24 Burst results for "practical futurist"

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

02:43 min | Last week

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"Help better <Speech_Male> understand people <Speech_Male> very <Speech_Male> we talked before about <Speech_Male> the william shatner. <Speech_Male> I'm fascinated by <Speech_Male> the fact that people are <Speech_Male> training <Speech_Male> to <Speech_Male> better understand. <Speech_Male> Emotion to <Speech_Male> better <Speech_Male> mimic <Speech_Male> is a strong word but <Speech_Male> to reflect <Speech_Male> the communications that people <Speech_Male> have. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I talked to many <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> researchers recently. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Been wanting to <Speech_Male> kinda capture <Speech_Male> themselves so <Speech_Male> that their children and grandchildren <Speech_Male> can interact with <Speech_Male> them in the future <Speech_Male> and then i recently did a project <Speech_Male> where <Speech_Male> there's a new <Speech_Male> system that will take a <Speech_Male> still image. <Speech_Male> An <SpeakerChange> animated <Speech_Male> image. And <Speech_Male> i took a picture of my <Speech_Male> grandfather. Who's <Speech_Male> away for quite some <Speech_Male> time <Speech_Male> Holding me as a baby. <Speech_Male> I animated <Speech_Male> that using <Speech_Male> ai and <Speech_Male> shared it <SpeakerChange> with my mom. And <Speech_Male> i wasn't sure if she would think <Speech_Male> it was wrong <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> or she <Speech_Male> cried. It was <Speech_Male> beautiful because <Speech_Male> it brought to <Speech_Male> life image. That has <Speech_Male> that was just a still image <Speech_Male> that we all look at <Speech_Male> and it really brought. It's life <Speech_Male> so there's a connection <Speech_Male> between people <Speech_Male> that i think is <Speech_Male> beginning to fill in <Speech_Male> in <Speech_Male> so instead of thinking <Speech_Male> of ai as <Speech_Male> becoming an intelligence. <Speech_Male> I think <Speech_Male> it just enhances. <Speech_Male> The human experience <Speech_Male> in ways that i'm just fascinated <Speech_Male> by so i <Speech_Male> i read as much as i can <Speech_Male> on that topic <Speech_Male> so probably my last questions <Speech_Male> quite pointing than how <Speech_Male> do you <SpeakerChange> want to be remembered. <Speech_Male> I'd <Speech_Male> like to think that. I helped <Speech_Male> people become more <Speech_Male> aware of <Speech_Male> the implications <Speech_Male> power. They i- <Speech_Male> perhaps inspired someone <Speech_Male> to follow a <SpeakerChange> career. <Speech_Male> They might not have otherwise <Speech_Male> brett. Thank you <Speech_Male> so much being on the show <Speech_Male> today. How can people <Speech_Male> find out more about you <Speech_Male> when you work. We <Speech_Male> certainly published quite <Speech_Male> a bit On <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> cognitive dot com. <Speech_Male> As well as <Speech_Male> you know we share a lot <Speech_Male> on on social so <Speech_Male> between lincoln <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And blogs and series <Speech_Male> that we do. I <Speech_Male> think it's just important <Speech_Male> for us to keep a dialogue going <Speech_Male> in society. So <Speech_Male> we try to be very <Speech_Male> prolific <Speech_Male> but certainly visit us cox <Speech_Male> dot com <Speech_Male> follow us on <Speech_Male> linked in follow me on linked <Speech_Music_Male> in. We talk <SpeakerChange> about these topics <Speech_Music_Male> ball. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you so much. <Speech_Music_Male> I've let a lot today <Speech_Music_Male> and <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ronald have this. Well thank <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you andrew. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you for listening <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to the pragmatic <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> feature to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> podcast. we do. I <Speech_Male> think it's just important <Speech_Male> for us to keep a dialogue going <Speech_Male> in society. So <Speech_Male> we try to be very <Speech_Male> prolific <Speech_Male> but certainly visit us cox <Speech_Male> dot com <Speech_Male> follow us on <Speech_Male> linked in follow me on linked <Speech_Music_Male> in. We talk <SpeakerChange> about these topics <Speech_Music_Male> ball. <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you so much. <Speech_Music_Male> I've let a lot today <Speech_Music_Male> and <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> ronald have this. Well thank <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you andrew. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Thank you for listening <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to the pragmatic <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> feature to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> podcast. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You can find <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> all of our previous <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> shows at futurists <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dot london <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and like <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> what you've heard on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the show these consider <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> subscribing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> your favorite <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> podcast app. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> So you never miss <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> an episode. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> You can find <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> out more about andrew <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and how <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> he hopes corporates <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> navigator <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> disruptive digital <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> world with keynote <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> speeches <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and c. suite <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> workshops delivered <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in person <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> or virtually <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at futuristic <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> dot london <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> until next time <Speech_Music_Female> this has <Speech_Music_Female> been the <SpeakerChange> pragmatic <Speech_Music_Female> futurist podcast. <Speech_Music_Male>

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

04:30 min | Last week

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"They they did this without being asked. Did it without a customer telling us to do it. We just did it because we unlock that. And i think that's the kind of we want to see. But i'd like to see us all focused on the signals. That will matter. What have we learned from the pandemic what signals were indicative here other sicknesses might have other signals so we have to open our eyes to that and other challenges will have different signals. So it's up to us. I think all of us to advocate for the power of data that power sharing The power they i- the examples where it's been done we do we. We do so much of this work with clients and we share that work in where the clients wanna share. Those stories i think sharing those stories on really unlocks value. And and certainly improve. Data literacy literacy of ai and its potential. This is what really matters. I think to the world so just beco- nation of data credits. We talk about various intangibles beyond a balance sheet and brand equity for example on a balanced and sometimes it goes up. It goes down. Should data be an asset. That's on a balance sheet and access to that data is seen as an asset without question. What we all forget is that we're each uniquely have knowledge that is valuable to someone most of us don't have the chance to share it. In a way that creates economic value but there are companies now sitting on significant amount of valley. Some of them are in a position to share it with their ecosystem summer. Using it as part of their business model but recognizing the value of that data is is huge when i look at a company like tesla and the millions and millions and millions of miles that they've they've logged collecting data to enable self driving. There's an enormous value that's clearly baked into the valuation their company because people recognize it. The question is how would you measure. How do i think there's still wide open questions for the industry. But i wouldn't be surprised in the years to come if the value of data starts to show up as a line item balance sheets and begins to become a significant portion evaluation of companies. And it is why you see companies talking about being coming moving from prada company to software company to a data company. It's why the internet of things took off so wildly was the data coming from things has tremendous power insights into healthcare manufacturing automotive almost every sector almost out of time but as this is the pragmatic futures podcast. What three things. Can i be doing to better understand the power of ai and in particular evolutionary. I three things boiling down the entire world event three things. I think the the first piece is to recognize that the work in a i is very heavily data. Making sure you have the right. Data knowing which data matters cleansing data preparing data pipeline data. Don't underestimate that. That is a huge huge focus in any air program. I think the other part is then tibet to expect significantly. Better predictive models of what's coming. Anyone is running decisions in a business. Anyone who's making a decision about what's going on. Who is an operations leader. Shouldn't be looking at what happened last month. But they should have predictive models and says based on everything they know using these are the things that might happen in what confidence you have in that you should expect. Your predictive models include confidence levels it. There's a fifty seven percent chance. This is the kind of thing that's going to happen. Informs us more and then with evolutionary i..

millions first piece last month fifty seven percent millions of miles tesla each three things
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

03:57 min | Last week

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"He holds payton's in the areas of collaboration systems. A bachelor's degree in electrical engineering and a master's degree in manufacturing systems engineering. Welcome brit. thank you so much andrew. It's great to be here. I just realized we have a lot in common. Because i also have some engineering degrees titans on my belt but it sounds like you came from a a sort of an engineering background is will the out of the possibles at fair it is. I think when you grow up as an engineer you have a certain way of thinking that can be applied to business. And that's what i kind of learned through. My career was really had to take systems thinking problem solving and engineering into into business and how to marry technology and business together now. We both worked at ibm. Some time ago and across. Poss- the and i'm sure but more recently joined culbertson. What is your compensation entitled amendment. So we do everything around digital transformation and very much. I'm focused on turning data into a powerful competitive advantage for companies and certainly over the last couple of years the adoption of cloud the integration of external third party data the ability to make data accessible to all decision makers within the enterprise is transforming product engineering experiences. How companies go to market how they handle risk pretty much. Everything is being touched by data and transformed through day. Now i've had a lot of experts on the show. The last couple of years to talk about i from general i to outlawing multiple uses the technology. We've had my friend. Minto doll to talk about the ethics of i even introduced a new term to me. Evolutionary is festival. What is this and has a different to the that we see in the press. One the is seen. The press is all over the map. I think there's way too much hype you know around it. You have to be more focused and specific with evolutionary. Ai we've turned some techniques in place of ai helps shape ai. In other words when you design a model of a a neural network to do something to.

andrew brit both culbertson One last couple of years last couple years
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

03:25 min | 2 months ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"I'm going to be the hub of the wheel with all these different spokes coming out to different facility us with different styles but around a common theme you not be. if it's breaking down silos what better climatfor can you have So and then just kind of be the ringmaster in in the middle east. We call the rhythmic ringmaster. Now on the road starring so in your normal act. You would've taken all the drums there and have been given a drum by you now that we're virtual you've got to use things around the time. What's the strangest item. You've seen being used for percussion in your in your lost twelve months. Someone said to me punch the picture social media and some what's the calendar and the On the whisk doing on the floor. And which is great sense. It sounds good tamarine. So the strangest guy. He's playing these young daughter right. I said the people. Okay we're We're going to play guitar. Anything you know wouldn't spend enough or can be you know could be remote control this guy. He he's young daughters probably about four years. Old just ran these names..

twelve months about four years tamarine
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

05:16 min | 2 months ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"Looks impossible so to arrive. What are the. What are the tools i've got. I've got rhythm so that Connects people in a way. They didn't expect however we complain rhythm online. So cross that. Out of vocal harmony vocal homely gives people and experience so while voices really mean something when everyone's on meet so cross data of got the security of being that venue y y y expensive place blinds down All right we'll do it for now. This guy seems to know what he's doing nobody'll now nobody's filming it. That's gone dogs watching. The kids are watching your wife's watching the house. Every tool i had was taken from really by covid however the outcomes of one in a bomb people given experience solve the wall twin coming to join them and discovering a kind of energy that just ignore them. That was available to me so Hart being on you know. I've i've been on him. You know with all sorts of people. If i say. Do this people do it. But there'd be little bit out of time but will be out of time together. So i thought well i can do that deal. And then i think know you know this platform of the hopi something which i we had to coming through zoom. So you couldn't see anyone. You couldn't see i couldn't handle it. I could see was me like this All right well thank you got something on. The death could be a wooden spoon. The remote control song. That's this.

Hart one
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

04:44 min | 10 months ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"Standard that can be built you by anyone and that we get the benefits of that Status Oklahoma Telco point of view and from an equipment manufacturer point of view, the underlying principle of standards and global standards hadn't contribution of. To that development is still in place. So that's my hope at the moment I. Think it's looking a bit fragile, and if that is the case, then the economy's a which. The. said a substantially reduced in terms of costs and the development cycle are increased because of. The the global usage and the return on investment means you get more donor for you are a deep and and I think that we will be ourselves totally connected. Heartbeats I have A. SMART, watch just. Cracks me up when I first saw it. You tell me what the hell was. That is going to be seen as prehistoric compared to the monitors that you could do. You could on yourself. So they will impact send activities have on your body and pre diagnostics, go back to a central database that will then tell you where you might have health issues or otherwise, and then all these industries which are largely. In their nature becoming more digital and the whole infrastructure will be much more robust as well. Young with you, I have a fitbit and sounds like you've got an Apple Watch. So that's good. See Jonah, but you think about it. Let's assume that other nine hundred million people have smartwatch able to measure hot bayden conditions. That's one hundred, million probes. If you connect that and you allow that data to be collected a mention, we could have maybe predicted covert because we would have seen it coming. So I think I'm with you that will actually have these data. Someone asks me is a futures from stage of the day and fifty years time. What will we say and I think the advances in? In health, you may be able to predict that you've got a major health issue. The challenge there is, do I want my GP tonight? I or my insurer obese. So I think what you've said though is that the technology will help that, but I think the reason that we can talk on the Internet today's because of standards. I think you're right. It's important that we maintain the standards bodies that capable technology together to keep the cost down. One final thing if you had a magic wand and you could wave your wand and change anything in the Mobile Industry today except the government decision would that. The government decision that's beyond the magic that I have to change anything in the mobile industry I think the single most important thing. that. We need to make sure doesn't change if I can use it. That way is the splintering of the standards. I would say that our future is much brighter together than separate and whatever politics is going on geopolitics trade rules. I. Think the most important thing for us. Is We maintain that future with a global standard. And that we cooperate in the development of future generations as we have done in the past and. We realize the benefits that we can see through the next generations so. wish things something doesn't happen as opposed to wishing something does happen. But if we continue with the way, we going I think we'll be much good going forward fund question Jeremy. How can people find out more about how and what you're doing in the UK? We have a website, we distribute our devices through the high street and our customer bases household names, Vodafone, bt, and others. We also invested a lot and worst recession development in the U. K. through universities and quite frankly nine does you'd better come talking to US rather than necessary reading must be in the papers, but we're here we're committed and. We'll look forward to seventeen UK. Jeremy I've really enjoyed had discussion very open and honest, and Franken I've loved the discussion that use leader and the whole work from home. Any else. Thank you so much for you time and stay safe. Thank. You for listening to the practical futurist podcast, you can find all of our previous shows at futuristic. London and if you like what you've heard on this show, please consider subscribing via your favorite podcast staff. So you never miss an episode. You can find out more about Andrew and how he hopes corporates navigate a disruptive digital world with keynote speeches and C., suite workshops at futurist DOT Lunden. Until next time, this has been the practical future is podcast..

Mobile Industry Jeremy US UK Status Oklahoma Telco Jonah London DOT Lunden Apple Vodafone Andrew Franken bt
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

07:18 min | 10 months ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"For an IBM Software Company and Consulting Business Welcome Jeremy Thank you. Thank you. Enter could sold here. Now. We have a lot in common. We've both got a career in Tokyo and we've both would with IBM. So what's been your journey to while you K-? Well as you as you mentioned I did in the only part of my career work in professional services with IBM in the US. And then in the mid nineteen ninety S I came back to the UK and I joined the British. Telecom, bt and what the twentieth bt. So I've been really in the telecom space now for or three decades and seeing the development from. abloh through first generation. Now into a fifth generation and my background is in product and product management and joint benches, it had a number of course Europe. We have very similar correct trajectories. We'll explore that in a minute, but it's great to talk to another Tokai friendly person. So back on season two, episode four, we spoke with your colleague Paul. Scanlon about the future of five. G.. And we had a really interesting discussion about why's approach to five G. From Technology Point? Is You know I? Ask you a bunch of technology questions today. But what is five gene to you? Five G. as it implies is the next generation and every generation of brings new opportunities with the Wallet Space. But potentially, I. Think. The second generation was significant. The full generation was significant and the fifth generation is probably very significant with an industry can be criticized a little bit of over promising to quote Bill Gates's overestimate the short term and underestimate the long term and five G. is going to deliver on a number of promises that perhaps it'd be made over the last few years. But it four G. was about APPS and consumers and smartphones five. is about connected devices and B. to be health and agriculture and verticals. So we think we're on the cusp of. A major change in the telecommunications industry and ecosystem around it. I'm sure we're going to talk about that, but it may take another two or three years before the networks rolled out and the applications developed and someone has the aw iphone moments in five G.. What's funny? You Miss Three G is that inflection point? I? Remember when three g came out and I went nine, the carrier, but everyone was promising video calling. I think my too cozy mind tie life. It was really about foster incident although when my guys back to three G or Heaven Forbid Eighth? Edge? I just have to create jogging and should be illegal in any country. There's enough legislation being talked about in our industry right now, I would suggest that the superior technology of four G is going to replace creepy and you're gonNA. See Three G retired property before g that there are some applications onto g which swell three G that spectrum probably will be reformed and used in five G.. Leave. My old employer, Telstra, I think is turned off their entire to work in the spectrum they read farm. So there's some countries where it Econet, she get A to Z signal. You've been away for years to about your heritage research and Innovation UK. While is one of the top investors in our indeed in any industry. I, think we're in the top five or six in the Telco sector where we're number one, a number one by away this year, we're going to invest twenty billion globally in our D.. And that's delivered considerable competitive advantage and give us a jump on the five G. space. Here. In the UK, we have a number of centers of excellence for Recession Development, not least of which is the optical research development and chip design that we recently announced a billion pound investment in developing that further and a fabrication unit is well, our deed is a team sport, and in order for us to really maximize the benefits, you've gotta have an ecosystem around, and so we chose Cambridge to make that major investment whether it is already quite a good develop ecosystem and chip is on chip. Development. Now, let's address the elephant in the room. Recently, the UK government ruled that you'll find G. keep must be removed from UK Upright Eight wakes by twenty twenty seven. That's a pretty big deal. So if you must be removed, what does that entail what might cost operators and why will it take? So long to complete I, what we're very disappointed of that decision reverses the decision made in generating this year. And it. It's essentially takes time because if you imagine the infrastructure that is necessary to create a wireless network, it's physical. Antenna which often sit on top of buildings and getting access to those buildings. Getting cranes, moving that equipment is not a trivial task, because many of them are in city centres and even got access to the building, you need to get permission to local authorities, plus there is a very key economic reason why I it can't happen immediately, and that is huge investment has got into implementing forty five G. Networks, and there has to be return on investment, the carriers bt of Vodafone to being very clear to the UK. UK Government. If they seek to accelerate to any fossil trench, twenty seven, the cost will go into the billions and to them. There'll be blackouts because the very nature of Wallace designers. You cannot just take down no one cell and expect the sales to compensate. If you're doing a swap, you need to planet needs to get the permissions you need to get the cranes do physicals. It's quite a protracted exercise, and then if you have to do it in a hurry is very expensive and risks, blackouts, anyone says. From technologist view, this is unheard off that the government mandates to remove equipment that's been bought and paid for stolen. As you say, it's not trivial to take antennas off ruse. Is this the first time? This has happened? Yes I think it is the first. I can't think of another example, and that's probably why they've chosen the date for twenty, twenty, seven because. We're talking about five G. Today. Sixty Is the end of this decade. There is a natural churn that if you build it within the natural churn and plans within the natural judd, the costs can be managed and. The engineering funches can be organized, but actually the true cost to this decision. Is the real significant cost is actually to the UK consumers because whilst bt of Said is GONNA cost them half a billion in direct costs, the the UK was the second country in Europe to five G.. And was will placed with a number of government initiatives to experiment early on with five G. With the these. Tests. So government-sponsored testbeds in manufacturing which Roy.

UK IBM UK Government bt Europe IBM Software Company Bill Gates US professional services Tokyo Telstra Scanlon Paul Econet judd Roy Vodafone Recession Development
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

04:34 min | 10 months ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"Today's guest is Jeremy Thompson who was executive vice president of the UK and overseas development of Hallways UK businesses. Jeremy Join UK. Twenty. Twenty. As deputy managing director with specific responsibility for carrying Strategy Business Change in K customers. Pratt while why Jeremy worked for twenty years in senior management roles including product leadership and telecoms joint-venture development for bt group in the UK and other parts of Europe including. Spain. And the nordics. Journeys. Also previously worked in the US in the UK for an IBM Software Company and Consulting Business Welcome Jeremy Thank you. Thank you. Enter could sold here. Now. We have a lot in common. We've both got a career in Tokyo and we've both would with IBM. So what's been your journey to while you K-? Well as you as you mentioned I did in the only part of my career work in professional services with IBM in the US. And then in the mid nineteen ninety S I came back to the UK and I joined the British. Telecom, bt and what the twentieth bt. So I've been really in the telecom space now for or three decades and seeing the development from. abloh through first generation. Now into a fifth generation and my background is in product and product management and joint benches, it had a number of course Europe. We have very similar correct trajectories. We'll explore that in a minute, but it's great to talk to another Tokai friendly person. So back on season two, episode four, we spoke with your colleague Paul. Scanlon about the future of five. G.. And we had a really interesting discussion about why's approach to five G. From Technology Point? Is You know I? Ask you a bunch of technology questions today. But what is five gene to you? Five G. as it implies is the next generation and every generation of brings new opportunities with the Wallet Space. But potentially, I. Think. The second generation was significant. The full generation was significant and the fifth generation is probably very significant with an industry can be criticized a little bit of over promising to quote Bill Gates's overestimate the short term and underestimate the long term and five G. is going to deliver on a number of promises that perhaps it'd be made over the last few years. But it four G. was about APPS and consumers and smartphones five. is about connected devices and B. to be health and agriculture and verticals. So we think we're on the cusp of. A major change in the telecommunications industry and ecosystem around it. I'm sure we're going to talk about that, but it may take another two or three years before the networks rolled out and the applications developed and someone has the aw iphone moments in five G.. What's funny? You Miss Three G is that inflection point? I? Remember when three g came out and I went <hes> nine, the carrier, but everyone was promising video calling. I think my too cozy mind tie life. It was really about foster incident although when my guys back to three G or Heaven Forbid Eighth? Edge? I just have to create jogging and should be illegal in any country. There's enough legislation being talked about in our industry right now, I would suggest that the superior technology of four G is going to replace creepy and you're gonNA. See Three G retired property before g that there are some applications onto g which swell three G that spectrum probably will be reformed and used in five G.. Leave. My old employer, Telstra, I think is turned off their entire to work in the spectrum they read farm. So there's some countries where it Econet, she get A to Z signal. You've been away for years to about your heritage research and Innovation UK. While is one of the top investors in our indeed in any industry. I, think we're in the top five or six in the Telco sector where we're number one, a number one by <unk> away this year, we're going to invest twenty billion globally in our D.. And that's delivered considerable competitive advantage and give us a jump on the five G. space. Here. In the UK, we have a number of centers of excellence for Recession Development, not least of which is the optical research development and chip design that we recently announced <hes> a billion pound investment in developing that further and a fabrication unit is well,

UK IBM UK Government bt Europe IBM Software Company Bill Gates US professional services Tokyo Telstra Scanlon Paul Econet judd Roy Vodafone Recession Development
Interview With Jeremy Thompson

The Practical Futurist Podcast

04:34 min | 10 months ago

Interview With Jeremy Thompson

"Today's guest is Jeremy Thompson who was executive vice president of the UK and overseas development of Hallways UK businesses. Jeremy Join UK. Twenty. Twenty. As deputy managing director with specific responsibility for carrying Strategy Business Change in K customers. Pratt while why Jeremy worked for twenty years in senior management roles including product leadership and telecoms joint-venture development for bt group in the UK and other parts of Europe including. Spain. And the nordics. Journeys. Also previously worked in the US in the UK for an IBM Software Company and Consulting Business Welcome Jeremy Thank you. Thank you. Enter could sold here. Now. We have a lot in common. We've both got a career in Tokyo and we've both would with IBM. So what's been your journey to while you K-? Well as you as you mentioned I did in the only part of my career work in professional services with IBM in the US. And then in the mid nineteen ninety S I came back to the UK and I joined the British. Telecom, bt and what the twentieth bt. So I've been really in the telecom space now for or three decades and seeing the development from. abloh through first generation. Now into a fifth generation and my background is in product and product management and joint benches, it had a number of course Europe. We have very similar correct trajectories. We'll explore that in a minute, but it's great to talk to another Tokai friendly person. So back on season two, episode four, we spoke with your colleague Paul. Scanlon about the future of five. G.. And we had a really interesting discussion about why's approach to five G. From Technology Point? Is You know I? Ask you a bunch of technology questions today. But what is five gene to you? Five G. as it implies is the next generation and every generation of brings new opportunities with the Wallet Space. But potentially, I. Think. The second generation was significant. The full generation was significant and the fifth generation is probably very significant with an industry can be criticized a little bit of over promising to quote Bill Gates's overestimate the short term and underestimate the long term and five G. is going to deliver on a number of promises that perhaps it'd be made over the last few years. But it four G. was about APPS and consumers and smartphones five. is about connected devices and B. to be health and agriculture and verticals. So we think we're on the cusp of. A major change in the telecommunications industry and ecosystem around it. I'm sure we're going to talk about that, but it may take another two or three years before the networks rolled out and the applications developed and someone has the aw iphone moments in five G.. What's funny? You Miss Three G is that inflection point? I? Remember when three g came out and I went nine, the carrier, but everyone was promising video calling. I think my too cozy mind tie life. It was really about foster incident although when my guys back to three G or Heaven Forbid Eighth? Edge? I just have to create jogging and should be illegal in any country. There's enough legislation being talked about in our industry right now, I would suggest that the superior technology of four G is going to replace creepy and you're gonNA. See Three G retired property before g that there are some applications onto g which swell three G that spectrum probably will be reformed and used in five G.. Leave. My old employer, Telstra, I think is turned off their entire to work in the spectrum they read farm. So there's some countries where it Econet, she get A to Z signal. You've been away for years to about your heritage research and Innovation UK. While is one of the top investors in our indeed in any industry. I, think we're in the top five or six in the Telco sector where we're number one, a number one by away this year, we're going to invest twenty billion globally in our D.. And that's delivered considerable competitive advantage and give us a jump on the five G. space. Here. In the UK, we have a number of centers of excellence for Recession Development, not least of which is the optical research development and chip design that we recently announced a billion pound investment in developing that further and a fabrication unit is well,

UK Jeremy Thompson Europe IBM United States Bt Group Hallways Uk BT Deputy Managing Director Executive Vice President Spain Bill Gates Recession Development Tokyo Ibm Software Company Telecoms Pratt Econet Telstra
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

04:18 min | 1 year ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"How many places still have s fades? which are which are available which already helps, keep me up to date with a bunch of you know interesting news that you that you know otherwise pasta other people by we talked about this last week on the podcasting festival, the hilarious our says for those listing stands for really simple syndication and years ago it. It was just uses that would XML mockup to get blog posts out there, and it's been the cornerstone of podcasting, but we did talk last week, and we want to hear more about whether it needs to change what's available now and of probably what fifteen is all? Maybe it might be older. And what does it need to evolve to to allow monetization shots Elizabeth? Things and apple seem to be leading the charge and sort of forcing standardization. Is that fair? He I think that is I. Mean so RSS. As a thing and I love how it's called really simple syndication. It's anything but but. As a thing it, it was thought up by a chat from Microsoft and mangled Dave WanNa really built to You know to move data from one place to another and then Adam Curry, who was an MTV Dj at the time if you remember when MTV actually played music? hey ended up thinking. Wouldn't it be clever idea if you could also? Link to files through this He was thinking about it from to the onus from Paris, Hang, TV shows, but actually it turned out that it was a really handy way of of united doing podcasts, as well doing pieces of pieces of ODA and You know so that sort of started going. Steve Jobs so somebody at apple thought well. This is interesting because this is a way of keeping people using the IPOD. Keeping people you know picking up that device every single day if they can get lots of content on that lots of free content on there that we apple don't have to pay for Why that? We put podcasts into I tunes, said that it will also magically stick new content onto the ipod, and that's basically why apple jumped in and Y, you know. Apple wanted to make it. Look a little bit nicer work, a little bit better, and so quite a loss of they ideas behind podcast the fact that you have a category, the fact that you have an image the fact that images square and should be anywhere between three thousand to one thousand four hundred pixels wide out. All of that stuff was basically apple wanting to make podcasting. Look a little bit nicer on their devices. And Apple is really been driving those sorts of standards ever since so making sure that the categories a correct making shoul- that you know you can now mock things as a serial podcast, or as an episodic podcast you know, and all that sort of thing is all basically apples, apples ideas, so that's been really helpful, but also that means conversely that if you want to come up with a new idea around podcasting, if you want to add a donate button for example, then you've got to convince somebody at apple because apple has sixty five percent of the market so it's good news that we we've had a strong leader. It's also potentially bad news because actually. You know the evident. Dick dictator is I. Believe the phrase that some people use You know they've been really good for us, but also you know basically told a the podcasting world what we should be doing and you know it would be useful if the was a couple of challenges to to apple,.

apple Adam Curry MTV Steve Jobs Elizabeth Dick dictator Microsoft Paris Dave Wan
The Future of Podcasting with Podnews Editor James Cridland

The Practical Futurist Podcast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

The Future of Podcasting with Podnews Editor James Cridland

"Today's guest all the way from Brisbane. Australia is James. Cridland the editor of the leading source of podcast. News Hug News Dot Knit. Without the twentieth easily radio and online business in two thousand five James help loans, the first daily podcast from UK, radio station and the world's first regius station streaming. APP, he offers a truly international view is a bridge leading Austrailia witnessed companies across the world including North America. He's also a keynote speaker and consultant, and wrote his first podcast RSS, fading January two thousand five, and also launched the first live radio streaming at from eyeball finds in Cya. Importantly, he's worked in the audio industry since nineteen eighty nine. Welcome, James, thank you so much for having me what we only spoke last week. Your against on the podcast festival, a joint production with podcasting buddies mean to doll and safety. That was a law show with you. Questions thrown in a producer might. this week prerecord so will move a bit slow pice if that's okay, Hanna absolutely fine I'm glad you said that. Look I feel like running exchange program. You're a Briton stride. Yet I'm in London. What's it like in strider? The moment I hear a lot of the lockdown restrictions eliciting. Yes, Oh, they're beginning to lift him in. We can't so. I'm in Queensland can't go anywhere in Queensland. We're not allowed to leave. Leave our great state, although I state frankly is big enough, so that's all okay, but yeah things are beginning to beginning to relax I'm not quite sure what the latest figures were, but certainly we we've had one case one coronavirus case in the last A. Week or so here in Queensland so you know we're doing. We're doing pretty well rather better than you guys think, and you'll side pod news dot net which I encourage one to sign up for the daily newsletter. Have you seen increasing traffic is forecasting immuno thriving during this pandemic I mean pain and increase in the amount of people getting it, which is nice and the amount of people. Using it, but I mean obviously. There's been an increase in podcasting as well so actually in May. We saw a new record for the amount of podcasts launch, ninety, six, thousand, five hundred. So you know you can clearly see and yes, some of that is going to be Ju to coronavirus, and the fact that you can launch a podcast of your home and you might. You might be a bit bored or whatever but I think also part of that is just because podcasting is actually growing and quite a lot of those. We're going to launch anyway so you know a tremendous amount of growth there and suddenly podcast hosts of I'm talking to that saying that as as significant increase in the amount of you know in the Mount of people signing up and the amount of support Kohl's that having an everything else which is old boats, said good I. Think so why we're going. Here are the podcasting Stat Guru. but What what number of these podcasts will quote a sort of survive? I mean lots of starting up because people bedrooms when I go back to work and things you think there'll be some on jeopardy, or what sort of half life of a podcast series. Yeah, I think that's going to be interesting, isn't it? I mean quite a lot of podcasts. Don't last particularly long it. It has to be said. And you know that may be bydesign. May Be because people you know, realize that actually producing great audio is quite difficult. And you know and so therefore they can't necessarily work too hard on that I mean if you have a look at the amount of the amounts of active podcasts there while there are one point one million podcasts in apple podcasts, and about half of those are active, so that means that they've published one episode in the Pasta Ninety days so about how for the market about half of them are inactive, and that's I think actually pretty good in terms of you know they longevity of podcasting the that you know? Know half a million still being currently made. You know that said that's quite thing i. think often asked is podcasting the new blogging and you've been around probably as long as I have gone Do you think they blend It's it's not simple to do a great audio show, but you can actually say something happened and get your news thoughts out there, but is podcasting blogging I. Don't think so I mean I. Ingenuity. It's interesting. I, was talking to US talking to Turkish television last night, and you know and they were saying. Is podcasting growing and I think one of the interesting things around focusing. He's been going for fifteen years but it's been nice, slow and steady growth every single year every single year. It's been getting bigger. But what podcasting hasn't Betas is it hasn't been. A My space or a Bibo or vine? Hasn't you know a dramatically? Increased and then all of a sudden. Disappears again.

Australia Queensland Brisbane James Editor United States North America Briton London Consultant UK Producer JU Hanna Mount Of Apple Kohl
Thriving in a time of uncertainty with Dr. Lynn Gribble

The Practical Futurist Podcast

09:59 min | 1 year ago

Thriving in a time of uncertainty with Dr. Lynn Gribble

"Today we have returning guests. Dr Lene Gruber who is one of Australia's founding coaches an accidental academic and an award winning author and university Electra. Lynn Kolzov a pragmatic futurist coach. She also helps people to future proof. They careers in an ever evolving workplace. Lynn is coming to us. Live to die from Sydney Australia. Now it's important to note as you record Saturday. Twenty first of March twenty twenty. It's fair decided on both sides of the world. We're living in completely uncharted waters here in the UK pubs clubs Churches Museums Cinemas. Theatres and schools are now closed. The government is just offered to pay up to eighty percent of workers wages while these companies have shut down and everyone I know is working from home and last night. The streets here in London would deserted. I've never lived through World War but many are saying this is a similar time highly and first of all. How are you and how your family are? They safe and healthy yet. Where all siphon health healthy I moved to working from harm From Tuesday of this last week We went live with everything we were doing in a virtual world from Monday so we did Chinese for Monday and so we're just practicing really good processes of you know keeping things clean making sure that everything that comes in the house is clean and kept clean and so it's all good for us that just for some context. Those didn't he lost your on season. One you'll university lectures explain way you lecturing lecturing so I work at the University of New South Wales which is one of the top universities in part of the group of universities in Australia and a we have the number one business school in Australia. And I'm part of that school and so we have a number of international students as well as local students. What about fifty? Seven thousand students on campus is full so This week we've made the decision to put all our lectures and everything online and work with students in a virtual space which is very exciting. Because I've been teaching online for sixteen years and I think that this may actually be the future will never wanted to have a study about the future work and lock. Y'All been working remotely for many years on the nomad. I just need Wi fi coffee in a flat surface. What's interesting a lot of my colleagues? That have been working at home first. Time actually help one of them like a monitor up of the stays the other day they finding it really really arresting to to work first of all on their own so mental health issues but also getting work done What tips could you give someone who has all of a sudden main told Guy Heim and wet from high and what? What are some things that can be doing to ease into this because it is very very uncomfortable environment? I'm sure a lot of papal use their workplace as pseudo family spice and I think that that's the first thing that we need to acknowledge that we spend a lodge amount of time at work and work as a very for many people social environment My pitch they looked at what happens to people when they get retrenched. And so I've heard all the stories of isolation and not being in the office at citrus. So the first thing that people need to do is recognize that just because you're used to having a lodge monitor. Aw traveling somewhere for work doesn't mean that that's what you need to do for the rest of you life. The second thing around this is that people often focus on what's different rather than focusing on. What's the same so you need to Cape? A routine routine is absolutely kate. If you think about how different for many people if they work say Monday Friday they will often find that on the weekend not aging at the same time then excising time than getting up at the same time so what going to. The office provides structure. And so if you can make a structure about being at home and tried to create the similar structure. You would have as if you're going to work so if you normally get up at seven you should normally get up at seven if you normally get up at six and go to the gym. Maybe your gym workout is now at home. There is so many great apps to be working at home. So and you can look at it harm Ryan shine whether it's forty degrees in Australia. Role minus four degrees in London. So the thing is created routine that you can replicate anywhere and this is one of the foundational things of being able to be flexible and work from anywhere. So one friend of mine was talking about Having to have facetime so a lot of these things are on voice coal and apparently They've also said well. Once a week we have to have quite facetime and now talking about how they then had to quit my cup on and and the hair and everything else Is this the right thing? Should WE FORCE PEOPLE TO BE PRISON? I was actually saying to them that probably after if this goes on for months we weren't k. What we look like in six months we will just go on with their hair. No makeup or whatever Just to to be present but is an important to see other colleagues. I mean I'm seeing lots of photos on social media of all these like the Brady Bunch squares all these people I why having and happy Let's fast forward six months. How will it look in six months when this is the new normal so actually connecting and however connecting works for you? If that's about seeing somebody if it's about texting somebody so if it's about being present you know I always remember when my daughter was quite young That I'd often ring a friend on Friday about five thirty and they also had small kids and we would havoc foreign conversation and share a glass of Wine and Sofa may the whole idea of virtually meeting up. I mean look here we are you and halfway around the world and this conversation wouldn't be that different. If we were in the same room the difference would be that we can see each other. If we really want to see each other now we could turn on a medium that would allow that. But I don't feel that are necessary and to your point about paypal feeling that you know. Do I put my Cup on? What do I get dressed or not now the the ritual of getting dressed into business? 'cause there's lots of studies that talk about when people dress casually they act casually so there is a really good rigor about getting up in the morning and getting dressed for work particularly if that's what you've always done and then overtime being careful that you don't start to become too casual and your work colleagues like you might treat your friends because there's a different set of engagement so it's not about whether you wear makeup or don't wear makeup where a social don't wear a suit. You should be dressed in a way that makes you feel professional so a lot of people where this falls down for them is that they would prefer to where they're jim gear. Twenty four seven and this is awesome. Why we he at New Moms? Say All you know. I just don't get dressed up anymore. I just don't feel like myself anymore and I say well I need dressing the way you were when you went to school when you went to work. And they say why. Don't need to and I GOTTA. You might be surprised how that affects your psyche. So there is a real thing about you know. Get up turn up show up you know and do these a way that makes you feel professional because clubs are often are Armagh to the world. Now I'm sure a lot of people whether they waking from home or freelancing. This is a time of uncertainty. And you said you. Phd cover these thriving in on uncertainty. Let's assume as the government is trying to tell us. This could last for months not weeks. How do we thrive in uncertain times like now the thing that happens with the human mind is that when we are uncertain we try and solve that problem we are problem solving being and so with uncertainty? What people try and do is imagine how to create certainty from the time? We're very little each have to think about what's the first thing they tell you with a young baby get in a routine so it knows what's coming next so it understands the system the passion the prosise so when we break those patents and processes people become very uncertain then they seek ways to create certainty. His thing I'd say to just about everybody today because a lot of people have asked me this week. You know you'll very happy and I go home happy as a clam because I had predicted that we would move to a work from home model and I had predicted we would do that around mid to late. February. So I'm a little bit out. I was a little bit ahead of myself but none the less. What we do know is is that for now. Most people who've got a job doing that from an isolation perspective. Whether that's at harm or distancing social distancing so that is annoying and that's not going to change for the foreseeable future now whether that's a couple of months many months or more than many months but it certainly isn't going to change in the next week or two so you can know physician that how you're setting up to work you should set it up so that you're comfortable to do this for an ongoing period and if that's a couple of months or more than a couple of months that should be arcade don't make do instead of make it what you want it to be for that. Focus on all the things that you know. So if you've got a job you know what that job looks like how you go about. It might change. But the job itself hasn't changed. Your family hasn't changed. Your living situation. Haven't changed so focusing on what you know rather than what you know and keep your mind coming back to. I know these when somebody says what about this darn dwelling the. I don't know because as soon as you go there you'll mind will try and solve it so focus on it. Make a list of all the things you do know and when somebody says what about the actually what I do know is this and keep talking about we know and focus on what you know and what you can anchor

Australia London Lynn Kolzov Sydney Dr Lene Gruber University Of New South Wales Facetime UK Churches Museums Cinemas Guy Heim WI Cape Ryan JIM Armagh
The Future of Professional Relationships with Andy Lopata

The Practical Futurist Podcast

06:28 min | 1 year ago

The Future of Professional Relationships with Andy Lopata

"Does the professional relationship strategist actually do? I guess the answer is pretty much in the title but I'll work with organizations and individuals within those organizations to help them look how the professional relationships they build Com charge their business And Charlie career If you look at most to the challenges and the skill sets the leaders and Successful business people focus on that that that powered by relationships whether you're looking at change management leadership in itself business growth. You can list challenges and pretty much. Everyone could be made easier. I'm better if you have the right connections with the right people in the right place and strong relationships with them but we tend to leave that to chance and what I try and do is encourage those people to think about the most strategically. Well if you're asking someone to do something that will involve change or is uncomfortable. You WanNa be asked by some on you actually like you've got to lock them in that. Yes I would do that for you because we have a relationship at some point down the track on my need to ask you to do something. And it's equipped Park Roy. Something really struck me Back in January I was Speaking events event organizers before Mytalk I listened to the opening plenary session and it was a lady called name. Ray Who's the COO of I make switched? One of the biggest event organizers in the world. They run you know mixed they run events of fifteen thousand twenty thousand people in in Las Vegas And in Frankfurt and non Emory was talking about how they making their event sustainable and she had three key points in. The second point was collaboration and she threw out the talk. She talked about the different stakeholders she needed to have on board in order to make the event sustainable. And I since I had the chance I rushed out. I got to the slides and I created a brand new slide for my presentation listing stakeholders and the point I made is you had in the started with the team. But she didn't say the team it wasn't the IMAX team. It was they Finance team the sales team the delivery team so you had all the teams with an I. Max You had all the different suppliers so you had. The people that build exhibition stands the transportation on ground level to cleaners to the cleaners. Caterers You had the clients and bring the clients on the journey and I listed about twelve or fifteen of just from my notes from the talk and and my opening to my presentation that morning and it's become the opening this new presentation. Now anyway was what's the one thing that's going to make your life easier in bringing all of those stakeholders forward and it's professional relationships strong relationships on and I had a quote from now lamb. Ris At the end of that which said If you have your partners on board you multiply your impact. So that's what I try and help people and I think people don't recognize the power of professional relationships will go into more detail but we think networking is. I have connect with you on Lincoln sidewalk and his whole story around that you actually for years were known as Mister Network But you start to move away from this. So is networking now a dirty word networking word and I've always said that if I could find the replacement for it then I'll make my fortune I. It's it's not as dirty words it used to be Two thousand eight changed that you know when when people started losing their jobs linked in activity might experience absolutely spiked People were maybe on it but weren't really using it. Two Thousand Eight nine sort of sea change as people either looking for new job or felt their jobs under threat And I saw massive change. In the way people engage with networking from that point to the point way up before the crash I was at an event for women in technology. I did the bravest thing I've ever done in my life and I've parachuted and jumped so on abseiled. I put my hand up and asked a question of a panel An event could women technology where they were one hundred ninety nine women in the room where man and I wasn't even in technology I ask the panel about the the difference for a woman to a man networking corporate space. Because at the time I was moving from running a network for small businesses and knowing that I wanted to move into working with corporates and one by one. Shut me down They said you know we don't do that. We don't have time to go to the POB after work. We manipulate Everything that they said about networking was negative. Even though everything I would define networking is was represented in advice. They gave presentations One year two years later I was at an event for another women's event. It was European professional women's network. I'm one of the speakers of hundred fifty women in the ordinances time. How many of you think networking is important? Your career every hand went up. That was a huge change in a short period of time. So I don't think networking is as dirty word as it was in the you know before. Two thousand eight having said that it still misperceived misunderstood undervalued. It still seen as a soft skill is seen as a sales tool a saint something for junior levels. And it's it's all of those things and none of those things And and the reason for my shift from a focus on networking to a focus on professional relationships of which networking forms a part Is the I was getting pigeonholed into how to work a room You know my friend. Susan Susan Rohan wrote the book how to Work Room probably thirty years ago. Now it. It's a word is a phrase that's really stuck in the popular vernacular and we do need to know how to make the most of networking events but they set tiny percentage of what I do and when you talk about professional relationships conferences and events are just one tool. And I've been preaching that message for a long time but I think it took the shift a wife and talking about networking and talking about relationships for people to get that then. If you want to build professional relationships you can at how networking events and conferences. Sit into your took

Susan Susan Rohan Mister Network Park Roy COO Ray Who Imax Las Vegas Emory Frankfurt
The Future of 5G with Paul Scanlan CTO Huawei Carrier Business Group

The Practical Futurist Podcast

10:42 min | 1 year ago

The Future of 5G with Paul Scanlan CTO Huawei Carrier Business Group

"Welcome Paul thanks very much under now. I've just been very fortunate to sit around a round table with a bunch of influences. And you're quite candid about you know the challenges that you face in the industry but this podcast is about the future of and I wanted to talk about the future of Five G. Sofa my listeners out there that may be in markets where five gs and live or just been launch. How WOULD YOU DESCRIBE FIVE G? And why's it better than four g you know Andrew it's This is probably the most misunderstood technology. It's been bandied around as being everything from the you know the evil of the world to To the savior of the world right and I think the answer probably leaning towards the latter. Which is you know. It's something that really will transfer so I like to think of I five as a platform for transformation. Went talk about it as a speed thing or this thing or that thing. I'll just terrific platform for transformation. Everybody says you know five G. It's faster it's this that and everything else when we talk about them. Do you operate four G. And how do you operate five G? When we operate forgery generally we designed it for this thing called twenty megahertz of spectrum because in three G it was five Megahertz Chunks of spectrum. And therefore more megahertz means you get more spectrum. Generally you get more bang for your buck when we talk about five Jay. We're talking with starting with one. Hundred doesn't mean account. Wigan Eighty or seventy six fifty or ten yep but it was originally thought of. Let's try it for for for one hundred MiG. One hundred twenty two one mistake now. Of course you've got the up link in the downlink say have maybe it's about two or three to one put it in called a spider spider. So you have about two times or three times more spectrum so you're really not comparing for and five Jay in like for like we learnt Andrew many years ago five years ago in doing you think Oh. Wtt X. Wireless to the something. We learnt that we could provide wireless communication as a sort of an alternative center. A Better Time. To market than fiber by deploying wireless buys technologies to provide home-based broadband solutions. Because you build an anti put an antenna and you can sell it so cash and carry you. Get Five Mega. Hit megabits per second team. Maybe one hundred right now. This fixed product is competing with the mobile product. The second one is the bane with these not there so you don't really have enough resources but we learned very quickly that if we were able to put more antennas in we call the massive. Mimo. Then you end up with a better better result. Suddenly you can offer not three hundred customers. Ten makes you could offer three thousand customers teen makes and the more customers more Abu more money simple. It's all about money so now comes five G. so five G. The first thing we do so we've already got some empirical evidence about how much more efficient having one hundred megahertz of spectrum is in this. Wimax area. We're using two point. Three two point five. We've picked a different spectrum. Three point five GIG which means three point two to three point. Six three point eight. Maybe four point two to four point six just relishes the higher the frequency the more efficient it can be she can get more bandwidth through the high frequencies. Would you get you get larger amount of contiguous ECKSTROM? Yes and understand a little bit about how breaking spectrum up into blocks become very inefficient but if you have a big block of spectrum absolutely right and that's why the millimeter wave even higher stuff is even far more beneficial because you have a clear one gigahertz and suddenly war instead of five megs of got one GIG. Simple physics tells you you're GonNa get more bang for your buck. Yeah so five. G. Comes along with starting the premises. One Hundred Megahertz Huge leap ahead of four G and we've got these improvements inefficiencies. So that's what Linda lend lend itself to the high throughput but wait. There's more right and the more big comes to about things like lighten city and massive connections. So we could already see that the challenge is always the always the latency at the air interface and the reason for that is because you could imagine from a base station probably in developed countries. You can have five back to the cornet work for the back to the corner. Work five milliseconds into into the top rate Japan. Top to bottom ten roughly these sort of rough guidances of how how much delay you have across these areas. But if you want to do things that are more interesting like connected car. You don't need five Jay for car but You know if you want autonomous driving. It's one of the options. Yes you could use other methods. But that's not the the most important but if you take a robot right if you've ever shook the hand of a of a rebel with articulated digits but the first thing is if you want one hundred kilos of metalwork comes toward you put something out the first step back of course when you put your hand out and you grab it if the latency is not really shop. Then by the time it gets feedback in squeezing your hand it's probably to light my crusher hand. You got it so we need latency so there's a practical example. Yes but you have more certainly connected car within a couple of meters. The shorter duration robotics interaction. Let's talk about the medical profession if you wanted to do telemedicine remote medicine. Yes so between a practitioner. Highly capable person. Let's take a simple like it's not really simple. Let's take ultra ultrasounds. So you have an expert a technician. The journey woman sitting there with a couple of hundred grants with equipment. What about the village? That's you know two hundred dollars or three hundred kilometers wide. So we just discussed about this thing called latency. What about if I wanted this person to do some remote monitoring of a man or a woman or somebody on the on the I and we've got these tactile feedback devices now? Yes but the person is a couple of hundred Roy. So you imagine. There's a basic person. Triage a stripping. His thing to your body for a couple of thousand dollars which is cost effective. And you got the expert with brain paranoid analytics copy with scopes and everything and now. He presses and two hundred kilometers lighter. It's pressing on you. And then by the time he gets the feedback. He's got to realize that I shouldn't push too far because it's the robot prom you don't want to crush the got it so this this problem. So this is lighten savings on. He's a couple of industries and a couple of sectors that where you can feel that latency. We important robots inside the factory today factory in factories. Andrew haven't changed in one hundred fifty years. Everything is serial from the day we industrialized in the UK. Right I give you the material you do your bit. You Pass it to him. He passes it to her. She personally what happens today? Robotic PLANT ROAD. I does this positive robot. By-pass Robert C. So let's suppose this boardroom. Were nail which vacant and a couple of hours is the Knicks factory from twelve six income the robots willing themselves around connected with five G. They're from different companies. Kawasaki. Ibb ETC. And they're all connected to the cloud by five. G. So the latency is really small. And of course if you take beyond this. This is not thing of few connections to multiple connections per person to devices everywhere. Lamppost ties dresses salt pepper. Shakers everything the cup of tea bags or connected and they will be. You might think it's stupid but you know today it'll get down to something you know a third the size you now. Then everything's connected. If you have that competition of connectivity things in a cell a mobile cell with people you have come back to the first. Problem fixed wireless existing and with mobile paging competing for resources. And it's signaling resources. Yeah and you won't have a few thousand people per sale. You might have hundreds of thousands but the thing with it is. You don't need the speed because some of these things are transmit low data rate but if you've got millions of them in the same spot they all want to compete for radio spectrum to say. Hey I want you to get your data you got it and so you're quite right after that. The data rates are pretty small and listen to a couple of K. kilobytes. But you have a lot of them and it's a signal you know. I've got to wake up not communicate to the end so it's a bit like ceiling overhead traffic. It's it's competing for this. Some of the data so there's a lot of optimization bottomline so affected that in so that's why you have speed latency and throughput as the three key components of five G. But what nobody ever talks about is the social impact five g. and the social impact directly about energy. So you know. Today we're at the product and solution launch of lawyer and we announced that we have a five G. product. That is now. It went one year ago. Forty kilos to twenty five. From two hundred Megahertz bandwith to four hundred megahertz bandwidth but also consumes about the same amount of energy as four J. site. So you've just gone for something that's twenty to one hundred times better for the same amount of energy so some of the analysis that's been boy very specifically by a company called steel partners a consulting company here in the UK. And they've done some analysis based on you know while always products in an older competitor's products looking at all the networks around the world and their energy consumption and a very simple tagline is if you keep building four g networks you double the carbon footprint the planet but if he's five g. It flattens out and it starts to reduce in five years. That's not a bad reason for deploying five G. above the other I think you're great storytellers. It'll just had the opportunity to spend an hour and a half in the room and you. You mentioned the point about your station equipment. Going down in White told a great story about why wife now people know about while we for all different reasons but I love the story about how the thing dropped in. Share that story so I was at a meeting in headquarters and the CEO is sitting at a table with with a number of US including the product and they director in the product. Our Day director was showing the new version of the first five G. Base station that we're going to be launching in a few months and the white was forty five kilos Andrea and he said left on the table. What do you mean forty five kilos? Don't you understand occupational all health and Safety in Europe? It's forty kilos. Everybody looked at him. What does that mean and he said you need a crane. If you need a crane to install this. Do you know how expensive it'll be for our customers? They want. And how the time delay plus the expense and everything. Everything's the wrong wrong targets. You know the capital equipment costs too high. Three months later are endangered. Came back in forty kilos right. Thank you very much forty kilos. We launched now with twenty five kilos and he just on stage and said. Do you know why it's twenty kilos because a person is allowed to carry a twenty kilo product and install it and you know so we're always thinking about how do we improve person the customer's business. It's not about. We've got a great product you want to buy it or you buy this product because it's got these features we're always thinking about from the customer's perspective and generally everybody has the same. Kpi therefore KPI's it's called Revenue Prophet brand market share. You want all of those things. That's what you want right. That's the key metrics so we always think about those components whenever we building products or solutions or focusing on customers. And things like

JAY Andrew UK Forgery Paul Director IBB Knicks Wigan Europe ABU Linda Kawasaki Japan Technician Robert C.
The Future of 'The Internet of Things' with Ron Rock from Microshare

The Practical Futurist Podcast

08:53 min | 1 year ago

The Future of 'The Internet of Things' with Ron Rock from Microshare

"Welcome thank you enter now before we get into this topic. It's probably with hearing your own definition of the Internet of things. Are I think it means many things to many people. How do you describe it? Wow what a heavy question to start our conversation with today. You're right Iot means a lot of things to a lot of people bowl and I've actually learned in the last six months that some middle management in large corporations advise me to not mention Iot in the C. Suite because it's got this bad reputation IOT was first coined back in nineteen ninety nine at Mit. And the idea was that we had computers running browsers and they were all talking to one in another. It was the height of the DOT com and somebody came up with this great idea that wow what if machines could actually talk to each other directly. What if our refrigerator and our car our and our appliances at home what all these things could actually be interconnected what of cars and traffic lights and ambulances were all connected so this was a big? The guy idea what happened in the subsequent two decades a lot of money was spent on Iot and frankly a lot of failed projects and so so through that the buzz came through Iot. Everything's GonNa talk to everything to suddenly. It became a bad thing to talk about in the C suite. The were a few exceptions things. Like the GE jet engine we were able to put very expensive sensors in that engine. It generates over one hundred megabytes of data a second but the ROI. I Made Sense. We're going to keep planes in the air so no matter what the expense it made sense but we never really saw Iot in its Vision of two thousand. The George Jetson error. We never saw all of that automation. Come together so I agree that. It is going to bad rep. And I'm also also not using it to him because one it's confusing and also the other thing and we might talk about this. People say aw is not my Internet camera. That's being hacked. And unless things just has a really bad connotation so I know you now talk about Maka share as a sensor as a service company that's I think a much more compelling view but what does it actually mean well and and I can do a precursor to that I'd like to say we talk about Iot under this. Concept of digital twinning digital twin has a lot of definitions out in the marketplace as well at the highest level digital twinning is. We're going to create a virtual replica of everything in our physical lives. Why are we going to do this going to do it? To drive operational efficiencies. We're going to do it to extend the quality of life. We're GONNA do it to find new business opportunities in the marketplace. I say AH extend the quality of life because data in general has gotten a bad rap lately. And so just like. You're teeing up the question hacking. Our Cameras Time magazine Kazini Tries To scare the hell out of us every week with our baby monitor has been hacked in. Its watching. Little J. T. so it's bad and it's consid- exactly all all of that so what we don't talk about and the press doesn't talk a lot about is all the good things coming out of data so cars that don't get into accidents in the first place are are happening. Because of thousands of sensors talking to one another and proactively making our automobiles safer proactively driving our health care system to look look for cures to cancer improve cardiac care. All these types of things are benefits of data but we take those for granted and we try to scare everybody with the data must be bad so I think one of the first things we we tackle at Micra share is the idea that there's a lot of really good data out there and the more data we can collect elect the more efficient. We're going to be able to make operations the more. We're going to be able to create new business opportunities new insights and let's face it. The companies beneath that run in a data centric business model are the companies that are now the most valuable in the world and legacy companies that have been around a long time are struggling and you need to make that switch or risk going away so I agree with you. Data is so powerful. But there's so much out there. Let's let's make more personal for our listeners. What sort of data can you collect? If you've got these senses give a sense of what is the data we can collect and how that might be turned into insights sure so at at microbes shared. There's so many a different industries that we could have pursued as an early stage company. We decided to focus on commercial real estate and we picked commercial real estate for a few reasons. One it's not regulated to everybody has some commercial real estate. It's ubiquitous across the planet and it's typically been underserved from financial our our technology investment perspective. So why do people care about data in commercial real estate. Well if I'm the tenant I want to know how many people are in my room in in my building increasingly. We're now working with a group of investors here in the UK. They lend the money to build the skyscraper. And so I'm going to give you a one hundred million in dollars but I'm GonNa Build into the Covenant of the bonds that I get to see the data of the occupancy in that building whenever I want to now that has real monetary autry value absolute monetary value and. Why do I do that because I want to know that my tenant is potentially going to go away nine months before they typically would tell me because I'm watching real time how that building functions so the money people interested the landlord is interested? The tenant is interested interested and the real low hanging fruit that we have found. Is that the facilities management folks. The people that cleaned that building are really interested in that data. Why typically large companies like here in London Caribbean went out of business? These were big companies quote unquote too big to fail billions of pounds running on razor thin margins on a race to zero. What does a company like really do among other things they clean your office space? How do they typically clean it? They have the minimum wage employees pushing a cart from point A. TO POINT B. to point C.. Every day on a schedule regardless of utilization. So what if I could actually clean space. That's being used and not clean space. That isn't being used fun. Little fact the number one complaint North America America and Europe in the workplace is dirty bathrooms and so suddenly I start cleaning the bathrooms that are being utilized more frequently and I stopped cleaning the bathrooms that for whatever reason time of year Time of day or no longer being used so one of our large global facilities management companies a fortune one hundred company. We were in a meeting a few months ago and they said wait a minute. Ron I think I get it. Occupancy equals dust and that is a fundamental game changer. So now you're in a razor thin margin business huge big global footprint if I can suddenly suddenly shave a few points off of my cost whilst at the same time improving the level of service. That's a huge win. For these companies comes is back to a wellness thing. So we. He'd millennials warner come to work and being spied and and make their their passion but if they're working in a facility that I like ords duty then they're not gonna be happy and I know that if I go to a bathroom facility. There's a teddy piece of paper that someone signs of being there but you wrote that's program. Every hour ago they with it needs cleaning. Knock so just to break down the sense of basically says this spice this bathroom. This coffee area is arisen being used so that data goes back to someone who can take action on. WanNa that's right and typically those sensors in that data create insights. Those insights are integrated in with your dynamics three sixty five accounting system or your pegase systems business process management bpm system or sap and these insights then drive action so for example being in a bathroom and having push-button there that allows a consumer to say. Hey this bathroom needs to be cleaned. I now have a date time stamp of when they push I that button. It needs to be cleaned when the cleaning person shows up. They have a small magnet on their keychain. They tap the bottom of that sensor and I now have a date time stamp is to win. The response showed up as we look at some of these big global facilities management contracts. The margins are so thin that they've have begun crafting service level agreements. SLA's and so now the facilities management company can actually get an increase in revenue. If they meet certain service Chris Level Agreements. We now provide the data that shows real time feedback from the people using the building and the facilities management companies real time response as to how they are servicing the facilities that. They're engaged

IOT North America America And Euro UK George Jetson Maka Kazini J. T. London Caribbean RON WAN
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

13:42 min | 1 year ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"And welcome to the practical features. podcast a biweekly showed will about the near term future with practical advice from a range of global experts. Expects to help you stay ahead of the curve. If we episode on the question the future with voices and opinions that need to be a hand. You host is international keynote speaker and practical futurist Andrew Grill. Welcome to the practical futurist podcast. My guest today is a return guest. MINTA doll thanks for being back on the show my pleasure. We're GonNa talk about something close to your heart and more recently close to my heart. The future of podcasting you'll first episode was November. Twenty ten. What got you into podcasting? Well at the time I just left Liau. And and like so many things things I I wanted to do what was digital and so I started blogging in two thousand and six while on the executive active committee worldwide and at the time it was considered illegal if not improper to self promote where they considered itself community company in a big company. Soon as soon as I left I'd been listening to Pud cosmic wine. I try this out and so in a very amateur manner. I started cussing. I actually believe my first ones were right after I left and we're done in French the time I was in Paris so I started podcasting and I wanted to explore what it's like and and and then little by little home not just the technical aspects but mind skills. I remember years ago in Adelaide. I was offered to be on the university radio station and ahead. A slaughter was three in the morning and I decline that but I always look back to think what would have happened. If I'd actually taken up the offer so now I get to do that. Because essentially podcasting is a radio show right. That's why I use first of all that would become might have become a night owl and secondly I used to start off a Pud cost. The word is seemed so Gauche Woodward came from. Well I think the law basically says it's it's The different senior broadcast and politics. And so so the PODCAST IPOD and that's probably came together. So what are you gonNA add. podcasting I so the very first and most important thing is I learn so I I seek out individuals. I think are interesting. Done something and they don't need to be grandiose people they just I think if you get your listening skills feels turned on everybody you can learn from so I I seek out people that I'm interested to hang out. With and by the nature of recording inevitably inevitably. The other person feels like they need to show up and so then in that moment you get to learn stuff there they you just not gonna come with your b-game. We don't WANNA come to be games because Zeros like everyone's going to hear what you're saying it's a you think podcasting is replaced blogging. Well I think the blogging certainly has come under pressure and so for having blog for so long I can see that the volume of of people listening in common reading and commenting has declined and so put customers competing with blogging in terms of getting our attention span will it. Has It replaced. No I think that there's still a place ace for writing and reading and commenting But I do think it's a really interesting avenue for individuals authors of course worse but also companies. What do you think now is the time to podcasting? I think it has been the time to put costs for quite a while I think that people are now becoming coming more accustomed to the idea podcasting. There have been certain podcast shows that have really generalized the ability like cereal in the United States or your pet show down in Australia. And so you've you've seen the major media companies creates more regular well produced. podcast shows that are consumable on your time. So that convenience factor the more seamless experience downloading it. That it's now come round as opposed to weigh. It wasn't the Beginnings Finance Asia has made it easier and yet there's still plenty more room to grow so now maybe because there's still plenty more to go yet I would say that you shouldn't just launch podcast for the sake of doing a podcast. which is what I did at the beginning? I because I was just in the experimental mode. If you podcast you you should be thinking about as is a long term engagement engagement just like blogging in the day. And you want to think about why you're doing it because by the way it takes energy efforts resources. Yeah and so. If you're going to do it you better be aware of why you're doing it. And that's going to help you get up and do it. Do you think podcasts will become the new influences when we've gone. We've got fatigue from these instagram influences and brands realized they don't get anything out of it. Do you think podcastone will step up to have that level of authority. I think it depends on the platform that you have. There's there's definitely really You know all the major Pud Kosters where you have thirty forty million people downloading it every week. Yeah that's that's that's significant influence getting on their shows by the way. Good luck really. Well of course because Joe Rogan's Harrison so yes you'd love to be on the a show but it's going to be difficult so much more selective and and they're much more aware of their influence now the beginning when you were an infant service sort of kind of fun. Oh I've got a million followers so it'd become much more sophisticated and much more demanding and ultimately the thing about podcasting. Which is interesting is that it's hard to hide? You can manicure a beautiful photograph on Instagram. You can cut and pastes deletes REEDIT A blog post I. But it's a whole lot harder for you as the podcast producer in this case to edit mentor. So what's coming out of my mouth with the IMO emotion. The intonations you as a listener are much more capable of detecting bullshit but I think also for the podcast. They are on show. If you're not an expert it'll come out and if you're having a conversation like we are and obviously nodding and saying that's nice next question without actually being involved in I think that's what draws people in because and the reason why I'm doing shy we'd guests rather than just made no one wants to my voice. I want as intro. These voices choices that need to be heard. Well that's kind and yet I think what's interesting. Andrew is the more you know as put coster it also can create a much better environment virement and conversation and so by the nature of the questions. You're asking you of course in my opinion demonstrate knowledge because near the end it also demonstrates who you ars individual they they get your vibe and by the way they're going to hire US speak they better wanted us into what you say but I think there's this This rawness to it that makes it in the in the intimacy of the ear a really interesting medium in order to vehicle messages you mentioned before about about what brands and companies can do. I've started to listen to a few branded podcasts. You think that's the next area that brands can really explore. It really depends on what they're trying to achieve Steve. So if in their strategic overview in imperatives they have a specific need maybe put costing his answer put. Custody is not necessarily early. What needs to be done and so if you feel that you have an engagement I was even in B.? Two B. is probably far more interesting and Abebe environment where you have specific shared expertise within the business that you're operating where you will get. Experts in the interest of long form in podcast can be real interest and yet on the other side. You know. There are various formats for podcasting whether it's bite-sized two to five minutes. Get fifty minute slot. You Got Twenty Minute Commute. Got The forty five minute jog. You got the one and a half to four hours. You know people who just like to spend their time in a constant Audio matter maybe while the ironing or doing other activities Anyway so many formats and so what are you trying to achieve the type of audience and I think the key point then is to think about it as a long term ambition because by the way at the beginning for the most part you're GonNa get very very few people listening getting people accustomed to you understand that type of audience them the different types of people you have on the show get them coming along on a regular basis. You need to do this regularly and have constant interesting compensation of course they do a weekly format. How does it work in terms of production time and effort even put into that all right so a my general idea is to have a thirty minute type of view when you add in the post production that the pre-roland the postal it? All ends is up to run about thirty five minutes. I never have to do the interview and then I have to listen to the whole interview at the end to make sure that it's all good so from the the time I find set up. Do the interview postproduction. I think every show takes around three hours because I also had the show notes and everything is have you got a a favorite guest. You've had on one. The one that comes to mind is a doctor. Jack Kreindler characterized jackets. Incredible polymath he lives in London he he he operates on late stage cancer and does it on top of that does surgical operations at high altitudes. Well he's a high performing athlete himself and and also does medicine for high performing athletes so he has his culmination commission of things that he pulls together on top of that. He's entrepreneur with a lot of things anyway so I could have gone on for hours with Jack. A second person who's coming up is A professor of sleep allow who was one of the first people ever to teach sleep his PhD and Sleeps Behavioral Behavior Psychology and he was from Stanford and he taught for one semester. One course at Yale and because has he been taught by Geico Bill dement. Who's The godfather of all sleep anyway? Mark rose kind is his name and he went from being asleep teacher to training astronauts on how to sleep to being on the board of the FTSE which is the federal tray of Federal Transport Transport and Safety Board United States to running Mitzi. And now he's doing a start up on the autonomous vehicle. Anyway that kind of personality I could just eat up every day. How do you find guest? He sounds amazing. How do you find some odd and find them constantly every week? We'll not only as challenge is pinning them down. Because this is the challenge I I I I basically I never promise anything big from them but I promise to have an interesting conversation and so I you know when I when I write on my Buggy I WanNa meet interesting people I find people I tag them down and then I do everything I can to get in their wheelhouse and attract them on. What you podcasts? Savoy there are things that they shouldn't do if you're insincere or authentic about doing it that's that's a no starter I think that you should avoid loyd being to amateur production. I think we've now gotten to a more sophisticated level and if you have a crummy recording device in sounds not good people. We're GONNA switch off the they have so much choice now out there that you can You'll get get tired of it if you're going to do it don't do it. Just for and fizzle out. Think about it strategically figure out why you're going to do it of a year. Maybe think about the types of guests you WANNA have on. If you're going to do guests you might be just desire to do individual vigil and and make sure your clued in heavily into why you're doing it if you're if you're not clear on that they'll start and could point. What's the last podcasts? She listened to you. I listened to the daily actually this morning which is done by the New York Times and and does a nice twenty minute? More or less in depth. If you uncalled in-depth a review of some kind of news item. There's so much that's going on that's of interest. I would like to suggest listening to Sam harasses. PODCAST used to call waking up with I'm Harris. Now it's called making sense. He he amongst other podcasts. Luminaries in in the United States are using the platform. I think very intelligently now the trying to monetize it but it really is about having long-form conversations with conflicting opinions in a civil manner and by demonstrating civility in in argument. I think it's a brilliant example. He's he's part of this. What they call American broadly speaking intellectual dark web make that then they use a lot of podcasting Joe? Rogan Jordan Peterson. The FEM spinners cleaners and a lot of interesting people Some of them swing a little bit too right but there's no idea. I was listening to try and yesterday up to ensure a speaking Gig I just came across it called thirty minutes to the Moon from the BBC and they basically look at t minus thirteen and every episode is one minute closer to what goes on and the guy that produced it actually. He had some affiliation with NASA. So he's got access to all the people that are still alive involved with a mission to the first one but it's just a really interesting to literally slice in those minutes up into thirteen episodes..

Joe Rogan United States Andrew Grill Jack Kreindler Pud Kosters Liau Rogan Jordan Peterson executive Paris instagram Gauche Woodward NASA Adelaide Australia FEM spinners Yale Sam New York Times REEDIT
The future of Podcasting with Minter Dial

The Practical Futurist Podcast

08:52 min | 1 year ago

The future of Podcasting with Minter Dial

"Welcome to the practical futurist podcast. My guest today is a return guest. MINTA doll thanks for being back on the show my pleasure. We're GonNa talk about something close to your heart and more recently close to my heart. The future of podcasting you'll first episode was November. Twenty ten. What got you into podcasting? Well at the time I just left Liau. And and like so many things things I I wanted to do what was digital and so I started blogging in two thousand and six while on the executive active committee worldwide and at the time it was considered illegal if not improper to self promote where they considered itself community company in a big company. Soon as soon as I left I'd been listening to Pud cosmic wine. I try this out and so in a very amateur manner. I started cussing. I actually believe my first ones were right after I left and we're done in French the time I was in Paris so I started podcasting and I wanted to explore what it's like and and and then little by little home not just the technical aspects but mind skills. I remember years ago in Adelaide. I was offered to be on the university radio station and ahead. A slaughter was three in the morning and I decline that but I always look back to think what would have happened. If I'd actually taken up the offer so now I get to do that. Because essentially podcasting is a radio show right. That's why I use first of all that would become might have become a night owl and secondly I used to start off a Pud cost. The word is seemed so Gauche Woodward came from. Well I think the law basically says it's it's The different senior broadcast and politics. And so so the PODCAST IPOD and that's probably came together. So what are you gonNA add. podcasting I so the very first and most important thing is I learn so I I seek out individuals. I think are interesting. Done something and they don't need to be grandiose people they just I think if you get your listening skills feels turned on everybody you can learn from so I I seek out people that I'm interested to hang out. With and by the nature of recording inevitably inevitably. The other person feels like they need to show up and so then in that moment you get to learn stuff there they you just not gonna come with your b-game. We don't WANNA come to be games because Zeros like everyone's going to hear what you're saying it's a you think podcasting is replaced blogging. Well I think the blogging certainly has come under pressure and so for having blog for so long I can see that the volume of of people listening in common reading and commenting has declined and so put customers competing with blogging in terms of getting our attention span will it. Has It replaced. No I think that there's still a place ace for writing and reading and commenting But I do think it's a really interesting avenue for individuals authors of course worse but also companies. What do you think now is the time to podcasting? I think it has been the time to put costs for quite a while I think that people are now becoming coming more accustomed to the idea podcasting. There have been certain podcast shows that have really generalized the ability like cereal in the United States or your pet show down in Australia. And so you've you've seen the major media companies creates more regular well produced. podcast shows that are consumable on your time. So that convenience factor the more seamless experience downloading it. That it's now come round as opposed to weigh. It wasn't the Beginnings Finance Asia has made it easier and yet there's still plenty more room to grow so now maybe because there's still plenty more to go yet I would say that you shouldn't just launch podcast for the sake of doing a podcast. which is what I did at the beginning? I because I was just in the experimental mode. If you podcast you you should be thinking about as is a long term engagement engagement just like blogging in the day. And you want to think about why you're doing it because by the way it takes energy efforts resources. Yeah and so. If you're going to do it you better be aware of why you're doing it. And that's going to help you get up and do it. Do you think podcasts will become the new influences when we've gone. We've got fatigue from these instagram influences and brands realized they don't get anything out of it. Do you think podcastone will step up to have that level of authority. I think it depends on the platform that you have. There's there's definitely really You know all the major Pud Kosters where you have thirty forty million people downloading it every week. Yeah that's that's that's significant influence getting on their shows by the way. Good luck really. Well of course because Joe Rogan's Harrison so yes you'd love to be on the a show but it's going to be difficult so much more selective and and they're much more aware of their influence now the beginning when you were an infant service sort of kind of fun. Oh I've got a million followers so it'd become much more sophisticated and much more demanding and ultimately the thing about podcasting. Which is interesting is that it's hard to hide? You can manicure a beautiful photograph on Instagram. You can cut and pastes deletes REEDIT A blog post I. But it's a whole lot harder for you as the podcast producer in this case to edit mentor. So what's coming out of my mouth with the IMO emotion. The intonations you as a listener are much more capable of detecting bullshit but I think also for the podcast. They are on show. If you're not an expert it'll come out and if you're having a conversation like we are and obviously nodding and saying that's nice next question without actually being involved in I think that's what draws people in because and the reason why I'm doing shy we'd guests rather than just made no one wants to my voice. I want as intro. These voices choices that need to be heard. Well that's kind and yet I think what's interesting. Andrew is the more you know as put coster it also can create a much better environment virement and conversation and so by the nature of the questions. You're asking you of course in my opinion demonstrate knowledge because near the end it also demonstrates who you ars individual they they get your vibe and by the way they're going to hire US speak they better wanted us into what you say but I think there's this This rawness to it that makes it in the in the intimacy of the ear a really interesting medium in order to vehicle messages you mentioned before about about what brands and companies can do. I've started to listen to a few branded podcasts. You think that's the next area that brands can really explore. It really depends on what they're trying to achieve Steve. So if in their strategic overview in imperatives they have a specific need maybe put costing his answer put. Custody is not necessarily early. What needs to be done and so if you feel that you have an engagement I was even in B.? Two B. is probably far more interesting and Abebe environment where you have specific shared expertise within the business that you're operating where you will get. Experts in the interest of long form in podcast can be real interest and yet on the other side. You know. There are various formats for podcasting whether it's bite-sized two to five minutes. Get fifty minute slot. You Got Twenty Minute Commute. Got The forty five minute jog. You got the one and a half to four hours. You know people who just like to spend their time in a constant Audio matter maybe while the ironing or doing other activities Anyway so many formats and so what are you trying to achieve the type of audience and I think the key point then is to think about it as a long term ambition because by the way at the beginning for the most part you're GonNa get very very few people listening getting people accustomed to you understand that type of audience them the different types of people you have on the show get them coming along on a regular basis. You need to do this regularly and have constant interesting compensation of course they do a weekly format. How does it work in terms of production time and effort even put into that all right so a my general idea is to have a thirty minute type of view when you add in the post production that the pre-roland the postal it? All ends is up to run about thirty five minutes. I never have to do the interview and then I have to listen to the whole interview at the end to make sure that it's all good so from the the time I find set up. Do the interview postproduction. I think every show takes around three hours because I also had the show notes and everything is

Pud Kosters Liau Executive Paris Instagram Gauche Woodward United States Adelaide Joe Rogan Australia Reedit Abebe Steve Andrew Coster Producer Harrison
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

08:05 min | 1 year ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"I thought this is crazy. I'm doing nothing. I'm not doing anything to improve the value of this currency if he easy call the currency. But it's going up and down and then when I tried to convert it back into theatre beck into pound. That took me four four weeks into banks but I think the reason it's got such quick press is that it's about money and everyone wants to get rich. Quick Ken if you can sit there and mm sit on APP and refresh it and value up and down. I think that's that's exciting for some people but then recording November twenty nineteen for reference so recently recently Mrs. Aqua bags being before Congress again obsessively to to talk about his crypto you platform libra but essentially they wanted to combat. Everything else. I I will it succeed. Was it put together right. Why does facebook have the right ambition and ethical ambition to too late? This do you think about before we get the vast. It's but I guess I would. I would maybe challenge what you said or just. I'm not sure I accept that it's entirely about money and I'm okay with Ademi and if you you know every Tech new technology goes through these initial booms. I mean this is the gardener hype cycle all over again. And we're just kind of in that semi trough of disillusionment phase right now. Oh and that's fine. I mean you remember Internet in the two thousand. Two thousand four era was it had been on the front pages and then disappeared for a couple of years only for facebook to be launched launch in two thousand four and twitter in two thousand seven linked in some around there also. So that's the natural flow of these technologies so while the massive evaluate increase in value You know certainly garnered headlines like. I don't think that's what it's what it's all about the same way. The Internet's not just about making money. Honey I mean it's there's certainly in money to be made I'm in there but I think it's it's it's much more about You know giving people people more control over there. I mean at a high level their lives but really more control over their their value the value of their money any more control over their their data and their information and being able to have a little bit more. You know Agency in how their lives are live. We have these sort of interesting sort of juxtaposition of life right now on the one hand you know we're seeing this massive massive increase in bandwith wireless coverage in computing power. But at the same time. We're having this ridiculous destruction of trust in traditional institutions doc income and wealth inequality on one hand. And it's just GonNa get exacerbated as you know more and more gets pushed into these. Few smaller organizations smaller organizations accrue more more value in the centralized like we're seeing with the fangs docks. Or what have you You know so and but you have more information in your your hands. It's like the you know the classic about the more power than the rocky going to the moon kind of thing but surveillance capitalism or Total surveillance state. Eight is becoming commonplace that we're having these tensions that are affecting our current system and I think that's what this movement is is really about. which is we can have the benefits of a globally interconnected world? Where people's lives are improved through trade without without having to compromise on our personal privacy on our rights on on the things that allow us to feel some degree of safety as we go about our daily lives and have more Say and what we're doing so I think that's what it's all about coming to libra. I've never been a big fan of libra. I mean and I understand why facebook's doing it because it's basically free money for them and they have massive distribution but to me. You're replacing one problem with another. which is in general centralized currencies? And I don't WanNa get too crazy here but centralized Fiat currencies are ultimately. You know there are a risky proposition for her. For the for the people who hold the currency's inflation is simple is the is the erosion airy process that eats away added value. So cut out comes back to the fact by holding bitcoin. You said you were doing anything to add value to the network and I actually don't agree with you by holding onto bitcoin. You are ARP pudding skin in the game you are saying I'm going to hold this remember. There's a fixed supply of bitcoin there. Twenty one million so if you hold on it and other people increase their interest interested that increases the value of whereas if you sell it the decrease denies simply by holding in saying I'm in this for the long term. You are contributing being in some small way to network so I think what's challenging right now. Here I read a great article recently. That talked about the the offering of Railroad L. Road stock in the eighteen fifties in the UK and it was the first time I mean really where anyone could access have shares in the company and most people people just could not get their head around it. It just like why can't use this shared actually travel on the railroad. I can't actually do anything with it. I'm just supposed to hold it will. We'll now you'd be an idiot for not holding shares and. I think we're just seeing this. Emergence of a new type of participatory capitalism. That was previously didn't exist exist and I understand it's a new paradigm. It is difficult to get our heads around. But this is how history evolves is that. We have these new innovations allowing more people to the more access to create more wealth and improve lives in to me. That's what crypto economic systems supported by decentralized blockchain base infrastructure are going to afford us. And hopefully we can leverage them To distribute wealth a little bit more equally and saw some of these these issues in a way that actually represents the public The common good so you make a lot of sense and only points and I I can see a lot of stuff you're saying and You know you've been can't these closely and playing with it for the last four plus years and podcast like this a one way to get that message out but we can't get into everyone's years whose responsibility is is it to talk up the benefits that you've said is it. Obviously it's been chimed. Bit like Social Meteorologist Social Media Gigs talk about social media. But how do we talk about the positive benefits benefits and and whose role is is that government is facebook as it you is at me. How do we get the message out there because they're so many actors in the Geiman and some good actors and some bad actors? What's beautiful in my mind about? CRYPTO is it's not one one person's responsibility it's anyone who's a member who's an owner of the network by having one bitcoin or one ether ether. One whatever token you are an An owner of that organization. So I think it's one of the books I've written on this offense called a decentralized marketing organization it's that everybody's part of the marketing organization now simply by being a token older but I think as the technology matures and you talked. You know you're an early adopter and I say look we're at like the fourteen four. Dial Up Modem days maybe twenty eight twenty eight and I'm coming to you and saying Andrew One day you're going to be able to watch any episode of friends that you want at any point and anytime and you're going it'd be able to do it in your car and you're like Jeremy you are smoking way too much stuff. There is no way that's going to happen and I'm like no no Andrew. The innovation parts done. It's the engineering part of that has to be addressed it will get addressed but the innovation of how do you transfer data. We've we've solved that and I think with Crypto. were seeing that. I'll give you like a couple of stories that really really sorry. I got super excited about you. Know I I heard I heard. I heard a phenomenal story coming out. Three Lanka where You Know Industry Lanka. There are a Farmers who are living right on the edge of poverty and do especially they're at risk to climate related You know Challenges or destruction of their crop..

facebook Ken Mrs. Aqua Congress Andrew One twitter Ademi UK Lanka Geiman Jeremy one hand four four weeks One day
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

13:06 min | 1 year ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"You host is international keynote speaker and practical futurist Andrew Grill. Welcome to episode fourteen of the the practical features. PODCAST my yesterday is Jeremy Epstein C O of Never Stop Marketing and he's got twenty years of international marketing experience most recently Jerry was vp VP. Marketing at Sprinkler which grew from a twenty million dollars valuation and thirty people to one point eight billion valuation and fourteen hundred people in four years which is pretty remarkable today. Jeremy's he's a sort after marketing advisor in the CRYPTO and blockchain industry and work with some of the leading and most innovative projects including Arkansas and Deco. Welcome Jeremy Thank you so much for having to me. We've known each other for wall. I think most of the guest We start off with how we've known each other. We came across each other at sprinkler. I think as other IBM will create a new a running marketing there at Spingola so back then we were very very focused on social media analytics. But now you're in the CRYPTO guy. Tell me what was the reason for the pivot. Yeah well well as you said in a previous podcast. One of the most important things that you advocate for people is to be digitally curious and I have lived at mantra my entire life on so as I was finishing. Sort of my mission at Sprinkler. I started to think about what what should I be curious about next and I had been exposed to Bitcoin in two thousand thirteen. Didn't buy enough and all that problem but I was curious. What exactly are these? bitcoin join and why do people think they're a big deal so spend a couple of months Doing a deep dive and emerge convinced that Crypto oh and the crypto economic systems that they are going to bring with them represent a third alternative to the stark choices that we currently only face on the global stage and I've spent the last four years as a student and advocate consultant speaker writer and investor in the crypto space. Trying to bring about what I call the crypto future so I think in many ways the student I I have no skin in the game. I liane nothing twenty pounds worth of Bitcoin. So I'm never going to be millionaire. Weighty think is the most misunderstood part of technology and the application location. Well I think that's a great question I think it's misunderstood in many ways. I think people I don't even know where to start to answer that question because there's so many areas whereas I misunderstood the first thing is it's not only used for money laundering and criminal activities. So I think that's number one number two is I don't think think crypto by itself is going to be the cause of significant climate climate climate disaster ecological breakdown so I think those are are important things but I think the big thing walk away with is if you think about it You and I have been in the Internet and social media game for a long time but there is no native currency to the Internet. We have an information superhighway which goes all the way back in the late nineties but we don't have an economic system system in a way of transferring value that is as equally as efficient Low cost And and fast as As has as the information transfers so what Crypto represents I believe is the next logical step in the evolution of the Internet and it's really the flips the second side to the coin a pun intended Around the information revolution that the Internet brought brought this is the value transfer revolution component. That can only be built once. The the information infrastructure has been built out which we've obviously seen the last twenty years so I think what most people don't understand is this is a natural complement to the seismic change in information technology that we've seen over the last last one years and it just extended and makes it even more powerful and more accessible to to billions of people around the world so it was ten plus years ago that this anonymous satory Nakamoto who he or she is and they we can talk about that at length as well. read the the famous Piper. That's ten years ago and back then. Cloud computing was in its infancy broadband was in its Infancy D. Think if they were to develop it again in two thousand nine teen they would do it. Differently Blake Knowing what we know now you're scholar of this spice If you were charged with redeveloping the blockchain technology and Bitcoin of things on top of that. What would you do differently? Tennessee's on a cigarette question. Well it's interesting because a lot of people are trying to do exactly that I mean. There are hundreds if not thousands of different blockchain implementations and networks being experimented with Currently I think right now. It's hard to say that there's a better way of doing it because the the the the beautiful thing in my opinion the elegant thing behind Bitcoin is that the way that security is provided to this this network and I remember at the end of the day. All the Blockchain is is a ledger that has global consensus or agreement about about who owns what at what time. And a way that The participants who provide the security to the network Demonstrate their investment is through. Something called proof of work will prove work is nothing more than having demonstrated three. Things are one thing. Which is I've solved this particular puzzle or prop math problem on at this time and the only way to solve that problem is by actually investing electricity and computing power? But that is you mentioned the word skin in the game and and that's the essence of of Bitcoin blockchain which is you demonstrate that you have a contributed some you put some skin in the game and that in in aggregate is what provides the security to the network to provide this global layer of trust around Who owns what it what? Time property rights writes financial Allocations what have you I understand that blockchain and Bitcoin is developed because there was a lack of trust and so it was solving the trust problem. But if I have a trusted relationship with the supplier if at the moment we have. API's with each other. We have a commercial agreement Kubanov tissues a distributed database and ending. This is again the cynic in me does it always need to be a blockchain solution or can it be a hybrid or other areas. Where both Chinese maybe not the most efficient technology us because of the the head of the trust factor as proof of work is statistically computational very very complex and a drains lot of power and everything else but if you have that trust relationship relationship is blockchain always the right solution? Oh definitely not. I mean. They're certainly plenty of situations where it may not be the best fit and that's totally fine. I mean you you if you do have a totally trust a relationship or you WanNa keep a network that's close. There's no reason to make all the investments essence on a open public blockchain. The analogy I tended to to use or is that if you remember back in the late nineties when the Internet the Commercial Internet Internet started to pick up steam there were sort of two reactions. The first reaction is the one. That's most typical in as new technologies. Come on the scene which is hey. How can we use technology to do what we already do? Better faster cheaper. Which is why you know in ninety eight ninety nine? If she recall there was a good year where everyone talked about. Corporate Intranet S- intranet were all the rage. Don't get me wrong Internet's have a ton of value. And you should do it. You save money. Save time all that kind of stuff and distributed ledger. Technology can do that but as we both know and everybody listening knows the real value is created on the open public internet. So I think the same thing's going to happen with blockage you'll have a couple. They call 'em private blockchain's to me it just calling it a distributed ledger like you said if you have a trusted relationship. You don't need the computational overhead whether US proof of work proof of stake or any of the other proofs to send that they have there but it's the open public nick blockchain's where I believe that trillions of dollars worth of value all powered by these various crypto assets are going going to exist. It's you know this is where you can handle micro payments that you cannot do with. The existing financial system is where they they much more potentially a much more cost effective way of allocating risk and capital. It's uniquely suited. I think when the engineering part gets resolved solve for solving some of these large scale go global problems that we're facing and ultimately I think there's a really improved cost And risk structure. I think right now. We're at a very interesting time in history where we're faced with these two choices of of of societies dieties and governments. You know have sort of the Chinese model that sort of going off in its own direction looking strong and then we have the Western model. Which is obviously I don't need to tell anyone who lives in the UK How much stress? That's under right now. You think about the economy and and the way that our governments and our economies are a bill are built for B. Industrial era. They're built for the world of things in material items. Well the last fifteen twenty years have shown us now. It's it saw for for eating. The world is becoming a more. Intangible we need to dematerialize. We need to integrate all of these sensors. You need to pay for access to you. Know some remote. Hello I'm not device somewhere. You can't swipe a credit card to do that. You also knew to solve these problems around global poverty in migration in all the two billion people in the world who don't have bank accounts you know there. There's all these issues that are facing us which I just don't believe can be effectively addressed by the centralized institutions that we currently have because they're sort of built on a previous paradigm of of Industrial Age Academies and we have to create a global trust layer especially when our leaders don't seem to be stepping up to create You know they're putting up walls instead of continuing to reduce the walls and allow people to improve their lives through trade and through Feeling like their their their voice matters and I think that's what Crypto by respecting property rights and the fancy word people use a cell sovereignty. I think that it offers the potential to ameliorate many of these issues. It's not perfect. Don't get me wrong. We're GONNA have a whole new slew of problems just like I didn't see the fake news coming when I was evangelizing for social media. I'm sure there plenty of things I don't see but fundamentally Particularly in industries that require a high hi degree of consumer trust insurance or remittances and even social media on these calls for stakeholder capitalism as sort of the next level of or the next iteration of capitalism are intensifying. I think Wendy's CRYPTO economic networks start to mature from from a technology perspective that values going to migrate to them. Because they're just going to be better faster cheaper and also most importantly a significantly lower risk totally with you. I think fundamentally the social impact question is something that can be solved over time. We'll talk about the elephant in the room. Lebron the second because that leads onto something you've said but I think the issue is that I haven't seen it. Technology get adopted so quickly and reached the headline so quickly as script type. So I was probably in any doctor had a website. In Ninety. Ninety four will be on the Internet Since ninety three or Dahl up and everything else I had my first my phony nine I four I. I'm the poster child for nearly adult. Draw try this new technology and so you look at how quickly the friends around me. My family got my phone's it took years. Not It's not months. I think the problem if you like weeds blockchain Bitcoin is it. It's about money and humans a fundamentally grady and so when in people think they can make money very quickly it reaches the front page so here in the UK back in November twenty seven so two years ago Bitcoin was on on the front page of newspapers. Because it was news because one minute it was worth five thousand pounds and ten thousand pounds and I actually bought some bitcoin. I think the Diet was at its peak at I. Talk talk about this To clients that. I bought bitcoin not to get rich. I bought twenty pounds worth three coined vice. I bought a two reasons. One is to find out what it felt like to own cryptocurrency to hold on. I remember efficient coined by sap in the afternoon were on board and Twenty pounds became twenty two than it was twenty three twenty six twenty one..

Bitcoin UK Jeremy Epstein C O IBM Andrew Grill vp VP Spingola Jerry advisor Arkansas nick blockchain US Tennessee Dahl Blake
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

13:17 min | 1 year ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"And welcome to the practical future is podcasts a by weekly show all about the near term future with tickle advice from a range of global experts to help you stay ahead of the curve if we episode answers the question what's the future of we so twelve and the practical futurist podcast today's guest is Julian Fisher. CEO of retail platform jessop Julian has enjoyed a varied background in technology payments and you media and in Nineteen Ninety four he launched the UK's first Internet exhibition since then his workers remain linked to the Internet and improving sales the payment and issues with compliance together with information solutions for a wide and diverse group a blue chip companies. Welcome Julian thank you now you told me earlier becky ninety four all at the UK's first incident exhibition a BBC Breakfast interview ask the question what is this thing called the worldwide web what was your answer back then oh back then the the answer was information we didn't have many sites as we do today many of the millions of today providing retail products to buy and mrs so back then it was it was mostly information and it was people trying to connect through dial up to the Internet so not really purchasing that was just beginning to see thought it was more information da well in fact in my presentations I play the dial up time it's actually hard to find and let the audience just go I remember that in fact oh I've been online since nineteen eighty three dollars on bulletin boards as Darling Bulletin Boards back in Adelaide so I think we probably both incident veterans today we're GonNa be talking about the future of tell something you're very passionate about and we've got to bring the elephant in the room out the elephant room of course Amazon they've been around for twenty years and my keynotes I ask people for show of hands who uses NFL on prime on now actually say who doesn't use Amazon prime and few hands go up so a question for you with Amazon side dominant Ken Highstreet Beside d- absolutely the even Jess Jeff Bezos said that his company represents less than one percent which is quite extraordinary figure for world sells global sales but the the high street has got something which Internet doesn't and that's the ability for you to try something on there and purchase it and take it away with you so that advantage is they're playing to a lot prices of major factor we all understand that but now it's becoming more to do with experiential actually having more to do to see too oil to experience inside is still we'll talk about it in a minute because that's probably why we can bring people back into the store we are seeing major change disappear house of Fraser deadman's even John Lewis closing down doors what could these companies have done differently and for the ones left what should I be doing now to prevent extinction well of course the the one of the main reasons for their uh-huh was that they adopted too late everyone knows story of blockbuster this is one way up in Oregon as well we should head the now uh-huh mugs and stickers but the thing is what you go there to rent as a VHS type and I don't think many people can actually play it yeah and the problem with VHS tapes is that the time that you have to get the maintained so it must be nostalgia than anything else watch the latest movies on VHS. I did try and find the tape of my interview on the BBC breakfast fill the the trade show but found it but I couldn't find a plan the high street with all the shops that are disappearing or have disappeared basically got to adapt to the new market they've gotta pull back on the phenomenal amount of shops that they own people don't need as many need to have so many prime positions longer you can be out of the city and still enjoy phenomenal opportunities phenomenal styles so it's a case of adapting licking looking at your market saying looking to buy where they want to buy them and meeting those demands basically so one thing I saw in the UK happened that signs braise actually boggles and I think that was a really smart move because they now have an online business that that is quite lean in fact I heard the of the goes part talk and he ricans they're able to compete in some areas with Amazon do you think that was a good move for them and what other should be doing yes and absolutely we it was not considered by many to be a good move especially after the time to buy into as the but yes it's been a very good move it has taken people a little while to get used to the idea of being able to go into Sainsbury's and effectively you go into what is a different brand in the same store but adapting change is something that people will get used to eventually so yes it was a good move and a small move now in department stores we would be used to the thing who concessions for those listening around the world this is like in suffrage is where you have the Selfridge's have the floor spice but you have the Mike County have the handbag counter that a staff people from those companies and I almost rent the spice could we see a signs breeze because of the moment you walk in on August there's a simpsons what I heard the CSI was they thinking about adaptive reuse we don't need the full four hundred thousand square feet maybe we have a small presence for Sainsbury's but you have other other people in other tenants is is that the mix you think you'll see in these existing sort of big box stores yeah you are seeing that whether Sainsbury's will do that is another matter they typically we have owned all of the businesses that are so they've coffee shops coffee shops they do have concessions outside the store so timpson 's can keys cart can get your shoes cleaned and fixed but actually yes a lot of shops are actually looking at ways in which they can create more opportunities create more reason for people coming to their store so concessions is definitely on the cards of course you got to remember that this was very much evidence yes yes well for them but the reason for that is much more to do with the fact that they were too large to over-sized without having a focused direction and they were carrying a large amount of debt so as a company they could not get over the debt at the same time as being able to grow the business which of course if you're a young burgeoning Panini starting out you don't usually have those problems so you are actually able to move really quickly to the ever changing demands of the consumer so deadly is a good example God I've been to their website nor would I consider buying something through that website with to light to the fall within ECOMMERCE solution whereas the others John Lewis now there's adapted undoing quite well well they they did have a website the issues run deeper the actually people weren't particularly keen to buy from there were much better offers sir opportunities product selection elsewhere they launched a new logo I and they were something that people in the same way as John Lewis not so much but they would enjoy the uh-huh adverse at Christmas but unfortunately again the size of the store it was just too much weight to carry and of course when Mike Ashley kept on up to demand more changes within the within the business this focus their attention in the wrong ways so actually remember John Lewis who one of my clients and social media and dealing with people getting their ecommerce up and running at the time they said that they mind flagship store was doing four hundred million pounds a year and they wanted their online to do that and more I think probably it's fair to say online platform does more than any single stool and they almost treat that as a as a standalone store to get people in there do you think John Lewis has done a good job of their online strategy they have now they they didn't the beginning John Lewis have to be created probably but I think it was e- Bairo by dot com they bought into a business so they were experimenting thing which is something that they've always done and they do now there are very innovative creative company they focus much more delivering quality of service never know sold but you wouldn't necessarily thing to John Lewis for the cheapest product but you would definitely go there for the for the quality the variety and full service so they have done extremely extremely well and and everyone in the retail and she do look to John Lewis now to to actually get a temperature gauges as to how well the market's doing so many of the reto magazines online magazines will report sales of John Lewis every week going up and going down so we can see the mood of the consumer in terms of how how much they are heading to the highstreet to buy in the source brings me to an interesting point looking at my own retail experience recently I wanted to buy a new four K. television so I went to Peter Jones which is near where I live I saw the television how it might look on the on the the wall size the the number of inputs and outputs awesome man about the the the different options are they went home bought on Amazon probably actually for the same price that's what we call show rooming I know they've been in Mrs Way I think in a camera shop the practice look if you want to look at the camera give me a four hundred dollar deposit and you get it back if you buy the camera but I don't want to have to get it out and show you knowing had gone on an Amazon so you ceiling are you seeing showrooming becoming a big deal showrooming has been around for quite some time now it's been made oversee easier for the consumer to to use the mobile phones when they're in the store and she identified the product for many years we've had our clients say it's been quite cheeky of customers actually are to help you find the product on their mobile somewhere else isn't but actually the idea today is is that the consumer is looking for information they've been looking for information since all show back in ninety four but but the looking for information to actually satisfy a need which is to buy a product or to get some more information on the product so the idea really for the High Sch- Rito is actually meet the demands and provide that infamous day there while there that an actually connect with that customer find out what it is they are looking for and if it is possible to meet them with the price and actually find a way to to connect with customer and say well actually we can give you this right now ten percent fifteen percent on if the retailer knows their margins well than they'll know where they can go to in terms of now I appreciate this sounds easy to say that actually do but that's where overseas services like our own just this is exactly what we do we give the the retailer the ability to meet those demands in real time but for the consumer they're going to be doing this whether the retailer likes it or not and in fact when game we lost manages and supervises and stuff you know do you do this to you showroom yes of course in an ID is well I mean I'm shit that has a a device with them don't go to a cash point or a till and they meet my needs now it's getting busier I know this is a tricky kind of hover if you want someone to help you in an apple store but they seem to have pioneered this it's mobile payments basically you go and find someone and I get the the thing out the apple experience I haven't seen replicated elsewhere unique or it doesn't work in other environment again of okay this is what we do so we are advocating with retailers to to actually get rid of their pay desk okay if you imagine you come into the store you're looking at products if you're interested you pick up a product you walk into you pay yes I know there's a few product sometimes there but really what we're doing is we're saying you use the technology like Jessop to actually provide the information can you feel fulfilled my is you say you can use technology in the store client yes so so what we do is remember off we'll have the phone or a tablet they're responding into to a by request by the customer they come to the customer they are able to continue the shopping experience helping the customer this is what apple has done they help the awesome so we help the customer with our application bringing together to people this is really important is the human element so we are company but very important is that we continue to develop the relationship between the customer and the retailer that's what retail retail is all about is that connection with me individual the worst performing stores are the ones where they've pulled back on staff they've got no one on the shop.

Amazon Julian Fisher UK BBC jessop Julian CEO Jess Jeff Bezos John Lewis Adelaide Darling Bulletin Boards NFL Ken Highstreet Oregon Fraser deadman nineteen eighty three dollars four hundred million pounds four hundred dollar fifteen percent twenty years
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"Director of competitive strategy choice point now pot hot of lexis-nexis and spent two years a special advisor to the director of the White House in Washington. DC welcome Lauren. Thank you Andrea good to be here now. We I even even before I joined. IBM IF I remember correctly houses of influence a platform cred and I presented to you in some of your colleagues nearly two thousand thirteen so apparently what I said obstruc cold because six years later he nepad cost of course it did come on now. I remember that day in Southbank well so what is being chief operating data officer entail. Oh day-to-day evolving feast of activities. The interesting thing is when I joined Dentsu Aegis after leaving IBM one of my requirements in coming coming in was I spent ten years data and technology sometimes good sometimes bad and if there's one thing I learned it's the person with a with a revenue figure is the one that get stuff done and get the assets so my request management when I was doing interviews is very much. Give me a revenue number. Data should be on the piano and hold me accountable able to the things I want to do and let's actually make this data driven business so it was very much about Co Positioning for the C. D. O. Role when I came in and through that I think I was able able to really transform the businesses view of having data be a front office activity as well as a back office. Activity data is actually an asset to have yeah and it's great so I would go to these roundtables and we work a lot with Peter and so we were talking with the accountants and saying how do we get this on the balance sheet. Will it ever happen and I do see this momentum. Intimate people saying it is something like brand like goodwill it. It has to be accounted for and if you look at the equifax scandal with the data leakage it has fundamentally the mentally impacted their entire market capitalization so it is critical importance well hopefully on this podcast will understand how important is and you're right. It's going to be on the lot goodwill. It's it it is an asset that people have and I think as people understand more the data they have available it will become more valuable and probably will be on the panel for every company. Yes and I think it's the only becomes apparent once you have the right organizational design to take advantage of it and so that's how I actually ended up volving into the chief operating officer at Densu. Now now is because it became apparent that while we have data and all these different places do we have the roles and the right skills to actually make sure the data goes through the process that leads to the ability to make decisions off of this trusted data and having spent ten years. We've done it together right as many counts. We talked to together where you look at all of the information information that's in the digital universe a lot of the stuff you focused on with social. How does it the map into the internal information and all this other information. You have to actually give you a full picture. What's going on so that requires this whole thing of digital transformation right. which is now the latest dot? I saw is digital. Transformation consulting is worth forty forty four billion globally which was eighty percent increase between two thousand sixteen in two thousand nineteen success. My years are a bit off considering it as two thousand nineteen now but that's massive right that's huge huge growth and it's because everyone's trying to figure out what do I do. How do I look like a Google and facebook. It's not an overnight thing toll for another time but I think digital transformation is often misused because people do a fake transformation. I say doing it yet on the Wifi and so are the hygiene factors that I get this all the time. You are obviously very passionate about data. It's a subject close to to your heart odd argue with just drowning in it so what can companies do to start to tame the data they hold. Oh Gosh where to even begin on that one well. I'll give you to kind of like stories stories right so one story for us as being agency right. That's helping clients understand. What is my brand strategy. How do I even understand how I drive someone with their emotions and their aspirations to buy this Louis Vuitton handbag at the same time. How do I convince you that when you're thirsty you on Dan in water or Nestle water or some other sort of branded water right whether the differentiation literally is the brand again. It's not this aspiration so when you look at all the data assets we have. We're using data assets assets that we get from Google. we get data assets from facebook. We get data assets from our own market research so we are literally drowning in data on consumer opinions and you need to have have the understanding of each of the data sets is coming through a particular lens and then you're analyzing it for a particular outcome so you really have to start to think about each of these data sets sets has been created with a particular group of people for a particular end goal and then it's bringing all those three things together knowing that one is coming from digital ones coming from let's say offline and how do those combined to say this is the ideal archetype of person that we think is our muse and the person that we actually want to buy our product and then how do you then use that externally to by this billboard to buy this TV spot to do whatever digital campaign and also to advise. How do I evolved all of my product with Adidas. How do I evolve my shoes over time so that while everyone loves it today. I want them to love it for the next thirty years so that's like one one side of the story the other side side is I'm currently rolling out sales for CRM internally inside my company as well as Workday as well as d three six five so we have three massive massive master data systems of record for our finance information for our HR people information our talent and then our actual pipeline so that's a whole nother set of data that you can drown in and if you don't again make sure that the people using it understand what the tool is for and what the definitions are for each. Let's say you know sell then it becomes useless so the drowning thing is quite interesting how there's a functional drowning in my operating role and then there's the whole creative marketing media side of how do I use that to then drive a business outcome around people buying something often. Canaanites I challenge the audience to look at all the source of data they have and had a motto Kwara give you example Spike to Technogym who do gym equipment and and a bunch of GMO knows I said look you're all have free. Wifi in your gyms. Do you know that because everyone has a unique Mac address you could find out where people move around the Jim and how often they spend on the treadmill versus and they went. We haven't even thought of that. The data is actually there. You can actually go and get the data but they don't know what to do with it. So you sound like you're drowning in debt you. I know that you have and I actually open up sometimes the source of data and I did it for train operating company. I did my Kanai an hour after we had these roundtables and I force them into groups was to say think of all the other sources of data that you have. How do you get it and if you had what would you do with it and there is would just open because we didn't know we had access to all these extra extra data but the challenges you said he's even if you have it you still drowning high and you have to and that's why the multidisciplinary teams that we've created. We had all these folks in their individual individual silos of I do performance marketing and most of my stuff is digital analytics. I'm just doing data platforms in engineering. I'm just looking at market research and people who answer are these kind of response highlight group information once you bring those brains together you literally have an anthropologist here you have a data scientist statistician you have a variety and then you have to say a computer scientist and you have this mix of people who are combining the best of the right brain and left brain thinking still probably more right brain because it's not as completely like picturesque ask but very data driven about what does this actually mean and what do we as a group want to do about this and I'll never forget it. Vicky Brock is the CEO of clear returns. She was a big SPSS S. customer and used to speak for IBM at a lot of events and so I still follow her today but she had that idea. Let's get these young people in to think and problem solve around these data sets and I feel that that's what I saw a lot in. IBM role is people hiring data scientists and just saying here's the data like find the answer and that is never the the right outcome or the starting point. Let's say and a lot of the data scientists would say this is unfair but I'm getting paid a lot of money so I'd better try to figure this out and so I think it's evolved evolve now and that you see data scientists who've kind of leaned into the business who've picked up a domain followed on that area and can speak the language but that's where I feel so fortunate with my career having having been a political science and Spanish double major did some stuff in politics as you mentioned end up at a data company and then went to IBM where I learned loads of things that really have. I've made me where I am today right the process. The exposure on multinational level was huge. Even you current company sounds like data. Go you promoted. Yeah I love it brings me nightly to the role of the chief marketing officer the CMO role is evolving and it has to evolve. I'm saying required see my skill sets now moving into an area where they must be both data and tech literate not just having massive the discipline of marketing more recently we've seen the rise of the chief digital radio to breach the CMO and CTO roles. What's your view on the digital literacy needed for these sweet rolls going forward and is the chief digital auditor officer he stay so fantastic question so so it's one of my favorite topics right so. I thought when I laid out my career plan right especially as is looking to leave. Ibm I'm going to be a CMO that to me. He is the pinnacle of I don't want to be a CEO but see him that to me is where you're really driving the combination of the data the technology and still that creativity of how do I stand out from all the other competition yeah what I've seen especially in this agency role where we're working from both marketing side and media side along with actually crm departments. I'm seeing this the fact that most marketers use fifteen different tech applications that are best of breed because it preferred you as best of breed means that marketing is massively silos and I think that is at the detriment of the ability of the CMO to run that as a fully oiled machine what I also see is in the people that we work with in our client side more and more of the digital data oriented folks are the ones getting promoted so I do think it's without a doubt that those who came from more traditional brand background. CMO's they will have their day again. I'm sure but for now it's definitely the data types you and especially the folks in digital because there's a desire to do this just one to one marketing and coming to the UK nearly ten years ago the US has a huge amount of data so you can do that one to targeting. The laws are very different for us over here. You're in the EU with GDP are and so forth it's actually more about let's say contextual targeting now and so you really have to begin to understand how do I use all the tech in an appropriate way to really early triangulate to what I want this person to do and where do I use all of the data and tech and channels to achieve the brand marketing that gets you to buy into that long journey of I love this brand. I love John Lewis. I I really do so by the way John Lewis Love you so I love that shop and so if you think about that therefore as people look for places to buy in a very noisy the attention disruption environment you need to be able to guide that and so I do believe that the digital officer is actually actually oftentimes evolving into the CMO but they have to have that understanding of that market research that brand side and I know Matisse pressure and he used to work with me at IBM as well he's done a couple of CMO roles and he's been quite vocal on linked in about let's not forget the right and left brain of marketing but there definitely is back to digital transformation loads of technology algae companies coming in selling the dream marketing transformation. It's the new ERP didn't you and that's where I'm again as a client of salesforce but but also a partner with salesforce we were the number one agency partner for salesforce last year by no that is a big part of what's going on so it's actually the CFO the CEO and the CTO Jio who I think are buying the tech that the CMO then has to use so if that CMO's not skilled up to understand it's about the process and the people that are in fifteen silos. That's it's part of my dysfunction. The technology is not going to solve that now lock you. I was glued to the net flicks documentary the Great Hack which fight zone the canes and the experts I from two thousand eighteen. What can we learn from this. What did you learn from it..

IBM officer CEO facebook CMO and CTO salesforce chief operating officer John Lewis lexis-nexis Andrea chief marketing officer DC equifax Director Washington Dentsu Aegis Louis Vuitton nepad
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

16:21 min | 1 year ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"Welcome the episode seven of the practical futures podcast. Today's guest is peter hopwood communications and presents coach public speaking and pitch china and conference host in the first episode of the podcast series. We spoke with martin brooks the impact tallest about the future of communication and presenting impact in today's chat with paid it. We're going to expand in on this thing as he works. The lodge of startups incorporates to get them pitch ready to welcome to the show. Thank you so i'm delighted to be forgot fantastic when we first met in may two thousand sixteen actually in advance. Will you coaching startups then. You're the university of zagreb's leap summit where i delivered a keynote. Two thousand students funny thing happened. I think i shared this with you. After your then for the the <hes> the leap summit i was leaving in the lift and there was a founder of one of the startups dot ups and lift and so i said what you lift pitch and he can lately floundered and i said you've blown it buddy. We had full flaws few to pitch me your idea and it was kind of ironic. He obviously wasn't listed. You'll sation upstairs interesting in on yeah. That's actually something that people are not really ready to to shed yeah they've got everything else. Kind of figured out ready to feel is ready to stand on that stage. Let saying they have to do a lotta people but on this day today i a basis where we have to get people interested curious about what we do to keep that conversation going once won a vote of file file on that and and that's <hes> that's something that i help you today. I'm sure you'll sharing your elevated pitch all the time. The people that you made so it's one is like two sentences. Is that means so much just to get people to stop in like you start to be curious about what you're doing can actually be a mako break because i'm mm show off to that elevates a lift the diary jenny you had your impression. What was your impression of that person you until into off do you. You got out of the missed opportunity exactly exactly where i'm sure i'm not sure but i'm i imagine maybe he had a good service. Always good products may be a bit could become a winner but he he missed opportunity failed a vo generally just by on sharing two sentences that could have already started a conversation food in there's one simple thing that i do two things actually shia vents whenever i put my name in my company on the badge a put my title is futures canine speak on a wick at the practical futurist the other thing i do is i put the badges highest possible on my lapel or shirt so it's easy to see and people say oh practical futures. What's that and without me saying asked me what i do at invites a conversation because they become curious. I think about you todd told us on your badge. Unable to see does make it different. Make it interesting thing and make it stand out from that very first time. They look is on your bed. Absolutely i mean we're we're. We're in well. Basically businesses is all about how loss of the people doing lots of things we have to stand out so if we can stand out by using having a time to last that creates curiosity that was if you can stand why might be for example what we what we wearing something slightly different not too flamboyant not to elaborate the something a little bit different. Maybe different color. It gets people ooh serious. Maybe that starts conversation as we start a conversation over can then help you break the ice and then new foods was bit more about what you do you help get companies pitch ready. So what are the most common mistakes and what can i avoid when they prepared to percent anyway. Okay i mean the the first thing <unk> speaking about your audience. When you share your idea share your product for you. A product assumes that you've been working on an idea you've been suspended. His was the time of money as well some energy view it means a lot but for the past and listening to what you have to say it's the first time listening to what you were sharing and bring value of it doesn't the strike it cold or if it if it isn't something that they would be would care about they read as senate redone can so it's many trying to get your message across bringing value in getting people to listen to you which is the key thing in the beginning because your fast as united the first thirty cents even less of a tour of a pitch over presentation of anything really what you have to share message in front of people is so crucial bass the time people are judging unit deciding whether they want to keep on listening deciding whether they would kind of trust you into why i saw that study that first mini under a minute where you'll sharing many will you have to shape. Is something a lot of stocks housing or people sharing their presentations. Don't really understand at the beginning because that's that's really the make-or-break pau of the presentational page so without naming names. What's the worst pitch of ever seen. I'm not gonna outlines one specific <unk> some of the things that we say i'm sure you've seen as well this is the energy is the is the passion and when i say energy and passion i'm not joking him out someone coming on stage and really you know jumping down smiling really feeling on top of the world's. Nothing like that is just showing thing that you care about what you'll talking about. So many people do that so many people don't give us impression will give us a feeling that they really into it really carrying about what sharing about ed products so that comes through different things from the voice it come three clearly the nerves in anxiety when that rises up that achieved barrios well so he here in things in the voice we hear the <hes> from the procure dry throat voices while those things that i'm really showing passionate but but the the thing is before they get one stays reading is thinking about again. What kind of energy do they want. More is the energy was the style they want. What what is the the tone. You wanna be sharing. Did you start thinking about that and then you start feeling how you want to share your age you actually a new brand name is bunny now. If you start to play down your head and then he's going on stage and then you can start to shed so without thinking about. Dan army's not going to happen if you come out with a little bit of energy little bit passionate a little bit of <unk> quite law focus. I would say people will start. Let's listen to you. People will want to listen to you if you don't have why on us should anybody listen to what can people do to get under control troll before that big presentational pitch okay so in terms of the anxiety tennessee jaycee <unk> to cave aries. It's the anxiety just before info you. Go on so just before you go on just before you step on stage so that's one area. The other area is way way way before so thinking about now as as the months you what he's thinking <unk> tease hitting you because you're thinking about the beings hides they just before we go so this two different areas the first one just before y'all stage again. It's it's actually getting your body ready getting getting your mind ready really feeling by. You're gonna share value so it's a mimic your body which mimics someone that's calm. You extent become calm. How did you actually how do you do you do just before you go on stage and you will. I always workout what my first ninety seconds gonzaga lost ninety seconds a one nile that and actually often i play video do something where i can just reflect while the video's playing and i kind of sira. That's the ninety seconds away. We're often running and i looked at the audience and i know that i've i've delivered that first ninety seconds and that helps send to me because i know exactly what i'm going to say the woods one thing i think because a speaker i used to be so excited on stage i would speak really quickly and it's i speak quickly generally and so what i did looking back at my videos i could. I'd say this is distracting from the message so i learned the art of the pools and just slows me down and it means i can deliver the message. The has more impact. What are your top tips to own the poor's. I'm so glad it was speaking about police. Now i really i am. I'm a big fan of opposing examining benefits of posing so festival when you start to when you start say at the fox ostby yo when you start to slow down automatically whether you realize they are not what happens with your voice actually starts to get lower. If you're in a boardroom situation or you're trying to pitch to a client or the presentation being different can help. I'll i'll give you another example presented when i was at i._b._m. To the u._k. Government it was a a cross agency group about thirty people from different departments and we did a bunch of hustles <unk> about rehearsals in a minute. I think four hassles and the first time the i._b._m. E._m._t. got together. I said look i'm a new i._b._m. Stop i'm going to try something a bit different and i are channeled my inner don dry from edmund don't drive when he pitches ideas and mini advertising companies do they use easels and they flip them overnight explained how the creative work and so i want to explain about this two hundred year old company under year old company that had had been collaborating for wall and add save money so i use four easels and i basically flip the as was around the last days will have the i._b._m. Lie unfortunately the other i._b._m. Is the the lead may predator the hands up. How do we follow that for six months afterwards. All they talked about was the guy with the azores. That's what they're amended because it was different and that was a huge risk and to the credit credited the person who earned that meeting an i._b._m. They said it just sounds crazy. He might let you do it. Then led to a bunch of meetings and out of that particular meeting it led to an ideal radio ten million dollar consulting engagement because we were different so being a little bit quirky and being memorable can actually get you notice and get you the business just just own rehearsals though i mean i rehearse everything i do not just the first last ninety seconds are hustle the tech and everything else no matter what you'll pitching presenting away you are how important important news rehearsal <unk> really very imposing day rehearsal again and it helps us to remember things it helps us to the confidence and so the thing is you know when we when we practicing we everything about what we're doing actually sends messages in o'brien's creates his programming our heads an insulin we about to do again when we when the pressure's on if we already done it many times full day feeding a little bit more confident as as well and i think something that i the i._c. Fought often and i'm sure you do as well at some orientating different keynote speakers at different conferences. I so many so many in conversations i have with the impression on gaz while is that they haven't really spend too much time practicing rehousing polishing their back decide. We can tell so much by body language. We can tell so much by the feeling and if you have a prepaid and you go out on the stage and you think he can do because you've done it many times before that down the won't you share on that stage will be quite different from <unk>. You've practice. Did you done many times before but if it was practiced law did you rehearse you. You'll trying something new stepping out of your comfort zone risking something doing something ninety they haven't done before that ah the impression that will give is quite different what i do in the on the podcast because this is the practical features podcast gutowski some practical tips and tricks so so what a three things can do next week to improve their chances of winning a pitch rice so as i mentioned before bounce thinking about the venue so think to yourself you know as an why should people listen to you ryan say they don't gonna if you start to think about what he's gonna share. Why should someone keep listening to you because no one can. No one really cares about who you are what he doing even your products until until there's actually a connection about what what you're sharing think unclearly about that and i thirty seconds. Let them know somehow. You know why they why. Why should they listen to you but that moment as you step how that is just in just as important because even before you said anything you'll you'll looking at your audience you you kinda smile on your face almost <unk>. My clients is thinking about having a sexy secrets safe. You've got this thing about a sixty secrets. Don't share says he's eager. You can if you wish to do but i would recommend it but just thinking about that when somebody looks at you and you've got this kind of sexy seek seek and funny cedric. That's on your mind. You'll facial expression will show that you'll facial expression russian shows someone who's out something. They want to share something cool something goods but they don't know yet and the last thing i would say is again think about you'll you'll justice. These are the things this is. The iowa uses the name see. I've seen united to use gestures as well as i age so so when we move on hands when we move on our arms connected with saying we actually funny enough. We sound better three things. I'm gestures help. You sound better and give you that morning..

university of zagreb peter hopwood founder martin brooks todd senate Dan army iowa tennessee o'brien ryan ninety seconds ten million dollar two hundred year thirty seconds six months
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"Curve have every episode answers the question what's the future own with voices and opinions that need to be heard you host is international keynote speaker and practical futurist Andrew Grill. Welcome welcome to episode six of the Practical Futures podcast where I'm joined by former I._B._M.. And Blumberga Ethan McCarty a former journalist Ethan joined I._B._M.. In early two thousand to manage the web presence for IBM six billion dollar year research division he also co-authored their groundbreaking blogging guidelines launched I._B._M.'s Internet podcasting platform and worked on I._B._M.'s award-winning annual report to shareholders his now the C._e._o.. Of Integral Communications Group A consulting firm specializing in employees activation ovation as well as a massive electra on digital media and Employee Communications for Columbia University Wilkinson. Thank you so much Andrew. It's a pleasure to have an opportunity to talk with you so we've both worked at IBM and also work to Bloomberg for those. Oh you don't know you what's been your journey here. And what did you set up a firm. That's focused on employee engagement and activation well. I've I've kind of been in the business for more than twenty years of kind of inspecting the space and optimizing activating that space in between organizations and there are people it wasn't some grand plan or anything I have a an undergraduate degree in creative writing and master's degree in in liberal studies which was kind of like theories and philosophy economics so there's not like a a job path where you're like. Oh Do you know I I've had this by luck really rather than by design this opportunity to work on one N- project after another over the course of my career an organization desire some kind of outcome and they need their people to do it but it's not clear who their people are you know is it. The employees always alumni the organization. The customers is a communities answer that space you know whether you're kind of <hes> developing what's so called externally communicated versus. What's internally communicate is really blurry Laurie? I think that's a function of digital transformation. That's been taking place over the last twenty years and so I had those roles at I._B._M.. Where simultaneously I managed Joan Intranet for a Business Unit for their research division at I._B._M.? As you mentioned and then at the same time I managed the I._B._M.. Dot Com the you know the external facing website and then at a time when I was running I._B._M.'s intranet and at the same time ran the alumni per which we grew to over one hundred thousand members and so it's like these spaces that are like well is that internal community who's extra communications and again and again. That's that's been the kind of recurring theme at Bloomberg I had similarly these kind of internal no responsibilities so-called internal communications responsibilities with executive coms and so on and I also had a public relations component multimedia production so again and again these things get conflicted that are very often hardwired organizationally so you'll have like a marketing department or a P._R.. Department that's focused externally and then an H._r.. Department or internal comms department that's focused internally at many organizations and it's that space in between where I think there's tremendous opportunities communities for organizations to really differentiate themselves and grow once. I pleased that he told you just because you're gonNA friend of mine. This is a subject really close to my hot like you before joined I._B._M.. I had my own social prisons. I had some level of notoriety around the world and when I joined I._B._M.. It was lower. How do we haunt us that? How do we bring that external and internal view together and in fact I wrote a blog post? She is going titled Employee Advocacy Beyond.

Andrew Grill IBM Bloomberg Ethan McCarty Joan Intranet Practical Futures I._B._M. Employee Communications Integral Communications Group Columbia University Wilkinson N Laurie Business Unit executive twenty years six billion dollar
"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

The Practical Futurist Podcast

13:08 min | 2 years ago

"practical futurist" Discussed on The Practical Futurist Podcast

"Down the opening chapter really offends my thinking about the value and the skill public speaking and gala provides a couple of examples. He says that persuade his are replaceable. He argues in the book that the days of being everage in business over, if a computer Caribbean is average, it can replicate. Everage everage, simply isn't good enough to stand out in the digital age another beautiful. Quite if you can persuade in spy and ignite, the engine of others. You'll be unstoppable, irresistible and irreplaceable. And with all the talk of the moment about, and I'm going to lose my job will be replaced by that. He has a point that there is a transferrable skill old humans can lean and we can. And that is the power of persuasion. One more quite get. You'll you'll many he goes on decide that emotional connection is indeed. The winning ticket in a world where technology such as what mation big data out official intelligence and machine. Learning are eliminating millions of jobs and disrupting entire industries businesses and careers. His key point is an every incoming shift and we're in one right now. And especially in this digital revolution communication skills, become more valuable and not less on not going to disagree with that. Can you December FAI? What Gallow was saying that, that having the ability to communicate effectively and having really impact will actually protect your value to an organization. I couldn't agree with more with those ideas and thoughts, I think you've got to step back a little bit and go. Why not true? And one reason is certainly what you've definitely alluded to, you know, if you're a simple structure to what you're doing. I will be doing in the next five ten fifteen twenty years, whatever that time is going to be the thing is about what can you do differently better faster, and certainly communication on persuasion. We talked earlier about that idea of sensory acuity and picking up somebody as buying into the idea chance by the idea, excited by that's very, very difficult for a lot of people to how about flexibility be able to shift and change and do something different. So that idea Royne persuasion is definitely a K one. On the interpersonal skills to be able to do that. In fact, I've heard from Carmine communication leadership skills are in high demand on the low supply. And if something's in low supply, premium premium of high demand and low surpri everybody knows that. So that's definitely one part of an I would agree. And I think why is there that skill shortage? No. And I think that's because, you know, you and I here we sit in our fifties in our teens in our twenties, when we wanted to speak to our friends, we did it face to face away. Divet over the phone. It was interactive people coming into the workplace ni- have spent done a lot of communication that we did face to face on the phone by our what's up lacking. Not interactivity pace. Anybody who practices, any skill will more than somebody else will be better. It it's just simple. Neurology repetition is the mother of skill. So people coming into the workplace ni-, who haven't got that seem pr-. Practice that same exposure to this kind of stuff, like turn taking conversations. You can you can always tell when somebody wants to speak, because they breathe in, and hold their breath, simple, things like that. In a few no EV haven't had that practice. You're not going to be as good as somebody else. So they think there's a second element. Yes, I would agree with Carmine Fayette can replicate it will. But I think also for people who are younger, maybe people listening to their podcast thinking about their kids, you know, who thinking about four five ten years time, they're going into the marketplace. What can we what can we help them with? And I think those core communication skills, certainly in leadership, if you want to inspire team motivated, same. You want to energize it. Same. That's not something I can do, that's all human to human stuff. So the importance of those key communication skills, really, really important when I go up to speak come off stage, and some of his, I could never do that kind of chuckle going that's one less competition. Getting with me. But my daughter Madeline, she's twelve and I'm encouraging her to practice these skills at a young age, that I was debating young than her. So I'll get used to being in front of a crowd. I got used to being nervous and getting over it. I had no idea that in forty five years time this would become a real transferable skill Incan, omic skill pot of how I own my money in my trade is by by public speaking. But I didn't realize also that in this shift now, technology and jobs are being lost that probably, this is the number one skill that will ensure that you are relevant into the next transformation. Absolutely. As one of those things that. You look the. Pistons that every year by people's top phobias, what's right up there, public speaking. And again, that's fair rejection, Magnus, very visible, lots of people that I work with will orientate them back to what I call a primary psychological event, you know, what school for the first time they came up and got public, funnily enough, if it was positive public speaking, yes, it was negative brand goes Rostock my head above the pop at once I had a shot off. I'm not going to do that again. So that's where I go to do off a lot of work rhines building people's confidence, and giving them the how to so they know how to hide to be able to I'm not really, really important, and it comes back to the old idea that a lot of people find it difficult. Then there's a niche, there's an opportunity there, and I don't think our, our psychology and physiology is going to change. I think that's going to be similar. I think if you do that those research in five years time, I think, public speaking is always going to come up as something that people don't like so I'm assuming the demographic of this podcast, probably three different groups got the young leaders who want to impress. We've got the middle managers just trying to break that Knicks point. And you've got the senior execs in the CEO's, who are representing, they companies, what are some simple things that h can can do to overcome that fear and stand out of me, great communicator, big part of is psychology and the big part of find the emotional states that we get ourselves into this is very powerful. But also very challenging, is that every emotional state that we ever got into. We did it. We did it to ourselves. Other people can't make you feel something, I think it was Eleanor Roosevelt famously said. Nobody can make you feel about about yourself. That's, that's always self decision. So in terms of the nerves failing on failing challenged by public. Speaking, one of the things I, I, I, call the three Bs of boosting your, your confidence on the first one is your brand or psychologists, call your inner voice every single time I've worked with somebody who's got a heightened nervousness. Not quite a phobia, but certainly quite fearful of the public speaking when I see them get into that emotional stood. I, I say, stop. What are you saying about yourself to yourself inside your head? Right, ni- ninety nine point nine nine times out of a hundred. It's all you're screwing this up again, I can't believe I hit this I hit doing public. Speaking is terrible. You're watching me. I feel terrible. So how what kind of emotion that thought process, going to create it's ever going to create nervousness anxiousness, and I remember hearing this wonderful story from voice coach years ago by John F Kennedy? And he had an outward mantra for one of better phrase on when he's going on stage and he'd incredibly nervous, looking item on the president of supposed to be this great speaker, blah, blah, blah. He would stand in the wings, and we would look into the crowd on, he would say, I'm delighted to be here with you. I know that you're divided to be here with me. I'm delighted to be here with you. And I know that are. Divided to be here with me. So that positive self talk that mentor they may get himself into that more confident psychological state to van be able to walk as president of the United States and such a wonderful way that he did. So that I be your brand. How you talk about yourself to yourself as a major indicator of the psychological state, you're going to be in on how well you're going to perform. All my time as report cast to ensure these all about practical things you can do. Let's have some quick fire practical tips. So what are the three things listens? Can do to be more effective next week fantastic. Grit question. Three things people can do to be more effective next week. First of all, as think of bite that satnav analogy if you're going to communicate with somebody coir they where do you want to get them to. I'm what is the most appropriate roadmap to be able to do that in term start with your message a mic? Sure that's really clear. Most speakers. I find talk with sumptious of interest is Hyun their audiences interesting. Their topic is I and they're just not. So the first thing then is get that message right? The second key thing they can do is prepare rehearse more the number of times. I've talked to people that go through their slide deck, and I say, how many times you stood up and said this lied so far and they look at me with the field. Expression that only indicate the number zero so practice and rehearsal. So, so no, your message practicing Mahar, so on the third thing is look at people who are successful, we talk about technology. Look at Ted. The website, tat dot com. The best biggers in the world doing your thing, start to be much more curious about higher to the top speakers. Do this. You've referenced Carmine Gallo books, which are all fantastic talk, like Ted five stars, etc. Etc. They will give you tools and tips by a high be able to do it. So three things that people can do differently. Get their message right. Rehearse unplanned, invest time on Thirdly pay attention to fantastic resources that are right there in terms of books tad inorder to really challenge ourselves by hard. Do we communicate raw than just thinking about content to mow bonus quick questions? You run a small business. Yes, What's been the greatest threat technologies. Brought to your business. Well, this is interesting in training and development where I've come from learn. As being the greatest threat. I known a spreadsheet look staggeringly compelling pay for twelve senior executives to come together, but the moment hotel the night before them pack consultants being the room with them. They're all stopper Tunde costs are not doing their job for those two days, etc. Etc. Hey, let's stick this thing online learning and they can do it in their own time. New travel, not-i'm don't pay consultants, small wonderful, and that has been a big threat to the learning and development industry. Non. Fortunately, everybody who has done. It knows that against shift of environments, very difficult to make that work. There's been lots of interesting research called the biggest part of learning is actually something called social learning paying attention to other people do or don't do doing the things that they do. Well learning from their mistakes talking about..