro. Today's mass classes all about you. Fire nation becoming data rich and taxing your business with data. So let's just dive in because we got a lot to cover today. I don't want to leave anything out. So let's start just by sharing. What specifically is data? And of course why should we be data driven? Yeah so I'm going to before we get too deep into this. I'M GONNA hope that most people didn't already to now when they heard data 'cause I'm sorry what'd you say I told you down Because data is simply information. I mean too. Many people will see it as ones and zeroes earn some sort of technology or math based thing that you know a lot of entrepreneurs or business owners just they they. WanNa touch with a ten foot pole and yet every single business owner when we ask them. Do you want to be more informed or less informed the very very simple answer that you need more information? Because there's a it's a competitive landscape right and everybody's fighting for their prospects attention and if somebody knows where those prospects are or who. Those prospects are how to find them. What's the best way to attract them? Obviously they're going to win every single time so data is simply information and the more you have the better suited you will be and it will give you the competitive advantage. Because nowadays there's data everywhere and so those those businesses that are using that to make decisions are always going to have that leg-up that's right and we're here to two companies. No like you have. Not every single business knows it but you are a data business no matter what and those logo like to say is the companies that used data will have the the competitive advantage over everybody else. Because it's it's it's literally just an edge up. You know if you know more. Data turns into Information Ryan. We're here to make it fun. We WanNa make it sexy like even if you're somebody who fail math class it can be fun and easy. Don't have to be complicated. You don't have to. It doesn't have to be complicated from the analysts. And all the stuff you see on Social Web's and all the and all the predictive stuff like don't worry about that we're going to are now. Yeah now am I saying data wrongs. It's like a niche Inisia-. Nobody knows type thing. Is this like data. Data like are they interchangeable or am I stupid? They're totally entertainment. It's more like aller allure. I actually. I'm a big believer though. The people should say Jeff just because when you say Gif I honestly always. I'm thinking about Christmas gifts and I just don't know you're talking about emojis. Wow the Internet would slay you right now. But it's well the Internet's hearing me right now and I stand by that Jeff Jeff all day long and fire nation. Most of you listening right now are small businesses. Your solar preneurs. Your Cyber Noor's your entrepreneurs you make things happen with a small team.

Jeff Jeff Business Owner
Listener Questions: Marketing That's Working Today

Startups For the Rest of Us

10:12 min | 4 months ago

Listener Questions: Marketing That's Working Today

"Dive in to listener. Questions Ruben. Thanks so much for coming back on the show man. Thanks for the invite. Yeah it's GonNa be fun. I think you have some good insight on a lot of these questions today. Our first question is from will and it's actually a question that I don't think you and I have a lot of insight into so I've called in a remote correspondent to help us out with that. The question is are there any good places that you know of to pick up more stuff on affiliate marketing? One thing that came out of this past year is that I can write a lot faster and more effectively than I thought. I'm not convinced that writing code is even my strong suit even though lots of people tell me as I'd like to explore options in this area a bit more but I'd like to borrow your behest filter for a minute trouble with people. Teaching affiliate marketing is that they're also affiliate marketers and a signal to noise ratio is brutal thanks. Well that's been my experiences. Well I ruin before we recorded. You mentioned that you haven't been in the affiliate marketing area for a while. You'd never like that comment that most of the people selling courses our affiliate marketers as well. So it's really hard to know what's legit exactly you're dead on will and so what I did is I tapped a friend and mentor. Microsoft Speaker Taylor Hendrickson who does exist in that space a lot of the stuff and affiliate space. And let's throw that over to Taylor. Hey thanks for the question will give him my name's Taylor and I've been doing affiliate marketing in one form or another since before the panda update in Google which view non nerds out there almost ten years. Now you're completely right that most people out there who are quote teaching affiliate marketing actually aren't good at themselves or just regurgitating the same information. They senior of posted a billions of times. That doesn't actually help anything or anybody. So for that reason. I actually really don't have any good courses or resources to point to affiliate marketing. Who aren't just hawking the same stuff everybody else's but one of us did provide a little bit more perspective or way of thinking about affiliate marketing. I think will help guide you in the right direction and looking for the main core of affiliate marketing the same main core is normal business. You get into it solving the defined set of problems for defined audience. So when you look at WHO's doing that well filial marketing look at places like wire cutter. All they're doing is recommending the best version of whatever. The problem people were coming to the website for in exchange for the commission. They know that the only reason they have an audience were bought for untold. Millions OF DOLLARS BY THE NEW YORK. Times is because they provide amazing value to the people coming. They're looking for solutions to their specific problems. So I'd recommend the same thing for anybody looking to get into marketing. How can you provide value to very specific audience with very specific problems by recommending things that you would actually recommend to a friend or a loved one not just as a highest philly commission or just random things? You're trying to make a quick buck. People see through that really quick and if anybody is promising those one click riches or anything. That seems a little bit too good to be true or actually doesn't stand the test of this last another years completely run the other direction because they are probably a charlatan. So I know this doesn't quite answer the question you were asking but hopefully give some perspective as to how to think about this industry better now back to you rob. Thank you so much Taylor. Being are onsite correspondent for the affiliate marketing question. Our next question is a voicemail around new modes and methods of marketing. Hey Rob wave to Mike. Muslims donal longtime listener You both kept me going through tough times so really appreciate that. I'm a recent return to my home country of Ireland but a tech networks and security for a long time Bacchus I built my first self-funded. Saas up twenty eighteen. It did live technical screening of engineering skills and engineering skills but to get traction for a ton of reasons. somewhat intentionally did things backwards like built at first as I was new Tyrrell's and web APPs so I was learning as I went a failed at marketing failed to get paying customers Alba. I did demo for some large and small works on experimented with a whole host of cold and warm methods to get leads so after nearly given up I ended up pivoting PUN SIFT DOT com a few months ago to Saskatoon back in the deception text base. So it now automatically. Honey Tokens Your deploy branches effectively. It's kind of like a breach detection. Up for Saas and infrastructure. Codes did enables attacker detection in Minnesota the months but there's some customer education required for both security teams or engineering teams. And I'm trying to figure out positioning and pricing but my traffic is currently almost nonexistent so as I restart marketing efforts. I'm struck by the recent five. I'm hearing on the podcast and elsewhere that an email list an existing audience doesn't really cut it for Saas any longer so apart from one to one hundred. Combat Customer by customer are there any other new or nontraditional avenues? I should or could be exploring for marketing. Rather than content marketing. Seo PPC and giving talks doing. Podcasts ARE GONNA conferences any help or guidance. Much appreciated love what. You're both doing thank you so thanks so much for the question. I think I want to chime in real quick before I throw it over to you. I've heard a couple people quote back to me. That like on the podcast. I've said that having an existing audience doesn't help and I really want to clarify that. Because if you have an existing audience that is BTC. I'm sorry is a beat. A be focused audience and they could potentially be customer of yourself. I think there's huge value in that. Especially if you have ten thousand or thirty thousand on an email list when I talk about this audience thing not being the end all be all of SAS is that I've seen the kind of beat AC- marketers have a large audience of kind of WanNa preneurs or folks who were looking for that that opportunity to make a million to make money online crowd and then they try to launch US asset for them and they realized that none of them want to pay and the truth is through the roof. And there's a bunch of mess with it and and that is really hard. It's a lot harder than selling info products. That's more of what I'm saying. You are trying to say like if you have info product audience and you're making hundreds of thousands a year and you think that you can switch to SAS and make hundreds of thousands of year. I've never seen anyone do that. Well right so do you. Does that make sense? And do you agree or disagree with that? Yeah I completely agree that sort of the Internet marketing space where basically most. It's usually INFO`products where happens lot selling in that way Selling to people who are trying to buy Education courses and other products is different than selling a sas so yet. I've never seen it. I've known several people have tried to do it. That had big audiences that were successful with info products. Really usually struggle when it comes to selling this just because it's different. Yeah I agree. I think the one example that I can think of that worked with Klay Collins with Lepage's but it was man. It was all annual plans. It was pretty high pressure sales. If you went to their webinars it was really marketed. In a very specific way and frankly they struggle with that longer term they got big quickly but then that had its own drag on the business there couple there couple that have done it the It's not everyone but most people are not going to be able to do it. I'm the other one that I can think of is click funnels. What's his name Brunson something Russell Brunson. Yes so to donate question. What do you think about? And he mentioned a bunch of stuff Hussein content marketing. Seo Pay per click. One on one. I think he was meaning cold emails. Speaking at conferences. Going on podcast right and in my like all that stuff still works right right right it does. Some of it is harder than it used to be like paid. Ads are generally more expensive across the board content marketing back in the day. You do a volley Volume thing just published two three four five posts a week and the more republished more Traffic you got so in some ways it used to be easier but things have changed in its I'm not sure that I'd say that it's a lot harder. It's a little bit harder but it's it's also different so it's about like just getting educated on what's working nowadays I think it's part of it but I think one of the things that you mentioned was that he was trying to figure out positioning pricing. And things like that and I don't know about you but when I hear something like that I'd be kind of hesitant to start looking at channels. That are that are a lot of people aren't using there aren't proven because in my mind I would need to figure out that I can sell this product who the customer is had as a customer by that. This is going to work. That is fun that I have a funnel that kind of works before I kinda start exploring other channels and channels that that are little unusual or something like that right. Where do you think about that? Yeah I think you're right. It sounds like he's in customer Developmental Mostel. Maybe his product is is to the point. People can use it but if you don't positioning pricing down than yeah I wouldn't. I would really wouldn't start marketing yet. I would be doing a lot of sales. Yes so a lot of people equate the two is the but the different like I see. Sales is really a one on one. Act even if you draw in all the leads through marketing techniques than the sales becomes conversations. And that's where yeah in his case I'd be looking to have a lot of conversations and try to pick out their language to to figure out positioning you learn so much from those conversations that later help you do marketing In a better way otherwise. You're just sort of guessing you know. I'm I don't know this category. So maybe if this category has a lot of competitors and they're doing really well and it's pretty established the you know that this type of product works. That's a I think that's a different situation where you can have more A little bit more confidence but it still pays to sort of do that upfront work. I think

Speaker Taylor Hendrickson Ruben Microsoft Google Russell Brunson New York Wanna Preneurs Minnesota Philly Saskatoon Ireland Tyrrell Rob Wave Hussein Alba Klay Collins United States Mike
Residency pairs aspiring restaurateurs with temporary sites

Monocle 24: The Menu

08:05 min | 5 months ago

Residency pairs aspiring restaurateurs with temporary sites

"Today we meet the team behind residency. A new initiative assistive to pay or vacant restaurant spaces with emerging culinary talents launched in London. The new enterprise already looking to go into national with the mission to support young talent and budding entrepreneurs can me. Let's opium of restaurants consultancy districts and sip fork of restaurant experts. Montana Montana fog are co founder of residency. And I met them here at Majoria. Oh studio one to find out. More residents say is an initiative which we have creates it which pass up and coming chef superclubs new concept's any sort of emerging thing and food and beverage or hospitality with vacant spaces basis at the moment across the capital but our ultimate jets viz and beyond and through our combined expertise so it's a residency is a collaboration between between district. which is a property restaurant? consultantcy Montana fog which is a restaurant. Consultancy and through combined expertise we can create pop-ups ups and empty spaces very easily. We have contacts with landlords because district says a property business. A Montana can support the operators on the ground and enable the space for operators to go in and start trading. So how did you find each other. What kind of discussions did you have when this idea was born? Well we've nine furlongs. I have yeah we have. I think we first met when my partner and I were looking to open a restaurant or committed was advising us and thankfully we didn't do the deal not through any issue with Camilla ritual. It was the wrong space the wrong concept at the wrong time which is a restaurant consultant but then we work together on a project for the crown estate and had assault on Heddon street which was ironically the property like you offer done or any love it and synergy edge we and then we came together and they had a site where that essentially the keys are being put through the letterbox in the previous tendency unfortunate made it and they had a site that was fitted the Dow and ready to go and they didn't know what to do with it really they'd been thinking for a long time about how they could launch some finish itself which is something we are seeing from landlords now because if you were wind a few years back when a new site came up with an estate in central London landlords always wanted the latest new concept concept the newest operator and since then has been a few burnt fingers so in terms of pushing brand new concept landlords our little bit more cautious about that mom so they are thinking of ways that they can do that without perhaps taking on a long term risk without of committing so when ten had in st came back to the landlord new I think one of the stories I think sub told me was that they only bought some new carafe when St when and everything else was was there and it's provided a great opportunity to trial the poop concept and so the crown at hired Montana fog and district separately and district in terms of helping helping with some sort of strategic direction but also in terms of doing the licensing making sure that all the documentation and Montana fog to find the operators and support them on the ground from day one so basically what you're doing now you're looking for these spaces and he also looking forward to preneurs budding restos operators. I would like to take over the spaces for some time. What kind of conditions are we talking about? How long would this pop ups for example? And what kind of operators are you looking game for. Exactly it depends side-by-side how long the pop-up lost with Tennessee. I think we are moving into month. Eight seven and Republican another three or four months. We'll see so it depends on the landlord. I mean typically day-old Adage from restaurateurs is once you found this all you want twelve months later you'll open the door was that's how long it takes to sometimes raise the money to get your lease. Signed your heads of terms obviously to fit it out so adama landlord or have an empty site. It could be there for a year before I'm actually GonNa say that open again so we can activate that site pretty much within a week to week turnaround. Make sure it's fit for purpose and get an operator in there. And they could trade their quite happily for four to five months whilst unseen the new incoming operator who takes a full lease is doing doing the negotiations with the landlord. Millennials have let so I activated is very flexible model rarely because some operators will want to go in for four to six months and north of gang of presence in makes him return perhaps but others will perhaps wants to do a supper club or decently much shorter term or might be happy. Just go in somewhere for a week to Derby PR and some of the landlords that we're actually talking about our existing operators already have to activate spaces particularly helium pumps and they could be much shorter. Say It's bespoke and it's flexible. An in terms of your other question of what sort of entrepreneurs are we looking for. The Sky's is the limit. We've had interest from a large very well. Funded American Vegan concept. which is very edgy? We've had interest from people who've superclubs in Hackney these people some of well funded and well back to existing. Operators is the ones that aren't who would have a great concept on great passion Russian but to get in front of a landlord to get a lease for ten to fifteen years. No way you ever going to be up to do that. Unless you've got some very very well funded ended backers of which most people don't because the banks unfortunately won't be lending anyone any money for quite a while for the smaller operations and this gives us the opportunity he to educate the operator in terms of how a landlord works. We should very much district comes and for us the Montana folks of of residency to work with them and help them and with the figures look concept introducing to suppliers etc etc.. Actually so there is a lot of support available when you choose. The operator so veto need to be worried about north knowing everything takes yeah. I think that's our biggest point of difference is it's three hundred. Sixty degree support system. Why there will be people who the first people we've introduced a ten Heddon street with David Carter from smoke stack and Chris Leach who worked at Bratton cooked lots of different places? How much support do they need? Not a great deal to be honest with you because they're incredibly experience but moving forward when we take someone from WHO's done of a food stall pop pop somewhere. They will need to understand how the western works because the West End Actually David. Chris did put their hands up and admit that the learning experience of coming from east blondel shortage into what is basically mayfair. Soho borders different world. Because lunch is a big thing. Lunch makes the difference. It doesn't make you a millionaire China but without lunch you really suffer if you're in the west end but you cost this much higher You've been following London restaurant scene for years. How has it changed changed? And what are your predictions. What is going to be happening in the future and always the landscape changing thing? We've seen this of past. Few years is a huge increase in the number of restaurants in London and this was sort of lead from consumer trend to solve. Eat out more and with the sort of casual dining lining crunch the so called and they changing political landscape confidence decreased and the oversupply of restaurants. Met not this wasn't in any way sustainable stable anymore. So that's when we started to see like restaurants going back to landlords and whilst the market is still very vibrant. There's loads of new. You operators out there that wants to take on site and central London. There's nowhere near as many as there was before and what it's done is created a survival of the fittest backdrop so the good restaurants still still trading while and a very very good and another thing. That's sort of is in between nether is is suffering. We've also seen rents go very very high because of the lack of supply of restaurant

Montana London David Carter Opium Chris Leach Majoria Co Founder Hackney Partner Tennessee Assault DOW Camilla Consultant China Bratton
How To Manage a Bad Day

The $100 MBA Show

06:15 min | 7 months ago

How To Manage a Bad Day

"They say when it rains it pours and it often does. I find that. Sometimes you get these days where everything thing goes wrong. Everything comes crashing down. And you just can't wait for the data be over because it's so bad it's ridiculous but as business owners we can't it. Just step away from her problems we face head on and we had to be able to manage things and improve things because we're ultimately responsible. But how do we do that. How we stay positive as of how do we change things up so we don't have an ulcer and don't make decisions or take actions that we're going to regret later? The first first thing is that you need to be mindful of the signs that you are really having one of those days. When you're getting stressed out things are getting out of control? We we all know ourselves so for you. It could be something different but for me. I know that if I am starting to raise my voice if I'm starting to have a bit of anger in the tone of my voice I know I'm starting to get stressed and I need to change things. I got to do something different so I can course correct. Because that's not a state that I want GonNa be in because I can't improve things like that. I can't make the best decisions when I'm in that state for some people they get quiet some people their body. Eddie language changes you know yourself you need to be mindful of this and have sort of an internal awareness alarm that hey this is happening. I need kick into action and do something to change this. So what are some things you could do to changes number one. Change Your Environment Get out of the office. You might think I'm I'm too busy right now. I am to stress allegata billion things to do. I understand but you're going to be able to accomplish those things with a lot more efficiency and with a lot more efficacy. You'RE GONNA make a lot more difference if you are in the right state of mind so five minutes. Three hundred seconds skins is all it takes. I literally put my phone down. I don't take it with me. Put on some flip flops and step out go outside. Even if it's raining training get an umbrella. It's okay if it's cold. Put a jacket on get out of your environment. Gather the office get some fresh air and walk around the block. Just go for a walk. Step away from the situation for a moment so you can get perspective. Don't talk to anybody. Don't do anything. Just breathe and walk. This often solves loves a lot of problems. It often gives you perspective. It often leads. You organize your mind. You're giving yourself a chance to organize a strategy a plan of action to take take on the frustration. The things that are causing you frustration. We often don't allow our minds to have that chance. We just go go. Go go go and in the the process we make a lot of mistakes in decisions that maybe are not the best so taking again five minutes is all takes. You can literally just just step outside wherever you are. Go for a walk. I personally think a walk is better than just sitting outside because walking is known to allow all your brain to stimulate and salting subconsciously. Some of the best entrepreneurs make their decisions when they're going for a walk. This is recorded and detailed in and so many biographies of ground. PRENEURS and coaches like bill. Campbell and Bill Gates and Steve Jobs and Reed Hastings founder of net afflicts. All these people have mentioned that they go for a walk when they wanNA solve things when they want to be able to reshape the challenge. They're facing so number one. Five minutes is GONNA make a big difference number two. I repeat this to myself about three or four times a day especially when I start are feeling overwhelmed. I have a big to have lots to do with a lot of demands on me I say to myself one thing at a time one thing at a time okay. It's very hard to do anything with any kind of positive result. If you don't focus on one thing at a time so you want to just focus on your task get it done next thing and as you go through cross offer to do this and keep going keep going if you feel super super overwhelmed and tired and you just feel like there's so much to do start with the things that you can get a win quickly. Momentum is a very powerful so start with a smaller tasks you can complete. Maybe be in five ten fifteen minutes thirty minutes whether it's an email whether it's a phone call whether it's whatever on your to do list because this is going to give you some momentum. It's going to see that to who list get shorter and shorter. Because you're crossing things off and it's going to give you some confidence okay. Things are working out. Don't start with a five hour project number three set up a goal all for yourself at the end of the day. Sometimes we need to devise things to allow survive allows to continue. Can you to motivate ourselves. There's nothing wrong with doing that for yourself. This could be something so simple. It could be something like hey if I get what I need to get done today by closing time. Whatever or six o'clock whatever you and you stop working? I'm GONNA treat myself to thirty minutes of my favorite video game or an hour. I'm GONNA treat myself to one scoop of with my favorite ice cream down at the ice cream shop down the street. Simple pleasures things that are not going with the Bank of things that are just things that you love doing. Doing it could be something similar. Like I'm gonNA allow myself to have an hour of guilt free Internet browsing. I just want to surf the web for a bit and just like you know look up things have been meaning to look up. Look at some things on my favorite clothing store online. Spend a few minutes the planning my next vacation. Whatever fun stuff so set up some sort of reward? Sometimes we use the stick a lot with ourselves we gotta use them care to to to say. Hey that's looking forward to and sometimes just enough. That scoop of ice cream might be just enough. I like all right. Let's refocus. Let's get these things done. I can do this another thing. I do that really helps me get through. These tough days is a remind myself of previous tough days. Hey there's

Eddie Bill Gates Reed Hastings Founder Campbell Steve Jobs Thirty Minutes Five Minutes Five Ten Fifteen Minutes Three Hundred Seconds Five Hour
Lee Baucom: Thrive...No Matter What

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

08:51 min | 8 months ago

Lee Baucom: Thrive...No Matter What

"Surviving simply isn't enough. We should be thriving now. Lee Bow Gum is an expert in thriving no matter her. What life throws your way? He helps people to thrive in their relationships than their lives lease. The host of three podcasts. Were all addicted to podcasting according to to mice to enter chair. Three he is you. GotTa you gotTa start. Achieving some level of six seven eight hot get out of the three. That Lee hosts right now. The thrive algae podcasts. The Save Save the marriage podcast. I found that a little too late and the and the man of significance. PODCAST if you're listening now in November of two thousand nineteen on this Show Man of significance. PODCAST will be launching in the end of this year the beginning of Of Two thousand twenty. He's also the author of seven books and works with people around the world to find their meaning meaning in their purpose and to make there impact in the world. Hold on tight if you want to better understand. Relationships had to have a better marriage more significance in your life how to avoid veer how to thrive. I had an opportunity to learn from and with Lee while attending the new media summit and I love his approach not only business but especially as approach to life Lee. Welcome to the Nice guys on business podcast. Oh Man Doug I'm happy to be here. Thanks for having me I love having you here Lee. And you're one of those guys that just stood out in the crowd because You know one of the things we talked about in I don't know if we talked about this a new media summit but we did talk about this recently in our prerecording conversation was that people people oftentimes have this. This fear that that difficulty is Is it means you're on the wrong path and I wanNA share not only a little. It'll be your story but I wanNA talk about that as we get into it because those that are listening I want them to just jump in right now. We all are facing these difficult times. When it comes to running a business thriving in our business and kind of moving to that next step and sometimes we feel like difficulty means that? We're going down the wrong way. So why don't you share a little bit of your pass and talk about this difficulty. Means you're not necessarily on walk past. Yeah so part of my story of entrepreneurship is I didn't actually realize that was what was for years. I just knew I made a really bad employee. Impact Vaca at a at a number of Review Tom's when I would walk in and Annan you the person who was the director out. I was trained as a therapist. But what had already done a number of businesses really since I was a teenager a was a Now this secret there doug but Abbas yes we won't tell anyone right air show so all of the magician when I was a teenager so Gidon yeah in the in. The nerdy. Ranks I was right there. but I was a magician who made some pretty decent money when I was a teenager because I did parties all the time and I didn't ever really think that I was you know in business I just I was doing agile shows and getting paid for it and so even when I look back you know I I I did that. I helped run a clothing store when the owner was burned earned out and Pretty much everything from ordering the stuff to a taking care of other people on staff and I was a teenager at that point and then I did the same thing with a restaurant. The owner was burned out and I ran a restaurant or helped run the restaurant and and what I realize long ways I really didn't like being told what to do so that kind of extended into my life as trained as a therapist and yet I worked in an agency which brings us to that point when I would walk into the the job review annual review and say hey anoma really bad employees You can get rid of me. I'm you know I'm happy. Go somewhere else if you want. And what they basically they did And and where I kind of made my way is when they let me do what I thought was best and so they stuck me in satellite office and let me run that program and it became really the only thing that kept that Senator in Business I was kind of a cash cow for a long time. And so along the way I right realize at some point. This is a realization that I think we all realize that at some point. We're no matter what we're doing if we're professionals we're an hourly employee employees. I mean as a therapist I can only see so many clients. I can only do so much and so at one point I Decided to start a business on the side which was no surprise? I don't think that my wife but this was a bigger gamble than I thought so. Here I was trying as a therapist to figure out how to make an extra income stream came from a family We were. I've been Grad School for forever I was talking with someone the other day. And I said I was in Grad School for as low from college to the into Grad School. As long as I was from kindergarten to the end of highschool well professional student way to go with it was a long time and along the way you know. You ever see the forty year old virgin. Did you ever think. Fortunately fortunately for me I had to work along the way that was the the thing about Being trained as therapist you. You can't just do school. You GotTa go do some real training and so I actually was working for a good stint of that time other than college I really was working the whole time on the side but that was when I realized I'm like you know this this hourly thing I mean I can only go so far and so I tried to create this business snus and it crashed and burned and I figured out why it crashed and burned but it was a painful event for me because while I was trying to build something from my family would I ended up doing is putting us way deeper in debt I'd already had kind of a stunted professional life because while I was working I was also going to school and so I couldn't really go full force and so suddenly we were extra in debt With a business loan that had a rough Payback payback. And I refuse to do bankruptcy. I just I was like I did this. I'M GONNA take it on and I'm going to finish it and learn some very important lessons along along the way about what happens when you try to start a business that's not in your place of purpose or meaning And incredibly painful event and then A stayed away for a while but I wrote a book and I thought well. I'll just write this book and be an author and along the way This was back in nineteen ninety on at a friend who said Hey Who's going to publish that for yesterday? At I'll figure it out when I finish it. He said well while you're trying to figure that out. Watch making an e Book Doc Now e Book Nineteen Ninety Nine like what's Abbott. Nobody knew that Renault not a wasn't a ninety nine cent you know thing that Amazon had done at that point and so what I really didn't realize as I was getting into informational marketing world and I didn't really realize that even after I had a website up and I was selling the book and it was getting to be more or more successful and sigh. Finally one day out I was like an. I'm one of those Internet marketing gas And so Yup had to revamp what I understood about myself. I just I kind of stumbled from Osh preneurs shipped entrepreneurship and finally one day went. Oh that's the problem. I'm an entrepreneur. That's the personality pieces that I had missed along the way But what I realized I like to do was to help people have better lives. I mean if if there's much ship of that it's really about how do you help people so tail end of my graduate school literally sitting at a desk surrounded with my two little kids. who were toddling around me with stacks of Books Everywhere Writing My dissertation and I turn to my wife and I said Hey? I just read this article about this coaching thing. This was Nineteen Ah Eighty six. I think and said That's what I do and she said wait. You've done a lot of schooling to be a therapist and now you're telling me you WANNA be a coach and I said well it's Kinda how I do therapy. And so that launched me into the world of coaching added coach. Training literally had not even turn in my dissertation and I started a coach training program and took that into My clinical life and so along the way figured out that was a coach and entrepreneur an informational marketer. A writer now podcast all that stuff just kind of fit into the place of how do you help people people get to a place where life has more meaning for you. So how's that for now. That's really cool and I appreciate you you sharing all of that because again Nice Guy Community is you're checking this out. Just think. Think about your particular place in life in the journey that you have taken especially as an entrepreneur. It's it really is a matter of just. You're never going to focus on an entrepreneur entrepreneur. I think our goal We always think is to get from point eight to point Z.. And do it as profitably as we possibly can not realizing oftentimes along the way. There's a bunch of what we think at the time maybe setbacks but they're really opportunities for learning and growth

LEE Grad School Doug Lee Bow Gum Gidon Writer Vaca Amazon Senator Annan Renault TOM Director Abbas One Day Forty Year
One Big Clue That You're Ready to Outsource

The Goal Digger Podcast

03:38 min | 10 months ago

One Big Clue That You're Ready to Outsource

"I was a solo preneurs the idea of outsourcing literally made me seize up with anxiety is working around on the clock to maintain and expand my business in the thought of bringing in someone else might perfectly orchestrated system. That wasn't broken. It made me feel woozy. I'm really being on this year now. Here's the thing my sister had actually wasn't perfectly orchestrated in fact it was far from it sure I had piecemeal systems together rather but were they really working for me. I mean I never got into photography or Entrepreneurship to work twenty four seven in yet. I was tapping away at my computer all hours of the day and the night in order to stay on top of things. I never left the house without my computer and I even slept with it on my nightstand. Talk about not great boundaries. Now I went into business for the freedom and flexibility of working for myself but I found myself a slave to the calendar in my clients rather than being free three and living my best life feeling you might be experiencing something similar. Whatever category of business you're in when you are the one running the show it can feel impossible to hand over. Even a little bit of the rains are recently ran into a local entrepreneur and I asked her how her busy season was going and she kind of awkwardly crudely Dr Head and said I know I know I need help. I've just got to get things ready before I can hire someone I mean. Have you guys ever heard someone tell you I gotta to get in shape before. He joined the gym and you're like what that doesn't make any sense. The same goes for outsourcing. You're not going to be good at everything in fact you're not supposed to be an odds are you're working really hard and really long hours and you barely have time to keep up with your life. Let alone hire and train and manage another another person or a team of people. I get that it feels intimidating. I get that it's scary. I was right where you are. I was embarrassed to bring someone in and let Kimsey my process because while it was working it definitely wasn't streamlined or well-thought out so maybe it's a control thing that's holding you back or maybe you're finally at a place. Yes where you're growing your prophets or maybe your profits are even booming and the thought of spending your hard fought for money to pay someone else to do. Something that you can do is a tough have idea for you to grapple with screw money. Maybe it's just a trusting you built your business from the ground up you and only you can do things the right way. You've seen seen it through dry seasons and uncertain trying times as well as all of its highs and successes in advancements in wins everything that's happened has happened because of you you and you alone and bringing in another person might feel like you're opening the doors to a major dynamic change or worse potential failure. That person messes up up. I get it. I felt all of these emotions. I was gripping onto my business with the white knuckles to the point where I just felt train up a deed and stressed out like like Jesus. Take the wheel tired but at least I was handling it all myself right. That's what I thought wrong. Doing it by yourself doesn't make you you the strongest business owner out there. It doesn't make you more capable or worthy of success in honestly just slowly drains you overtime because your pouring your heart and soul all and most of your waking minutes into the hustle that one day you'll wish you could have that time back. I know it's heavy to think about if you'll save to hold onto your business with everything you've got. I totally empathize but it is okay to lay down your fears about money and time and control to allow people to come in and lend you a hand and in fact. It's really good for you

Business Owner Kimsey Dr Head One Day
"preneurs" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

07:21 min | 1 year ago

"preneurs" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"To preneurs, and it's the south by southwest perfect panel for entrepreneurs in pet lovers, and you have some great people that are going to be on the panel this year. Can you tell us a little about it? Sure, sure. So south by south west is one of the biggest festivals in North America. They have over a thousand panels musical guests cetera et cetera. And eight hundred fifty thousand people attend now, all eight hundred fifty thousand or not coming to my panel as much as I would like that. But I am with three other women one is during Wagner, who comes from cat lady bucks. One is Julie on a. Carello who comes from the CBD manufacturer tweet bowls, and then calling Wilson who created the agency called pets on Q. And the reason I put this group together is I met them all through cat con. But I felt that, you know, the cat business from what I've seen is definitely excuse female, as far as a business side of things. And I thought it would be great to get a panel of women together to talk about how we all got started. We all left corporate environments to go into the pet business. So what we're going to talk about with on this panel is how we did it. Why we did it. And what we can offer as far as recommendations for if people want to get into the pet business, for example, into the cat business, I should say, you know, for example, just because you love cats. It doesn't mean that you can start a cap is this. It's a matter of doing the research and looking at who you're competition is, you know, I created cat Khan, and, and there was nothing like this, that Mary. Cutting pop culture during of cat lady box, basically created a subscription box for cats and cats, people that also did not exist Juliana again, created the first CD company for pets, which is really controversial in innocence, because people still don't understand the benefits of CD for pets. They think everybody's going to get their cat high or their dog high. When Phoebe is non psychoactive and what the benefits are, and then Colleen works with a series of celebre cats and dogs that are now positioned, as influencers to promote products, ranging from Nissan target, and these animals have become celebrities spokes cats. Cats, you know, and some of choline clients have literally done things with me, son, or swiffer, or with nine lives, some of them actually came to cat last year. We're sponsored as part of Morris the cat from nine lives, Kat pack kind of like the rat pack. So it was his posse of, of, of kitties that supported him and his endeavors to promote, adoption and awareness. So I think it's going to be really interesting to see how people respond to this, that it is the only pet panel in all of south by south west, the only one, I think it's gonna be a great panel. I think you have some a lot of variety on the panel between the four women, right? Former on there and I love the focus on women in business women in the pet industry, because the Pierre right? The pet industry is huge. It's growing and growing and growing and I don't know what the. Are. But I'm pretty sure more women own cats than men, but, you know, more, you know, better than a lot of other people, you know how this industry has grown and how there's so much potential right now. And what I will say is like when I created cat. Con as I said, there was nothing and now there are ten or eleven cat conventions that popped up over the past two years. Now, what I'm really happy about, is that seven of those seven or eight of them are either founded or co founded by women, so again, you know to be able to promote women run businesses and showcase what we can do in an industry that is exploding is something that I'm really proud to be able to promote. Well, I think what you do is fabulous, and everybody listening as always. There'll be more information on pet life radio on the episode page for links to the site, links and information. So don't worry. If you're, you know, driving or exercising or something, and you can't write everything down. There's gonna be information on the episode page on Pelee radio as always. But I just wanted to ask you, everybody's always I get emails all the time. What about their pets might about where what do they have do? They have cats. They have dogs or how many are so I heard through the grapevine that you have a cat that was a really cute name. So why don't you tell us about your cat? Real quick. Sure. Sure. My kitties name is miss. Kitty. Pretty girl also known as he's also known as the cat, calm me is. But like many cat owner, I have many names for her. She is miss kitty pretty girl. She is miss Kay. She's the prettiest girl in the house, and then she's the cat con- news and I got her at a shelter a kill shelter in Los Angeles, almost fourteen years ago. And when I got her, she's a Maine Coon, so she's a big talker. And when I got her, it said, may fifth, and that was the day I walked in, she just came in today and they said, no today is her last day. So she looked up at me, like, are you my mommy? And I said, yes, I am. And that's it. That was that was the beginning of our relationship, okay season. I have more goosebumps. You know, my first cat because I didn't have cats growing up my first cat. I literally opened the door and Dennis walked in, and he's Maine Coon, or part, Maine Coon, and they are the most amazing cats. I know everybody has their favorite, but he is I've heard that Maine coon's are the dogs cats their temperament is just amazing. So I just think Mankins walk. I'm sorry, there's other cats at our to we have have four, I have four others that are different tabby, and torty in just others that I don't know, because they're from outdoors and we took him in and fix them and took care. Them. But I love being coons so to wrap things up. I, I thank you so much for being on cata tude, and working people. Find out more about this south by south west panel, if they can't make it to the panel and just want more information. Yeah. You can go to south by south west dot com, which is S, X S, W dot com and type in cat. And because it's the only lecture around pets. That's what's gonna come up. Thank you so much for coming. I'm tattooed and sharing all this great information on Cancun, and as well as the south by southwest panel, it was so to speak with you. Thank you. You know, by the way, our, our tagline is the convention with cata tubes. So it's perfect fit. Oh, exactly perfect. Well, I kinda teed friends, I think that was a great show. A lot of great info,.

Maine Coon cat Khan North America Wagner Julie Cancun cata Carello Juliana Morris Pierre Phoebe Wilson Los Angeles Mary Colleen Kay Nissan coons
For Competitive Edge in Womens Co-Working Space, The Wing Partners with HBO

Business Wars Daily

05:16 min | 1 year ago

For Competitive Edge in Womens Co-Working Space, The Wing Partners with HBO

"Business. Daily is brought to you by Dell this month. Dell is thanking small businesses with up to forty five percent off select computers with Intel core processors. Call eight seven seven by Dell to speak with a small business technology advisor today. That's eight seven seven B you ideal L for tech advice and one on one partnership. From wondering, I'm David Brown. And this is business wars daily on this Thursday may sixteenth co working spaces are big business these days as the number of solo preneurs in the country grows, so too, does the demand for independent office spaces, but a lesser known phenomenon has been gaining a lot of steam over the last few years co working spaces designed for women most big cities have at least one or two born from the same entrepreneurial zeal. Shared by the audiences are intended to serve some of these companies have international ambitions, consider the wing, which now has offices in New York, San Francisco, Washington, DC, Los Angeles, and Chicago. There are more on the way including one in London. Now the wing offers co working features, tailored, specifically to women that includes offices that are, you know, warm enough cafes lactation rooms, Instagram worthy common spaces, and frequent networking events, but the facilities aren't the real draw. The wing is heavily marketing itself as a social club, dedicated to women's empowerment, it's even inked and agreement with time's up, the nonprofit devoted to safety and equity for working women. The wing is community first office space second founded in twenty sixteen. The wing has raised more than one hundred million dollars. That's a huge amount of the new women's co working market, but it's a far cry from we work, which is set to go public soon. We works owner sports controversial valuation of almost fifty billion dollars. If that sounds like a tough rivalry will look under the covers and you'll see that we work is a wing investor the company's hedging its bets, don't, you know, projecting that demand for women. First spaces is only going to grow. And as it does the wing is doing everything it can to ensure it's top of mind it's been entering into high profile partnerships, such as one with h. HBO the wings helping HBO promote the new season of the hit show. Big little lies. It'll host advance screenings in many cities and even a panel discussion with Reese, Witherspoon, Nicole Kidman and Meryl Streep, but the wing is not alone in cultivating starpower arrival. Women's co working chain called the Riveter has featured events with Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg, and US Senator Tammy Duckworth, by the way, in case you slept through history class, the Riveter is named for World War two's, famous feminist icon, Rosie like the wing. The Riveter is well funded. It's raised more than thirty million dollars so far. It has seven locations and Embiid to operate one hundred around the globe. Both the river and the wing. Call themselves women Centric, meaning men can join it's not a philosophical choice before it changed its stance. The wing was sued for gender discrimination, and with membership starting around two thousand dollars a year. It's also been the object of criticism that it's designed primarily for. Affluent women, while the wing may be grabbing attention in the market. It is by no means the clear winner. In addition to battling with the Riveter, it's also competing with growing numbers of smaller local women's co working businesses, especially in trendy cities like Los Angeles. Denver in Seattle term success is far from guaranteed. But, you know, maybe that's the key to success, potent mix van Bishen and uncertainty that spurring innovation innovation. That's pushing the wing out the traditional co working box. From one three. This is business wars. Daily Haiti life are take on the news shares with a friend. And if you're a member of co working space drop line to your colleague. Thanks bunch. I'm David Browner will see tomorrow. Businessworld daily is brought to you by Dell. There's nothing small about your business, your impact on the communities made a huge difference as thank you during small business month. Dallas offering up to forty five percent off select computers with Intel core processors, plus get a free. External hard drive with select PC purchases. Call eight seven seven buy Dell to speak with a small business technology advisor today. That's eight seven seven. B. U. Y. D E L L for tech advice and one on one partnership, eight seven seven by Dell.

Dell Riveter Intel Technology Advisor HBO Los Angeles David Brown London Senator Tammy Duckworth Dallas Sheryl Sandberg Haiti Van Bishen David Browner Facebook Embiid Meryl Streep United States B. U. Y. D E
"preneurs" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"preneurs" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Watch preneurs on the planet, and it's time for them to jump in and become an astronaut on Kennard house. He this has been a Business Rockstars minute. Biz eleven nine weather. Strong thunderstorms possible across northern Georgia Saturday, sunrise culture, sixty seven chance of a widely scattered shower. Thunderstorm storms are much more likely Saturday afternoon into Saturday evening. A few might be severe pies around eighty from the Weather Channel here in Atlanta. I'm meteorologist Mark sibito. Now back to the best stocks now right here on biz eleven million. And welcome back here to the second half of the best stocks now radio. Our we have a pretty good day going on on this Friday to begin a long of new weekend podcast want to come back to this. Tesla story for a minute Tesla's going to raise two billion dollars. Okay. You looked into that. Tell me a little bit about that two billion dollar capital. Raise. Yeah. It's a combination of common shares. So that's the deluded. In addition, there's notes that are going to have a coupon of two percent. Mature in twenty six and they have a conversion price of about three hundred hundred dollars. So that also can be dilutive depending on how many would convert, and I don't know I'm not real excited about, but no, you know, what the stock is not above that level. What what's the strike three three? Oh, nine you're just getting a two percent. And that's it. Yeah. Now if it goes to three fifty or four hundred right? It's a bad deal 'cause you can convert it to stock. So it's kinda like it's a little bit like an option. Isn't it? Bit is. Yeah. Well, Yvonne,.

Mark sibito Kennard house Tesla Thunderstorm Atlanta Georgia Yvonne two percent three hundred hundred dollars two billion dollars two billion dollar
WeWork Loses $2 Billion

Business Wars Daily

05:04 min | 1 year ago

WeWork Loses $2 Billion

"Business wars daily is brought to you by net. Sweet the business management software that handles every aspect of your business in an easy to use cloud platform net sweet has a special offer for listeners of this show and net sweet dot com slash BWI. Ellie be sure to stick around to hear more about it at the end of the show. From wondering, I'm David Brown and this business daily on this Wednesday, April third with all the hype around unicorns. These days, you know, the startups with gigantic valuations. It's hard to miss the opposite that is companies with gigantic losses, especially when they're one and the same as in the case of we work the rapidly growing New York based co working company last week. We work posted a loss of one point nine billion dollars that was on revenue of one point eight billion. Yes, that loss is obviously gasp or the, and it's adding to the doubt many observers have expressed that the company will ever become profitable. As it predicted. It would be by now, but we work is still growing revenues doubled in twenty eight teen over the year before so what Gibbs can a huge co working company make it or has. We were been overly ambitious the company blames it's deep losses on rapid expansion two new communities both in the US and abroad. Many of those new offices aren't fully leased out yet executives told the Wall Street Journal, they promise that once those buildings are full their highly profitable. And in the meantime, the company has six billion dollars of cash in the Bank largely from Asian investor. Softbank still there were reasons to be skeptical that it can overcome almost two billion dollars in losses. This year. One of those reasons revenue per customer is dropping the average. We work members worth about sixty three hundred dollars a year. That's about thirteen percent less than in twenty sixteen. Furthermore competition is increasing about a third of. We works customers are companies with one thousand employees or more. And in that market. We work faces CBRE the world's largest office landlord solo preneurs the majority of. Works members have plenty of options of where to work more and more local and regional co working spaces are popping up every month. CBRE itself is launching a we work competitor, a co working business called Hannah later this year. And if the economy softens, we work will face even more competition from a rival that doesn't need to make any money at all the home office. That's where soloists are most likely to return to should business weaken, you know, and always on coffeemaker a dog at your feet slippers and no rent to pay not a bad deal. But we work insists it'll continue. It's aggressive development growth. It says will create profitability many observers are dubious as one Wall Street Journal reader recently commented. Apparently, we don't work we will see. From wondering this is business wars daily. Hey, listen. Let us know what you think of this story or any other business wars daily episode write a review on apple podcasts or your favorite podcast app. We read everyone. Thanks, John Brown back with you tomorrow. Every company battles challenges as they grow updating manual processes, replacing inefficient systems getting a handle on cash flow as you scale, you'll need software that can handle that growth introducing net suite by oracle the business management software that handles every aspect of your business in an easy to use cloud platform with nets. We you can save time money and unneeded headaches by managing sales, finance and accounting orders HR instantly right from your desk or even your phone right now net suite is offering valuable insights to overcome the obstacles that are holding you back for free. Those insights come and guide called crushing the five barriers to growth. All you have to do to get it for free is to go to net sweet dot com slash b w daily again get net weeds guide crushing the five barriers to growth when you go to net sweet dot com slash be w daily now. One more time net sweet dot com slash b w daily.

Wall Street Journal Softbank Cbre David Brown Ellie New York United States John Brown Gibbs Hannah Sixty Three Hundred Dollars Nine Billion Dollars Six Billion Dollars Two Billion Dollars Thirteen Percent
Nipsey Hussle, rapper and entrepreneur, fatally shot in Los Angeles

Sean Hannity

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Nipsey Hussle, rapper and entrepreneur, fatally shot in Los Angeles

"The news at Grammy nominated rapper nipsy hustle was murdered in Los Angeles Sunday. Sierra Crawford report community shocked a lot of people saying him more. So beyond is like the second celebrities like ice cube for rail, Drake and John legend shakin after the Thirty-three-year-old was gunned down in front of his marathon clothing store. It was just one of several companies. He's invested in is becoming famous. We recently opened up intercity co workspace in vain of we were for local preneurs. We also have a science technology engineering and math center on the second level for young kids to be able to get trained survived by his partner. Actress Lauren London in his two

Sierra Crawford Lauren London Los Angeles John Legend Drake Partner Thirty-Three-Year
"preneurs" Discussed on It's All Political

It's All Political

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"preneurs" Discussed on It's All Political

"Meaningful solutions. So you've never held elective office before you've never run for office before we already have a first timer for president. Now. Why should we trust you to do this? Well, if you reflect on it, the American people have been casting about for some sort of change in the last number of elections. So here you have Donald Trump who I believe that terrible president. But also Bernie Sanders is outside success last time, and I'm sure many people listening to this really liked Bernie, and like him still and even Brock Obama's election in two thousand eight which was in many ways it change election election. So you have to ask yourself. Why is it that all of these change candidates keep doing so? Well, and I'm going to suggest that it's because we've recognized on some level that our government is behind the times and is not actually responding to the challenges of today. Now, it's true that. Donald Trump is our president he hadn't held elective office. But Donald Trump gives all entrepreneurs a bad name. And it is not the case that all preneurs are Donald Trump. Most entrepreneurs, I know regard Donald Trump as a fraud as a marketing, Charlotte's was not popular here in the valley the land of entrepreneurs, many reasons, and so to me it's not about what someone's background is you have to find the right person with the right vision in values, and that person's background can be whatever the American people identify. You have arguably the richest amount of material policy prescriptions on your website than any candidate out there. There some candidates rather thin. So I would encourage people to who wanna look your policy positions to go there. But sort of as as an ethos, do you think that many people come from business to politics always talk about running government, like a business do believe that that's true? Well, I think trying to run government like a business is stupid dumb. Because they're different things. And if you came into government and acted like, a CEO, it would not work I benefit, yo..

Donald Trump president Bernie Sanders Brock Obama CEO Charlotte fraud
"preneurs" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"preneurs" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"I mean, I will everyone needs to know where their comes where I really think nowadays a lot of people don't know where their food comes from. And another thing food the future is one. I'm not for females up here. I'm talking about like, let's bring males and females to the same level because I feel like once you get those two together. Like, I mean, you see all these competitions all male all male, and I've thought. About why it's all male. But I don't think I could do it because I have kids, and you have to study you really have to have no life not that you don't have to life. But if you have kids, your mom, you have more towards at home. But if we bring this equality of imagine how far women can go to we can go just as far as mail. So to me, there's two points of the food of future for me is educating kids, especially my kids where the food come from and teaching them that my daughter lily can be just as equals Thomas. That's me. So Diane, very basic terms told us what she's doing to sort of put some of this change into action shell we're going to go back to you. Can you tell us just a few things? I mean, you do a lot. So maybe just tells one thing, but tell us one thing you're doing to bring about some of the change that you'd like to see I am really making it my purpose. And a part of just what I do to really celebrate plants in vegetables. And what's healing? That's coming out of our backyard that we think about is weeds or things that actually can help us medicinally. So that's something personally for me. But I also do work. I think for me and the community that I serve my community is this twin cities, but specifically for me, I serve the community that I most identify with which is the African American community specifically in the food industry. And what I do is. I like help other entre. Preneurs in this business, and it has to do with just sometimes just inspiring someone with what I do. But also was with helping people that are looking to build a business. I'm really about entrepreneurship, and creating an ecosystem that will help us on the level of business as well as food. And so I my purpose is to impact people through food. And so I start there. But I do a lot of work. I'm teaching I have a curriculum called healthy roots, which I teach around on the history of soul food and really reclaiming the narrative around so food, but also looking deeper into how that really impacts our bodies in our lives, and our kind of trajectory, and then I also teach food safety and some other things around that. But my biggest impact I think is helping entrepreneurs and really showing that we can make money in this industry. Industry, and it's not just a ten dollar an hour job. And I think that was one of my biggest things when I came into the food industry is everyone's like, you're gonna make ten dollars an hour. And I'm like, you might make ten dollars an hour. I think I'm one of those embracing the fact that I'm a kick down the door type of person and. Yeah. Melissa how about you. My answer is two fold number one. I wrote a book dinnertime broke for me. I couldn't figure out how to get dinner on the table. I knew that. I wanted us together as a family that I I wanted to create that ritual where we came to the table every night. I sometimes I'm a little nutty. But I look at food. And it's I just imagine it screaming at me like stop gathered. Eat slow down nothing else matters at least for a second. So I wrote a book so that I would actually cook and it works..

Diane Thomas Melissa ten dollars ten dollar
"preneurs" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

Wall Street Oasis

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"preneurs" Discussed on Wall Street Oasis

"It's kind of like focus on your strengths the whole Marcus Buckingham like philosophy. You know, just like focus on your strengths rather than your weaknesses. Don't try to be that guy. You're not that guy. You know, you just gonna it's not gonna work, and it's going to be frustrated you gonna take a long time. Maybe like, maybe you might get it. But like by by the time, you're out of college. Like, you should have a decent sense. If you start working on things like where you're good at it. Usually the things you like like if you really enjoy like the hiring process and like getting people to be their best. Then you'll see that skill set sort of evolve, you know, but if you like, you know. You know cleaning in organizing and putting pieces together to make like the basics of of accompanied, and you might have more my skill set. And there's there's tons of other permutations of it. But I think for me at least it's like identifying what you're really good at what you really love to do. And then optimizing to build that build the startup in that way, and just realizing that like that may mean you are set up to go the long distance. And that may mean that you're not, you know, like, the more and more I work the more. I think like I might just like start companies get them to a certain point and then bay at like seldom or leave and give it someone else. Like, I just don't I'd rather do it again. I like that especially in mobile, I really enjoy getting things off the ground to a point where it's like. Yeah. I can tell you can scale this. Okay. Somebody else goes scale. Yeah. Totally. Okay. So let's say you're talking to told me voice start here. You've got you've got nine year old. But let's say they're twenty now and one of their graduating from school, and like it's popular now to be an entrepreneur, and like people that I went to business school with they wanted to be entre preneurs just for entrepreneur seek, right? I don't know that that that that's quite a thing that really works. But, but maybe, but they know like, oh, I want to be like you dad wanna be entrepreneurial. What do you tell them you say that plastic company? Go do something for someone else. Go figure something else out and then try to see something or. Yeah. I like, I probably if my kids got to that point as an example. I probably would have a sense of sort of what they're good at what to light. So I'd try and direct them uniquely to to them as individuals. But in a general kind of way, I probably like the best choice would be to go work for another entrepreneur, that's like already experienced and gather what you can from them. That's probably going to give you the best probability of accelerated result. I think if you take the path where you just go work for a company, and you just keep your eyes open and look and start to see like that will work to like it worked for me. But I think it would take longer and may not develop you at all if you just jump into it and start your own companies like you may crash and burn a few times. And then figure it out, but it may be harder or take longer you make you up like it might not work but going to work for like, not necessarily Zuckerberg or something like that. But going to go into someone that's like clearly done this for a while. While Ben doing it has a good company some company that you like like in respect and enjoy right and just like trying absorb as much as you can from that person or those people that you know, for me, I would I would go back. There was a guy that I learned a lot from indirectly at at the early days of blossom fi who's a great entrepreneur started this company, lower my bills name was Matt coughing. You still a guy around here, but he had a pretty good exit there as we kind of like, I don't know what he does he's day, but he goes on boats and cruise around the country in the world. But anyway, he won the Ernst and young entrepreneur the year the year that they sold low my bills, and we did a lot of work with them..

Matt coughing Marcus Buckingham Zuckerberg Ben nine year
"preneurs" Discussed on No Ego

No Ego

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"preneurs" Discussed on No Ego

"Is is is funny how risk adverse they are. When it comes to really insisting on greatness from their people. Well, yes, they do that for themselves, and that was absolutely much. Any? I was would just let everyone get away with anything because I want them to be happy. I wanted them to lock me wanted my workplace, and you know, if if they left it was like what did I do wrong? What what didn't you like? Like, it was it was personal. And and I really when I look back over the journey of building out a tame and Modu I didn't I didn't sign up for being a great manager. And later I wanted to boot a business, and I didn't think about well. Now, people are going to be looking at me and expecting me too late them and have the answers and and make the right choices and all of those things which know human, and we died in as entre news, we just working it out as we go along. I started the business. I went on my own I wouldn't have to manage people. Like literally like, I was a leader for a long time. And I'm like, I'm going to start my own business. But the problem is if you have success, you're back into leadership and management, you can't escape it. Yeah. And I found that. And I think when it was really small we sort of used to make decisions together around the table. And they wasn't that. I didn't have to keep people accountable. I didn't have to mention what they're doing. But then when it starts getting bigger, and, you know, not every single person in your team is going to be an Playa. And you know, started suddenly something I'm spending more time having to be a manager, which I don't feel is my my area of strength. And yes, so so then I could see my behaviors around what I would do to keep everyone happy, which was the worst thing not good for the business. But absolutely not good for them actually stumped today grow. If so anyway, I said now, and what actually occurred over the time of building out that consulting firm was that in the end most of acids in products would develops because I implemented them for me because I was like these job description things don't work with performance reviews. Don't work this way or mobilization structures is not wrought. So it's impacting me. So I would then spend time fixing my business and go. This is amazing. And then sell it. And that's why I think we're kindred spirits because a lot of people love myself because it's research based evidence base, but yours is evidence base. And I call it like tribal learning you're out there in this lab called your business. Figuring out what really works for preneurs, and founders. And then when you perfect it through your own company. You beta tested, and then you go out and sell it..

preneurs
"preneurs" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"preneurs" Discussed on The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

"Annually and then start figuring out. Ideally, who should be performing those different tests that alone is going to give you so much clarity number one on not only how much you're actually doing because we all know as entrepreneurs Lee where a lot of different heads. I always say, we're we're masterful jugglers, right? Oh, it will. It will help you see, you know, Doug. If you go through that exercise while you you have a team of people. But let's say the average person who may go through that type of an exercise will say, oh my gosh. I'm doing the work of like twenty different people. Whereas in your mind, you may be thinking, well, I'm I don't do that much. Really do. Yeah. We spend we spend our entire day. Is entrepreneurs just you said, we are a masterful jugglers we we work really hard at everything that we do. Whether it's the accounting portion of our of our of our practice, the customers support side of things the growing marketing side, the sales as Sola preneurs, especially and I can remember being that person for for decades that was that was my agenda and until we started this podcast production company. And we started taking on a team. I really didn't even know how to delegate so oftentimes I just needed someone just to say, hey, it's okay. To like, oh, this responsibility is a matter of fact that you're not letting go of something that you're perfect that you're really not that good at it. This what I had to say to myself, you need to you need to step outside of and just stay within the stuff. That's your zone of genius and Farrah's between my partner and Strickland between us he was a great backs back end systems kinda guy loves. To deal with spreadsheets loves to deal with building the systems. I like the relationship building side in the selling side. So we really did make a concerted effort just to say, you know, what I am not going to step outside of my zone of genius. And won't when I do find myself doing that's when I get the most anxiety in the most frustrated with my business when I try to do too many things that are outside of that. But how do you when you go into an organization, and you help them create this infrastructure, you help the manager infrastructure? How do you convince them that? Maybe the first step is maybe I'm answering my own question. But I want you to contribute because you're the expert that how isn't that people know when it's time to let go of the things that they are that are not within their zone of genius. Neither bring somebody in fulltime or part-time or even as an intern. Or as a, you know as a contractor it varies. Sometimes it could be having that heart to heart conversation with them. Sometimes it could be. A matter of exposing them to people who really are experts in these different areas. Even if it's it could come out in the form of let's say an interview, if I may recommend sewing, you know, it really is time for you to get your own keeper is it you need to stop doing trying to do the books yourself. And so I may say, well, you know, what just to prove that point to you. Let's start interviewing some different bookkeepers people who specialize in doing bookkeeping, an only bookkeeping and in the course of having a conversation like that what can happen is a person who is a subject matter expert will start asking you as the as the entre preneurs business owner certain questions, and it'll really help get your come into wheels rolling..

Strickland Sola preneurs Lee Doug business owner intern Farrah partner
Diddy Pledges $1 Million to Open a Charter School in the Bronx

Investor's Edge

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Diddy Pledges $1 Million to Open a Charter School in the Bronx

"Diddy. Former rapper turned entre preneurs helping kids in New York City, get a better quality education. Now he announced on Instagram yesterday. He's pledging one million dollars to build a charter school in the Bronx this school for sixth and the seventh graders is scheduled to open next September

New York City Bronx Instagram One Million Dollars
"preneurs" Discussed on The Longest Shortest Time

The Longest Shortest Time

04:47 min | 2 years ago

"preneurs" Discussed on The Longest Shortest Time

"I think it's impossible to talk about kid entrepreneurs as I like to call them kids for preneurs in twenty eighteen without talking about slime. It's a team thing, right? Yeah, it's like a national craze. So many of our listeners are going to be familiar with this putty there like all kinds of as to make it. But one of the basic ingredients is generally glue, like white Elmer's glue. Tons of kids are doing this. They're like they're making videos of meeting it, folding it, like sticking their manicured fingers in it. And I gotta say it's like a really satisfying sound. A lot of kids don't see slime as a toy. They see it as a money maker slime IRS put work like making sully. You're kind of like a slime our guess. Do you consider yourself a slime or. Yes. Yes. So Andrea, it turns out, I actually know a slime our my name is Hollis and I'm twelve years old. I'm going into seventh grade, so Hollis lives across the street from me. She babysits for my daughter, and she has one of these Instagram accounts where she posts videos of slime and she sells it and a few weeks ago, she let me come visit her house. Here we go to the basements to see slime h q. This table in the corner, my basement. It's a mess right now. This looks like a lab like twelve year olds lab. You've got like, you're shaving cream, your glue, and this disgusting looking gray stuff in his bag over there. What's that? I have a bunch of my dead slimes down here. The ones that like melted or turned into graveyard. Dark place, and then she had all these little Tupperware bins of stuff to make her slime special. You can add like little styrofoam beads called flown. 'cause it makes country new kin and glitter with also makes it county, and there's like packing away. Crunchies lime is good. Yes. 'cause the noises fun. Flint, isn't that crunchy? Because there's too much in it. The put a lot of star foam it for it to be very country now, Andrea, yes, Hollis like any good entrepreneur clearly knows what's appealing about her product, but she's also aware of the competitive landscape a couple years ago. She made a video with pink slime in like a glass where it looks like a milkshake and there's like shaving cream on the top. That's supposed to look like whip cream. She takes the whole thing, dumped it out on table and mixes it all together with their hands. You out a law shaver fan to slime in it makes it like really makes a lot bigger like fluffy, but Hollis would never do that now. It's not really anywhere, no one. Why not? Why is that out of style? I guess things just kinda like fade and then new things come in. What are some of the things that have come in and out of style? It's line clear slimest. And right now that is using clear glanced jet of the normal white clue. And so you can like see everything underneath. I've only made one wasn't very good. Now when I went to his house, I had no idea how she ran her business or how big it was. All I knew was she had an Instagram account with about six hundred followers. And her profile says, I sell cheap slime and people like beyond me direct message. Yeah. And then I like bring this line to them so. So is it all people in town? Yeah, some people I know. And then like they kind of tell other people like ripples out, I don't really put prices. I if people on it, they just like direct message and then I'll tell them the price. Oh years coming up with it on the spot. Yeah, I guess so. So like if I wanted that blue one with the clay in it, how much would be charged for that and on the size, if you wanted eight ounce, probably four dollars because the clay is expensive, kind of raise the price and what if I wanted the biggest size you could possibly make if you one of the sixty nine hundred probably be like like six or seven dollars. Actually this is Hollis's seconds. Lima count. The first one she made. She got locked out of because she couldn't remember the password and that one on the profile, it said, all purchases will be donated to the Montclair animal shelter to you still donate all of your earnings to the Montclair animal shelter..

Hollis Instagram Andrea Montclair IRS Lima Flint seven dollars four dollars twelve years eight ounce twelve year
Thursday in the Time Machine

The Nice Guys on Business Podcast

04:30 min | 2 years ago

Thursday in the Time Machine

"Broke. I always, I always being recorded the day that that Doug was organizing his movers out of his house and studio is absolutely blank. So just so you just so you know, that was the day that you may not realize that, but that's the day that my my wife kicked me out. I don't I don't know. know. We're talking to Richard non guard about viral leadership. His book Vira leadership sees the power of now to create lasting transformation available on Amazon dot com. I got Richard here right now just to share a little bit of information about the book. Richard goal, Golan businesses to take the success of the moment, but to create something sustaining. So the book takes you through the four quadrants of our leadership, engaging viral teams and creating innovative ideas and getting ownership by and for those things all on a fundation of a culture of engagement and following that strategy businesses, whether it's solar preneurs or a large business than has the opportunity to really enlarge their footprint to be seen by more people to increase the opportunities that come their way and most of all to create happiness. What's really cool about the book every check it out goal setting versus intention saying the difference between those two I would. I was learning. I was. Goal setting all along why should probably have been intention setting. So the book covers that. How had you create opportunity? Is it directed as it caused? Is it organic? Where's that coming from and how to create a viral success really interested in that as well. Check out the book. The link will be in the show notes. IRA leadership sees the power of now to create lasting transformation. The nice guys on business podcast, the sport does the motor heads geeks, sluts, blood sway stories. Do we stick heads? They think their rights just dudes. Need an education on how to grow your business. The nice guys are here to help learn about great customer service networking and how just being nice can help you prosper. Now here all your host, Doug Sandler and Strickland Bonner. All right. Strike starts up again. Hey, welcome back. Welcome back fans. It is now Thursday in our time machine and we are back with our funk infants takeover. Once again with Virginia Muzquiz JJ full Zene Ali from Finland Janney Bellinger Tennessee, Tim, Paul Brown and now just jumping on Marcel as well. And, hey, Doug Sandler might and you Doug Sandler. Are you doing? Wait a minute. I don't know Marcel. How do I know Marcel? Why don't you go? Where did I say you Marcel Marceau. He's Marcel no relation to Paul Brown Marcel Brown, right. I was going to say you're, you're a good looking guy. What did you have another fair that you needed to pick up Marcel. He's my personal chauffeur. He's not an actual lift driver. Okay. I understand. Hey Marcel. Do you actually live. Doc fries up there. I'm trying to figure out how JJ and Doug are on the same internet connection. JJ didn't freeze up and Doug did. I'm not sure how that works. I don't know, because because I'm out at the pool, I have my own IP address out here at the pool. I see. I see you're asking where Sal, if he actually show Marceau introduce yourself. I do listen to the show now dishonoring should. So do you listen to money as in Friday interviews, or do you listen to Tuesday and Thursday fucker. Mostly Tuesday and Thursday. We then up when you go all week, but I have listened to some interviews exclude them. I just listened to my show. Virginia Muzquiz episode on Monday. Doug did an amazing. You're just as fast Monday with Virginia moose keys for those of you who are not sure. It was episode seven, twenty four. Go back and listen if you haven't yet. Hey, and we also have we also have Paulo Brown hair. We. She was the the the final guest tune in on Tuesday, so Paulo. He just wanted to give you a chance to introduce yourself, introduce yourself and why do exactly do you listen to the nice guys on business podcasts? Aside from your excellent interview also. Yeah, thanks for that. That was really a lot of fun. Lots of people enjoyed it. Yeah, I listened to Tuesday's mostly because that's more convenient for me and it just Tuesdays. And then I sometimes read the show notes like Jeanie, Jeanie, and I are brilliant readers. So I read the show notes from Thursday and some of the other days. But I just like to laugh

Doug Mrs Ms Domino Jenny Marcel TIM Apple. Ali Jj Haines Steve O'brien Steven Brian Jinya Stricklin Tennessee LA Bader Strickland Russia Paul Brown Twenty Four Ounce Five Days
Extreme self care can help your business succeed

Book Marketing Mentors

01:51 min | 2 years ago

Extreme self care can help your business succeed

"Today. My special guest is a superstar, plain and simple. Cheryl Richardson is the New York Times bestselling author of several books, including take time for your life. Life makeovers stand up. Your life ought to extreme self, Karen many more including her recent book waking up in winter in search of what really matches admit light. She was the first president of the international coach federation who works been covered widely in the media, including good Morning America. That today shows CBS the new times USA today an omega Zine. The list goes on. On and on Sheba sativa lead on the Oprah Winfrey show. She's a co producer in hosted Haroon. Television shows on the oxygen network and public television specials. Oh my goodness. Wow. While while shero what an absolute honor it is to welcome you to the show and thank you for being this week's guest expert and mental. Thank you, Susan. It's really wonderful to be here with you and I love the idea of supporting authors. Yes, as one yourself many times over, you know, you certainly know what it takes to mock it books. And however the subject of your books is something that I think is really important too as as marketers as entrepreneurs all all the preneurs. Many of us are known. We spend so much time as a one personal peration and. If they're anything like me, you know, I'm my own toughest boss. So for the worker Hollick's amongst is what lessons do we need to learn about the importance of self cab. While it brings me all the way back to my original training as a coach. I had been a one woman shop prior to that already. I have been working as a consultant, and when I hired my first coach, he said to me, you know, you need to practice extreme self care. You know your whole life is out of balance. You spend so much time taking care of everybody else in not taking care of yourself. He said, I promise you, if you make the practice of extreme self care, your number one priority, your business will take care of itself. And of course, I thought he was crazy. But for the next year, I really focused ran my business in focused on growing business, but I also focused on things like making sure I took regular time off and making sure that I was taking good care of my finances and doing things like eliminating clutter from my life so that I like where I lived, and I liked where I worked in both in my office in my own Willie, we assessing my relationship. A lot of this is what I covered in take time for your life by very first book. And I remember Susan when I was really focused on myself, Karen, very deliberate way over the first year of building my coaching practice in my business, you know, I saw colleagues seemingly succeeding in their companies in making more money and getting ahead. You know, there was a voice in my head. The keeps things is crazy. You need to push push push, you work harder in this self care step. You don't have time for that. But fortunately, I had a coach and I met with him every week in. He kept me on track, and I will tell you that within Cobley three months of taking better care of myself, not only into business starts increase, but the kinds of people that were drawn to me were higher quality clients with projects in ideas and goals that were really interesting and exciting. And so the proof is in the pudding as far as I was concerned in it worked. And so that really played a pivotal role in my decision to make self care. Of focus of my work over time. And so it is really important. Sometimes the harder we work harder we are in our selves, the more we push ourselves, the less attractive we've become and I know you know this, Susan, I'm not talking about physical attraction. Really. I'm talking about energetically. People can smell exhaustion, or desperation or distraction mile away. When we take care of selves where more present for people, we have a better book writing experience.

Susan Fifteen Minutes
"preneurs" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"preneurs" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Entrepreneurs

"The entre preneurs with me matt allegations today brendan is here to talk us through why he left murdoch london and to explain why he's dipping his toe into the health and wellness market i did laws university or to post grads law and then after university or finishing all skill i did a year working in the city but i entered the world of restaurants thinking that i might attempt at revolutionizing the link between her we eat casually and wine so i opened a restaurant on hawks in square called crew and the idea was focusing on niche wine producers and introducing mediterranean food for example in a more relaxed manner so we introduced sharing platters and slits and it was kind of an old where highs that sat around one hundred ten hundred twenty people and it was a ryan two thousand and two shortage was really becoming more of a focus in the media as a destination white cube was across from air crew and you get a lot of international people interested in the art world people visiting from farflung places like notting hill and so they would come to shortage and some of them come and check out crew so it was quite interesting that i was twenty six and i was a little bit naive about the challenges of ride the restaurant industry for the first three years it was really great great reviews and won some awards but actually sustaining a business that's one hundred percent ryan human capital managing sheriff's managing the quality of food menteng service was up to the highest standard i became interested in other businesses i guess there was a lot of talk at that time by the metrosexual man and at that time i was looking around thinking oh there's not that many places that man could access concur and grooming and at that time you could go into summer like trumpers and some wonderful old mayfair establishments but their product line at that moment was perhaps a little bit moore's rooted in the past and to access contemporaries concur products or fragrance you would go to the department store which also was a little bit overwhelming because man's product would be kind of lost within what was very female dominated area thinking about the restaurant and all the challenges around around that which i mentioned i thought wouldn't it be nice to have a business where so many of your products are pre formulated in baltimore's and in more controlled environment but service was anchored point to murdoch and using the barbara charter as a tool of communication as a method of trusting and brand and building a relationship with the brand and the people within that brand was a crucial focus so i suppose i was just with murdoch taking a little bit of the past and updating it and then making a little bit more of my own so i sold the restaurant and put that behind me and it was a great experience and i'm not sure i think i would like to revisit it again at some point in the future but for that moment identity grieving was something that i could scale and expand have you always thought of yourself as an entrepreneur because you didn't give yourself much of a chance outside out of unique to do something else i mean you you have a restaurant and then you set up another business have you always wanted to be an entrepreneur i'm not sure wanting to be an entrepreneur i suppose my background is i grew up in northern ireland and i went to a great christian brothers grammar school but it was quite a narrow education in terms of the subjects that you would study and the jobs that you might do so i guess you would aspire to be a lawyer or an accountant or a dentist i my father was a builders merchants and he had been doing various building projects so i guess i got a little bit.

brendan one hundred percent three years
"preneurs" Discussed on Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"preneurs" Discussed on Fit Fierce and Fabulous Podcast

"Had to do without though is also connected if you if you look at it there's so i could totally cleverly connect all my evelyn's because architecture was really indices design and then i went into a plan to college so i i love design with climate i went into like like way deeper intellect climate and plans and then if you think about wellness like i had a really like intimate knowledge of of plants and botanical cz and it's just it's just so interesting how that all evolved and so that led to me leaving my career everything that i kind of stablishment there which was a scary leap in itself and and going all in as as i was calling myself a healthy living strategist and not like it was like i'm not going to be a coach i was very resistant at that time to coaching i officially calling myself a coach now but i took me a while to get there and and so i went all in with that and and that was when my podcast god birth feed your hustle might headaches talk with how food fuels hustle so i had this really clear solid brand around business owners entre preneurs leaders like fueling their dreams fueling bring the energy to their day based on what they were putting in their body and just what they were doing in their life like because it wasn't just it's not just through right yeah oh yeah and and so that became like such a huge part of me and i was so into that brand so into that message and i was really passionate about it but the actual work that i was doing my business i wasn't as much in alignment with like it wasn't natural for me to create meal plans for people or to like i was helping entrepreneurs ran burn out and running zayed's and all these different things and those if felt good but it wasn't quite right like i knew it wasn't using my true strength and so once again i knew that there was something like some new pivot to happen and and that's when an in it took a coach to like give me permission to step into directly supporting people around their businesses 'cause i didn't feel like i was allowed to.

evelyn zayed
"preneurs" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

MacBreak Weekly

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"preneurs" Discussed on MacBreak Weekly

"I was alone on loan onto preneurs alone freelancer but if you've got a team you'll appreciate the team features a my team page you can add team members on various permissions levels now you can create proposals right within fresh books rich text images request your clients e signature is a accept proposals and of course track all of your non invoice and come as well like online sales and ads so it's all in there and by the way when it comes to invoices nobody does it better than fresh books you don't have to chase your clients for payment you can accept online payments directly in that invoice which means your clients can pay you like with a credit card or online that means you're going to get paid on average two times faster bill for time by client specific projects and invoices estimates and proposals in many languages they just added spanish dutch german and portuguese they have also announced this is brand new collaboration with microsoft which rolls out this summer which means fresh books will work in your outlook so you can view and pay fresh books invoices view and pay fresh books invoices regardless of what device you view it from with microsoft outlook payments that's going to even make it easier outlook users will be able to view invoices in there in male click a button that says pay now most of your clients use outlook i promise you and if your credit card is registered with outlook payments you can pay in one click fresh books try it free for thirty days it just gets better all the time at fresh bookstore com slash mac break and enter mac break weekly in the how did you hear about a section fresh books dot com slash mac break we thank them so much for change in my life fourteen years ago and maybe changing yours too and supporting mak break weekly all right laurie i got to hear it what do you got.

preneurs bill microsoft laurie fourteen years thirty days
"preneurs" Discussed on a16z

a16z

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"preneurs" Discussed on a16z

"Exactly in the number of times that i've talked onto preneurs have said well yes that we think that's a big experiment we have all this other stuff going on so we're going to get to it and that's i think you know for everyone's sake it's important to do the kill you know the kill test early yeah yeah so that's that's always been my view on there's poc and then there's the equivalent of proved to proof of concept in the proof to me that this hasn't failed yes you know in a fundamental mode and you should know what that looks like do it early so may one last pitfall we could talk about is just pitfall for getting yourself funded so if you think about like three polls we got consumer enterprise in biotech and the space that we're talking about sometimes looks more like some combination this you might have a company that's using technology and healthcare but direct to consumer something that's more enterprise focus something that is maybe more therapeutic or diagnostic focused and each one of those has fairly different ways of proving to investors at you're making progress you know consumer maybe it's about the graph you know d a you versus emmy you and so on for prices might be revenue for biotech might be hitting milestones and so a lot of the challenges here i think is you know trying to figure out where you know the pitfalls of figuring out we're how can you prove that it's really working when some complicated mix of all these things and then which is the best investor actually at each stage of the business so i mean there there could be periods of time where it's you know much more tech like building a platform and there are periods of time where there might be a lot of science risk and tech investors.

preneurs
"preneurs" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"preneurs" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"Meet dan solvent from strategic coach and the reason she said this is that dan has more than forty years been a speaker consultant strategic planner in coach to entrepreneurs and he's the only guy i've seen who basically created an operating system for preneurs especially entrepreneurs with add which is essentially almost all enterpreneurs and dance now dan can i say we'll do you are yeah seventy ab a seventy four in two months that were from our by gas right now so dense seventy four and if you listen to the show you might have noticed love to learn from my elders people who've made all my mistakes for me ahead of time the problem with dan is he barely looks like he's may elder because he's on a pretty aggressive antiaging regimen and he is completely sharp and amazing in full of energy and has just helped so many people including me understand what's going on in our heads in our companies and strategic coach is based in canada up in toronto but now they've reached eighteen thousand euros in sixty industries and has been thirty bucks so if you want to know something about highperformance something about being an entrepreneur or just what's going on inside your head i don't know anyone better to talk to dan which is why he's on the show so dan thanks for being on day one i think about mating you which was in the very very hot palm desert if i if i remember correctly and you know and i got very very intrigued and how you approach the world and you know you have reputations through bullet proof and you know now bulletproof labs all the product offerings that comes out and i just see a perfect terrific example of entrepreneurial capability multiplying itself in the world reaching more people so this is just the sheer pleasure for me because i'm in the presence of someone who.

dan strategic planner toronto consultant forty years two months
"preneurs" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"preneurs" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"This is also something that they don't talk about it now mike waiting hard it's a huge novus preneurs are eighty me all of them yeah and a huge number of entrepreneurs are anxious they haven't said i mean it happens i used to when you look at what's going on a lot of times it's at your succeeding as remember because running away from failure or something that like you're subtly afraid of something you were doing a half to be an entrepreneur or was it just like so passionate about the spy thing i just want to do it like sometimes it's run for your passion for a lot of people it's run away from something scary or avoid something tell me about what's going on with you when you started i was definitely running towards something and then i actually had tribute a lot of my anxiety to what helped propel the business because you know that was what made me double triple check things that made me make sure there wasn't anything more i could do to make something better and even now as we've grown and there's about forty employees in our in our l a office if i see someone not getting anxious like i'm glad that you don't have inexact disorder but can you try and plug into like a low level of worry because that's what our businesses built on just like a grouping zayed's so yeah i think it was all positive i am definitely void when it comes to certain specific things but i'm not necessarily a run from problems type person but i would definitely run towards something positive.

mike zayed
"preneurs" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"preneurs" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"This episode is brought to you by we work i love we work i haven't had an office in many many many many many years since two thousand or so when i had my last real job i suppose in quotation marks but when i moved from san francisco to austin not long ago i decided you know what i'm tired work and home i'm tired we're going to coffee shops so one of the very first things i did was to get a space at we work i could not be happier with this change in my life we work is a global network of workspaces were companies and people grow together the idea is really simple you focus on your business and we worked takes care of all the rest including front desk service utilities refreshments and more i also often have things shipped from amazon and elsewhere to my office we work here in austin i've been completely blown away by the members only events special offers and perhaps the best cold brew coffee on tap that i've ever had it's been amazing it's been a real real change in my life and improved my quality of life and there are also dog friendly we work locations all over the place how fun is that we were caters to everyone from odd preneurs and freelancers to startups and even large enterprises including ge salesforce microsoft mastercard samsung spotify pinterest and red bowl among many others in fact more than ten percent of fortune five hundred companies currently use we work and it's a rapidly growing group in other words it's not just sola printers and ground level startups that us we work but everything from that to the big companies who are seeing very huge benefits as well we work believes that creating spaces where people can connect and create meaning together right after all if you are someone who has built a business modeled on the principles in the four hour workweek or elsewhere it can be a lonely road sometimes even though you're digitally connected it can feel.

san francisco amazon austin microsoft samsung ten percent four hour
"preneurs" Discussed on Absolute Advantage

Absolute Advantage

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"preneurs" Discussed on Absolute Advantage

"What's the word that i'm looking for emulate or compare yourselves to or you know that kind of thing so i love the whole idea of what you just shared i think it couldn't be more relevant than today's more relevant than ever i think what about you know i think that that as entre preneurs in his leaders in business there are oftentimes where you know we we need to make a change you know and sometimes we know what that changes sometimes we need some more clarity around it but there is a oh shoot what's the word that i'm looking for maybe a reluctance to take a real close look at it or to get real you know about what needs to happen any chips i i know sometimes there's fear associated with maybe they're making looking to make a major change in their business or go a different direction any tips for any of our listeners who might find themselves in that space right now well i think one of the things i always fall back on when dating those occasions those opportunities come up is i've never had the sesion never had something turn out i can't i can't look back in my life and go kay anything i did was a mistake you know everything has worked out i mean i'm here you know and it were so no matter which way you choose if you've got a fork in the road take one you know there's no what's what's going to happen what's the downside here so it cannot be the wrong decision you may get done with a quicker than you expected but it's you know there's no failing until you quit there's just k well this is where i am now and what would be the appropriate action for me to take given let's happening right now and here's the choice i can make this or that if i take this you know go that way to see how it turns out in there's no.

kay
"preneurs" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

03:40 min | 3 years ago

"preneurs" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"This episode of art of the hustle is presented by Emirates airline. Now. Let's get into it. Boy, Ryan, Leslie are the hustle. We work for radio, I heart. You know, we do today. I have well, actually, I'll let you introduce yourself. Your name is Neil and for everybody. That's listening. And wouldn't know what you do once you give an introduction. Sure. So I'm Neil Blumenthal, cofounder and co-ceo or be Parker. The big dog the victim. Right. So we're gonna just kind of break right into it. The idea here is just to to get a sense of. I how did this even come about? And then what are some great takeaways for everybody? That's listening. What are some great takeaways that they can apply to their own journey as entrepreneurs? So we'll start at the beginning. You met your co founders while you were doing an NBA at Warton. Okay. So so so what were you doing before? Then being so before I went to warden, I was running a nonprofit. So if you were to sort of think, I you know, who's gonna fill this company. I don't now if my profile is exact perfect one. But I was running this nonprofit that would train low income women in the developing world to start their own businesses giving I examined selling glasses. So I would travel around the world and set up programs in rural the dash and in India, and in Ghana and in Guatemala and. In the hopes of just trying to get glasses on as many people's faces as needed them. Because the thing that was crazy. And the reason why I joined this nonprofit called vision sprang was because I learned that almost a billion people don't have access to glasses, and that just seems crazy right? Because if you can't see you can't learn you can't work when we talk about vision spring. Yeah. We talk about visit spring the concept behind business. Bring was to actually not only put glasses on people who needed them. But also to foster this spirit of entrepreneurship amongst women in these developing countries. So for you as preneurs just always been something that you thought was important of something that you pursued on your own where you always an entrepreneur yourself. We selling lemonade or. Yeah. You know, I don't I don't think I would have called myself an entrepreneurs little kid. But as I look back there were things I did that were entrepreneurial. You know it. I remember in high school that I would promote clubs and Monin gloves in highschool, and I grew up in the city here, New York. So it's yeah. And would also make maybe a fake ID are to this is before nine eleven and the Patriot Act. Okay. You know, I remember always asking my mom for a beeper because this was in right way before, you know, people had cell phones, and my mount tell me, well, you only doctors are drug dealers have beeper. So you can once you go to medical school. I'll get you of leaper so wasn't able to do that. But I guess nightclubs ID's. And then when I was really young I remember seeing this infomercial for food dehydrate her and I got. Super excited about it. Because infomercials right tend to brainwash you. It's like if you order now in the next fifteen minutes, you'll get a second one free and.

Neil Blumenthal Leslie Emirates airline NBA Ryan Neil Warton co-ceo Monin Parker New York Ghana India Guatemala fifteen minutes