29 Burst results for "platypuses"

"platypuses" Discussed on Little News Ears

Little News Ears

01:38 min | 2 months ago

"platypuses" Discussed on Little News Ears

"In remove. I'm here but but i know happy where he said he was unhappy. At least he's honest. Which reminds me of one another story. I want to talk about but did what about winston help be fine. We always mood. If you're wearing a mood beam. I know your mood to put more beam like watch and it helps people know how you're feeling mom created it to help her understand her kid and now in the uk. They're thinking about using it to help us track their employees mental health can monitor it and the employees just after. Click some buttons. That sounds totally weird. Well the lockdowns going on people are concerned about how other people are doing. This is one way to help. It's a simple band and people are seeking more mental help. This could be a step. That helps define mushrooms. I assume terry. I've never seen before. Stay right where you are. We'll be right there. thank you want. This week's news for kids go to little news. Here's dot com and don't forget to check out our videos on youtube. Teach teacher lesson plans in more. Old news is dot com. May your sweetness shine and your colors glow. Services for today came from the new york times. The bbc scientific america..

uk youtube new york today This week one way winston bbc scientific america dot com terry one com
Investing in Bitcoin

Animal Spirits Podcast

05:08 min | 7 months ago

Investing in Bitcoin

"All right we are joined today by zach. Prince and ceo of block fight zach. Thank you so much for coming on today. Guys them so pumped to be here. I listened to your show every week for the first time. I've been nervous to go on a podcast public speaking in a while. Because i'm just so happy to be herbs so excited to be the first guest talking about cryptocurrency on the animal spirits. Podcast i think is a longtime Well thank you for saying that. We are excited as well. We actually started this pocket. And i were just talking about this in november twenty seventeen so right into the teeth of bitcoin mania and we'll get into two point out. I don't think it's quite the say manic fever that we saw in december twenty seventeen. But why don't we just start off briefly for those who don't know anything about you. Give us a quick introduction. Who are you zach. The founder and ceo blocked by. I grew up in texas. I was always kind of an entrepreneurial slash math in finance minded kid. I guess i actually put myself through college as a semi professional online poker player so unlike a lot of folks are generation unfortunate to not be carrying a big amount of college debt. I always wanted to work in the financial services industry. But i finished school in may of two thousand nine so i ended up working in an advertising technology startup that was ultimately a really successful venture. We got acquired by google. I spend a little bit of time at google but learned that. I really enjoyed building things and being at smaller companies left google to start another ad tech business that got acquired and then more recently and most relevant for blocked by i was working in the fintech sector specifically the online lending side of fintech. So there was a big boom in that industry appear to peer lending online lending and alternative investing and i worked at one of the companies. That was the biggest aggregation of data provider of technology solutions to institutional investment firms that were participating in that asset class. When i was doing nat i became kind of like the fintech guy within my friend group and i started writing a blog which i don't think rather i just i didn't stay with it as well as the Clogs and built up a readership but writing. This blog is what led me to discover bitcoin for the first time back in twenty fourteen and one of the things that struck me about it initially was a lot of what happens in fintech is just a new front end on top of the traditional financial system. So you're doing something that banks already do but you're doing it with a mobile app with a much better user experience and it's faster and easier. You don't have to go onto a branch when i learned about big like. Wow this is something truly different. You've got a brand new asset built on top of payment network where i can move something around the world. Twenty four seven and it's not using any part of the traditional financial ecosystem. So i was screaming to no one on this blog and twenty fourteen. I think you should be taking a flyer on bitcoin. Maybe it goes to zero. But with a little bit of capital you should be investing in it and then from there kind of slowly and steadily went down. What people in the crypto currency industry referred to as the rabbit hole and ended up starting block five around the same time. You'll start started this podcasts. In the fall of two thousand seventeen to before we get into what blocked by does specifically. How do you explain bitcoin. Someone who thinks they know what it means or has no idea in is never really entered. This base of workers obviously digital ledger been well. I mean i think one of the actual biggest positives about bitcoin. The fact that the narrative seems to change so many times over the years. But how do you explain it to someone who doesn't really know what it is one of the things. I like to start with when i'm explaining bitcoin. People is the best analogy and kind of story. That i've ever heard demystified a little bit and the story is actually about the platypus. So back in the sixteen hundreds explorers from europe. We're going all around the world. They got australia. They found the platypus and they sent some specimens back to europe on the ship and the scientists back in europe rigidly thought. They were playing twisted joke on them. And they're like this animal can't be real. You stapled together a duck in beaver and you're telling us this thing lays eggs like there's no way this is a real animal. It took the scientific community about fifty years to actually accept. The planet was a real animal. Create a little part of the animal classification kingdom that incorporated the platypus. Another funky animals like it but the platypus was very real and the problem that bitcoin is had is kind of this platypus problem in the traditional financial services industry. Where is it. A currency is it. An asset is it. A commodity is security is at a payment network. Well it's not really any one of those things in a silo. It's a little bit of all those things and it's something completely new but it definitely exists and the reaction from votes whether it's jamie diamond or others who are now coming around to it but back in twenty seventeen. They were saying bitcoin fraud. It's a scam. It's only used by folks who are doing illegal activities. Those types of things come from a position of not actually understanding.

Zach Manic Fever Google Bitcoin Mania Prince Texas Europe Australia Jamie Diamond
Early Mammals Had Social Lives, Too

60-Second Science

02:10 min | 7 months ago

Early Mammals Had Social Lives, Too

"Six million years ago a group of small mammals huddled in a borough in. What's now montana. They were good diggers most likely furry and petite. They could sit comfortably in the palm of your hand. I mean if you saw them running around today you probably think it looks like a small rodent of some sort like a chipmunk or or a a mouse or or something like that lucas. Weaver is a mammal paleobiologist at the university of washington. These little creatures didn't belong to any of the three main mammal groups on the planet today. Which are the placental. Mammals like us monitoring like the platypus and marsupials like koalas and kangaroos. Instead they belong to another now. Extinct group called the multi to berkowitz their teeth. Is what really distinguishes them from. From any other group of mammals they have these really bizarre molars with these multiple bumps on on the teeth which is where they get their name. Multi typically it just means many bumps. weaver in his colleagues have studied the fossilized skulls and skeletons of these animals dug up in montana. And they've given him a name. Philippe amis prime. Mavis friendly or neighborly mouse. The details are in the journal. Nature ecology and lucien. Weaver says drought or climate. Change may have killed the animals though. It's hard to be sure. But the critters were fossilized together in ways that suggest they sought out each other's company. That's a big deal because it's commonly thought that social behavior didn't arise in mammals until after the death of the dinosaurs. Ten million years after these smokers hung out together the narrative for decades his been that mammals that were living during the dinosaurs were mostly solitary rat like creatures that were kind of scuttling the night under the foot of dinosaurs. In so the fact that we're finding these multi berkeley mammals totally unrelated ancient group mammals. That's apparently exhibiting social behavior means that this was probably not uncommon among these early mesozoic mammals. And it kind of changes. The narrative of sociology is somehow unique to placental mammals. Even today social behavior is relatively rare among mammals but these findings suggest the need for company in some mammalian species is an ancient

Weaver Montana Philippe Amis University Of Washington Berkowitz Lucas Lucien United States
Two Whats And A Wow

Wow In the World

04:27 min | 11 months ago

Two Whats And A Wow

"Okay and there's another t rex eating a hot dog, and there's a baby would sail sailboats for hands. Oh Hey. Why. Are you looking at the clouds Tarazi and binge watching the sky? What episode I mean. What cloud are you on? I'm trying to figure out if this one up here. It looks like a panda wearing a two. Or a looping platypus definitely a Hula hooping platypus. Check out that way, is it just me or does that look like a surfer about to take on a massive wave? I don't know I think it just looks of like A. Piece of Ham stuck to a refrigerator the. Just really hard and then tilt your head all. Right. There, you go just like that the a heart you know what I see. It now really does look like a slice of ham stuck to a refrigerator. Well, anyway, Do you think we could press? Pause on the cloud binge-watching because we've got a Dane show to host. Crowds don't go anywhere. We'll be right back after these messages. What wait wait? Why pocket? And pull the curtain in three. To One and now everyone's second favorite game show after Joe Tuesday, it's two. What's. With your. Pin. Film! What the back wilder this time for another! Round of to? Scientific game show that separates the house from though what's now before we begin today's round. Let's review where we left off yesterday. We gave you three scientific statements about Eagles and challenged. You guess which one was the one true well, was it a golden eagles enjoyed covering themselves with? Or was it be the wings of Great Nicobar Serpent Eagles so big? They're often mistaken for small planes, or was it see the world's largest Eagle's nest was about twenty feet, deep or the size of five seven year olds, and to answer yesterday's question joining us by phone. It's led dory from Philadelphia Dory. What's the well I'm Andy and My name is Dorrie in I'm from Philadelphia. I am eight years old. My while in the world is that the biggest. Nonni Eagle, mass, which is in Florida, is nine feet, wide and twenty feet deep. It's really enormous. Thank you. I love your show. For dinner him there you have it wears. You guessed the answer. See that the largest eagle's nest ever was twenty feet deep. You found the winning. Wow, congratulations! Weather's weighing in at a whopping four thousand four hundred nine pounds, this eagle's nest, which was examined by the Guinness. World, records, back in nineteen, sixty, three weighed more than two or bears combined. It was found near Saint Petersburg Florida and built by a pair of Bald Eagles now if. If you just A or B? You weren't that far off. There are several species of birds that do actually like covering themselves and aunts. This process is called. Anti and scientists aren't quite sure why it happens. Some of them believe it could be because certain acids. The ants helped to protect the birds from Lice and other scientists think the ants might help. The Birds Molt, or shed their feathers faster, and if you guessed be, there are. Cases, where certain birds have been mistaken for airplanes, for example, the endangered California condor north, America's largest land bird has a wingspan so wide that it's actually been mistaken for a plane from faraway.

Nonni Eagle Great Nicobar Serpent Eagles Bald Eagles Eagles Dorrie Philadelphia Dory JOE Dane Philadelphia Florida America Saint Petersburg Florida
Police unions dig in as calls for reform grow

1A

05:32 min | 1 year ago

Police unions dig in as calls for reform grow

"States across the US are in their second straight week of protests over the killing of George Floyd by a police officer many hope to see police reform they have reached a current though and that's often the police unions to talk about the role of police unions and the power they hold over reforms we have Booker Hodges assistant commissioner at the Minnesota department of public safety and let's bring it round the lord a police union labor negotiator former police officer and the former president of a state wide police union in Texas run thank you so much for joining us well thanks for having me we're getting a lot of comments from the moment given example one listener tweets it seems all other unions are under attack but police unions only gets stronger what accounts for this and then Richard tweets the left is finally realizing public unions make it very difficult to remove crappy employees teacher police if you suck at your job you've got to find another job these these questions Rauner kind of centered around what makes police unions different I think and could you answer that for us to can we look back to the history of police used to get the answer well sure and I think the I always call it kind of the duck billed platypus of unions they're in a union but they don't look like other unions and there's a big reason for that because of the nineteen nineteen Boston police strike it pretty much wiped out unionization in America until really into the nineteen sixties they do said paternal so ninety eighty five ninety percent of all the police United States do not belong to the AFL-CIO they have one chartered union and it's a it's a small percentage so the police were late getting into the labor firefighters had an international in nineteen eighty S. all the public employee unions construction units you know that some of those are a hundred years old so police were late to the game they were used in many times as strike breakers and picket lines and so they didn't gravitate in there tend to be conservative by nature so their unions look different but they're still just working people their blue collar working people who form the groups who have become adept at using the American political system to increase our wages and pay in for job security so I'm not ashamed to be in a policeman or representing the police they can only do in a increase their strength or get their message out it's all illegitimate nature so different than people that are anti gun and pro gun you know free speech no free speech in America everyone has a right to speak out on things so well of concern to their members we got this tweet Booker from Tracey Wheeler and she mentions what Ron just said about the fraternal order of police Tracy says the police union's name the fraternal order of police is symbolic of the fact that it operates like an old boys club officers who speak up about bad cop behavior are ostracized in this culture and I want to put this book or in the context of what we heard earlier from you lie at the the Marshall project who was saying that often times African American cops don't want to join leadership because they don't want to be part of that culture yes so yeah I think there's there are some differences between African American officers on what offices regarding union membership I mean mia love the vast majority of my career I was in the union I was a union president you know so I didn't have some of those issues but a lot of the other people I know who are in other organizations did have issues regarding how that they didn't feel that the union represented them or didn't defend them as strongly as they did white officer so I I I'm fully aware that that issue does exist within the labor unions run it sounds like you wanted to respond to that as well well that issue exist in America so you could say I'm a seventy two year old white man who grew up in the south where our view the world may be different than a black person my age who grew up different but men and women officers have different views about things Hispanic officers have different views are Asian awesome so that's in it in and of itself but you have to say policing in America is eighty five percent means there's been no woman firefighter president that I'm aware of any part of union in America ever so so we look at it and then we say yes but they appear to be older white men yes but there haven't democratic elections welcome back officers in America only about twelve percent of the police no less maybe nineteen so that's wrong but the pollution is not hurting anybody the city hires the city provides room recruitment in six cities were even worse off when it comes to female officers their lesson about twelve percent of the police which is half the number of Canada Australia and other European countries so thank you in that profession is eighty five percent median and whatever sixty seventy percent white means that white men tend to gravitate up yes but lots of officers don't become involved in the

United States George Floyd Officer
Sherry Hagerman Discusses the Importance of Education

Photofocus Podcast

08:21 min | 1 year ago

Sherry Hagerman Discusses the Importance of Education

"This Shamir young and I'm joined by my co host in of Florida. Skip calling Florida. This is really good because our guest today. Her parents live about five miles away. I don't want them to know that. I'm the King of Florida. Think that so. Yeah all right. I'll be the King of Florida. Just for the PODCAST. Cast how are you? I'm wonderful. I have some Florida envy right now. Here in Michigan is pouring rain. So I'm a little jealous of you Floridians while we had the storm this morning and got all the rain and now it's gone. Let's talk about one aspect of Plata pod. That's become very very cool if you think about it whether it's the Max or the ultra once you've got the base. It's kind of a blank canvas to do anything you want. What and I was looking at some of the things the other day and seeing some of the images on the instagram page that that Plateau pod shares and on the blog That are that are being shared. And it's very cool because everybody is taking things like the goose necks with additional lighting or changing up the kind of ball. They're using more. We've got that that I love that little square jellyfish phone holder. Because I've used that on an ultra of myself and while you could go out and you could get if you wanted something. Just hold your phone. They're a dime a dozen everywhere. But when you talk about putting the square jellyfish on Your Planet Pot and then you Wanna be able to do other things with it in terms of recording with your phone It it just changes the diversity of the product which would which are some of your favorite accessories. You know it's I. I love the goose next and I have to add by the way you know. We all have extra time right now with with everything going on with pandemic and it's the perfect time to experiment and explore with your style and creative projects and it's just very very cool and so I'm loving playing with goose necks and I mean just looking at stuff. That people are posting it so inspiring. You mentioned the blog. We've got toy photography up there. We've got Frozen FRUIT OF FROZEN FRUIT TO`real freezing fruit and getting really cool artistic shots. Someone else posted about. They were capturing images of their city from their car like not even leaving their car and the platypus helping with that. It's just it's very cool the different things that you can do and especially with the accessories available now well right now and you said it. We've all got. We've all got time so being able to play with this stuff and go from from a macro to anything with your cell phone and tie it all in together it just becomes one of these really diverse little tools that you've got to play with and it takes up no room and I don't want to turn this into more of an infomercial but you and I are both for for our listeners. Shamir and I are both involved in working on different plateau pod projects but were involved because we believe in the in the product and especially especially Larry doctor Dr t who is the founder and was down a looking for new application. So and here we go. Let's talk about today's guest. Let's get to it. We've got Sherry Hager. Men in the House and my friendship was Sherry. Our friendship is testimonial to an industry. That we all loved dearly. Sherri is an award-winning very successful. Winning and portrait photographer. But these days she's best known for a much bigger role and that's founder of Click on now just to give you some history on Sherri Sherri and I met I think it was either two thousand nine or two thousand ten when she attended skip summer school and that was a workshop series. I was doing that. Went all the way through two thousand thirteen. We've been involved in numerous projects. We spoke at different conferences together. Sherry and her husband. Jeremy and Sheila and I have all been out to dinner together. I love working with her and I especially love working with her team on. Click con- now click. Con- kicked off last summer with their first annual event Chicago. They broke all records with. I mean they just had this incredibly diverse educational and trade show event and it was amazing because you could feel the electricity in the air and I know that sounds Kinda. Hokey and sappy. But sometimes you go to a conference where it's kind of flat like a soda. That's spent left open all day long. It's got color. It's got flavor but no phys while this one had phys had a little of everything and people were so excited to be there. This year click on was scheduled to start About a month and a half August eleven so actually no. It's about two months away but like everything in our lives. The pandemic changed all of that. Now here's the cool thing team. Click con- isn't going to slow down so while this year show has been postponed to August tenth. Twenty twenty one. They're launching click con- nation on the same day that this you show was supposed to start August eleventh. The pandemic may have changed everything in our lives but moving to online couldn't be more perfect for the management team also known as the heart of Click on. So we're going to talk about education. We're GONNA talk about expanding your skill set. The challenge is building your business back in today's in in today's environment and who knows what else will come up on the PODCAST and I know I've gone a little bit too long. But it's hard not to do when you've gotta guess that you know so well so Sherry. Welcome to beyond technique. Hi. I'm really excited to be here today. And talk to your listeners and give them some good information call. We are so excited to have you. Thank you is on you now. Good information. Wow we have a lot I think between the three of us we can really figure out some good stuff here for sure for sure and you know. Let's start with our favorite first question. Just our listeners can get to know you a bit more. Tell us about yourself. Share your background and how you ended up doing what you're doing today. Well my goodness we're going really far back now so I started a while. I've been doing photography since I was six years old had a little. I don't know if you guys remember those Kodak. One ten cameras. I got one of those for my birthday but I didn't really ever take photography serious until I was out of college during college. I had taken a ton of photography courses because I loved it. I got my first real. Dsl are when. I was eighteen for graduation from high school graduation and When I graduated college I was actually going to become a Animation artists and work on movies Lake Toy Story and things like that for Pixar But I ended up shooting. Somebody's wedding and I fell in love with it so I became a wedding photographer. Spent about sixteen years now. But I've been doing that and I absolutely love it. I had a hard time coming out of the gate. Which skipped can attest to. And that's how I met skip. I actually attended skipped summer. School in That's pretty much. What gave me my left or my push and also really gave me the wants to educate other people so I think skipped summer. School is really where the photography part of it came out where I started catching on to pricing myself. Right and doing things right as well as wanting to get back to the community so both of them actually started right there with with his show that he had had But yes sixteen years. I'm number two in the. Us number one in the Midwest and Voted number six in the world.

Sherry Hager Florida Shamir Sherri Sherri Founder Instagram Midwest Michigan Twenty Twenty Kodak Pixar Chicago Larry Doctor Dr T Jeremy Sheila
Beyond Technique: Charles and Jennifer Maring Discuss Growing Outside of Your Comfort Zone

Photofocus Podcast

09:54 min | 1 year ago

Beyond Technique: Charles and Jennifer Maring Discuss Growing Outside of Your Comfort Zone

"This is Shamir Young. And I'm joined by my co host and social distancing buddy. Skip Cohen. Boy. Isn't that the truth? I got I got all excited yesterday. Because our daughter-in-law Us handmade masks. I'm serious that's so sweet. Mine is a pirate and she has got bumblebees. So the fun thing about the pirate is living in Florida. It looks like it's the Buccaneer logo so I have a feeling that I can't wait to go into a non-social distancing mode and having run to the supermarket and where my new mask. I don't know about you but through this pandemic I am constantly looking for something to fill in a gap on timewise. Now because I'm a writer and I do podcast and blog and all that stuff. I'm probably a little busier than most people are right now but on the other side of the coin. I am having so much fun. Just following some of the some of our own content over at Plata pod dot com on the blog and also on instagram. Oh for sure you know. It's a lot of photographers have downtime right now. Needless to say and one of the things that we can be doing is projects at home to stay creative. And you're absolutely right. Plata pod is putting out a bunch of cool content on their blog about project ideas that we as photographers and creatives can do at home so I highly encourage listeners to go check out. Platypus DOT com slash blog. Just yesterday we posted about macro photography that you can do in your own home another photographer. Joe Pelicans Own. We have a blog post from him about how. You don't even need to leave your car to take some cool photos. We've got some Lego photography as well on the blog is just a ton of cool ideas that we can do to stay creative right now and then if you run out of what you're reading on the blog wander over to instagram because Hilmar Smith is sharing something every single day over on the instagram page. And it's just it's from photographers from and they're not necessarily professional summer. Just good strong serious. Hobbyists others are working professionals. And they're all things that they're doing to change their perspective on the way they're capturing images and there's some very cool and fun ideas there especially to take advantage of during this pandemic near inspiring. So let's get this show on the road because we've got a great one today. Yes we have got Charles Jennifer marring with us today and this is truly a kick and I use that expression alive but this one really is a kick They have been friends of mine for a whole lot of years going back to my early early. Wpi days both of them are artists. Photographers there podcasters. Their writers educators and they couldn't be more diverse in their focus on business. They're also both Panasonic Bloomberg's ambassadors and they were to the very first artist take prototypes of the new Plateau Ball Ball head out for field review right after. Wpi most important of all and the reason joining us on beyond techniques today is the way they've changed their business over the years today. Marring visuals regularly demonstrates their commitment to imaging but together in style comes of wide variety of lifestyle topics well beyond just photography now right now. We're all going through the same challenge and your diversity and you skill set as a photographer has never been more important. The pandemic has changed all our lives. But we're not going to be hunkered down forever and we WANNA help you with ideas. So you hit the ground running when things get back to some level of normalcy. And maybe there's some things that are gonNA come up today in the conversation that'll help you change some of the things you're doing right now while you are hunker down so Charleston Jennifer. If I didn't totally screw up technology here. Welcome to beyond technique. Hi How are you guys today? Be here it's good to have you guys. We're so excited to have you both you. Two are definitely the dynamic duo of creativity and you know we like to kick things off with our favorite first question and this is to the both of you or either one that wants to take it. But could you just kind of enlighten us on how you got started? Give us your background and kind of evolution of high. You got to what you're doing today Yes so you know. I'm a second generation photographer. My Dad was a photo enthusiast growing up that built a darkroom in the house. And about the time I was seven years old and so just seeing I print come to life As a young child it's like it's like magic and so I learned to print long before I picked up a camera and then In my high school years I started picking up the camera and moving forward with it and It's just evolved from there and My my father. Photographs of weddings and portrait's When I was in high school but then I just Kinda took all of that and ran with it and so It's been an evolution. Starting at that point very cool and myself I mean I. I've always been really interested in arts and photography and I mean Charlie. I met when I was like literally eighteen years old. So it's been quite a journey over you know two decades together and you know it's it's really cool to be involved in something that you know as a young person you've dreamed of and then as an adult you see everything kind of coming to fruition. Well it's interesting because the two of you are both out there together as educators. You're both out there together as photographers artists. And there's so many things that you share and just before this podcast started for our listeners. We were talking about when when I remember my. I guess my first presentation broadcast or Ashley wouldn't have been broadcast. I think it was just a A blog post from together in style and Jennifer. You're talking about ideas for entertaining over the December holidays and that diversity. His you guys have stayed true to that constantly constantly but continually changing and morphing into some other aspect of our lifestyle development. And I. I'd love to hear where did Or or when did Together in style. Start to take shape and also and also. Let's talk about where you see it going because right now it's so relevant where everybody is hunkered down. But as I've reminded everybody and other podcasts and blog posts hunkered down. Doesn't mean hunkered down from Your Business what you've got to do to stay safe and healthy. So let's talk about a little bit about together in style and also things you guys are doing now. Well I think You know we've been surrounded by surrounded by so much lifestyle work organically We photographed many different books with celebrity party. Planner David Tara early on and we were just constantly lifestyle driven work and what we realized along. The Way with that was that we were bringing to the table. A lot of creativity to the photo shoots and we realized that we had our own knack for the vision of lifestyle and so as we started to interact and started to move more towards video. We felt like we should be sharing this so that we can build trust with our clients on a deeper level than I'm congested. A camera actually someone who has a sense of style and so I think that's where it kind of evolved from. Yeah an interesting enough. We've always been a the type of people that have embraced change we've always Seek new opportunities whether it was in photography or expanding our own availabilities in sharing our ideas with our clients and know sharing ourselves as lifestyle Experts and other avenues Such as like home decor or recipes or Just particular you know we would do little inspirational shoots and basically gave our clients at different perspective of who we were and it also challenged US personally to come up with specific ideas in T- them come to life you know I'm curious about you just mentioned The word challenge and one of my favorite things that I love to ask is about an artist's challenge photographers challenges. The challenges that we all face as we grow businesses and develop as as artists. And so I'm curious as you've gone through this evolution Of Imaging video and together in style are there any challenges that you kind of stumbled on along the way? And how did you overcome that? I think daily we have challenges and it's one of those things that is a part of everyday life and it's a growing pain And I'm happy to have them because ultimately it ends up in something that Either learned a lesson One way or another and And it's really a cool thing to do. It's it's interesting to go outside your comfort zone and to start to recognize the potential in living. I'm without feeling a

Charles Jennifer Instagram Shamir Young Skip Cohen Writer Florida Joe Pelicans Panasonic Bloomberg Charleston Hilmar Smith Charlie Ashley David Tara
Gardening the Permaculture Way: How to Create an Abundant Perennial Garden

Sustainable World Radio- Ecology and Permaculture Podcast

08:12 min | 1 year ago

Gardening the Permaculture Way: How to Create an Abundant Perennial Garden

"Guest today is Morag Gamble. Founding Director of the PERMACULTURE Education Institute Morag is a permaculture teacher and designer based in Queensland Australia where she lives in a permaculture eco-village when Morag is in educating or designing. She can be found in her award. Winning Garden Morag has taught permaculture in twenty countries and is the host of the popular. Youtube Channel are permaculture life. Welcome to sustainable World Radio Morag Gamble. It's so wonderful to have you here with me today. Thank you Jill. It's lovely to be here to today. We'll be chatting a bit about your no did guard method. Which is really appealing to me. Is the Lazy Gardener. Then we'll be discussing some of your favorite permaculture plans to put into our new garden beds or into pre existing gardens fantastic. It's one of my favorite topics. I think the ninety got any something that has just ever. Since I started doing permaculture gardening ride in the early days when I helped to get the north St city farm going in Brisbane about twenty five years ago the neither method was something we started doing there. Because well you couldn't actually get anything into the into the ground OUGHTA shovel. I think you used a pick. It would bounce back. Army way was up and that time every almost saying. Let's do it this way. Let's do it that way. And so we tried all these different methods and over the years. I've evolved this particular way that I create the ninety gats and I always do my God C. Span. I've used this method around the world and is kind of a bit of a twist to the way that I do that. I think it's an interesting part of it to explore because I think it makes all the difference. The four we embark on that journey. I just wanted to ask you for your definition of permaculture in case we have listeners here thinking what the heck were they talking about? Wolf Ame- permaculture is essentially all about design and my simplest response would be designed for regeneration designed sustainable living. It's about reconnecting with nature and living a more simple low impact life and surrounding ourselves with Wonderful Food. Great community doing things in a way that a regenerating the US Amer generating communities regenerating ourselves to. Because it's it's we. We're in a process now. I think where we need people. Who have they kind of? Healing the planet so permaculture Regeneration as well seems like your life and work are all about permaculture and I did read online that you discovered permaculture as a teenager so permaculture has been a large part of your life for quite some I I was at I remember at when I was in high school. I was sorry passionate in as a as a peace activist. There's a lot of things happening at that time. There was the I think. This should notable incident Though at the same time cities. We're getting captured by massive dust storm so the landcare movement was studying. There was all these massive movements happening around me at that time and I spent a bit of time kind of being a peace activist and an environmental activist. And I. I still call myself that but I got to a point where I was feeling that was fighting against something all the time. And and a lot of babble on you see me coming and turn the other way. She's going to start talking about that again. I E to I you know what I may not and so I. I was really looking for something that was that was a positive solution art. If it's not that we don't want that world what will do we want. I remember my my parents. Kinda brought us up in a really natural and and You know a really low fleet locate life and my dad was always reading about coach and he kept handing me this book. Saying you've gotta you've gotta read this. This is this is where it's at and I think it was because of that I ended up going doing Landscape architecture and Environmental Planning Union. I always worked it through what I was doing. And yes so it's kind of being there guiding and and I guess driving in a way what what I have done with my because it made so much sense. It's just really good common sense and sometimes we we overlook the things that seem to be the most simple approach thinking that they simplistic will actually think it's not. It's they often the simpler approaches. Which can have the more profound impacts on a mock sensible to more people? Yes definitely and you know you took your skills as a landscape architect and you created this verdant using permaculture as well but created this verdant gorgeous oasis. I believe your garden has over two hundred plants. Can you tell us a bit about your garden? Your climate and where it's located. Well I'm I'm in subtropics. I'm in the Jaffe of of Australia Dole. I'm on the East Coast and about halfway up the coast of Australia. So about one and a half north of Brisbane and a place called Crista waters which is a permaculture village. And I've been living here for about twenty years this this place. It's an amazing place. Actually because we have six hundred forty acres. That is the Chris. Awards and within that we have one AK- that we have the tower owned freehold title so most of the land is common land for forests for the Rypien Zion's this kangaroos hopping around everywhere and wallabies and platypus. In the rerun. The other day almost bumped into an occasional wounding through the bushes and it's this beautiful natural oasis with surrounded by National National Park. And so this we have a group of about two hundred people who live here and and and work together in different ways. You know From little cow collectives to cafes to All different sorts of things. It's quite an ECLECTIC group of people. And all different ages and backgrounds at last count sixteen different nationalities so krista waters in itself is an interesting place and it has received a United Nations World Habitat Award for demonstrating low impact. Sustainable ways of living I think was there the tag back in the nineties. And so within that context. If it's kind of like a place where people look to come and see what does Pimco Timothy Look like? What does it mean to leave a culture life? Because I think and that's the reason why I'm here I. I came here in the nineties because I realized in e conscious be talking about. Penta cultural people need to see it feel. It tasted touch it experience. It see how it kind of looks what does it. What does it actually man and I wanted to explore that too. So that's what I've tried to create he and we built around hyme And we've created Dot Gardens in the whole way of life that we have here to do that and it's and it's turned out to be this beautiful thing. I didn't have a full plan when I started. I had those guiding behind it and so of being able to create we have a higher Menara Garden and I work with gotten a debt. It's just been an starting out from that point. I actually think the no debt thing has been a huge thing. That's been able to free up a lot of the possibilities for creating this so Gradually just saving up a bit of money and and building a little bit more building a little bit more finding local resources Engaging with my friends and my family to help us build and my house is almost finished. It's finished enough. You

Morag Gamble Permaculture Education Institu Brisbane Youtube Founding Director Jill United States Queensland Australia Wolf Ame Dot Gardens Pimco Army Australia Dole United Nations World Habitat A Environmental Planning Union Australia Subtropics Crista Waters AK East Coast
"platypuses" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"platypuses" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Fifteen southbound past Carol canyon you'll find the right lane blocked Aaron in old town stop and go north found five between eight and noble Dr this report sponsored by the San Diego zoo safari park in February mission is free for guests sixty five and older at the San Diego zoo safari park don't miss the platypus learn more at S. E. safari park dot org follow mark Larson today at ten one AM seven sixty converting your four oh one K. or your IRA into a Roth IRA could potentially save you thousands of dollars in taxes and there are a number of other benefits that are not offered by your IRA or four oh one K. for example when you convert your retirement accounts into a Roth IRA you get tax free income in retirement there are no required minimum distributions and you can pass along the money in rock irate to your beneficiaries some restrictions do apply so the question is does converting to a Roth IRA makes sense for you your financial advisors can answer that question for you in our xcelerated retirement master assessment call eight eight eight nine nine four six two five seven schedule your there's no cost and what you learned could help you avoid forking over thousands of dollars in taxes to the IRS call us right now at eight eight eight nine nine four six two five seven eight eight eight nine nine four six two five seven or visit pure financial dot com you know everything about console or for your home it's much more than just the solar panels that a company is selling my friends a pal muscle roofing they've been fielding many calls due to the rain of people had solar systems installed by someone else and now the roof is leaking but the companies refused to help them that's why it's so important to your research pow muscle roofing educate the consumer to make a wise decision their consultants bend the time to show you how to that other companies and they'll discuss all the other details that should be considered before entering into.

How Steve Irwin's Family Is Saving Injured Australian Animals

Radio From Hell

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

How Steve Irwin's Family Is Saving Injured Australian Animals

"Stever one's family I remember him the the crocodile hunter his family still very involved in animal rescue and animal issues in Australia they have saved rescued entreated ninety thousand animals re injured in the wild fires and Ollie an orphaned platypus was patient number nine thousand so he was orphaned because his parents were consumed in the fire some our died in the fire so they do they are affected but they are they are more likely to survive smart because I was

Australia Ollie
The Rise and Fall of the El Camino

CarStuff

04:29 min | 1 year ago

The Rise and Fall of the El Camino

"A car that you particularly love? Kurt well Off off the top of my head El Camino comes to mind You've hit a pine the topic of today's episode so by the scenes things This is this is a weird way by scenes when you and I were working on our previous episode on the cars of breaking bad We also talked about the the spin off films. Breaking bad came out called El Camino and at some point. I don't know if we ever mentioned this on Air Man Dan but at some point we were both baffled that they're never been a car stuff episode on El Camino or as we call it here in the US the El Camino Camino which should be hilarious. Anyone who speaks a lick of Spanish. Because what we're saying is the the road you know it's like saying ATM machine or Orvin Number Ri- vehicle identification number number the El Camino man. By the way I'm GonNa Continue Calling the El Camino movie the The the alchemy of is a fascinating vehicle. It's it's sometimes like A. It's like a platypus of the road. You know what I mean. It's not quite fish. It's not quite foul. It's something different. Something unique a mix tape and you and I have some personal stories about the El Camino but I have the following proposition. Why don't we start with the origin story of the actual vehicle vehicle which may surprise some people some eighties? Babies may be surprised. How old this vehicle actually is? El Camino is introduced. The first generation was introduced in nineteen eighteen fifty nine. It was basically a response to Ford's Ranchero But even before that in Australia in the thirties a created this this vehicle known as the Coupe Utility. So the idea of a car that had some of the attributes of a truck The idea that was around for a while before they started showing up in America and even in the early Fifties Chevy and Ford made light-duty drums like the Chevy's made a truck called the task force. It was a light duty pickup truck but the El Camino brought in some of that I guess the elegant lines of the late fifties and early sixties the chrome trim some of the more visually appealing aspects of the sedan's at the time yet you can look at some pictures of the first generation El Camino and you can clearly see the aesthetic. You're talking about here. Kirk I do. I have to also confess. I have a weakness for those Those flowing lines that space-age retro-futurism so common in Ford's and Chevy's of the fifty s and into the sixties A. We do have a previous episode on car stuff about utes in Australia and their origin origin for anybody wants to check that out. There's a really cool quote that you found about the youth as well of from the like the way it was marketed in Australia. Stralia right yes so It was Farmer's wife in Victoria Australia she desired a car that quote to go to church in on Sunday in which to carry our pigs tomorrow on Mondays. And so that encapsulates the entire concept here. You know what I mean the the idea that instead of buying two separate vehicles for two separate specific task right you can buy something something that fulfils Both of those functions. This is a question that will come back to right. Because what we're what we're GONNA WANNA see here is going to be ultimately a battle between some of those functions like is a daily driver or your. You know your good-looking car right. Your Business car. Is that the same thing as your haller your work vehicle. The folks who made the Cameo carrier and the folks who made the El Camino and the voter made the utes in general. Were there answer due to that was yes it can be the same thing. Forward the future. What a time to be alive?

El Camino Camino Ford Chevy Australia Utes Kurt Orvin Number Ri United States Victoria Australia Kirk America Farmer
Blanco Brown on being discovered as a child

Bobbycast

08:56 min | 1 year ago

Blanco Brown on being discovered as a child

"When all of you guys are in an apartment I get that to Iceland with all my cousins you just live where you can live right everybody's trying to to to have enough money to pay rent sometimes you gotta make your move together a bunch bunches lived in a trailer for a while much of a bunch of apartment so like I get that and also know me I was the kid in the group that was I'm going to get out and I'm GONNA use education like that was my thing it sounds like yours was music music way early yeah the first deal now seven you what am I doing I was seven years old and and how did that come about and how did you get to a place where someone could see you at seven to go I like that kid man that's a good question I I never really got to say I never asked that question I just know that we were were recording in new records like just like that I just remember who it seven years old discovers you it was new star Rex Guy by the name of Anthony Richardson an owner if he discovers somebody took us to him you know what I'm saying I really can't remember how it happened you're seven years old yeah I just know we were singing recording practicing going to school we by the way me my brothers okay so you were you guys like in a singing group group how many were there called times three because it was three of us are brothers and it was just the X. would apostrophe S. three where were you in the age group of the three brothers I'm in the Middle Okay Yeah and so you got with the goal of of what I know you're only seven but looking back were they trying to break you guys as like Jackson five but the X. as the three more so like another bad the creation can meet some singing brothers because we really saying like you know what I'm saying but Jackson five it was that would have been harder doesn't file there man they weren't legislator after they were legendary though they had to even start at yeah but I'm just saying like by the time we you were yeah they were already like Jackson Five. ABC's good like another bell vo to all those groups were around that time to where all you guys just singing because hip hop stuff to just thinking and I was the wraparound the group so wait were you rapping I was like the the the but if from immature who are the sexy talking I did the sexist seven and eight I'm telling you you know all this time I've been playing around Oh yeah I've been playing with my gi Joe's and pogs girl and I've been thinking about you I know I'm nine man that is hilarious I know I'm in third grade girl but I'm drinking milk yeah so that's kind of how growing up I was I didn't how to confidence to sing so they will give me the parts while I was more like mellow talking Canada rapin Canada singing Adams found my singing voice until like fifteen sixteen so you're fifteen sixteen are you still in school yeah definitely graduate high school yet okay so you're singing all the way through high school all the we are you known as that kid the kid in high school like we're all noticed something I was nerd I was known as the singer Okay so you're singing all the way through and as you go through up until about twelve th grade at that point what is your biggest break before you graduate high school Aw I mean we met with a guy named Dr Massenburg he was over at motown and we were about to do a deal met him at the Intercontinental Embark Eh right by mall he looked me my brothers and my mother in the face a y'all have no words Mama they've been able to take care everything we won't sign wing you sat like two weeks later found out he was no longer with Motown town that was one of the moments that was like a huge moment and then do you think he lied to your do you think he got fired in the process of signing you on if you got fire of he just some happen where he just left but I just know the deal didn't happen right and after that outkast we don't want to deal with outkast you know it was you know at that term life they would just a dope group whose from Atlanta like Guy and I remember me with them and they wanted to sign my younger brother to a solo deal so he's going to do a solo deal and then you know me and my older brother like okay cool ooh that'd be fine once he gets all the way where he needs to be he he brings home and then that didn't go away we plan to either you know what I'm saying they're signing him he ended up signing to a whole another deal and he came up with a song or a few songs and yeah I mean what what what when you meet with outkast do you actually meet with Andrei Big Boy Yep like the guy show up and they're like all right this is the plant so they were doing things outside side of outcasts way early even before they blew up they were they will Purple Label and my dad actually just takes me that pitchy like two days ago and my phone like of us in the same room with them without shirts on taking pieces with them yeah so that didn't work out you graduate High School Yep and what's the plan then for you musically 'cause high school probably big deal to graduate high school what's for me where am I hold my whole life I was told you know stick to my art I went to school for art I got a Bachelor of fine arts in so we're not college though from high school to College Okay Okay so you then you decide to go to school where are you going to school where did you go to school I went to you okay and your thought when you go to college is Blank Finish College or learn music or make friends and my really my thought would college was be the person that went to college and if that don't work out just note that music is always number one either way I went down just you know pretty much as their are had degree and what did you study in school art so you study art but you're doing music yup okay so you're studying well what does it what does study aren't though what does that mean I mean I mean you go through all our theory in like paintings yet I sculptures like an op the not even music like you're a whole different track I I did I did all that like sculpturing and websites from dream we would Mac with three D. and do all that so even less than digital art stuff too yep and then if you were to have this let's just journey off a bit and let's say the music stub you end up getting an art degree if you were to pursue that what would you have done an art Oh man you know cartoon network or something yeah voice overs with some animations I could tell just Bella anything you can yeah a Squirrel Squirrel Squirrel pretty good duck one one one one more minute okay let's do more does it isn't an easy one how about a platypus because we have no idea what applaud sounds like I don't know okay maybe but earnestly XLII music was always the forefront but I didn't have confidence to do it I didn't have the confidence in myself so I just I just wanted to figure out how to be a part of it I started engineer straight out of college I started engineering so like the sound engineering so if you're listening right now what that is you had a computer and and you're basically adjusting the levels of everything to break it down like a five years old so your your engineering music and where do you learn those skills to be a music engineer one of my homies hey daryl showed me how to use the controls twenty four and I start messing around with it and then next thing you know I was engineering engineering recording for the Wow Gospel compilations and stuff dip set itself taught yet your friend just said here here here's the kind of how to do it then you just took an indigenous

Jackson Iceland Rex Guy Anthony Richardson ABC Seven Years Five Years Two Weeks Two Days Milk
"platypuses" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

SciShow Tangents

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on SciShow Tangents

"Epidemic threats to platypuses do not have stomachs. There Suffolk is just connect to their intestines somewhat. You said Lee, or three pot his poop once per week, and it can weigh as much as a third of their body weight. I'm immediately drawn to big dukes. But I wondering what do platypuses eat like the eat kind of food that would allow that they wouldn't need to digest that much. I think that pot possesses eat, do you know that they like little warming and bugs that they find in the soil? That's what I think, like occur, small grasses small, it's like a bird like diet. Do they vegetation to? I wanna say, yes, but if the vegetation, they would have to poop more often than no, it is for me, my Cheez left food. I'm just trying to imagine what additional processes would be required to make the no stomach thing work stomach. Is mostly not for absorption? It's for breaking down. Do they chew with that, Bill that heart of the Bill does because if they could chew it up your good? Maybe they would need a stomach. They're also things like chambers that some animals have like a gizzard in a bird, when they swallow rocks than they like rumble around that digests stuff are part of this is related the birds at all. Tenderness though. Birds have a duck Bill. Yeah. Of the of the words in the name duck Bill pot, only one of them is a kind of animal and its bird. I think that platypuses do not have stomachs. I also think that, that makes me think they know something I'm gonna big dukes. The answer is part of push his stomach. National and smart. Oh, we should all those aim one. We could have deprived Sam his point that I didn't want a repeat of the molasses pipeline. Pipeline. I told somebody about that recently when I was in Monterey California, the aquarium, and I was like let me tell you about the molasses fine. And they weren't amazed at all. They were like. Yeah. In Monterey that we have we used to have sardine pipelines. Dead certain. Yes, catch the sardines, on the ships, and then, like pipe them into the sardine-canning is a whole new YouTube channel weird weird pipes. Fight. All right. So let me explain some of these two pilot pussies. Do not have stomachs many fish, also don't have stomachs, and scientists sink that is for kind of a similar reason platypus, his deal, a lot in water fish, obviously, dwell on water and the eat some more things so platypuses e like shrimp, and worms and stuff at the bottom of the water that they live in, and while fish are eating an wall platypuses are eating. They probably eat a lot of dirt, and mud and stuff. And that scientists think this is just a possibility. They're not really sure that the mud would neutralize stomach acid anyway. So just enough of that happening to their stomachs because I think that they did use to have stomachs, but enough of that happening just visually made it so that their stomachs withered away into nothing but they aren't really sure about that. And they just depend on the enzymes in their intestines doing and then the other thing was that things like crabs and crawfish also have a lot of calcium carbonate in them, which is also an acid Neutralizer. So how big are their dukes? Okay. So I. Probably this normal. But the dukes one is slotted slots only about once a week, and they're huge boobs that take them forever to get out. There's a very good video that all linked to in time. Yeah kinda. This lady holding this very sad, looking sloth and poop, just coming out, so slow and ladies like, oh, no. She feels really bad for it. So they poop and it's one third, their total body Cowley. It takes them like a month today. Jess things, and the way that they poop is kind of a mystery to science. They chosen to watch climbs down their tree onto the grand poop on the ground, which is like the most dangerous thing that they could do they should just poop off the tree. And scientists aren't really sure why some people think torii..

Epidemic Monterey Suffolk Lee YouTube Monterey California Jess Sam
Effects of Thyroid Hormone on Cardiac Function

60-Second Science

02:29 min | 2 years ago

Effects of Thyroid Hormone on Cardiac Function

"Gathered the hearts of offense lizard, a Little Brown bat and naked tailed Armadillo and dozens of others we try to get them from zoo. But I'll fortunate we the student walkout very well. We couldn't get any samples even when dynamo die could get heart developmental biologist at the university of California, San Francisco, he says they had more success obtaining specimens from the jars of natural history, museums, but the reason for this biological scavenger hunt Wong and his colleagues wanted to examine the number of chromosomes contained in heart cells across the animal kingdom, because there's a curious phenomenon in our hearts, which is that most of the human body cells are diploid, meaning two sets of chromosomes one from each parent, but the lion's share of our heart cells are actually Polly -ployed, meaning two or more copies for mom two or more copies from dad. What one and his team found looking at that collection of hearts is that the proportion of Polly played cells in a heart goes up as you go from fish to lizards to him fibia NHS to transitional species like platypuses to mammals, the reason that finding might matter to us is that recent studies in mice, and zebra fish of shown that hearts with more diploid cells, like zebra, fishes are actually able to regenerate and heal themselves. Hearts with more. Polly -ployed sells like mice and humans cannot. So what makes a heart have more Polly played cells and thus less chance of regenerating costume. Oh costume. But one answer once team found is that thyroid hormone, the same hormone that regulates metabolism and makes us warm blooded creatures might be to blame. Because when they added extra thyroid hormone disease officials tanks. They're tiny hearts were no longer able to regenerate. And conversely when they engineered mice to have hearts that were insensitive to thyroid hormone, the mouse hearts could regenerate back after injury heart function, which is mainly measure contracted the of the heart. We can see to heart function improve or would tie off the injury. Welcome to my cannot improve. The results are in the journal science as for fixing human hearts, perhaps manipulating thyroid hormone levels could be a start. We know regularly in federal home alone, not sufficient to cure, heart disease. Lisa for promote a har-, Richard. And completely. And if we can figure out other major regulator of this process, we might be in a. Better shape.

Polly -Ployed San Francisco NHS Wong University Of California Lisa Richard
Warm-Blooded Animals Lost Ability to Heal the Heart

60-Second Science

02:45 min | 2 years ago

Warm-Blooded Animals Lost Ability to Heal the Heart

"This is science Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Dodd yada. It sounds like a witch's recipe gathered the hearts of offense lizard, a Little Brown bat and naked tailed Armadillo and dozens of others we try to get them from zoo. But I'll fortunate we the student walkout very well. We couldn't get any samples even when dynamo die could get heart developmental biologist at the university of California, San Francisco, he says they had more success obtaining specimens from the jars of natural history, museums, but the reason for this biological scavenger hunt Wong and his colleagues wanted to examine the number of chromosomes contained in heart cells across the animal kingdom, because there's a curious phenomenon in our hearts, which is that most of the human body cells are diploid, meaning two sets of chromosomes one from each parent, but the lion's share of our heart cells are actually Polly -ployed, meaning two or more copies for mom two or more copies from dad. What one and his team found looking at that collection of hearts is that the proportion of Polly played cells in a heart goes up as you go from fish to lizards to him fibia NHS to transitional species like platypuses to mammals, the reason that finding might matter to us is that recent studies in mice, and zebra fish of shown that hearts with more diploid cells, like zebra, fishes are actually able to regenerate and heal themselves. Hearts with more. Polly -ployed sells like mice and humans cannot. So what makes a heart have more Polly played cells and thus less chance of regenerating costume. Oh costume. But one answer once team found is that thyroid hormone, the same hormone that regulates metabolism and makes us warm blooded creatures might be to blame. Because when they added extra thyroid hormone disease officials tanks. They're tiny hearts were no longer able to regenerate. And conversely when they engineered mice to have hearts that were insensitive to thyroid hormone, the mouse hearts could regenerate back after injury heart function, which is mainly measure contracted the of the heart. We can see to heart function improve or would tie off the injury. Welcome to my cannot improve. The results are in the journal science as for fixing human hearts, perhaps manipulating thyroid hormone levels could be a start. We know regularly in federal home alone, not sufficient to cure, heart disease. Lisa for promote a har-, Richard. And completely. And if we can figure out other major regulator of this process, we might be in a. Better shape. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Christopher Don. Yata?

Polly -Ployed Christopher Dodd Christopher Don San Francisco University Of California NHS Wong Lisa Richard Sixty Seconds
"platypuses" Discussed on Material

Material

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on Material

"But was not a complete success. We can agree as a tablet or as a notebook upbring system. So that was project mercury in terms of like desktop sort of stuff and we've got project few show coming up in the near future which is Google zone. We are throwing away. We're not Not even even giving giving. we're not even using Lennox. We are starting from the absolute ground up, creating an absolute not just twenty-first-century operating system but mid twenty first century operating system. So maybe Chromos is like these Gemini capsules that are little bit ungainly and their little bit weird. And I suppose there actually were plans to adapt. A Gemini capsule to do like a lunar mission. If Apollo was a whole failure. But you know, it only kind of almost what a worked and it had inject had ejection seats instead of an escape tower. Because they thought that here's something we could play with. But definitely would have killed both astronauts, if they were ever used all the where it's it's gonna get a little bit more ungainly before it teaches us what what teaches Google what they need to build for for project. Fuchsia? It's so it can be a little bit of a platypus while still being an important and useful thing. Everybody to be down on the platypus. Awesome. What is not awesome about a platypus? Kevin Smith had a huge rant about was probably hard. When that happened fair fair enough. I am just again the nerd in me is just incredibly excited for all of these things. This is what I love. This is the this is stuff that I love it brings me back to good old times before smartphones. Before this world was as tech world was as complicated as it is. Now, you know, how complicated it is not only that I have to install the Samsung gear Samsung wear app, I also had to install the wear a plug in for the buds specifically sorry, again, just remind you Google, I happen to have an example. This is called this is called a headphone plug and you into. Stay in there and music goes into from the phone to your ears, and you don't have to install any set any software, and you don't have to agree to have data Philex sold. Well, maybe maybe I actually want to hear the soundtrack to west side story without being notified of who's posting something on Instagram. Mom has sent you. A message. Medika? No joke ahead. So the only thing I don't like about my Google pixel USB see buds is that. I have to remember to turn off the feature where helpfully explains to you. Like being okay. So there's a notification nor that and then ten seconds later when I press the button to did you know that by pressing and holding top I can read. No, I was really thinking that I was listening to this really dramatic part of this podcast where someone was finally coming to felt his so they've made a breakthrough on their mental illness and how it has been affecting their lives and their work. But the thank you for remove for totally dispelling this veil of motion connection happening. Everything. Goodness. Oh boy. It's it's been it's been a weekend. We're recording this on the night of Wednesday. It's technically morning for Andy. And it's been a week, folks. Thanks for being here. With us clues to another fifteen minutes. I can get one more run orders in. Yes. So this has been another episode of material after him, boom, boom, boom. Both Arcus regularly scheduled programing Harry Belafonte has entertained us with stories of his recent press tour. Niven has been painting. Portraits of all of our guests over the course of the taping. So that'll that'll do it for this weekend. Anything especially wonderful coming up the next week that you want people to know about. Yes. You know, if you'd like to support me, you can go to my website at Florence dot com. Or you can find me on Twitter at Twitter dot com slash. Ooh.

Google Niven Andy Samsung Twitter Florence dot com Chromos Arcus Apollo Philex Kevin Smith Harry Belafonte fifteen minutes ten seconds
"platypuses" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

The Steve Deace Show

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on The Steve Deace Show

"So the platypus is new here. But that's not how this works. That's not how any of this works. Here's how it works. The way. It works is the left gets to do whatever they want to whoever they want. Whenever they want. You pay you pay you pay you pay you Bank. You pay you pay you pay your bay, and you pay some more, right? It's five dollar you Hala every every day. That's what it is. That's how government works left does whatever it wants whenever it wants to whomever wants, right? And you pay you pay five dollar you Hala. We elected bunch of Republicans to do something about it. Of which they never will. However, it keeps people like me in -ployed because we get to continue to click bait the cultural marxists are making us pay with content that gets shooed viewership. Because most of America, regardless of how they vote hates this crap. And so it helps us to grow our audience and conservative media by pointing out all of the bias in fascism and tyranny and oppressiveness on college campuses. All right. And that's our reward is we get to make more money in conservative media. So we can further subsidize the tyranny, they then give us the the cannon fodder of content to write about and broadcast about in order to get you guys to watch into to listen to us. That's so for you're new here. Platypus cafe is. Right. And you're not really sure, hey, man. How's this whole house? This whole politics thing work. How's it work? What's how's it? What's it? Do. How what's the what is the system was the swamp? What are the establishments? What's the unit? Brow? How's it? How's this whole thing? How's it? What makes it tick? Now, you know. Happy. I can't possibly add to that on the cynicism front right now. That was a tour to force I can't smiling. So happy..

Platypus cafe -ployed America five dollar
"platypuses" Discussed on Clockwise

Clockwise

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on Clockwise

"Now, there's a balance here too, right? Because so much of our technology now is so complicated. And so small that it's really hard to actually fix them. Like the number of things you can replace them stuff in in an iphone. But like would you get down to the nitty gritty, it's really hard to fix some of the things that go wrong because like we're dealing with things on microscopic level sometimes but like. You know, I've got I've got a MAC book air. It's battery is going. I know I can replace the battery ever played solid state drives the knees. I put a new hard drive in a MAC mini like I used to work in IT. All this stuff is like like aunt tinkerer. I like playing around with these things, but I agree too with Georgia that like the whole commercial aspect is is troubling, right? Like, we do have this tendency now to just think like out toss it out by new one like it's dead, and it's hard to combat against that. But certainly the price tags on it. Sometimes make a good argument against it. So I I want us to be able to do it as an option as much as possible. But I also understand that companies are trying to engineer these things smaller and smaller tolerances. And that means making trade offs and sometimes those trade offs come unfortunately in the fair in the frame of response repairability. So these things are sort of a give and take there too, which I get but thanks for your thoughts on that. Really? Appreciate it. Let's move on to our last topic which comes from Georgia. Okay. So in a world with black mirror altered carbon minority reports. There's a company in the Hugh k that is trying to micro chip their staff. They're saying it's a feature. We microchip our pets. Do you think that microchipping adults will ever be acceptable? And have you ever thought about doing it or any use cases yourself? Wow. So I. What growing up my I was super super super religious like my family's very religious. So this kind of thing would scare the living pants off of certain members of my family and would have at the time for me. Now, not so much like even even microchipping. Pets was scary for them. Both of my dogs are micro-chipped, and it is fantastic. Because that means that if one of them gets picked up they can get scanned and my information is there they can get a hold of me. And then they can also tell that the dog is spayed or neutered. So they won't try to perform that surgery on the dog. Having it already Cincinnati. I've been done. That's fantastic. I would like folks to know that I've been spayed neutered too. So maybe I'll get numbers getting. I love I love the idea that you know, we have our phones, and they have a lot of information on them and Google and apple and other companies have put forth this technology like with the iphone if you put it into emergency mode. You can see if someone who's put in their information for their health. That says I take these medicines I'm allergic to these medicines. These are the contact details, etc. There are situations where someone cannot respond and there are situations where someone may not have their phone nearby. And in those cases, something more permanently attached. I think is a cool idea. But I think that it would have to be something that is completely voluntary. And is something that I mean, that's the beginning in the individ. So couldn't be something mandated. I think that would that would really freak people out. But certainly something where I could say, okay. I know I have these drug allergies and these certain issues, so someone can just like swipe thing over the tip of my finger nail..

Georgia Cincinnati engineer Google apple
"platypuses" Discussed on Clockwise

Clockwise

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on Clockwise

"The I'm more show and just a fabulous wonderful around person, George. Dow was back Georgia. Hey, I think I should talk a little bit cooler just to to deal with how cool aunt sounds good. Going to talk a little bit lower. Gosh. More. Listen over here. We're all professionals here. Clearly all right now, we're all doing our voices. I'll go ahead and kick things off, you know, how the show works for people for tectonics et cetera. My question there was a recent Recode report that says that voice Tech- hasn't really found. It's true calling the idea that you know, we have all of these things, and they sort of are glomming onto the idea of talking with your voice. But really all we're doing is just like building voice as a new interface for things that we already do. But until voice kind of does its own thing. It's not there. My question for you is do you think voice tech is the future? Or are. We still looking for that next sort of interface interaction tack aunt we'll start with you. I think it is the future. And I think it's the future because these companies are trying to make it the future. I don't think is. A requirement or anything. But I do see the good use cases for for people that have assessable concerns issue. So I get it. We're not there yet. But I do like what I see from some some of the different tech companies out there with harder trying to integrate voice into I everyday day lives other than speaking. Yeah. I agree. I don't think I would say qualified. It's a future. I don't think it's the only interface that will be dealing with going forward. We're not even on even on Star Trek. They still had like buttons that they pressed every once in a while and use their voice all the time. But I think it's it's not quite there yet. I can't said like, it's we it's made some things easier. But as anybody who has an echo or any of these other smart devices. No once you go past a certain depth with like the complexity of your requests, you start to get in over your head very very quickly. So it's great for certain quick shortcuts. Like, I still use my eco every day to check the weather or to set timers and stuff like that. None of those are complicated tasks, I would love it. If there was a more intelligent construct in there that could act more like a real assistant in like, I come home until like, oh, you got some messages here, which like me turn these lights on and cetera. Like it's getting closer to that. But we haven't yet gotten to the point where it's more sophisticated than say, probably your pets. So that's kind of my feeling on it. What about you? Well, you know when it works. It's sublime me casualty requesting something and Siri taking care of my needs. It's lovely when it doesn't work. It's like this violent explosion like arguing with a belligerent platypus on steroids, by the way, I'm the platypus in this scenario, of course, is calm and serene through it all which really ends up just making me so angry. I start calling Siri names that I cannot repeat. So use your imagination. You know, you've done it. I'm not the only one..

voice Tech Siri Dow George Georgia
"platypuses" Discussed on The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

"Even you don't want to do that. Right. So I'm like, I'll do the platypus had never been done. Cool. I'll come up with the show, and I did this little platypus drawing. This is before finished and for by the way, I want to be very clear I thought you were leading up to that. Came out. In fact, it pains me because facing I got to do the platypus and I never did. And here's why. So I did this platypus. I drew this little sad sack platypus, and I called him splat, and I was so excited and Mike. This has been I remember walking into the meeting, and there's a whole art to pitching a show to not just you walk in and explain the show kind of going to go in there like a showman. If you guys are afraid a nervous in front of people want to pitcher show. Learn how to pitch a show get in front of your friends, you know, practice on people. So I go, and I have the drawing backwards in a sitting across from this lady exempt from Nickelodeon. I said, okay, many creatures have been done through the animation world. But one hasn't been done. The platypus, and I turned it around and she starts cracking up. She saw my drawing so you kind of build it up, but she loves her. She's all my God. I love this. What's this show? And I told her I was a little a little platypus who was a stuntman at a movie studio who got splatted every five seconds, right? Oh my gosh. I love that. We're going fast track. This. I wanted on the earned six months now. That's exciting. Right. It's pretty rare to right. Sure is Tony. I'm just gonna feed you. That's right. You're Tony Ryan guy. That's all right. So I'm like, wow. This is exciting and show six months go by show year goes by no show. My daughter's in fourth grade now she's in sixth grade dead winter show going to be out. Leone? So it took it took three years of development on splat A-plus going over it. And over it changing the colors changing the characters I writing scripts hiring new writers firing writers bringing people in. And after three years, they call me. And finally said I'm not gonna pick up the show. Thanks. It was like what was bone was bone. Crunching it was a crushing. It was just so destroying it was like, I can't believe this because I put so much my heart and soul into this show. And I really had to lean on God a net situation because God basically told me don't worry about it. Now, it's money in the Bank for later. See when you plant a seed, it's going to grow it will grow somewhere. So after twelve years, I've gotten the rights back splatter. Plus, I'm gonna make it on my own network someday. So there you go. Yeah. But..

Tony Ryan Leone Nickelodeon Mike three years six months five seconds twelve years
"platypuses" Discussed on Ask Me Another

Ask Me Another

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on Ask Me Another

"The platypus is very strange animal. It's a mammal, but it lays eggs. It's like a duck in a beaver, an otter all in one, and only one sex of platypus is venomous is the female platypus the one that's venomous Jonathan, your first. Well, knowing what I do about evolutionary biology. From that Google search in your life. On the one hand, the male is traditionally the sex that goes and fights platypuses fight. I don't even know, but then also there's a thing where sometimes the female has sort of protective measure. So I would say I'm gonna say, yes, that is the female under these that the the there isn't a lot of fighting in platypus land. And mostly it is defense mechanism that is volved to protect the platypus. Eggs grows myself out. All right. Well, you know what just refund? I would say female because if I were part duck beaver. Otter, maybe I kind of am I would be poisonous, right? Yeah, exactly all the things that people want to need poison, but to be different. I'm going to be like. I think the mail would probably be so threatened by the entire planet pie world. I'm gonna say, no, I think the male platypus is the venomous one, right? Let's see what the magic eight ball things. Signs point to. Yes. So Jonathan said, yes. Paul said, yes, I said, no, the answer is no the male platypus is. Apparently the platypus is one of very few venomous mammals and venom is delivered by Spurs on the male platypus hind limbs. More and more disguised learn about tiny baby ones on YouTube though. So cute. Here's your next question. Do the French consumed per capita more butter than Americans? Fear up? Aren't American's like ten percent corn and soy or something like that..

Otter Jonathan Google YouTube Spurs Paul ten percent one hand
"platypuses" Discussed on Do By Friday

Do By Friday

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on Do By Friday

"It's called the platypus it's called the platypus got it myself when i'm with you i'm frustrated that everybody was to want i talked to my sled problems here that i just didn't know could be it's backpack has been voted to me that's we're gonna get to that in a minute that's my bullshit it's your afrin that's my afrin an holy shit you got like a little dispensary in right my little north north face bags ooh yes well that's that's the other a checkbook yeah nice why oh okay this platypus wire by you accept the personal pence from japan i have problems everything's confusing my bag is weird so gosh your mass okay hot miss this does not work it does not okay it doesn't even even if you can't maneuver sport oh i also have the tile sport that has always doesn't work i'm telling you it does not have you how long have you been tile user have you started getting the one year nasty grams yet oh yes i don't i'm ready oh sofres collapse it will collapse it you need the top the top have x as sort of a container yes it's sort of okay what is it it looks like a flashlight it's the soft rubbery to alex alex is rolling it up like a little push play to leader ultralight collapsible water bottle keep i keep throwing it you just talk it into the table like you're trying to deny the point tennis.

alex alex tennis japan one year
"platypuses" Discussed on Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on Fuel Hotel Marketing Podcast

"Device that you can shop the robust that might be when they decided nothing else on this episode that that is that you need to be able to have electric production of airbus so one thing you will notice right as we're talking about google were talking about you know serb changes were talking about in a lot of stuff outside of just that the traditional algorithm reich is that always used to be when we talking about google it was always algorithm algorithm we talk about penguin and we talk about panda and these big changes sweeping changes that change how things were ranked that's not how google operates anymore they don't come out with these big updates to make a big big disruption it's constant iterative testing and refining and a lot of that is because of rain brain becoming so important the tweet king the metrics that he's looking at the tweet tweaking the inputs but the trusting the fact that the ai is smarter than the people at determining one is the best fit and they're doing that by looking at consumer behaviour in an understanding what is a good match so ghana the days where we see these big on this day it's you know when honestly the seo dead yet esi will platypus did exist the platypuses vic if you if you search for fuel travel platt plus i think you'll probably find the article we wrote about google platypus which was my favorite algorithm update ever happened to be released on april first um but it's variance tainting on the list.

airbus google ghana platypuses vic
"platypuses" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

KSKA 91.1 FM

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

"Little ones stay in there for two to three months after which there ejected by their mother because they have these prickly spines they suck milk off the for from a kind of sprinkler system milk is just secreted from memory glance into the for and their weaned at about six months and head off to look for ants and termites on their own kidneys are the most widespread animal in australia they found everywhere from the tropical forests to the hut sandy desert to the alpine mountain tops to the cool southern australian coast the area where i am this morning they're very common today the only threat to them really is the automobile tickets smacked while they're crossing the highways they are a remarkable creature the kidnap two the platypus i guess i was i looked away and i've looked back just to see the swirls on the water they circles disturbed wires if somebody had thrown a pebble into it but that was my platypus again not any more than fifteen feet away from me it comes up again it bob's upon the surface and floats here looking right at me with its teardrop i it's dark teardrop i now through the water i can see the black clad equis beak rolls down into the water disappears account australia he is a miracle with its refuge for animals like the platypus that just rolled up again in from you just stayed on the surface for about five seconds and went back down again as if a pebble had in thrown into the water now leaving the circle of bubbles all it remains supply is evidence that this amazing ancient one of a kind animal here in this pond in front of me on a sunny there it is against his flips over flips on the surface and disappears again down scuttling around in the bottom of the pond where i can't see it looking for its food and i can imagine it now just a swimming around right in front of me and there it is again slips up in front of me it just for a second exploding turning flips rolls down oh man i can't tell you how exciting it is to see a wild platypus drifting now 25 feet away from me tiny.

bob australia milk fifteen feet five seconds three months six months 25 feet
"platypuses" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

KSKA 91.1 FM

02:34 min | 3 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

"Of the whip bird or the call all of the woodford and hit a whips i don't know what more to tell you about it if you can hear it in the background you'll know what i'm talking about you and also the coursing of the australian magpies back there but what i really want to see in when i'm just feeling so urgent to see on the perfect mirror of this pond his day is the site of a platypus coming up no such luck so far platypuses were hunted almost two extinction judging by what i've seen of platypuses pushes this warning it's hard to imagine how anybody did that but apparently they were hunted almost to extinction they were regarded as a nuisance by fishermen but they also have a wonderful luxurious for there's the whip bird there now totally protected in fairly common in australia they're vulnerable to water pollution to the drainage of ponds and damning of waterways which keeps them from moving around and they're also sometimes hit by cars as they tried to move from one pond to the next the remarkable plan of course is not the only member of this family of creatures as i was mentioning to you earlier the monotreme 's there's another one and it's called the spiny can't either or a could known more commonly in australia these days this spiny aunt itre they look like a small porcupine or a hedgehog or really i would say a beanbag covered with thick very sharp spines which are modified hairs the he could not has soft under for ways about twelve pounds when it's fully grown so it's a lot bigger than a platypus over they're hopping along the sandbar on the other side of the creek is a rabbit you undoubtedly heard about rabbits being a big problem on australia they are now controlled selfcontrol by a disease but we do see them one hopping along the sandbar there in early sanoh two of them the kidnappers roughly the size of a rounded off football and you see them sometimes especially in sandy areas you see them along the.

woodford australia football twelve pounds
"platypuses" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

KSKA 91.1 FM

03:01 min | 3 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

"To sense feigned electrical discharges through pours around the edges of that big so for example a flipping crayfish will make week electrical impulses by the movements of its body in the platypus can sense those impulses and really wishing that the platypus that is supposed to live in this plan would get busy and start feeling so maybe hour get to lay eyes on it they eat up to half of their body weight in one feeding session eating crayfish worms insects clams tab polls keep their prey in cheek pouches that they carry to the surface and then they crush their food against corny pads inside their mouth they have no teeth the male platypus has uh sharper curve defame like spurs inside his hind legs at the ankle they're connected to venom glands up near the knees of the male platypus and they have a very strong poison especially during the mating season of poison it strong enough to kill a dog actually fishermen sometimes gets done weather unhooking platypuses that have been caught on their hook and this can cause extreme pain can last for days swell up 'cause the hander arm to swell up three or four times normal size but it eventually goes away one man who was badly stung by a platypus was unable to use his arm for about ten years after this injury there's no known treatment for the sting of a platypus why does the platypus have these poisonous spurs well it must not be for defence although is used obviously that way if if the platypus gets grab but only the mail has it not the female so why in the world these venomous spurs the poison increases quite a bit during the meeting season so is that part of the competition for meets between male platypuses nobody knows for sure twelve to fourteen days after they meet the female platypus lays one two three eggs in a berl very long grow up to sixty feet long the little nursing chamber is lined with soft vegetation entrance to it is plugged she nestles the female platypus nestles the eggs between her body and her curled tail up against her belly and they hatch intend to twelve days milk loses from glands onto the further in the tiny little baby platypuses succo of the milk off the firmer of their mothers they're very very tiny embryonic working little critters and they don't develop there for for some weeks after.

milk fourteen days twelve days sixty feet ten years
"platypuses" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

KSKA 91.1 FM

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

"And a half pound so it's the size of a not very substantial cat it also has webbed feet with big clause for digging because platypuses plight of high however you say it live in boroughs along the edges of extremes like this one and they dig those boroughs with these big splayed out pause with the hefty clause very thick brown for as you would expect for a for a water living mammal the bill really does look like it's been the on to the animals the plight of puts his a solitary creature lows several may live close to each other i'm hoping for just one in this placid pond now as the sun begins to rise and to touch the tops of the uk leftist trees across this on for me eucalyptus trees have a wonderful quality of fair white long white branches and white trunks being exposed because the leaves are perched at the ends the very ends of these branches as i said earlier at like an umbrella so that you see the white skeleton of the tree it's very very beautiful anyway i'm hoping that at least one platypus will show itself in this pond beside the highway up the coast of australia are shy elusive very very hard to see mostly active at dawn and at dusk a hyperactive animal i watched platypuses in a tank in the sydney zoo and they were an animal that absolutely could not sit still bing bing bing down diving sculling paddling constant motion in the water ray dive for seoul varying periods of time sometimes a dive and surface constantly lay on the surface for ten seconds or so dive for twenty to forty seconds up to eighty dives per hour very strong swimmers they paddle with their splayed out front paws they use their hind legs entail mostly as a rudder although they they use their tail also to roll down in dive they're very best animals in the water they also may come out of the water from time to time and forage for worms in wet ground or waddled from one lakers dream to another one they also allegedly makes soft noises growl when they've been disturbed when they feed close their eyes and their nostrils so they can't see and they can't smell they can't here underwater so how in the world are they find their food well apparently it's mostly by touch with their sensitive rubbery beak and also a remarkable ability.

australia sydney zoo lakers uk seoul forty seconds ten seconds
"platypuses" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

KSKA 91.1 FM

03:05 min | 3 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on KSKA 91.1 FM

"Platypus and the related one called the spiny and eater or kidnap more about that later they lay eggs they have instead of the usual equipment for eliminating waste and reproduction they have a common ducked for all of that which is called a clo wakar their body temperature is much lower than the other mammals about 80 degrees and they have skeletal characteristics that are more similar to reptiles birds and to the other mammals course laying eggs puts them right in there in concert with the birds and the reptiles are some of the reptiles any way some reptiles give birth to live young the platypus only lives along the east coast of australia from the tropical lowlands fire up in the north down to the chillier southern coast they live also up into the high mountains into places where it even snows and the winter time so they're very adaptable creature but they have a very small range they live in slowmoving streams in ponds in lakes the platypus of course here familiar with it it's a it looks a lot like a lever but a much smaller animal only about soul twelve to eighteen inches long all flying right in leniently close to me he's a night here and labour downer on a branch branchi dead trees that hangs over the water it's about 40 feet away for me perched the platypus is the messiah of somewhere between the size of a muskrat otter beaver lives the way those to animals do in the water and it has this incredible a thing of a mammalian body and laps bachelet be cut looks exactly like the big of a duck but on a bigger scale when the first specimen of apply to place was sent from australia to britain in seventeen ninety eight was considered by the venerable biologists of that day to be a hoax they concluded that had had been created somehow by a taxidermist who was skillful enough that they couldn't find the stitches where this mysterious person had put the bill of a duck like animal onto the body of a mammal it was a long time before they actually began to figure out how the platypus lives in almost fifty years later did they figure out that it was a he qilya aid laying mammals the maximum weight of a big platt a push is about four.

australia platt leniently bachelet britain eighteen inches fifty years 80 degrees 40 feet
"platypuses" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

The Psych Central Show

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"platypuses" Discussed on The Psych Central Show

"Yeah it's awkward of course we also have to acknowledge that you can't be so openminded the that your mind falls outs because like you said just because somebody disagrees with you doesn't mean they're great for your team and just because somebody agrees with you doesn't mean that they're great for your team you have to have some mechanism to evaluate s you know i'll be honest i i don't know that i'm sold on the on the consensus idea that you spoke of earlier because i tend to think the committee's make platypus it's because in order for everybody to be happy yet you're just end up with well with a platypus i think a single decisionmaker could have made something cooler committee is a life of six or more legs and no brain i get that and committees often do make bad decisions but it's not fair to say that a single decision maker would would be a better way to go as i said before consensus decisionmaking is very involved and it's not just about majority rules it is a way of of communicating with each other explaining why thinks should be this way listening to counter opinions it's it's a much fair and balanced way of of looking at any kind of an issue if most of our committees the world did this while we have a lot fewer platypuses i think i can agree with that i also think what you're saying is we would need to pick thirty six people that were willing to work together they didn't have a personal agendas so maybe were not looking for the top doctor if the top dr has a personal agenda who had refused to compromise you which refuse to work together who would try to be essentially what you're saying is no narcissists in the horizon.