36 Burst results for "polio"

Fresh update on "polio" discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

01:05 min | 22 min ago

Fresh update on "polio" discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"When we think about variables and lots of folks are asking what are the long term effect of Covid. Is a lack of. Those long term variables being recorded part of the reason that question's hard to answer. It is hard to answer because we can't predict the future again, this is a novel, it's a new virus. We've never seen this or and therefore we don't know what the long term effects are. We can only make predictions based on the experiences that people have on the short term but there's really no way for us to truly know fiber ten years down the line how this is really going to impact someone's house right? Because nobody at this point has had it for five years it didn't exist. Exactly. Tricky. For me that that makes me want to double down on all of my precautions and efforts because as. Because as so many people are as I'm looking at the news and I'm seeing the reports of some of the Post Cova complications people are suffering from my brain gets really caught up in fear for what's going to happen to those people next year and in two years and in five years, and in ten years, you know how how rough is this going to be for them and really what this conversation's making me realize is the only real way we can ensure that people aren't suffering for incredibly long periods of time from something like this is to make sure people don't get it. Absolutely. All we can really control right now is preventing the disease by using our precautions and also by trusting science entrusting that people are working hard behind the scenes on the frontlines to make sure that we get a vaccine or some type of medical treatment to help people who have the disease also. To prevent people from getting the disease as biologists, can you speak a little bit to the safety of vaccines? Obviously see a lot of fear which as a person who grew up with a grandfather who talked about the polio vaccine beginning in his estimation, a holy innovation I I worry that there's a lot of misinformation out there. That could actually be detrimental to US beating Covid if folks don't get vaccinated to you as a scientist feel that you can comfortably speak to the safety of. Vaccines. You know. I think a lot of the fear behind vaccines comes from people not. Exactly sure what they are, how they work and I. Think I couldn't maybe break this down a little bit on a basic level for folks who are listening. So let's say that. Somebody wanted to give you a food that you had never tried before. So. Let's say that they wanted to give you liquorice rate and you've never had liquors before Siri like I don't know if I know like liquorice. So you take a taste you're trying to take a little nibble. You, put it on your tongue, let the juices and the flavors flow and you decide whether you like it or not. Getting a vaccine is kind of the exact same thing. So vaccines usually there's there's different types of vaccines than their made in different ways but essentially what a vaccine is is a little piece. It's a little taste of the disease that it is trying to protect your body against, and so when we get vaccinations, we are giving our bodies just a little taste of a.

Vaccines Covid Polio Vaccine United States Scientist
Biden says US must come together to fight virus

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 17 hrs ago

Biden says US must come together to fight virus

"Joe Biden is making a call for healing his closing message a week before election day by then said the nation's become increasingly divided and ugly under president trump and some wonder if it's past the point of no return as the heart of this nation turned to stone he doesn't think so I run to unite this nation and to heal this nation by then spoke in Warm Springs Georgia doting that's where FDR went to recover from polio and to guide the nation through crises he says it's a reminder of the country can be healed we can restore our soul and save our country Sager mag ani Washington

Joe Biden Donald Trump Warm Springs Georgia FDR Polio President Trump Ani Washington
"polio" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

Ross Patterson Revolution!

08:15 min | 5 d ago

"polio" Discussed on Ross Patterson Revolution!

"DOT COM. Letting a polio. Polio. I. Think that I am I'm not sure how to tell you that. You, never started the show. So subdued I think. I think he actually have polio. Tried to do that one time where I'm like, Hey, what's up and you're like, no. That's not always start the show. So. There's an awesome story behind that and I really wanted to start the show off with that today because ever have like one of those weird moments in your life that you've totally forgotten for years and years and years, and then all of a sudden it just POPs back up and you're like, Oh Shit I. Remember that one time with this person in this thing, he's share. Yes. Here's what it was. Right. So last night at a little bit of difficulty sleeping Kinda, just rummaging through it's one of those nights where I felt like I was forgetting something like always forgetting something of like check all of those emails did I, text these people back today I know I'm forgetting something and I don't know what it is. There were a hard time sleeping right. So one of them I was scrolling through facebook to try to find this one guy for this one thing and. Find this one name and Blah Blah Blah rights Throughout. That process like I was trying to type in like their first names I'm not going to say this guy's first name in case he were to listen to this show or whatever. Right but. I'm very I gots to. Los Angeles. I was very adamant I mean coming out of Nyu and all that stuff. It was very adamant about in silver my professors like soon as you get there, get into an acting class rates you forget how much you hate people in acting class until you get in there and you're like Oh God dammit. I've got to put up with these assholes never forgotten personally. Really. Anytime. I mean an actor that's a real actor. You have a friend I won't say his name. And I love him I love hanging out with Han. But when we start talking about acting, I want to punch him in the face. And I'm an actor. But I just don't. He's here. Yeah. Like I don't take it. So serious that I don't I don't think it in the same way. Here's the deal always always known that it is a very vain profession and therefore when I was always conscious of when I went out to dinner or whatever I would talk about the craft of acting the art of it or anything else I would always leave that bullshit behinds like. My personal belief is like a job as an entertainer, all the way around rights be great whenever the cameras on and then whatever the bullshit goes on. Later, you don't need to tell anybody your processor like the Hawk I don't needs. No you put forty pounds of weight. Jackets for the shot show. Showtime minutes Ethan. Hawke Ooh face of him like. Over here. Out So last night I'm scrolling through the book of faces trying to find this one guy's name to to write him back this message, right? And I stumbled across somebody from my past that clearly I've been friends with on facebook for years and years and years, and it's this one guy like God. Damn. Why does that name ring a bell and I clicked their profile picture because when you see it's a tiny little circle and you can't really tell what's going. Right you cook the pope, the profile picture on your phone and I was like an soon as it popped up and this guy was is now married with kids and all that stuff like but he still had the same face of what this story was that I remember no like Oh my God when I first got to Los Angeles I signed up for this acting class. This is a fun fact it was Vincent Chase. Vincent Chase. So Mark Wahlberg had gone there. He ended up naming the lead character and entourage after Vincent. Chase same guy writes it's right by rocket Ralph's. Rochman Ralph's right. Right across the street old school guy. He's been doing it for years and years and years, and he's great. You met a ton of awesome people in there. Who ended up becoming huge all that shit right and it was great. However, there was some people who just took shit way too seriously the reason why he was so good was he would always try different shit. One of the things that he asked us to try as an exercise of him and why don't you write your own seen for your scene partner and then you guys act that out together. And then you judge each other and Blah. Blah, Blah Blah. This guy. Clearly going for an Oscar in the back of this tiny shitty. Brea. Started off his speech, his monologue with his fucking scene partner. Comes in and he tells his wife is bad news right comes into the door that stage door you know the old wooden stage and he just looks at her and he goes. I think I've polio. and. I burst out laughing. Okay. Polio hasn't been since the nineteen twenty s I think FDR was the last one who actually suffered something from it right sorry. Was this in the scene or he was saying okay and he had written it and it was like you went home and wrote that I think you have polio you're coming home to tell your wife that you think you have polio kicks the door open right comes in. So I. I think I have it was it was real summer Dahmer. Okay. He went sombre with. A one of those trench coats on and a hat. Took it off. He put it on the coat rack. He put the hat on the coat rack and he was just like, and this is something he got because they usually have a back room. Stuff that you can put onto like feel more like the character and it stinks it's old thousands of people who've been wearing it for years and years before you whole thing and he comes in and puts his hat on the hook and he's like. Polio I burst out laughing I. Didn't know you could read a comedic seen dramatic scene it was up to you, right. Homeboy had written a dramatic scene about him having polio didn't know is that it was comedy actually I'm dying laughing the entire time right and. So he does the thing and it's seen and he's real shook up about it and in all of this shit and I'm like, Oh my God I haven't thought about. The Guy who thought he had poll who wrote that? He thought he had polio in years until last night and. I burst out laughing lesson I was like Oh my God i Miss Him and Holy. Shit. Dude, if you would've told me back then that my life would have been what it is today after witnessing that because like part of me watch that guy and I was like, uh-huh, fuck if this is what Los. Angeles. Get Out of here. I cannot take any of these people seriously. I'm not hanging out with motherfuckers like this in real life, right? What was your? What was Say what mine was. No I wasn't asking alright because it was comedy obviously but I Follow. This guy tell me that you walked in Went I. Think I have polio as your seen that would have been great. But. You can't. You weren't allowed to do that in that class where it was just like. Amen. You couldn't make fun of people. You know what I'm saying, let's Guy Seriously. However I was after him and mice scene was about me telling my roommates that I was raped. By a girl and the the joke of it was like the whole comedy bid of it was is that I came four-times right so my roommate keeps going over and over again he's like, I'm sorry I hate to stop you but you came and he was like, yeah, I mean after the first time like I tried to get out of there but I couldn't say the next to. The fourth orgasm my head I like I've got to get out of here but you play dead seriously and like it was a huge deal everybody laughed and Blah Blah Blah right Ross is hilarious..

polio facebook Los Angeles Vincent Chase Rochman Ralph partner Mark Wahlberg Nyu FDR Hawke Ethan Oscar Ross Brea Los polio.
Jennifer Lawrence Confronts Anderson Cooper

Daily Pop

06:56 min | 5 d ago

Jennifer Lawrence Confronts Anderson Cooper

"Morning everyone are you ready for some day leave? Just out today. So Morgan and I are joined again by Kisha Knight Polio. Actress a mother and you probably know her from house of pain and the cosby show. Thank you for joining us again and we are. Coordinated, in our Maulvi Pinky we are. Show and here we go. All right. Have you guys been missing Jennifer Lawrence because I definitely have we haven't seen her much recently, but she is back. She hasn't changed a bit. She still holds nothing back. In fact, she's talking about that infamous fall at the Oscars and why is set off of nasty little battle between her and Anderson Cooper listen to what Jennifer said on Heather McMahon's absolutely not podcast. I'm sorry but interesting Coober I saw him on. CNN. Lee. Three days later saying like what she'd obviously the ball and it was so devastated this horrific humiliation to me that like took away like I don't know ever have a chance to give a speech that again I saw him at a Christmas party and I let him know my friend told me that they was. But he apologized and I think I think we're good friends now. Do you think I wanted to fall getting Oscar but I remember when I led with was have you ever tried to walk upstairs in a ball gown? Right. So then how do you know like I with that? He apologized. Oh my gosh. Okay. I gotta go straight. Ahead some pesky reporters. To write stories sometimes, it's so weird. I haven't been in therapy about it for years now anyway, what was the question? is you see this particular person which I know loves you so much Is and you got to run into him or her at a party. What would you WanNa do would you talk to her? Would you say something? Oh my God I feel like I've envisioned this interaction first of all shot to Heather McMahon because I love her she is hilarious hilarious. I am obsessed with her so I'm happy for her that she got J. Lo on her podcast I feel like. Jay Jay said Jay Lop. I said. On kidding. I wouldn't mess up but. I will say I've had visions of maybe approaching certain people that write things and I think it really depends on the alcohol consumption. Cooper I right. I would go to Anderson Cooper because he's a respectable journalist, he made a nasty remark. You know you're getting an apology out of him but some of these other bitches are a little nuts. So I don't know I don't WanNa fuel anymore fire. So it depends it depends one hundred percent i. think that's a very good point you have to know who you're dealing with because if it's somebody who really doesn't like you and you get that five, a day could very easily turn the story around and write a whole other article saying crazy Morgan or crazy. Kisha. Came up in screen that man apart. But the other thing they if they're already writing crazy thing, they can write it regardless you scream are not. So. That's also true. I would say you've got to follow your gut and I completely agree with more again it depends on how many drinks of the consumed evening, how you're going to approach because you know sometimes yeah. You know there's certain like the GENITA- Crown, it may go let. Me Go left. It also depends on who's with you right. If my husband was with me see, my husband gets much more fired up than I do and I know you might find that surprising but he would be the one that would literally do me to say something I think you should say something you should call that did out and. I'm usually the one that's like, no, no, no. No let's just let it calm down. But if I'm getting like talked up into it, then I might yeah, pay south. Yeah versus if I have someone that's like, it's not worth the babe just to let's just go over here I'll be like. All right. You GotTa have your backup backup. Yeah. You got to have the right height man. If you're wanting to do it, it's got to be someone that's GonNa go up with you and have your back no matter what comes out of your mouth but. It's also good in these situations with somebody who's not necessarily your friend to be as composed as possible but I think when you're so heated already. Interaction, never goes as well as you want it to. and. All. Thank you. Scream at them. Yeah. I'm GonNa, say real quick. I think also even better way to handle this have a good woman someone who could do your dirty work for you. So you don't have to be the one that goes says us that this Lella you can have them do it and then your hands clean. One hundred percent yeah you need the right best e with you I like that okay. Moving out of channing tatum. So sad news I think channing Tatum Jessie j broke up again Jesse just posted this video drinking and dancing with the caption single live in a pandemic. That's how you get there strap. We talk about that. A source tells US Jesse and channing broke up months ago because they realize they're just better off as friends now they've brought up and gone back together multiple times at what point. Do you say this is finally do you think this is finally for these two I? I'm. Not Down here, you know I mean. Go ahead. No, you I mean I just think listen like you know it's supposed to be sort of like a new relationship is supposed to be fun. It's supposed to be easy and it might not last forever. But if it's supposed to be the fun easy relationship and you've already broken up four times in between that time, it just seems like clearly there's something here that is not connecting you to something is not working out. So just like leave it alone there's no reason for these to attack broken up three times like. In my yeah. At this point in life, you know my motto is. You know it's like spoiled milk. You don't put it back in the refrigerator. and. Come back and think it's going to be something other and foiled. On because clearly, it was gonNA work by now. Exactly Keach. Have you ever gone through this where you broke out was somebody got back together the whole thing I think that's something that probably when you're younger and you Kinda keep getting things to try and when you fall in love with the ones possibility I think as you get older and you've done it and you've learned that lesson, you realize you know okay you know what? This isn't working for me. It is. Okay. We don't have to make our. Yeah. I luckily, you said Fall in love with their possibility men is that true? Amir Young? You're falling in love half the time with just what you think. They're GONNA be your. Number set and then you realize that potential here and I. Think also when you're younger, you're more willing to be in a relationship that might not be perfect because you don't skip factor in time as much. But I think as you get older, you're like I don't have the time to waste on something that's really too difficult. You don't have the energy either

Anderson Cooper Morgan Heather Mcmahon Jennifer Lawrence Channing Tatum Maulvi Pinky CNN Cosby Channing Tatum Jessie J J. Lo Jay Jay Jesse Wanna Oscar LEE Amir Young Jay Lop Channing
Happy 40th Kim Kardashian

Daily Pop

06:29 min | 6 d ago

Happy 40th Kim Kardashian

"Hey everyone. It is Kim Kardashian West fortieth birthday. We're kicking off the party right here right now on daily Pop Justin is out today's Morgan and I are joined by Kisha Knight Polio he's an actress kick ass mom and of course you know her from house of pain and as Rudy from the cosby show Kisha we're so happy you're joining us. Thank you so much for having me. We have so much to get to today we're going to be celebrating throughout the entire show you're going to hear from Kim's famous family. We're GONNA read breaking down Kim's most shocking moments and we cannot talk about him without talking about fashion. They go hand in hand the celebration is going on all day here on e- with the keeping up with the Kardashians marathon and Kim's fortieth birthday special that airs tonight at ten PM. The first Kim has always been an open book and she's made plenty of surprising confessions along the way watch this. You should just be who you are say what you want entrepreneur makeup mogul wife's mother and all around boss I'm going to do whatever I want Kim K. West confessed. There isn't anything she's afraid to do and her mind she has done it all and her crazy confessions don't stop there I. Love it during a livestream. Qna Kim admitted problem member of the Mile High Club she wants had sex in a public movie theater she goes commando almost all of the time wave TMI and she's still owns though seventy five, thousand dollar diamond earrings made her totally lose it. We Know Kim has been working on getting her law degree, but it sounds like she's mixing a little business with pleasure in a new questionnaire for e she revealed she likes a shot of Tequila with a cheeser when she said he's life with about being happy and when she's not hitting the books, she's heading gym her morning ritual includes a five fifty am start time to work sweat. Obviously, all that hard work has done a body. Good. It's not easy at all, but it's not all work and no play her favorite thing to do during her downtime. Text people with lots of glitter sparkle emojis. You could probably guess who he's in contact with most family I no matter what Kimmy also confessed she likes to treat yourself to a little. TV. But the mom of four go to guilty pleasures aren't exactly what you'd expect. I need your help help MTV's catfish is at the top of our list or she likes to unwind with some hoarders on a any. Other crazy Kim Confessions. Everything is always so public. She claims her hidden talent is smelling cavities and there's one celebrity whose beauty left her starstruck. No need to share Kim loves you. She's proved over and over and over again it's just a vibe and the confessions don't stop there. Kim told people she has models drowned her clothes so she can plan outfits in advance and she's spray tans her scalp. So her middle part has that extra glow. Oh that's a good ted. Have, for years, wargin timoth favorite Kim moment all my God. This is the hardest question I've been asked all year producers brought this up yesterday I'm like, how am I going choose but I think it has to be and I know Chris over this but it has to be when she's taking fees when chloe is on the way to jail like that's just know psychotic Kim to me it is it never gets old it so delusional and it's just amazing and why we fell in love with her in the first place it's the best it's that's definitely one of my top wants Kisha what am I okay I'm I'm going to go on the other end of the spectrum you know Kim. been doing things for a long time but you know I have to say it's all of the work that she's been doing to get convicted. Felons out of prison. The fact that she's taking a completely different turn and really helped us her platform to to affect people's lives in a positive way. One hundred percent. That's that's a really huge one and I'm going to it back to something a lot more superficial. I got. My favorite moment is when we just saw in that lovely package, Kim crying over her diamond earrings because honestly girls I relate if I had seventy thousand dollars, diamond earrings and I lost one that's probably exactly how I would react I've had mad but got ensure your jewels have to China and. Ensure those goals. All right. Well, caves fashion has changed so much over the years. So we're going to go deep into the archives. Take a look at Kim style evolution Ooh can really I am be our L. Y. Kardashian. K.. A. R. D. A. S. H. I. A.. Look. Very nice where do you win? Gucci and Jimmy, Choo Shoes and Louis. Vitton back to mix it up a little bit him style started out young and fun experimenting with Different Designers Have Wearing A. Skirt and a La Perla top a wonderful. Share. That'd be the not shoes I want to find something that is young and fun and fresh but still you know how classy and conservative this is my. She transformed into a sophisticated ladies setting the trends that posing Christian Louis, Vuitton he also, I'm wearing Eliah and Lorraine Schwartz I weren't accustomed gown I'm wearing our Kardashian collection leggings put this big waistband. To do we have favor Lon Max Mara when she became apparent this hot mama put her curves front and center. This is John Paul Go. Ta and I love her sparkly. It was it is. And you know I love it I just wanted to really go for it and be kind of like a robot a Blinky Sexy Robot I'm wearing address from revolve. Long Sleeve and it's hot out here. But whatever looks good. It was distressed by Rick Win. All made this for me and I love it him. You'll trade who you wearing. Where we wearing this evening, I'm wearing Vivienne Westwood now. has become so economy or calling it the Kim effect. This

Qna Kim Kim Kardashian Kim Confessions Kim K. West Kisha Knight Vivienne Westwood MTV Morgan Kimmy Kardashians Rick Win TMI Rudy John Paul Lon Max Mara China Mile High Club Vitton L. Y. Kardashian
NBC/WSJ poll: Support for Biden has almost doubled

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

04:52 min | 3 weeks ago

NBC/WSJ poll: Support for Biden has almost doubled

"NBC News Wall, Street Journal poll released yesterday, and support. For Joe Biden has almost doubled after just last week's debate the poll taken before trump announced he had covid nineteen has biden by fourteen, fifty, three to forty nine still with us our professionals. Steve Schmidt, Robert Gibbs Robert I am duty-bound to point out I think Hillary Clinton on this date in two thousand sixteen was ahead by exactly fourteen points with that in mind. What would your charge to your fellow Democrats be? Well I would. I would ignore the polls. And go full steam ahead on what you have to do to win this race next continue to assure the American people. That you're capable and that you've got a plan for implementing that. The. Change that you need to see in the White House but I think Lewis startling about that poll. This race has been remarkably stable Brian it's been stable for a really long time regardless of all that gets thrown at it, and so the NBC NBC eight previous polls, the average margin was Biden by eight percent in February it was Biden by eight percent in September. It was Biden by eight percent now it's fourteen. The American people got a good hard look at Donald Trump in that debate and they liked absolutely nothing of what they saw I don't think Joe Biden is going to win this race by fourteen points. The one of the last moments Donald Trump had available to him to begin to change the trajectory of this race in his favour not only did he miss that opportunity, but he actually handed a significant amount of support with now just four weeks left in this race to his opponent Joe. Biden. Mister Gibbs makes a great point Mr Schmidt and let's go further on. Politics. Steve Mitch McConnell is seventy eight. He is a polio survivor he is scared to. Of Covert nineteen by all available evidence politically, he is scared to death of not pushing through the third Supreme Court nominee what's going to happen? Do you think in the US Senate three Republican members down with positive diagnoses? Well look specifically when it comes to stopping a Supreme Court Nomination Brian you have to think about it like trying to rob a train before you can get to the safe with the gold on it on the train to derail the train you have to slow it down you have to be able to get on the train and so what the Democrats have to do is not be focused on delaying the hearings pass the election they need to be focused on delaying the hearings for the first day they need to push it back one day, and then once you can push it back one day you can. Get the second day, but the reality is is it'd be very difficult for the Senate to hold onto the time line because total recklessness of so many of these senators and of course, trump at the trump administration and all of the chaos that we're seeing play out over over this weekend, and then elect Wurley for the Senate I. Mean This is just a disaster I. Think Certainly Mitch McConnell understands. He's on the precipice of losing his Senate majority. It's almost a certainty that he will. It may be a wipeout. You see for example, Mike spn Mississippi Mike espy is in a very close race now you see. The Kansas Senate race, the Democratic candidate is points up there. So the it seems like the walls are collapsing on all of this. This was a terrible terrible week for trump and for all the trump of batters, enablers and accomplices in the United States Senate I, mean, it started with the with the debate and it got worse from there the. Senior leadership of the campaign scandalized there is a mutant in the campaign on Friday night. PEOPLE DON'T WANNA show up to work too terrified to go into the White House profound mistrust of their leadership, and then there's reports out tonight from the incomparable Gabe Sherman for example, a Vanity Fair talking about the divide in the family looking at how crazy trump's behaviors been. Over the course it is last weekend with Donald Trump junior apparently talent people that they have to try to rain man knowing what a disaster this is. So my view is this is all coming down the Walzer collapsing we're seeing that play out everything we're seeing trump do is from a position of weakness and the idea now that he's going to be able to. CAST himself as some type of hero for having defeated cove at I think is. A ludicrous delusion on the part of him Sean Hannity and his

Donald Trump Joe Biden Steve Mitch Mcconnell Senate Supreme Court NBC Kansas Senate White House Steve Schmidt United States Robert Gibbs Robert I Brian Hillary Clinton Street Journal Mister Gibbs Sean Hannity Mr Schmidt Gabe Sherman Mike Spn Mike Espy
Houston sampling wastewater to track spread of COVID-19

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:30 sec | Last month

Houston sampling wastewater to track spread of COVID-19

"City of Houston, working with researchers in the Texas Medical Center to attract the Koven 19 pandemic through wastewater City Health Department, Dr David Hurst claims that they can trace the Corona virus at a faster rate than traditional test methods. If we find it in whatever neighborhood that the numbers are going up, we will be able to get our teams to go door to door start informing people that what's going on in their community encouraged them to get tested, researchers say. Testing wastewater is not new of Baylor College of medicine, Dr used the same method back in the 19 sixties to find Houston's polio pandemic.

Dr David Hurst Houston Baylor College Of Medicine City Health Department Texas Medical Center Polio
How the Gates Foundations values shape the world

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:41 min | Last month

How the Gates Foundations values shape the world

"This week we've been talking with Bill Gates copy of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and is trying to eradicate polio and malaria globally gates created a billion dollar climate investment fund. He has funded multiple factories to find a vaccine for Covid nineteen and the foundation is matchmaking companies around the world to get that vaccine distributed. Gate. Doesn't the position to do all of this because he's one of the world's richest people because he co-founded Microsoft and to be honest that's a little weird. So in part three here I asked Bill Gates how his philanthropy ends up doing. So much of the work of government he said some of it is mission creep take malaria. When we started out, we mostly thought that we would just increase the arm de because. You know for malaria, the people who die which at that time was over a million children a year they don't have enough money to have a voice in the marketplace. So there was no. Science, or willingness to fund on their behalf in a capitalistic system. And there was a little bit of foreign aid but much. So we came in, is the the biggest player in Malaria Ding. At first, I thought our role would just be to create the drugs and the nats. And that we weren't mean to fund the actual delivery side. Because once we have the tools. The uptake would be there in fact, it turned out that. It was much harder to. Have things delivered than we expected. So we were CO founder the Global Fund. Goes after three diseases HIV to Berkeley similar, and we were a founder of this Kavi organization that buys vaccines for the poor countries at the very lowest prices, and so those two institutions which we did in our first two years of existence to learn about delivery so far actually they've probably been the most impactful thing we've done. The R. D. promises to give us some amazing things including the tools that will help ascent malaria and. Make incredible progress on issues but the delivery side I underestimated how hard it was and how we would have to partner up to figure out what kind of axiom would be acceptable. What kind of medical intervention you know even how do you tell people that they really need to sleep under that bed net and that feeds back to the design of the product? Because you're a partner in the delivering, you see what's not working and we thought we could get women to take a daily pill. For, HIV prevention. And the uptake on that very very low, and so now we're working on something that you'd only have to take either a shot or a pill every ninety days because it looks like that would get uptake, but you're driven by the limitations of of uptake, and so that's why we've got to be deeply involved not just in rnd, but also the delivery side at what point do your priorities, the priorities of the foundation end up becoming the priorities for the world, and you've described a sort of a series of unintended consequences that pull you in deeper and deeper to. Ultimately, the work of governments in no case should countries depend on our philanthropy or any other philanthropy to solve a basic need? We can accelerate the RND and so yes, by spending money on malaria supposed to. Some. Fancy. Vacation or something. Yes. The world's resources are going more into malaria now than they did before and those million deaths are now down four, hundred thousand and so yes our values to change what gets funded in this economy and malaria just. was in my view grossly underfunded. You said it was either like it could be either malaria or a luxury. Good. But there's like a lot in between there and do you ever think maybe I. Should Turn My Lens on disinformation or wealth inequality or racism in the United States. Well we spend. We have two big things. We do one of inequity in the US, which is lot about education, and then there's global health I do believe you really have to focus and become expert. We're basically saving a life for less than a thousand dollars per life saved. These miraculous interventions in other fields. People have brackets interventions through the giving pledge. Make sure lots of plant perceived these high impact things some problems. Government's spending way more than plant. Can haven't been able to solve. So mostly flat becomes up with pilots pilots. Of a mentoring program pilots of. How schools could organize a bit differently. So we do a Lotta that but once we've committed to Milorad occasion we're not going to abandon that. Sadly, there's very few fields where you can save millions of lives for small sums of money. Bill Gates is Co Chair of the Gates Foundation.

Malaria Bill Gates Co Founder Melinda Gates Foundation Malaria Ding Gates Foundation Microsoft Global Fund Polio United States Partner Nats Milorad HIV Berkeley Co Chair
Gates: The U.S. isnt helping get a COVID vaccine to the rest of the world

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:19 min | Last month

Gates: The U.S. isnt helping get a COVID vaccine to the rest of the world

"Many organizations are working toward a covid nineteen back scene but even once it's discovered, we'll still have to manufacture and distribute it around the world that is a big incredibly complicated and expensive task. But ultimately, it may be the only way out of a crisis that has devastated the global economy and according to a progress report from the gates. Foundation has actually reversed progress towards poverty education and carrying diseases that report is out now. And Foundation Co Chair Bill Gates joins me today for the first of three conversations. I asked him about the scale of the vaccine distribution problem. Well, the European countries have stepped up here we don't have enough yet to buy for the entire world. The US is kind of unusual. It's funded a lot of RND that is helping move candidates forward, but it's only funded manufacturing procurement for itself and so is the Congress looks at. No Supplemental Bill. The historical leadership that the US. Global health whether it's smallpox eradication an issue polio. Congress will step up as yet. It's been a no show on this. How frustrating isn't I wonder I? Mean you're personally funding factories that are all working on a vaccine. You're you're sort of trying to organize this extra governmental effort. WOMP certainly talking to the Congress about their great history that they're rightly proud of on a bipartisan basis of how the USA showed up here. The benefits are stronger than ever because even from a selfish point of view at stopping the epidemic returning But strategically, and from a humanitarian point of view we should do what we've always done. Help save these lives and help try to get things back on track the. Report shows that not just the deaths from Cova, but also the disruption to the economy, the schools, the health system causing gigantic setbacks even far more deaths than the disease itself is causing in the US you mean globally, mostly globally, their health systems far more fragile their ability to come up and borrow a lot more money at the government level isn't the same as what the US can do. So they're suffering far more. One thing that is a priority of the foundation it sounds like is is equity overall, and in this case, equitable distribution of this successful vaccine. Tell me about the role of manufacturing and shortages around manufacturing. That could make that a big challenge well, a number of the candidates including Astra. Zeneca Novak's Johnson and Johnson and snuffy can be made at very low cost and very high volume, and so we've set up arrangements where. Not. Just the company that invents the vaccine and supervises the trials but also other companies who have high volume manufacturing capacity can take exactly that same vaccine and produce billions of doses so that you get many factories getting up to speed ideally were getting over billion doses out in twenty, twenty one and enough to end the epidemic and twenty twenty

Congress USA Bill Gates Foundation Co Zeneca Novak Cova Johnson Snuffy
Nine Pharma CEOs Commit to the “Integrity of the Scientific Process” in COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

Squawk Pod

05:26 min | Last month

Nine Pharma CEOs Commit to the “Integrity of the Scientific Process” in COVID-19 Vaccine Trials

"Breaking news out of the former suitable sector. Let's get to make. Good Morning. Good Morning Joe Nine. CEO's of some of the largest drug companies in the world announcing they've signed onto what they're calling a historic pledge to uphold the scientific integrity and put safety first as they are developing covid nineteen vaccines. These are basically the front runners in the vaccine race for covid nineteen, all of the companies involved in operation warp speed in addition to Merck Pfizer and its partner biotech Astra Zeneca Madonna GlaxoSmithKline Sanofi Johnson and Johnson and Nova VACs all signing onto this pledge to do essentially four things. They say always make safety and wellbeing of vaccinated people a top priority continue to adhere to high scientific and Ethical Standards Regarding. The conduct of clinical trials and the rigor of their manufacturing process they pledged to submit for approval or emergency use authorization after demonstrating safety and efficacy through phase three clinical studies designed to design and conducted to meet regulatory guidelines through a regulatory authorities like the FDA, and they say to work to ensure sufficient supply and range of vaccine options including those suitable for global access. They say quote we believe this pledge will help ensure public confidence in the rigorous scientific and regulatory process by which covid nineteen vaccines are evaluated and may ultimately approved and guys. This comes as vaccine development is moving at unprecedented speeds and we are hearing about some hesitancy. From folks to believe in the process and to be comfortable taking these vaccines especially as the FDA's leadership has come under question about political influence regarding convalescent plasma and hydroxy chloroquine in a recent change research and CB poll about thirty percent of people said that they either definitely not or probably not take covid nineteen vaccine, and so guys the company is trying to step in here to tell the public, they will keep safety I. Yeah. It's in response to rumors that we'd get an emergency youth authorization for for one of these vaccines before completing. The process there's always pressure on the FDA. obviously in especially with you know we're talking about life and death situations with with some of these drugs to to cut corners and I think they're just you know they're just putting it out there that especially with so many people when. Vaccines are such A. Controversial even before this people, you know what? The Anti Vaccine and everything else and we do remember back with with polio before we knew everything luckily nothing happened but you need to be sure. His longtime ago we know so much more and we know what's in vaccines. We know the scientific basis for how they worked meg. So I, I would be comfortable with. with one of these, the ad no mediated. Vaccine or you know if there's a small stretch of Messenger Aurigny I'll give it a shot I. I'm not overly concerned with with like contamination by some horrific virus that we don't see or something like that. You know make so. A wary public needs to be. Absolutely certain that that. We've. Crossed all the cross the is and cross. The is in dotted the teeth I just wanted to know we are coming up on that and that final stretch and the vaccine development process sort of inconceivably because this only begin in January really. But when we get to the end of October that's when Pfizer is indicating that they may see results about whether they're vaccine works and the FDA has scheduled advisory committee meeting of outside advisers, October twenty second, and so a lot of people are gonNA be looking at that date and saying, are we going to see data and how transparent will this process be So these are nine major drugmakers saying that their first priority is safety and I think this is hugely important not only for building public confidence in. A covert vaccine, but for protecting the sanctity of vaccines in general broader, we've had discussions with Scott gottlieb about this. The reason you don't want to rush through and push something out there that hasn't been thoroughly vetted with a phase three trial is that if there were problems with it, not only would it convince people not to take a Kovin vaccine, but it could undo a lot of the work that's been done with other vaccination programs around the globe I mean Joe. Brought up polio. Well, Jonas salk actually. Vaccinated his children. As some of the very first people testing this out so you know that was something he felt one hundred percent confident with we don't do things that way anymore. But there has been so much that that we have done with vaccinations diseases that we don't even think about anymore because over the last fifty years or so you know they've they've they've kind of gone away up very common This is just important not only for covert vaccination, but for faith in the vaccination system at large. Yeah it's so fragile. Public Health experts are incredibly concerned that a misstep here when vaccines are so important could shake the the fragile confidence in the vaccine system in general, and as you pointed out, it's this terrible irony of vaccines that they have rendered all these terrible diseases sort of non existent, and so we don't appreciate that vaccines did that for us. So there's a lot on the line here.

FDA Polio Joe Nine Sanofi Johnson Merck Pfizer Pfizer Jonas Salk Astra Zeneca Madonna Scott Gottlieb CEO Chloroquine Partner
Universities Combating Coronavirus Turn To Stinky Savior: Sewage

WBZ Morning News

00:39 sec | Last month

Universities Combating Coronavirus Turn To Stinky Savior: Sewage

"Finding an unconventional, fragrant way to fight a Corona virus outbreak a stinky solution to getting ahead of a potential cove in 19 outbreak on campus. Some universities now testing sewage studies show genetic material of the virus can be recovered in the stools of about half of the people infected with covert 19. University of Arizona Quarantine 300 students after detecting it in wastewater to cases were eventually found, and they were asymptomatic. Utah State had positive wastewater leading four residents halls to be quarantined. A similar method has been used in the past to look for outbreaks of the polio virus. Lina Moise ABC news

Lina Moise Asymptomatic Polio Utah State University Of Arizona
Sudan declares state of emergency over deadly floods

Freakonomics Radio

03:59 min | Last month

Sudan declares state of emergency over deadly floods

"Sudan has declared a three month state of emergency after unusually heavy seasonal rains that have led to flooding and loss of life and left tens of thousands of people homeless. Tenaga Chip Coto is deputy director of the UN's humanitarian agency Gauche in the Sudanese capital Khartoum. They're flooding has affected over half a million people and then houses that have been totally partially damaged or collapse was over 100,000. So you can you can tell this quite big is affecting the whole country. But it hasn't to say this is the flood period for her, too, But they say it has been way above the norm. So that's why I'm having this impact currently, and it's the flooding caused by hours of torrential rain or or the flooding of the river Nile. It's both. It's both. So if you look at the western parts of the country that's been affected is more your your flash flooding and you get rain's coming incident but also upstream and when the action for blue now is utopia so intimate, so Pia impacting us quite a lot. AM River Banks being briefed, for instance, the Luminal midst the wet now, which is in factual, that area is overflowing and affecting a large area in hunting itself. And those people who have lost their homes, both local residents, and of course, I would imagine lots of refugees and internally displaced people who've lost their shelter. What provisions is being made for them. So before the rains is mentioned, we have joined season so every year we prepared beforehand we preposition our stocks in strategic areas. So areas where you have your displaced people. As you know, Sudan is about more troubling people at this place because ofthe conflict we have drifted. Jesus. Well, bumping one million refugees in Sudan is well and also in certain areas where we know that flood in the regular basis. So the stocks have them The only challenge you having these days that the rains have been way more. Then we expected so as a result, this talk that we had preposition now running law. We all scores a second. And imagine the health system mistress as well. When you have your reins, people need your your medical medical support, but also looking at issues around your your cholera. When there's rain get cholera. You also have your malaria. Making sure people get water to drink is also a big issue in some areas that are flooded. Schools have been flooded and Children to go back to school. So there are a lot of things that are going on most people who are affected along the river. Now they're seeking shelter with strangers, relatives and then is only the ones that do not money to go to friend's urges, or we're friends relate to that as well. Those are the ones that have been sheltered, using tense or you know the concrete buildings. Is there? Um, any silver lining to this particular dark cloud all the rains welcoming away after a period all the drought. The rain's always always bring in good myself. Agriculture. And also for animals. It means that I wasn't able to have grazing land. But right now we don't know what's more. Is it away the stage where it has caused a lot of damage for the compliments because there are some crops that underwater so The impact is yet to assist. As you can imagine. The focus right now is to measure that lives are saved. But that said, I think this is all happened in a country where the economy is that performing too well. It's been in decline for quite a while. We have coffee like any other country. There's competition in the cases of over there around 13,000 cases and slept over 800. Kids were also having a not breaking polio, so a lot of things that are going on and this is adding a layer off neat. We have not seen the end of the rings, so we expect more flooding for the next two or three weeks. Soldiers stop point is really required.

Sudan Chip Coto Am River Banks Khartoum UN Deputy Director Polio Gauche Malaria
How Are You Intelligent

Good Life Project

06:27 min | 2 months ago

How Are You Intelligent

"You grew up from my understanding in nineteen fifties sixties Liverpool. So can post war, which was also pretty interesting time and Liverpool. Yeah ours born in Nineteen fifty. In Liverpool. And was it was a? Is a city that had been devastated and the second world. War. In the middle of the nineteenth century, Liverpool was the probably the most important port in the world something like sixty percent of world trade what through the port of Liverpool side of empire. Realizes at much high to the British empire and it was the main point of entry for all the goods that were coming from the southern states to feed the the Mills of Lancashire. It was the hydrogen industrial revolution. So it was a huge import export trade. It was the of departure to the United States and also to far-flung parts. The Empire. If you had been around the pool in the. Mid To late nineteenth century defined this bustling port huge wealth great open parklands, magnificent houses, and know the metropolis Greg. Colton Center. When I was born in Nineteen fifty, it was none of that in the the docks were pretty much faltering the the passenger ships going from there anymore was international. Travel and empire collapsed so and battered by the lava. So we literally playing in bomb craters and in the austerity of Post War Britain wet food was rationed than we had. high levels of unemployment poverty I WANNA set in kids and. my dad had been unemployed for long time because of the situation generally unlivable. I Australia recently to my own kids about their life you know that that does children. You've no real. Grasp of what's going through your parents minds. That we took, we had a great childhood Safah's we're concerned we grew up playing in the streets of the full. we didn't have feel for. With every day only about a great family my dad was one of five kids. So we had. Lots of family on his side cousins and uncles. My Mom was one of Sutton in heck six girls and a boy she had giant fan found when we gather together, there were to be hundreds of his daughter actions and liberals very funny place I. REMEMBER GROWING UP A. Laugh in good times and but a call sweet new. Later on my parents, you know coping with only problems you have coming from, you know with unemployment and an economy there but they didn't let us know but. Did. You ever go back and and speak to them that what it was like for them that time curious. Yeah. Well, the thing is that. I was I was born nineteen fifty, a couple of things happened. the tech would be turning points. One was that. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, full, I got polio, which is. Endemic at the time there was A. Massive. International crisis around the spread of polio virus. So I called it around the time that Sulk came up with the vaccine. But not quite in time read. and. Until then my father was convinced, I was going to be the soccer player in the family. We grew right next auto evidence football ground, which is one of the main teams in countries. So he was convinced I was Gonna be the soccer player. So I was strong and fast and Anita, told me trauma had a great sense of Boll Control and he thought this is the one fan. My youngest brother Neil eventually went on to be professional soccer. Yeah, I'm played for evison. In fact, he my brother John were taken on by the team Neil persisted with John lack the life of it less. So yes, I got poed and that was Devastating. For the family members a kid you don't have a word I've devastating it is, but you can imagine now a spokesman about it. Later on, you can imagine your own four year old kid completely paralyze stretched out. Bad. Surrounded by sandbags, NICO overnight from being perfectly fit to being completely wiped out. And some kids didn't make it a total. So is in hospital for eight months when it came out on to braces and we will chat crutches and. I was tremendously cute. I have to say. Often, me money spontaneously in the street. So that was a big thing obviously for the whole family are seventy the only one in the whole family to get it So that was bad for them. A memoir of a friend of Mine God's. Cycle Colston rankin saved the day save is to Kensington this particular thing in the Standard on very well at his own haulage business. And my dad had been. A professional soccer player himself he'd. Run. PUBS. And have been very successful, but then the wall intervened and. he was being offered the to be the manager of this. Very successful pub, but he was then passed over by the brewers in favor of a well-known sock play who was looking to manage a pump. So. My Dad had to work a DACA long showman and. But there's whole period of unemployment than Stettin Christmases, looming and literally Christmas Eve. This guy stand rankin. Showed up at the highest where the become full of food. Tacky. Presents for us that hasn't been anything. There was just wondering how Christians tiny show with a tool. So ready for like a Father Christmas. Jonathan's exaggerated. Wasn't that we lived in abject poverty. But it was difficult for them. You know we. And we went as aware of it but but it was it was hard for them and then. In Nineteen fifty-nine. Madonna was back at work and had an industrial accident. He was what Mrs Stihler actor. And he broke his neck I'll he was Completely paralyzed. quadraplegic quadriplegic paralyzed from the neck down. To won't morning. This wooden beam they're working on fell thirty feet the rope snapped and broke his neck. Oh,

Liverpool Soccer Polio Lancashire United States Colton Center Neil Brewers Colston Rankin Mrs Stihler Safah Sulk Britain Nico Sutton Australia Madonna John
Baltimore Ravens won't have fans in stands at M&T Bank Stadium to start the 2020 season

Boomer & Gio

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Baltimore Ravens won't have fans in stands at M&T Bank Stadium to start the 2020 season

"Today we hear from Ravens President Dick Cass Baltimore, taking a different approach to fans in the stands than what they're doing in. Miami Polio Health expert said it was not appropriate. I didn't think it was the right time. So we backed off and listen to them and we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA wait, and even if they had fans coming in, he doesn't exactly trust the general public right now. There will be knuckleheads will not comply with the rules and we'll take a mask all that will require of an engagement with songs from the staff. So they're going to stick to the no fans for now until they get further direction from the. Go To, that will take the mask off. That's right. Yes.

Dick Cass Baltimore Miami Polio Health Ravens President Trump
Africa Declares Wild Polio Is Wiped Out — Yet It Persists In Vaccine-Derived Cases

Pod Save the World

01:01 min | 2 months ago

Africa Declares Wild Polio Is Wiped Out — Yet It Persists In Vaccine-Derived Cases

"Rare unequivocally good news is that the Africa Regional Certification Commission has declared, the continent is now free of wild polio this breakthrough as the result of a major vaccination campaign in Nigeria which had up to eight thousand cases a year through the mid two thousand according to the BBC accounted for more than. Half of all global polio cases a decade ago the reporting on this subject can be a little confusing right because there's another strain of polio that can emerge for people who have been vaccinated but the key point the thing everyone needs to know is that if if you get vaccinated, you're protected from all these strains. So universal vaccination is key in Italian protect these populations. Vaccination campaigns have been difficult Nigeria because there's a terrorist group called Book Haram that makes parts of the country very difficult to reach. Doctor is also half the battle conspiracy theories alleging that the vaccine is actually an American plot to sterilize people. Maybe these Islamist groups live in Orange County copen nineteen made everything harder right 'cause you couldn't travel. So this is a big

Nigeria Africa Regional Certification BBC Orange County
Africa Is Declared Officially Free Of The Wild Poliovirus

BBC World Service

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Africa Is Declared Officially Free Of The Wild Poliovirus

"The continent of Africa is now free of wild polio, but a vaccine derived polio is still circulating. NPR's later Peralta reports Getting to this point took decades of work. Health workers had to deliver vaccines to dangerous places in Nigeria, they would enter villages between insurgent attacks. Now the Africa Regional Certification Commission has declared the World Health Organization's Africa region free of naturally occurring polio 16 African countries. They're still dealing with the type of polio that mutates from the weekend version of the virus used in the oral vaccine, prompting this reminder from the head of the W H O Dr Ted risk every SS we still have a lot of work to do to finish the job. Wild polio remains president in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Polio Africa Africa Regional Certification Peralta NPR Nigeria Dr Ted World Health Organization Afghanistan President Trump Pakistan W H O
Africa now free of wild poliovirus, but polio threat remains

TIME's Top Stories

02:25 min | 2 months ago

Africa now free of wild poliovirus, but polio threat remains

"The World Health Organization declares Africa polio-free. By Jeffrey Kluger. Nobody will ever know the identity of the thousands of African children who were not killed or paralyzed by polio this year, they would have been hard to keep track of no matter what because in ordinary times they would've followed thousands last year and thousands the year before and on back in a generations long trail of suffering and death instead, no African children were claimed by polio. This year or last year or the year before it was in two thousand sixteen that the last case of wild circulating polio was reported in Nigeria the final country on the fifty four nation African continent where the disease was endemic and with the required multi year waiting period. Now, having passed with no more cases, the World Health Organization today officially declared the entirety of, Africa polio-free. A disease that as recently as the late nineteen eighties was endemic in one hundred, twenty, five countries claiming three hundred, fifty, thousand children per year has now been run to ground in just two remaining places, Pakistan and Afghanistan where there have been a collective one, hundred, two cases so far twenty twenty that's one hundred to too many. But there's no denying the scope of the whol announcement today's victory over the wild poliovirus in the. African region is a testament to what can happen when partners from a variety of sectors join forces to accomplish a major global health goal says John Hueco, general, secretary, and CEO of Rotary International. It is something the world can and should aspire to during these turbulent times. It was Rotary and International Nonprofit Service Organization that kicked off the polio endgame in Nineteen Eighty eight with the launch of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative the GPA. That program aimed to leverage the power of rotaries thirty, five, thousand clubs and one point twenty, two, million members in two hundred countries and territories worldwide to make polio only the second human disease after smallpox to be pushed over the brink of extinction.

Polio Global Polio Eradication Initi World Health Organization Africa Jeffrey Kluger International Nonprofit Servic Nigeria John Hueco Rotary International Pakistan Whol Afghanistan Secretary CEO
"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:08 min | 2 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Two years ago I was in Nigeria and I went to a lab. In Matagorda Yep. And it's it's the town where both harangued bought stock. And they took us to a camp for sixty thousand internally displaced people and you know to see those polio workers working there. You know the day before I was there three people have been killed by a suicide bomber. Then, these these are the just. Devote devoting a lot of them are folios. Anyway, we. They, they took us to one of those labs. It was in Matt Gory onslaught of a hospital campus And I was in this room and it was in this room. Where they found the very last cases of polio in Africa. And it was. It was surreal. Being there. But then you outside this is fine on the building. And it was named for a Rotarians Oregon. who was very devoted to polio eradication help to fund this. So hell unfortunately that that lasts out pretty younger like this picture of her She's doing fine but you know, sadly the the. The The stopping polio. Didn't come soon enough for her but we're hoping it will for showed him. Thank you very much like thinking Mr I do and I think. Congratulations. and. Probably, pretty? Much. We're getting there. Thank you. Take. Care of. Again congratulations to the rotary clubs and to everyone who has in polio. Worldwide not only to conquer polio but also to create the infrastructure that we can use to combat this and other epidemics and pandemics that may come in the future. So we hope that the world will soon be free of polio and certainly hope that we will soon be on track to get covert under control for everyone so that we can get back to the normal life that we have enjoyed in the past and beyond as current disruption. So thank you everybody and be well and always be a powerful patient. Take good.

polio Matagorda Yep Nigeria Oregon. Africa
"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

05:35 min | 2 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"Forces out there. Control the dialogue. and You know that's not easy. people have their beliefs. People have their causes but you know that's why it's important. You get you know real community leaders out in front and particularly some of those. Uh. In, religious communities in these first. Right I've been reading some very zing articles. It was a really good one and the Science American. It was very complimentary to the work that the polio plus people have been doing to help with Kovic and There's. My I think. One of the problems for many diseases is because we have cleared the my. There's a sort of historical Amnesia about it. You know we've forget how difficult they were things like measles things like this serious. We used have twenty thousand children a year die from. And when was the last time you heard somebody having? been down to single digits a year now for longer than I can remember so and I had. I had friends with polio. So I know very keenly and when onto other countries I've seen on the streets they. Wish to wins shrivel guns. We don't see that in America. Have Forgotten. So it's so easy for people this day why why should have bother my child was this scene because it's not so bad You know in the United States, for kids going to school and you know most states it's required that the kids have these vaccines So you know the United States checkable polio vaccine that that the kids receive as part of their routine immunization. you know it. You know it's been a lot of years for polio cases here in the United States and in Canada or you know so many places you know it's I I look at the rotary experience and you know we. Have, been added for thirty five years. rotarians believe. In a radical polio. Many of these rotarians countries that haven't seen polio for a long long time the United States. Rotarians have donated of their own money over one billion.

polio United States polio vaccine Kovic Amnesia America Canada
"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

Powerful Patient

03:04 min | 2 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Powerful Patient

"See with A. Face Mask protections that are going on a social distancing and with the you know the actual you know folks stay in their homes for a certain period of time stopping big events, all those things You know it's it's it's been. You know knock on Wood success success specify. So what did we learned about controlling this kind of epidemic or pandemic Both from polio and from your current experience with. And with people in the past, what does it take to get one of these things under control? You know I think we learned an awful lot over the years from polio. One is the the the importance of effective communication and you know particularly media work. For example always had billable been, you know that they don't allow them in my state but in many of these countries have billboards and these billboards, you know about the message of the importance of getting the bolio drops but all of those billboards were converted over to cove and says similarly radio advertising You know which is still social media in particular advertising on social media. All of these things were done in polio and they were also replicated in these countries using Using you know disabled techniques folded as we use. And we have. A, lot of staff in different countries and. The estimate is is during the first quarter. Of fifty million dollars worth of polio support. Directly from the partnership, not just from the country, but that which the polio partners support. Fifty million dollars that went to support Hobie. Nineteen interventions. So. Obviously communications and it sounds like community corporation because if people don't actually do it and all the communication doesn't help. Yeah absolutely it's it's the communications. This is establishing chesting regimen the polio network funds about one hundred and seventy six laboratories. In the areas that we serve as having those laboratories up and running and ready to go to joe analyze the cold chest. It's all that but you're absolutely right on nothing gets done. without support of you know the the individuals who live in a community. We've had polio resistance over the years in different places. where it always comes around is if we can persuade. The mothers and fathers. In the communities that we do that we we get religiously involved..

polio Wood Hobie joe
Africa now free of wild poliovirus

WBBM Early Afternoon News

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Africa now free of wild poliovirus

"Now free of the polio virus. But the threat of polio remains. Polio has been wiped out in Africa in what medical experts are hailing it as a major milestone. Nigeria the last country on the continent to be declared polio free, it took a huge effort to reach remote and dangerous regions on some health workers lost their lives. But now all the Children of Africa can live without fear of this incurable disease that can paralyze for life. But which a single vaccine can't prevent. Vicki Barker

Polio Africa Vicki Barker Nigeria
Africa declared free of wild polio in 'milestone'

Not Too Shabby

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Africa declared free of wild polio in 'milestone'

"On independent panel, set up by the World Health Organization has declared that Africa is free from wild polio. It marks only the second eradication of a virus from the continent since smallpox 40 years ago. The head of the W. H O Dr Ted Ross Adhanom. Gabrielle has hailed the achievement. Today is a day of celebration, and they offer hope. Today we come together to rejoice over an historic public held Sachs is the certification off while poliovirus eradication in the African region. I congratulate the people and governments off Africa for your leadership and determination. Your sax is is the success off the world. Pakistan and Afghanistan. And now the only countries reporting cases of wild polio.

Africa Dr Ted Ross Adhanom World Health Organization Gabrielle Sachs Afghanistan Pakistan W. H O
A Conversation With Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey

Latino Rebels Radio

04:32 min | 2 months ago

A Conversation With Massachusetts Senator Ed Markey

"Ed Markey thank you so much for being on Latino rebels radio. Well, thanks for having me on polio. This is a great honor for me. You know can I just tell you this story before we start I actually met you very briefly at the Kelly's roast beef and you're actually they're ordering Kelly's roast beef in your congressman at the time and I said Hello I just that was just the first time I met you so so so here we are getting your on my show. You're in the middle of a contested race at I never thought that this this primary has become sort of a national story senator and I wanted to talk to you about. I. Think. A community that gets ignored a lot in in Massachusetts is the Latino community. And can you talk to me about your history with the Latino community I in Massachusetts and I don't think a lot of people know this. But I've I've talked to a lot of your supporters who are Latino elected officials who have told me about some of your roots can you just start with that? Yeah. Well, thank you for. The question and I actually eight, some stuff from Kelly's roast beefs afternoon. So you so you you know you you're on to me I love it. I love it. Yeah. Yeah. I I have confirmed that you are a fan of Kelly's. Are Continuing the tradition. So that's funny. Continue Center. So well, thank you. Well, you know I can begin with the work done for. Puerto Rico. In the wake of the of the of the hurricanes earthquakes that continues to ravage the island I worked very hard. To make sure that the trump administration is made accountable I actually flew down to Puerto Rico with Elizabeth Warren to play an oversight role in ensuring that that they knew that destroying paper towels at the citizens of Puerto Rico was not going to be acceptable. So I I did that and then I had multiple summits. With the Puerto Rican community, in Massachusetts, so I could hear their concerns and continued to reflect that in my oversight responsibility has been, and by the way those meetings took place in Boston those meetings took place in Springfield, those meetings took place in holyoke. Those meetings to place in Worcester. So I try to listen to the concerns and in addition I will say that listening to concerns I voted against promise the I know that I can I tell you one thing about that part. So you know I I am a Puerto Rican journalist I I'm I'm in Massachusetts I've been in Massachusetts since the nineties when you said that I think a lot of people miss that point in the debate that you said that because Pro Mesa? Is Not a popular legislation in Puerto. Rico. But also in the Puerto Rican community in Massachusetts and I do want to talk about other communities in Massachusetts outside of the Puerto Rican community but but let's stick on Pro Mesa why did you not vote for promise? You went against your party I mean it was it was a bipartisan legislation President, Obama, signed it. But why did you? Why did you feel that you were against promise of back then and and then talk about how that has changed you know it seems like you're right. I think history has made it very clear that that was the correct boat and by the way. My opponents casts the the opposite vote on that. Issue my feeling was that that we had to absolutely anticipate that it could lead to a hollowing out of educational services, a public safety services services in general who we know now the University of. Puerto Rico is in trouble because of that vote and so I, listened to those who came in and lobbied me on the issue on both sides. And it was there was a divided view on it, but I came to the very clear conclusion that. Big Mistake. To vote for progressives. So I voted no and I think history has worn out especially post. cameras, and the hurricanes that there is an absolute crisis going on in of Puerto Rico. Even as this belt tightening from this something essential control board continues to ham auditory citizens. So I feel very good about that though I think my no vote. has been vindicated historically.

Puerto Rico Massachusetts Kelly Puerto Rican Puerto Ed Markey Rico Polio Barack Obama Senator Congressman Elizabeth Warren Holyoke Worcester Springfield University Of Boston President Trump
"polio" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

06:34 min | 3 months ago

"polio" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Movement back a hint, but astoundingly didn't kill it a and. Rather than saying like no, we're not going to try this. People looked at polio cases and said this is so bad. We need to keep pushing forward despite that and so by the time salt came along and started working on his vaccine. You know people were already a little jumpy about the idea and it was made all the more so that he was trying. an unproven form vaccine where vaccines used attenuated virus, which is, it's live, but it's a weakened version of the virus, and it's in it's it's in a much smaller dose. What what Salk was suggesting what he wanted to use was a an inactivated virus, which is, it's dead in the in the sense that it can't replicate any longer. It's been treated with formaldehyde. But. Yeah, it's it's a huge dose of it so if it's not dead, you're in big trouble. Yet it was a big deal at the time because it was new science and a lot of scientists said that I don't think you could administer this much. Even killed virus safely. And so, what you had was a couple of different things going on a couple of. Potential pathways to take was give a little bit of that. Weaken virus. That's still alive. Two kids, which we know is gonNA infect them with the virus, so it's going to generate those antibodies, but hopefully it's not gonna be strong enough to get to that central nervous system point of infection. or A super dose them with this inactive virus, and that's GONNA cause antibodies in the blood, so that will one hundred percent prevent polio from happening. That will keep it from going to the central nervous system. They knew that right and that's great news, but boy you better be sure that that virus is perfect, because if it's not then you're in big trouble, right and not only not only that that's that's a big risk with it, but if you do it right, the risk goes very close to zero the other problem with it, because it produce antibodies in the bloodstream that leaves out the Gut, which means that you could still be infected by polio and. Colonize your gut and replicate and be passed in your feces, but because you have those antibodies in your in your bloodstream, it's going to protect you from ever developing poliomyelitis. Yeah, they were trying to stop the disease. Not Stop the virus right well. It depends on the paradigm like the one that wrote. Affects you. With polio is going to prevent the any poliovirus from ever colonizing your gut ever again, so it depends on which approach you were you're coming from and the course of some you know a couple of decades both came into use enough around the world that we actually have come close to eradicating polio. Thanks to this combination of both of them. Yes assault developed a two part test that he used on himself and volunteers, and then in nineteen fifty four you had to, you know this was yet massive PR campaign behind this like a in a big way because. They had to vaccinate a million children They were called the polio pioneers, and even though it was. Even though it look good. It's still a big deal to vaccinate a million kids with this new vaccine that you're not quite sure about yet, but they figured just. That was their only choice. They're like we can't just let polio. Continue to thrive and paralyze and kill our children. We have to take a chance with these pioneers right so so during this polio pioneer experiment It was actually from what I saw the first double blind in a major public health study, so no one knew whether they were getting the placebo or not or getting the vaccine, but one segment of this group of. Of Polio Pioneers, two, hundred, thousand of them were given a vaccine with that wasn't an activated, so there's a huge dose of still alive polio vaccine. In forty thousand of those two hundred thousand people came down with polio. Two hundred of them were kids who develop paralysis and ten died, and this is huge huge like. Can you imagine a setback like that or two hundred thousand? Kids were given a vaccine that hadn't been done properly like that would just stop it in its tracks now, but again because polio was so bad. America at the time was feeling very utilitarian and said you know. T two hundred kids, developing paralysis is horrible, but without this vaccine you know in Nineteen fifty to twenty, seven, thousand had developed paralysis so again they still push forward even with the government temporarily suspending vaccination programs or this this test I believe American. Parents still move forward in vaccinated their kids anyway with this this Sulk, what came to be known the IP or Inactive Polio. Virus that that salk developed. Tried the the inactivated poliovirus vaccine? To still around today, and again doesn't prevent the infection. but it does prevent the bloodstream for moving it onto the central nervous system. Right, which is, it's poliomyelitis. That's again what people mean when they say polio. That's right. Should we take another break and talk about the other vaccine? Yes, all right? We'll be right back to talk about the cheaper vaccine right after this. Actual. Bill. Everything School!.

polio Polio Pioneers polio vaccine Salk assault America
"polio" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

08:18 min | 4 months ago

"polio" Discussed on American Innovations

"From Pitney Bowes. From wondering I'm Steven Johnson, and this is American innovations. In one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, five, the world received its first viable polio vaccine. Courtesy of Jonas Salk. His serum used in inactive form of the virus to stimulate antibodies in the blood. The vaccines arrival on the market changed American society overnight. Polio had left families shattered in the medical community baffled salk vaccine was supposed to bring an abrupt end to the fear and for a time it did. Saux name became legend, but he was far from the only scientists with an idea about the best way to cure polio in the journey to conquering the disease, Salk had a rival. Albert Sabin. Savin was vocal about his own theories and ultimately created a different vaccine. The fact that we now live in a world in which we're unlikely to ever meet a polio victim is thanks to these two men salk and saving. When the effectiveness of socks vaccine was called into question, Sieben journey to Russia the land of his birth to find the opportunity he had been looking for. The final clash between the two vaccines and the two scientists is ultimately ca true story of how polio was conquered. This is the third and final episode in our series on the polio vaccine. This episode is called. The fight goes on. Back at cutter labs, everything generally looks fine. How did this point I think we have to assume that there's a virus in some of the cutter vaccine batches either the virus has withstood the killing process, and it's somehow beating all the safety checks, or it's coming in during the bottling process after the testing is complete. I assume you've noticed where they do the bottling. This could be the source of the problem. Cutter is the only vaccine manufacturer to bottle their product in the same building where the live virus is inactivated. From time to time, accidental polio infections have occurred in diagnostic labs, so maybe the answer is airborne exposure. Maybe, some viruses, making it into the air here and then landing in the bottles of vaccine being manufactured. This is just a guess, but it's reason enough to shot cutter down. Lives are at stake and the surgeon. General doesn't WanNA take any chances. sheely knows this is bad. But how bad is it really especially with so much of the evidence inconclusive? Does this merit pulling the plug on the whole vaccination program. sheely convenience a scientific committee to help them harsh through all the data possibilities, meanwhile, the reported number of incidents from team did vaccines rises the committee helps sheely come to a decision, and they pressure him to make an announcement to the public. She is preparing to address country in his office when the phone rings. He's greeted with a verbal ambush from Basil O'Connor. Listen to me. This is all being blown out of proportion. Live virus vaccine advocates foot by Albert Sabin WanNa cast public doubt on socks solution. If you go along with Sabin I'll see to it. You lose your job. Is undeterred. On May eighth. He gets on TV before an array of microphones, he tells the public that there will be no further polio inoculations until all six vaccine manufacturers can be fully reviewed. While sheely acknowledges that this is a serious and costly setback. He wishes to make it clear that this is not an indictment of the vaccine overall. I know that people will fully understand and appreciate the reasons for this decision which has been taken on behalf of the children of the nation. There will be in time ample safe vaccine for all who need it and wish. Following Chile's televised address the headline in The New York Times Reid's turmoil over salk shots. The ecstatic countrywide celebration of the vaccine just weeks before now feels like a lifetime ago, confusion, conflict and doubt fall over the polio vaccine. It's an especially hard time for Jonas Salk, who takes personal responsibility for the tainted vaccines and the polio cases. They've caused. At an emergency meeting, the National Institutes of health sought conceive disappointment, blame and condemnation and the eyes of his fellow scientists. SOCK leaves the meeting. Feeling hopeless, alone, borderline suicidal. He wants to disappear, but there's no place to disappear to. He's the most famous scientists in the world. A May thirteenth after an inspection of factories, responsible for making vaccines selected lots from two companies are declared safe for public use. Chilly wants to restart the vaccination program slowly and with extreme caution. He doesn't want the government to simply dictate when and how that will be done though he needs some help. On May twenty third. He gathered a committee to make recommendations for this new phase vaccinations. The committee includes Tom Rivers Albert Sabin Jonas Salk John Enders and a number of other leading polio scientists. sheely asked him to vote on whether the vaccination program should continue, or and altogether until further notice, salk abstains. The committee comes down eight to three in favor of continuing Albert Sabin is one of the three opposed. He emphasizes that killed virus vaccine is just too dangerous, especially with the strains salk selected. Following the vote reporters seek out. Basil O'Connor. Hoping you'll have some choice words. They are not disappointed. Mr O'Connor. How would you respond to doctor savings charges that the sock shops are dangerous. How would I respond? This is old stuff. Sieben used it in an attempt to stop the field trials of the salk vaccine. Since then he's been using it on every possible occasion to stop the use of the Salk vaccine listen. This isn't about science. This is about rivalry and envy for years. Saban's trying to get what is called live virus polio vaccine, and there are no president prospects of getting one. O'Connor's frustration with Sabin doesn't change the fact that there was a flaw in some of socks vaccines after tireless investigation by the epidemic intelligence service scientists discovered the original theory. That shutdown cutter labs was incorrect. The mystery was never truly solved. The most accepted theory suggests that the virus mixtures sat in storage too long sediment, gathered and particles clump together to strongly for the formaldehyde inactivated. Ultimately two hundred cases of polio are traced to cut her seventy nine children who were vaccinated, got infected with the virus, which spread to one hundred and five family members and twenty contacts within their communities. Most of those infected were severely paralyzed and eleven. People died from it. As a result, the rules for making polio vaccine. Manufacturers are required to filter their virus solution prior to the FORMALDEHYDE, getting mixed in to prevent comping. These new measures are extremely effective, and there are no more catastrophes. However the public battles within the medical and scientific communities have taken their toll. The cutter disaster is fresh on everyone's mind. Parents weigh the risks and decide to keep their children away from the needle that Summer Boston and Chicago are blasted by polio epidemics suddenly. It's like the vaccine days movie theaters off limits. Beaches limits. The fear of polio descends upon American households once again. Perhaps now what the public needs is a new vaccine one? That doesn't.

polio vaccine Polio Albert Sabin Jonas Salk Basil O'Connor Albert Sabin Jonas Salk John E salk Albert Sabin Wan cutter labs Sieben Cutter sheely Pitney Bowes Steven Johnson Saux National Institutes of health Savin Chile Russia
"polio" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

03:25 min | 4 months ago

"polio" Discussed on American Innovations

"The diamonds in the world and I won't do a bit of good and less major advances are made in the lap. He's reluctant to rush forward. Last time. Scientists rushed polio vaccine through the development process. The results were disastrous. He won't allow the mistakes of the past to be repeated and calls difficult. Hard edged genius who most of the time is only interested in one opinion. His own Lester O'Connor good to see you. Thanks for coming in. Thomas Rivers is director of the Rockefeller Institute. Hospital A self-described roughneck and the forefather of modern virology well rivers. Get right to the point. I want you to head up my foundations committee on scientific research. We need a polio vaccine and we can't have another park. Brody calmer situation God. No, you see. A lack of funding hasn't been the only thing slowing down polio research. Three Years Prior William. William H Park a professor of bacteriology. New York University medical. School had joined forces with the researcher named. Maurice Brodie to develop the cure for polio. They prioritize speed over safety and injected animal nerve tissue directly into children. They had no idea how dangerous that might be. The ended up infecting many of their young test subjects with the disease when they should have been and knock them against it. If that wasn't bad enough. The competition amongst researchers have the opposite effect of inspiring. Good Science John Colmer a pathologist in Pittsburgh heard about parks attempts and wanted to beat him to the punch, but there was a problem his vaccine was if anything, even more poorly researched. It killed nine people. Since then scientists have been understandably hesitant to test new vaccines. O'connor wants rivers to get the scientific community back on track, and to take a measured approach. How `bout you drop a list of research priorities, so we can emphasize first things first and trying to get somewhere for a change all run the scientific research group and I'll make sure it's run the right way, but we can't move forward unless we know what we don't know. By one, thousand, nine hundred thirty eight rivers has a plan. He says it before. Researchers can even think of developing a vaccine. They must I figure out how polio works how it gets into the human body. Now it's transmitted. The fight against polio books likely to be long-haul. With everything going on right now. A lot of people are asking if it's even possible to buy life insurance at all. The short answer is yes. You can buy life insurance during a pandemic, and if you have loved ones depending on your income, you probably should as an insurance marketplace policy. Genius is in contact with the life insurance companies on their platform every day. They're keeping track of all the changes in the market, so you don't have to. Which means they can get you covered quickly and for the best price. Here's how it works. Policy Genius compares quotes from the top life insurance companies in one place. It takes just a few minutes to compare quotes from the top insurers to find your best price. Wants to apply the policy. Jeans will handle all the paperwork and red tape for free. So if you're one of the many people.

polio polio vaccine researcher Lester O'Connor Thomas Rivers William H Park Maurice Brodie New York University Brody John Colmer Rockefeller Institute Jeans Pittsburgh first things first director professor
"polio" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

WSJ The Future of Everything

02:17 min | 5 months ago

"polio" Discussed on WSJ The Future of Everything

"That does that confer enough protection to actually protect people from Cova. Nineteen like we said not. Every antibody produced against a virus will end up attacking that virus and it's important to remember that the study has yet to determine whether these antibodies can stop the virus from getting into human cells replicating an infecting. But there are many reasons. This type of vaccine would be a breakthrough you don't have grow the virus and because you don't have to insert live or dead viruses into people. It would reduce the likelihood of having a bad reaction. I think that's the concept that that that these types of vaccines theoretically could could minimize safety risks. But I do think there's an open question about whether they're potent enough to to actually confer protection from disease another company in Oviedo Pharmaceuticals is also working on a gene based vaccine but it's using DNA instead of RNA. Lofta says results of its initial. Trials are expected in a few weeks to be clear until advanced. Trials confirmed that these gene based vaccines can actually make antibodies that can reduce the rate of infection. We won't know whether they're effective but there are about one hundred entities working on a vaccine. And that's what and LOFTA says at least eight are already doing human testing and one in China as reached an advanced testing phase. After just a few months remember. It took fifty years for the polio vaccine to be developed after the virus was discovered. One more cautionary note. The World Health Organization set a goal to eradicate polio by the year. Two thousand we came very close but even with the vaccine there are still some isolated pockets of polio.

polio vaccine polio Lofta Cova Oviedo Pharmaceuticals World Health Organization China
"polio" Discussed on Second Opinion

Second Opinion

04:26 min | 1 year ago

"polio" Discussed on Second Opinion

"Support comes from S T X films, presenting the upside don't miss the feel happy feel hopeful feel alive movie of the new year starring Kevin Hart. Bryan, Cranston and Ecole Kidman only in theaters January eleventh December is KCRW season of giving back. What are you grateful for breaking news award winning, cultural, coverage, eclectic music, free events, and concerts, and how about truth connection and community a KCRW it's all possible. Because of you you give because it matters your dollars. Make the biggest impact this month. Thanks to generous challenge grants. So cross off your list this season with a tax deductible donation at KCRW dot com slash join. Okay. It's time for a Sunday morning end of the year medical quiz. Don't worry. It can be done with your is only partially opened and it has only one question. Twenty eight is a the average age of people signing up for ObamaCare. Be the percentage of people crossing the border who are HIV positive or see the number of reported polio cases in twenty eighteen. Okay. Your answer. The answer is c in two thousand eighteen the world had only twenty eight cases of polio in basically, two countries, Afghanistan and Pakistan. This is remarkable because thirty years ago in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight more than three hundred and fifty thousand people were infected with the poliovirus most children under five in one hundred and twenty-five countries and most were left with serious disabilities and had profound impacts. On the rest of their lives. There is no cure for polio. But there are vaccinations. We thought we could make polio. The second disease that we are radicchio from the face of the planet. The I was smallpox. There is no question that the world vaccination program has been enormously successful, but moving from twenty eight to zero is an enormous step. In fact, this year the numbers are slightly higher than they were last year for polio. The barriers to success are not medical or scientific they are cultural religious and trust related by way of background. There are currently two types of vaccinations and injectable form used in wealthier nations and an oral form that is used in poorer nations. The injectable form uses dead virus to stimulate antibody production in the blood. The oral form uses a live weekend. Or attenuated virus to stimulate antibody production in the gut. We're hygiene is poor. There are some real benefits of using the oral vaccination once the attenuated or weaken virus can pass through the digestive system. It ends up often in source systems, and if others are exposed to fecal contaminants, they will also develop immunity based on the attenuated or weaken in virus. This is often called passive immunization. The biggest barrier to a radical polio in Afghanistan and Pakistan is surprisingly they capture of Osama bin Laden, you might remember that our attempt to capture bin Laden involved a fake immunization scheme in Pakistan, while we ended up getting bin Laden it left Pakistan with a general distrust of immunization schemes such that families are now avoiding children and rumors about immunizations. Bound and there are other barriers to immunization, including violent civil unrest and wars. But we are so close to a radical this horrible disease that it is worth having governments religious organizations philanthropists and businesses make that last huge, push and Aratu Kate polio. Once and for all, this is Dr Michael Wilks with a second opinion. This podcast was made by public radio station. KCRW our status has nonprofit enables us to make bold and unusual programs. But we need your support to keep it that way donate or become a member at KCRW dot com slash join. And thanks.

polio KCRW Osama bin Laden Pakistan Cranston Kevin Hart Ecole Kidman Bryan HIV Dr Michael Wilks Afghanistan thirty years
"polio" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"polio" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"Now let the folks that do come down and they put tremendous amount of energy and effort into this is not simply to take the polio virus says itself but to modify it so it does not produce polio in other words it doesn't replicate or reproduce it so and then they also use it because it can get into the brain so well to try to stimulate the immune system in the brain which is a very good system system of the brain is quite weak actually not in the body and of course but in the brain of toes and so they modified that virus to be more even more stimulating okay and you were saying the polio virus it doesn't you know i in its original say didn't affect the brain area what does it does affect that's why so so deadly it affects the brain and spinal cord all those things of course specific for neurologic tissue but that means it was really try to penetrate that so one of our problems is to find some system to penetrate only the nervous system tumor is not to penetrate other systems like say the blood or the long or something like that and how how successful is this study and and and in terms of targeting that well that's very good at targeting we have to we have to be a little conservative about this therapy it's it's certainly a breakthrough in a sense of modality so wait to try to use therapy you know the patients to this point have been very affected in the area that which the drug is given on the polio poliovirus i should say as given and that can react quite strongly there so there can't be side effects from that's and that's been in my opinion at least libertation of that they're happy so far is very effective in killing things in the local area we have to be sure the areas one that can stand that sort of injury in the first place in terms of treating thus doma what are some of the other treatments that are out there that are working and what is the time line in terms of treatment from diagnosis to you in general and can you can one recover from this well if we're lucky enough to find the tumor early from like us or something like that or most were to initially sometimes we find it just because the person had a head injury for no other reason finding a very small but general have to have a good surgery obtained which cannot be curative it's very hard to take all.

polio
"polio" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"Polio of the day butke ruined jim date we gambled warned when the hill no lights camera action while dirt applies though barely enough for it pay deals to date the book i eat enough alone in the no one the dow may be the home in the going frans the ladies of low no with religion if we devote of latino joe me three gatt of age in the blink the do and help jio but at midnight every how i know wait you three felt bad blow doku she may pain and again we'll make your ranks dole now in the lower now the goal may be at the holy cow the goal turkey ringling doing i would of the amanda who is really who which this of why young white milk in the ism survival may say may yard in those going down block standard how the simply in the heat the the the.

Polio ringling milk
"polio" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on RobinLynne

"Polio of the day butke ruined jim date we gambled warned when the hill no lights camera action while dirt applies though barely enough for it pay deals to date the book i eat enough alone in the no one the dow may be the home in the going frans the ladies of low no with religion if we devote of latino joe me three gatt of age in the blink the do and help jio but at midnight every how i know wait you three felt bad blow doku she may pain and again we'll make your ranks dole now in the lower now the goal may be at the holy cow the goal turkey ringling doing i would of the amanda who is really who which this of why young white milk in the ism survival may say may yard in those going down block standard how the simply in the heat the the the.

Polio ringling milk
"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Norway they have only ever use the ip they've never use the opv but they have really great sanitation so they're not having this problem where if everyone is vaccinated with the i p v then every individual is protected and what you're not necessarily stopping is the transmission to other people that have not been vaccinated does that make sense yes and so yes so that's one of the biggest differences that i found between the two of them both of them are effective but in slightly different ways and like we said already administration of say one dose of the eye pv and one dose of the opv like administration of both of them is actually very great so it doesn't have to be all opv or all ibv there can be some combination but in areas where there is absolutely no circulating wild polio you're better off with the ibv because the side effects are far less and the risk of a future outbreak is lower as well mmhmm cool so economic modelling wait back in the 80s predicted that polio eradication would save forty to fifty billion us dollars between 1988 and 2035 which is why the global campaign started i would assume so yes because everything's about money but what's interesting is that it's predicted to cost seven billion dollars between just 2013 in 2019 to keep the surat occasion effort going right because of the surveillance surveillance a super expensive we're going to have to switch to the inactivated virus vaccine which is more expensive there's there's just a ton of cost involved in it so i've heard a lot of critiques and we talked about before how this eradication effort really was spearheaded and started because it was white children in wealthy countries who were being affected not only obviously but they were being affected because they were affected is how it became exactly worked on so there are critiques that say you know.

Norway ip polio surat seven billion dollars
"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Cal fright that's amazing i know fan girling over here i know and so we talked about one of the biggest risk factors by of using the oral polio vaccine is that this vaccine associated paralytic polio there's another aspect of it we talked about the benefits but there's another thing that actually makes this of dangerous vaccine to use and that's the exact flipside of the fact that you get this passive immunization of your household numbers this exact same property is what allows for outbreaks of what is called circulating vaccine derived poliovirus moon this has happened in pakistan egeria in laos democratic republic of laos this what is called c v dp let's who many acronyms whoa the vaccine derived polio virus is circulating can evolve to become more virulent and more like it's wild type progenitor which is fascinating and scary and scary and insane and so this type of paralysis that's associated with the vaccine derive polio virus is clinically indistinguishable from that that you would get from a wild poliovirus you can tell by laboratory analysis so we know when outbreaks are going on what is which is causing it um so they are trying to move away from the use of opv now that the risk of these side effects are essentially outweighing the risk of infection by wild poliovirus in the majority of countries we also are seeing a push towards using a mano or by vaillant opv instead of a try vaillant opv are they safer or what's the well in the case of polio virus to their basically is no wild circulating pv to ray but we do see outbreaks of vaccine derived pv to happening from the four on that oral vaccine right so if they moved away so it would either be moving towards a killed virus vaccine the right exit vaccine.

polio vaccine laos Cal pakistan polio
"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Successfully tested on polio solicted and mentally disabled children i might add god always always the us celebrated salk became a celebrity overnight appearing on tv to tell his story but to also cautioned viewers that more testing needed to be done in response saveon publicly declared himself to be quote antisouth saying that the killed virus vaccine that salk had developed was not enough to ensure lasting immunity and apply that it was downright dangerous he emphasized that the only way to eliminate polio was due alive virus vaccine which coincidentally was what he was working on at the time of course savings hesitation did have some legitimacy socks vaccine was in no way perfect despite sabin and others protestations this vaccine was the closest thing yet to a prevention for polio and plans were drawn up for a countrywide experiment can you made me what you this is so this is in 1950 three okay when he announced hey i have a vaccine that is close to being ready but it was still under trials at this point who is still under trial s and so in nineteen fifty four the testing to validate this vaccine was going to happen and it was going to be the unite the biggest public health experiment in us history to date low so over the course of 1954 over one point three million children would take part one point three million ilian while with some of them receiving the seen ono and others receiving a placebo and others just being observed without receiving any sort of injection in april nineteen 55 the results of the trial were in the vaccine was quote safe effective and potent thank goodness 'cause like one point three million children just like laura i mean they do trials before they go to trials but still i mean back then it was a little more if i'm sure it was yep short definitely the well they did the trials just on kids who had no choice in matter exactly it was estimated that this vaccine conferred protection to sixty to ninety percent of those vaccinated bells were wrong there was actual rejoicing in the streets wow seriously children around the world could now be protected against polio coup wants a it was a huge impact of that a major deal and salk was a god of science in the eyes of.

salk polio sabin ono antisouth public health ninety percent
"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"There was only 1 strain of virus for the vaccine uh so creating the vaccine was pretty straightforward with polio researchers didn't know at the time how many strains there were and it wasn't until 1950 one that the final number was in well which as you mentioned was three that meant that an effective vaccine would have to contain all three types of the virus the other issue was how to grow enough virus to make vaccines previous reach research had indicated that the virus could only be grown in nervous tissue which was all but impossible to grow inside a lab time then a man named john anders tested this conventional belief by inoculating other tissue skin muscle kidney with the polio virus and it grew right because it actually infect your gut and inc can actually end didn't mention this but it can affect your spleen and your liver it can actually infect a whole bunch of your tissues but obviously they wouldn't have known that then because the only symptoms you really see or associate with polio highlight its or the nervous symptoms well he did he did know that like he did know he said well eat it infects your gut so it's got to be able to modify other god i or tissues smart guy inder well this incredible breakthrough would be the only polio related development to earn a nobel prize it revolutionize cell culture in the lab that doesn't really cool this finding along with the discovery of the three strains meant that the groundwork was laid for vaccine development the march of dimes began to essentially funnel money into the development of a vaccine an enormous number of scientists were involved in this process so let's meet the two men whose names you've probably heard linked to polio before jonas salk and albert sabin these two were similar in many ways both men were of eastern european descent both were jewish and both face substantial obstacles because of this however sabin was older more established and respected in the scientific community more concerned with earning the respect in praise of his peers who's like fella researchers salkin the other hand was young relatively young age novice when it came to police.

john anders nobel prize polio march of dimes jonas salk albert sabin
"polio" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

Popcorn with Peter Travers

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"polio" Discussed on Popcorn with Peter Travers

"What's meaningful in life and how we create lives that are very meaningful why liked how the movie didn't fudge the terror the horror the despair of being told because this guys very active and then suddenly he's falling down on a tennis court he can't do what he usually does and and that's when polio was in 50s this was what was going on and he almost suicidal cough i know you are just reading the popcorn and this is their land yeah you put it in a you could throw it at i wouldn't have at one maybe as she bought some but no you're absolutely right i think that that's that's exactly what do you do he was very athletic man he was very um that's how we experienced the well very gregarious very extroverted loved people loved life was god fearing was a christian man very um spiritual and religious and but just loved being alive and he is he kind of i think he met the welter in with with his physicality with his body so then yes of course the polio hits and um it was he took it as a death sentence really yeah no it wasn't he took it as such i know but what else do you do when that happens i can't i'm general married i am i what do i do what what's the point of me anymore i think he internalize this kind of a value listeners he didn't know where his value was if he wasn't able to provide for his wife in the way that he had imagined you know he he his wife was pregnant with their first son and only son when the polio hit and he you know having to let go of the idea of playing sport with your son you know having to let go of those uh imagined dreams of of bonding with your unborn child and having to accept the fact that those things can't be how do you deal with as a grief process and he didn't know he didn't know that he he there was a period of three is right depressed and he really didn't want to let but i will underline.

polio