35 Burst results for "physicist"

Why This Physicist is in the "Hope Business"

Here's Something Good

04:49 min | 3 d ago

Why This Physicist is in the "Hope Business"

"Dr shirley jackson is used to being a first and only she's a physicist and the president of the renown rensselaer polytechnic institute the first woman and first african american in that job and she's a leader pointing the way to a better future. Dr jackson believes that for our country to move forward to be competitive and prosperous. We absolutely must have women and people of color involved in tech and science. Her own life shows. How much change can happen in just a few decades when she was a girl growing up in washington. Dc public schools were still segregated. The nineteen fifty. Four supreme court decision known as brown versus the board of education allowed her to attend schools with better resources and broaden her horizons. She went on to become the first african american woman to get a phd from mit later. She served as an academic researcher and as chair of the us nuclear regulatory commission. We asked dr jackson about the challenges facing women of color in stem. How to meet those challenges and why she sees this as a moment of opportunity. Here's what she had to say. I think they're complexities. That african american women women of color face then that are rooted in the challenges that women face on the one hand and minorities race on the other now. We know that women get dissuaded. Many of them by the time they're in middle school from really thinking of themselves in these field and there are some fields that have been very a male dominated and that then will obviously breakdown to heaven affect on african american or minority women generally but then it's further exacerbated by sort of a kind of lack of confidence or belief in the talents of african americans in this country and and other minorities in terms of people seeing them seeing us in these fields and the net can become self inculcated so that the given individual dozen see ourselves as either being able to do these Do work in these fields or even if they believe they could do it and are excited The work they may feel the mountains of too high to climb and so people move into other things. All of us in higher education are by definition in the whole business because we educate the next generation of innovators and discovery discoverers and those who will be halsey makers etc but from the perspective of the kind of institution either lead. You know we really focus on those who will innovate will invent who will discover and join with those who come from other fields of endeavor to create what needs to be created to keep us moving forward and so i believe it is truly the most important work in the world and certainly here at rensselaer we. Educating many dynamic women leaders in science and technology we have women professors in computer science who have had great success in drawing young women into the field by proving to them that one does not have to grow up a gaming or programming as many of the young men in the class do in order to succeed in fact our young women do quite well here. They graduated very high rates and they go on to do amazing things. We have more challenge with a attracting and retaining minority students. But again those who come here they onion they do well and they go on to do important things. I'm one who believes times of upheaval can open up opportunities previously. Shut out of them. And i'm one who believes that one has to step through one window in time when it opened and to take advantage of whatever those opportunities there are offered and so we've now arrived at another moment when there is at least a more discussion about inequality of opportunity being recognized as something that in our democracy at least in most quarters is not something that we should have the finest tol

Dr Shirley Jackson Renown Rensselaer Polytechnic Dr Jackson Us Nuclear Regulatory Commissi Board Of Education MIT Supreme Court Washington Brown Rensselaer
Physicist Daniel Whiteson Explains: What Is a Neutrino?

Sean Hannity

04:39 min | Last week

Physicist Daniel Whiteson Explains: What Is a Neutrino?

"In the universe. That's there. There's a lot of them out there, but it just doesn't feel the same forces. It doesn't speak the same language that you and I and all the particles that make us speak or use right. That's right. Yeah, it's like, you know, it's like it's a It's death for something I can walk through the loudest bar. You know, with thump, thump, thump music right and not even hear anything. Don't even notice. It's there, right? It's not purposely ignoring you. It just does not hear it interesting. I was thinking a good analogy could also be you know how in the Internet today people communicate using Facebook or Twitter, or instagram or email. These are all different ways that people interact with each other on the Internet. But what if there was somebody who said you know what? I'm not going to use Twitter or Instagram or Facebook? I'm just gonna Respond to people if they write me a handwritten letter. That's right. Yeah, those people are social media knew. Trina. Yes. Yeah, that's kind of what it is. It's like everybody else is talking to each other in one way. But this one particle just says You know what? I'm gonna ignore those different ways to interact. I'm just gonna do my thing. Yeah. And given the toxicity of social media, that probably means the neutrino is the happiest particle And, Yeah, you know, maybe that's the key way should all learn from the treatise. Yeah, eh, So let's remind people, though, what the forces are so there's the strong nuclear force that ties the nucleus together. There's electromagnetism that's responsible for electricity and magnetism and light and all that kind of stuff. And then there's the weak nuclear force as the weakest of of these forces, And then there's gravity. Everything with mass feels gravity right. But in the case of particles, we don't really think about gravity very much because particles have hardly any mass at all. And so gravity doesn't really affect them to really those other three. So the corks the courts, they feel the strong nuclear force and electromagnetism and the weak force. Okay, so they feel everything electrons. They feel electromagnetism, and they feel the weak nuclear force. Neutrinos on Lee feel the weak nuclear force, which is called the weak nuclear force, because it's super duper week, not because it takes a week to act or something like that. So it doesn't just ignore some of the forces that everybody else fields but it only it like they wanted chose to interact with the rest of the universe. Is like the week is one. It's like the most inconsequential one, right? Exactly. It's like, you know, if you could only interact with somebody by sending him a letter to the South Pole, and the letters only go every six months or something. Right? And you know if the neutrino didn't feel any forces at all, then we would have no way to even know it existed. Oh, there could be a whole set of particles that Speak, even maybe a told different set of forces. Yeah, like people think about dark matter, right? Dark matter. We don't know if it feels any of these forces and that's what makes it so difficult to look for and to understand dark matter as far as we know, only speaks gravity, which is why you can only study it when there's like a galaxy sized blob of it. Neutrinos. You feel one of these forces, which is why we can talk about them and study them. Well, let's talk about some of these properties that I was reading about the neutrino. I read that it has a mass that maybe one lesson one million of the mass of the electron. That's right. Neutrinos are super duper duper low mass. And we don't understand why at all, you know, we look at the mass of these particles, the electron, the courts, the other ones. We have no idea why these particles of different masses. We did a whole episode on how they get their masses, which is by interacting with the Higgs Bos on some of them interact a lot where the Higgs goes on, and so they get a lot of mass, and some of them don't interact hardly at all. So they get almost no mass. We don't know why. Like why does this one interact with the Higgs a lot in this one. Almost None of it was like a bunch of parameters in the control panel. The universe and we don't know if there's a pattern to it or if they just set randomly the beginning of the universe. We have no clue, but it seems like an important hint. The neutrinos are so close to zero mass, but not actually zero. Yes. So they are kind of tiny, right? I mean, I know everything's appoint mask mathematically, but thieves things. I mean, they're not disappoint master there. Appointments that are really, really, really, really, really almost no Mass. That's right. But if again it doesn't affect their size, their physical size is a different thing from their mass, their masters like a quantum mechanical label, like electrical charge, right? Sound like something with more masses more stuff to it, But, yeah, you're right. Neutrinos are weird because they have almost no mass, but not zero like they're not the lightest thing in the universe. All right, photons have no mass exactly zero. They travel the speed of light neutrinos just less than the speed of light because have just more than zero mass these

Instagram Twitter Facebook Trina LEE
Magnets, The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

Short Wave

04:45 min | Last week

Magnets, The Hidden Objects Powering Your Life

"Okay jeff brumfield. Where does our journey into the world of magnetism begin. It begins with a call to carlos. And a guy named tim murphy. They both work at the national high magnetic field laboratory in tallahassee florida. Normally you know. I do research and i learn about things but this time i just i just brought some bar magnets thought i would let you. That's all we do here so they just you know they're bigger and they give us money for it so expensive too. Yeah and they're painted. We paint them. They're so ready for this interview. They were born ready for this interview. These folks work with magnets all day long. Carlos heads the k. Twelve education programs for the lab. Tim is a physicist there. And like carlos was saying earlier they really feel like magnets need respect. I guarantee you that whatever direction you're looking right now unless you're in the wilderness. Right now there's probably a magnet in your line of sight and you just don't know it well and if you're you're in the wilderness you're standing on the biggest magnet that we have which is the earth the earth is a giant magnet with a pole and the south pole and where that magnetism comes from kind of complicated so for today. We're just going to stick to smaller baghdad's like the ones we use in our daily lives. Jeff i'll be honest. I don't really know what makes a magnetic field magnetic field. So how would you describe that which is kind of fascinating. Because you've turned yourself. Into the shortwave fisk there's gaps in my knowledge the only god what is a magnetic field exactly well so magnetic fields like i just said you know based on the field. Actually they're often said to north and the south pole and right opposite poles attract and light poles repel. So magnets can pull each other together. Push each other part in actually magnetism itself is half of fundamental force a called electromagnetism which also includes electric fields. But what i think is really fascinating is aside from gravity. Magnets are really the only fundamental force that we can just experience an encounter on a regular basis right and we can kind of see this magnetism action when we're playing around with magnets and they stick to certain metals right. Yeah yeah i mean the whole metal magnet thing is kinda complicated carlos. Tell you that everybody comes up. I see on. Tv shows all the time even the education tv shows. They say magnets metal. And i'm like no you got it wrong again. There's only three medals of her naturally magnetic iron nickel and cobalt. And what carlos means there is that there are only three medals that be permanent magnets that hold their magnetism forever and never other metals can stick to magnets but then there are a lot of medals. They can't so we just moved to. A new house has a stainless steel fridge. And guess what like all our fridge. Magnets don't work on this fridge anymore. so what makes them materials magnetic and others not so much well it actually all has to do with electrons. Oh our friends the electrons. Of course these are. The negatively charged particles in adams and when they flow they create electricity. That's right and whenever electrons move in in particular when they spin around something they generate a magnetic field as well as an electric field so magnetic fields have to do with spinning electrons exactly so the electrons are spinning around the atom and that makes like a little magnetic field but then in a permanent magnet. What happens is all. The atoms are facing the same direction. Imagine all these atoms lined up in a row and they kinda wanna do what their next neighbor is doing. So if their neighbor is pointed up right there magnetic moment is up than the one next to him says. Hey up is the the direction so they go up as well. So now you end up with a macroscopic magnetic field because all of these atoms are kind of lined up with their magnetic moments so all of these atoms facing the same direction is what creates one. Big magnet exactly. That's how permanent magnets work like the magnet. Cystic to your fridge. All the atoms in that baghdad are lined up in the same way and they make this big magnetic field that polls the magnet against your fridge and keeps it there. But then there's another kind of magnet and tim the guy you just heard there he actually works with this one. It's called an electromagnet for electro magnets. We actually don't care about the spin of the electron what we care about is the

Carlos Jeff Brumfield National High Magnetic Field L Tim Murphy Tallahassee Baghdad TIM Florida Jeff Adams
Why there's no such thing as objective reality

TED Talks Daily

04:16 min | Last week

Why there's no such thing as objective reality

"In the next few minutes. I hope to change the way you think about the very nature of reality itself. I'm not a physicist. And i'm not a philosopher. I'm a historian. And after studying the ancient greeks and many other premodern people's for more than twenty years as a professional become convinced that they all lived in real world's very different from our own. Now of course you. And i here today. We take it for granted that this just one ultimate reality out there. Our reality fixed universal world of experience ruled by timeless laws of science and nature. But i want you to see differently. I want you to see that humans have always lived in a pleura verse of many different worlds. Not in a universe of just one. And if you're willing to see this reverse of many worlds it will fundamentally change. I hope the way you think about the human past and hopefully the present and the future as well now. Let's get started by asking three basic questions about the contents of our reality. The real world that you and i share right here right now. First of all what is it the make something real in our real world welfare us real things material things things made of matter the we can somehow see like atoms. People trees mountains planet by the same token invisible immaterial. Things like gods and demons. Heavens and hells these are considered unreal the simply beliefs subjective ideas that exist only in the realm of the mind to be real a thing must exist objectively in some visible material form whether our minds can perceive it or not second. What are the most important things in our real world answer. human things. People cities societies cultures government economies. Why is this well because we humans thing with special. We think we're the only creatures on the planet who have things like language reason free will by contrast non-human things to us just parts of nature a mere backdrop to human culture amir environment things that we feel entitled to us however we want and third. What does it mean to be human in our real world. Well it means being an individual a person who lives ultimately for oneself. We think nature is made us this way giving each and every one of us all of the reason the right the freedom and the self interest to thrive and compete with other individuals for all of life's important resources. But i'm suggesting to you that this real world of ours is not a timeless no universal. It's just one of countless different real worlds that humans have experienced in history. What then would another world look like the real world that. The cosco athenians in ancient greece. Now of course we usually know the athenians as our cultural ancestors is of our western traditions philosophy democracy drama and so forth. But they're real world was nothing like our own. The real world of the athenians was alive with things that we would consider immaterial and thus unreal it pulsating with things like god's spirit nymphs fates curses oaths souls

Greece
Anti-Racist Science Education

Short Wave

03:39 min | 2 weeks ago

Anti-Racist Science Education

"All right today in the show. We're unsmiling what's not working in science education around representation and racism and how to teach science in a more inclusive way and idea from listener and scientists esther kunle yes so thanks to esther. We went looking for k. Through twelve teachers teaching at the intersection of science and racial justice at all grade levels. And i want to start with. Let me see a fears. She's a post doctoral fellow in the collaborative for stem education. And outreach vanderbilt okay. She's a black scientist. Helping out in science classrooms in tennessee. Among fifth graders at this one particular school she is a total rockstar to walk into a classroom. And they'll be like dr. Yeah it's me. It's me everyone you know know autographs thing. We lit up each others world. Our saying that let me see a drops into fifth seventh and eighth. Grade science classrooms like a real life. Miss frizzle okay. I'm not kidding. You she wheels the cart between classes clattering with beakers and different very interesting looking chemicals and students. They're so intrigued. They run up to her on our like number my wife just all that stuff and then when she's in the classroom let me see a doesn't just help them run experiments. She'll also delve into the ethics of designing an experiment. Okay she'll talk about how wrong. The tuskegee study was which is win. Scientists studied syphilis in black men and withheld treatment. Sushi's like introducing bioethics to kids as important part of the curriculum. Yup scientists are presented as very human herself included and her students can totally handle these conversations. We see what's happening with this generation with them protests. And they're speaking out and they're not having it they're not gonna they're not going to allow us to continue to destroy her and her point is that if science teachers can tap into that compassion and that curiosity and show the way that scientists have messed up. Kids might take up an interest in science. I love it and if we can't do that then we are gonna lose on. And i think it's hard were minority kids. They already don't see themselves as the teacher or the prisoners doing the science so that already kind of puts up a block of well. That's just what the old white main with crazy hairdo and so another thing. Let me see a does is named drop scientists of color as often as possible. She'll talk about astrophysicist. Did eisler medical physicist hadean ecole green astronauts. Joseph akaba and jeanette epps. She designed paper rocket lesson around them and this helps kids develop a mental picture of a career in stem beyond a doctor or a dentist. This is so cool because it's not just about teaching science history right. It's also helping. Students see themselves as scientists and for gretchen craig. Turner the next teacher. I want to introduce you to this. Level of engagement becomes even more important as students get older and start to get into their teenage years and develop their own opinions their own opinions about science. Yeah to be critical of it. Oh yeah that was not in my k. through twelve science education hers either. I don't remember a lot of writing or Opinions being part of science in fact it was very much i believe taught. The opinions didn't belong in science right that it was supposed to be a

Esther Kunle Esther Tennessee Syphilis Joseph Akaba Jeanette Epps Gretchen Craig Turner
The Creation Of The Magnificent Makers

Short Wave

07:38 min | 2 weeks ago

The Creation Of The Magnificent Makers

"The griffis the author of the magnificent makers children's book series in the main characters violet and pablo are transported to an alternate world with awesome lab. We're talking robots cool bugs an anti gravity chamber there. They have to make their way through a maze by solving science based problems. Each challenge has three levels and they have one hundred and twenty maker minutes to make it through the maze. Otherwise they don't get the chance to come back. I didn't realize they didn't get the chance to come back. That's high state. Yeah yeah and these kids love science so they they have so much fun on these adventures but they have to be able to finish them in time if they wanna come back. Each book explores a different topic. There's one on brain biology one on sound. The one i liked best is about ecosystems in years one of my favorite parts of the magnificent makers as the reader you solve puzzles and riddles right alongside the characters and in each book. There's instructions on how to build something in that building or making was really important to the n. so science basically has two parts right kind of intellectual part where you're learning and you're thinking but then it has this very hands on part which is the doing so whether you're a biologist or an engineer or physicist you're usually making something like research is literally do and so. I felt that it was really important to kind of combine those two with these books right. They have you know kind of the sacks that the kids learn but then these activities that encourage the doing part of science as well. Yeah well. I think the way that science is taught in early. Education is often this memorization of facts. Stuff that other people have learned you know. And and you and i both know that sciences process set of rules to observe intestine problem solve. So was that really important to you in in the book. Yes definitely and it also shows kids you know. Just how fun science is. I think my favorite part of science is the doing being in the lab. Tinkering doing my experiments. You know seeing that positive result. It's just. There's really not something that i can compare it to in terms of that. Something that gives me that boost of adrenaline that science adrenaline talk about. So which character do you feel like you identify with the most. I'm gonna have to save violet. Foreshore little bit more of a daredevil. She's a little bit more of a kind of you know i'm going to do this. Nothing's going to stop me. You know pablo is a little bit more on the pragmatic side. He's a little bit more. Maybe i wouldn't say necessarily cautious but just you know he's the one that's always looking at his watch making sure that people are on time and making sure that you know that such a pablo making sure that they're getting through the maze. On-time environment is to reckless. But she's just a little bit more a little bit more carefree. And if i'm being perfectly honest with myself i definitely have a lot of pablo to right. That's what keeps me orderly. You know an organized you know. But i think my core and my essence has more of that like sco for it. Do it kind of side. Which is maybe how. I got into writing these books in the end right right sure. Well you know i noticed. So violent is a black girl who loves science and dreams of running her own lab one day. You're a neuroscientist as well as an author. And i'm wondering if in some ways this book was kind of like a little bit of a love letter to a younger you mo- currently most definitely not just a younger me. It's really a love letter to all kids who didn't necessarily see themselves in science rolls when they were growing up when they thought of a scientist they didn't picture someone who looked like them or came from where they came from or who had a unique feature that that's not what they were taught a scientist was and it's one hundred percent a love letter to my younger self as well as a love letter to. You know all the kids out there who just wanna do science and don't want to be told that they can't. Yeah i mean. I have to imagine it felt like good for the soul to write a children's book about kids of color who not only are engaged in science. But they're like really good at it cashing. Yes exactly because there's these concepts of what a scientist looks like in who is kind of naturally good at science. I think and someone you know who just kind of what they're born to do and that often does not include you know black and brown kids. I think black and brown kids are taught that we're strong where tough we can overcome. You know hardship which is which are all true things but we're also curious we're also creative. We're also excited about learning how the world works around us. You know and i wanted to really highlight that and i want to mention to that. I don't focus at least at this point in the series a lot on the kids races. I want that to just be a given you know. I don't want that necessarily that to be the topic of conversation per se. I just want them to be them to be care. Free to be out there doing love science and this. Isn't you know just for young kids of color to see. I think this is also important for white children to see the fact that there are kids of color who are also just carefree and doing science. I think representation matters for everyone. You know. it's not just important for young kids of color to see themselves. I think is important for all kids to see young kids of color you know doing science and kick him but at it. Y- yeah so. I kinda wanna talk a little bit about you in this process a little bit because you know when i was academia. There was definitely a hesitancy around putting a ton of time into outreach. Doing things that weren't quote real science. Were you worried at all. About what your peers might think of us spending time writing these books. Yes i mean yes and no. I've done outreach at museums with local libraries. And i've never felt pushback against those kind of activities but this is a little bit different because you know there. Are you know authors. Who are one hundred percent authors right and i am not a one hundred percent author. I'm also an active researcher. And so i was a little bit worried that it would be interpreted as me. You know just kind of taking on a new career and putting science on the back burner. And that's not what i aim to do. You know. I guess. That's the violet in me. I do both you know. I'm still going to be an active researcher. And i'm going to pursue these books actively because i think that they're both important you know as a black woman in science who is an academic science. I don't wanna leave this position. There aren't enough of us.

Pablo Griffis
The Real Danger of QAnon

People of the Pod

05:20 min | 3 weeks ago

The Real Danger of QAnon

"Finkelstein founder and director of the national contagion researchers to a nonpartisan multidisciplinary research group of experts including neuroscientists psychologists. Physicists machine learning experts who study online disinformation pamela. Presi is one of those experts. A senior research fellow at the institute who focuses on the psychology of thriving in a liberal democracy both have been sounding the alarm about the dangers of the antisemitic conspiracy theory cue on and we're not at all surprised to see the events at the capitol on january six there with us now to discuss what we can expect to see next from the movement and what is within our control to stop it pamela. Joel welcome to people of the pod. Thanks for having us so first of all. Please explain for our listeners. In the most basic of terms what is cunanan and why a group called. The american jewish committee might find it troubling. So cunanan is a cybercult that organized with populist conspiracy theories largely on twitter but another social networks as well it really got its roots in a trench community called h. ham and hmi is largely considered armpit of the internet Some of the worst ideas that arrived from social media come out of. Atm was inching about the colt of cunanan. Is that unlike other populist movements which rely on trash tags and organiz based on conspiracies have anti semitic components be value add for cunanan also had an anonymous profit so these diffuse organizations that form lobs on the basis of hashtags. They have a lot of power and benefit because people can act out in the name of the conspiracy without anybody really being responsible but one of the drawbacks. They have is that there's no leadership q. Figured out a solution to solve that you create anonymous leader who can drop missives secret coded information on avon that's encrypted with encryption that he's the only one that has the key for doing q enlisted his followers to become fellow researchers but got them researching with one another to portray vision of reality became increasingly apocalyptic. Interesting and so tell me a little bit more about the anti semitism that runs through cunanan. And how it informs these theories and this movement. The conspiracy group really semitic disinformation because every single successful conspiracy. Group necessarily has to reach for antisemitic. Disinformation as a matter of history and pragmatics. The beauty for a conspiracy theorist beauty being an awkward us but the the ease of anti semitic elements is that they are conspiratorial. And so there's a long history of as joe was saying things to grab things to look for that you just need to look at anti semitism defined and then you just enter that world that conspiratorial world where there is a mysterious you know evoke but somehow secretly powerful other who hides among you and is not always easy to spot that has tentacles in every seat of power government media and finance. That's the jewish conspiracy theory. That's the disinformation about jews. Jews benefit from transparency and the new technology of social media allows for so many areas of black boxes. You know so. Many areas of the dark web so many areas were light is not shining. And that's where these conspiracies grow pamela. Going back to your point about transparency. I'd argue everyone benefits from it. But yes i see your point about jews benefiting from that. I also should point out q. Went on rose to prominence not just during the isolation of the pandemic but during a moment of racial reckoning in this country is that relevant one of the places where we see this coming together in terms of the tools of the network contagion research institutes used to to create transparency and social media. Literally our goals create literacy on social media use machine learning to extract trans at a massive scale. So you characterize the information operations from these groups like you know and one of the largest information operations ever witnessed took place in the middle of quarantine when george floyd was killed and it was mobilized by cuban on and it was blaming george soros for instigating a civil war against antifa the moral other and so that really kind of i think brings home pamelas point in very concrete terms. You had this entire conspiracy network mobilizing around the idea that jewish international financier was causing a civil war was the force behind the moral other and that that was happening in the midst of the conditions of quarantine in that force not coincidentally also behind the virus so that was the largest surge of source activity. We've seen on twitter

Cunanan National Contagion Researchers Presi Pamela Finkelstein American Jewish Committee Joel Twitter JOE George Floyd George Soros
'Sisters With Transistors': Pioneers Of Electronic Music

All Things Considered

05:27 min | 3 weeks ago

'Sisters With Transistors': Pioneers Of Electronic Music

"Musical instruments that produce sound by using electronic circuitry bore the names of male inventors, and they were popularized by male artists. It is Allyson McCabe reports. Women were and still are at the forefront with a new documentary. They're finally getting their due in the 19 twenties, the Russian physicist Leon Thurman, debuted and electronic instrument that could be played without any physical contact. Musician stood in front of a box and wave their hands over antennas summoning otherworldly sounds seemingly from thin air. Experiment might have been a passing novelty, if not for the late Clara Rock quarry Ah, virtuoso who, well concert hall audiences and helped refine the instruments design music. It was not suspected, as she recalled in the 1992 interview with public radio station W Q. X are there was no way of breaking the sound. You couldn't make the cut that you couldn't make separation. All I had to do is inspire him that I needed. Frogmore is just one in a long line of women who change the shape and sound of modern music, says filmmaker Lisa Robin er. When most people think of electronic music in most cases, they'll picture men pushing the buttons knobs in the boundaries. So one of the things that really drew me to the story was that this was a story of women being enabled by new technology robbers. New documentary sisters with transistors celebrates their achievements spotlighting pioneers such as Daphne or, UM, who was hired as a studio engineer by the BBC in the 19 forties, while men were off fighting in the war after hours or, um, began recording and manipulating sounds on magnetic tape. Man. Her experiments led to the co founding of the BBC's Radio Franek Workshop, which also provided a platform for Delia Derbyshire. She crafted sounds for hundreds of BBC programs, including the iconic theme music for the TV side by Syria's doctor who which debuted in 1963. Five years later, Wendy Carlos took the first commercially available keyboard base of the Sizer to the general public. She introduced the instrument she helped Robert Mode design on her album switched on Bach, which sold more than a million copies. At the same time, female composers continued working on their own music. Juilliard trained Laurie Spiegel says Elektronik Instruments helped them bypass creative and professional obstacles and give voice to their compositions themselves. It was like looking the way a painter or a writer works. You were working on the actual work itself. You were being a piece of music out of sound that you could then play for somebody else. Instead of just having a piece of paper that you then needed someone else to go and perform. As a researcher at Bell Labs in the 19 seventies, Spiegel made music using experimental computer systems and complex algorithms to generate entirely new sounds. 1977 Spiegel's work was included on the Voyager golden record launched into space to represent all of humankind. That, she says the achievements of women have often gone on recognized early computer programmers very often where women because it was considered clerical. Then when they began to be called computer science, then it was suddenly totally men, and it was for gotten their women involved in your early days of computers. History of women has been a story of silence. Of breaking through the silence. We shall not be rubbed any longer. It's beautiful noise. Sisters with transistors is narrated by Laurie Anderson in 1977. Anderson debuted the tape Bow Violin, which allowed her to create her own performance art. In the 19 eighties, Anderson modified her Elektronik Trump set turning her body into an instrument. We gotta Lynn Drum machine and it was broken. And so I took it apart. And I thought, Well, what if you sold it into a suit? You know on your views to the various drum pads, specially For today's pioneers. Electronic music isn't just music. It's also a tool to break down barriers, says composer Yvette Janine Jackson. My creative journey with electronic music.

Allyson Mccabe Leon Thurman Clara Rock Lisa Robin BBC Delia Derbyshire Robert Mode Laurie Spiegel Elektronik Instruments Wendy Carlos Daphne Sizer Juilliard Syria Bell Labs Spiegel Elektronik Trump Anderson Laurie Anderson Lynn Drum
One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

Short Wave

09:46 min | 2 months ago

One Page At A Time, Jess Wade Is Changing Wikipedia

"So today. We're speaking with just weighed in experimental. Physicists at college. London and every night for the past three years just has written a wikipedia entry about a woman or poc scientists. And if this sounds like a big commitment that's because it is. But what motivates. Just keep with. It is the possibility of using wikipedia to combat the bias. In science. We see it in who gets through peer review. We see it in who gets big papers. Cited we see who gets big grants. We see it and who wins awards. And that means that the people that we celebrate and champion incredibly homogeneous and when wikipedia launched the internet was a very small space and it was very dominated by particular types of people. This kind of you know. Tech bro attitude that we still see in silicon valley and places like that majority white majority western a lot from north america some from western europe and those were the first people to start using it engaging in contributing to wikipedia backed according to a twenty twenty study. Eighty seven percents of wikipedia. Contributors are men with media includes wikipedia wick wicky quote a bunch of other platforms and for just this bias in. Authorship creates a bias in who gets a biography so this huge systematic bias against women against people of color against people from the global south against people who are from any kind of particular marginalized group. So it's kind of two things when we have a very diverse editorship and to the things they writes about a not very diverse and this is obviously impacted by the way that science celebrates people and who took about who we define as notable. Right right just to confirm by. Now you've written what nine hundred articles for the site. Oh no no. How many i've written i've written one thousand two hundred one thousand two hundred whatever so sub usually get a bit excited so obviously that's not three hundred sixty five times three so sometimes i get a little carried away but in general i try and stick to one a day sometimes. Yeah yeah. I mean. I've been going for three. Yes so i've done a pretty good job that in those i. We thought a lot about how to ask you this question. Because twelve hundred articles is an extraordinary accomplishment as far as contributing to this encyclopedia. And so the question we're going to go with is if you could build a quarantine bubble with some of the people that you've written about living or deceased who would you include and why should question so so for sure. I'd have to have some of the people developing vaccines enough air. The person who created the oxford vaccine which is is the vaccine this just been approved for use in the uk. A viral vector vaccine is a phenomenal professor. Sara gilbert sara gilbert has had this kind of fascinating rich directory working on the development of a whole bunch of different vaccines that can walk in different corona viruses and kiss kubat. I don't know if you've come across any of your reporting. She's she's a young african american women who is at the national institute of health and had walked back scenes for for sars and mers. So has this really great legacy but also alongside. I kind of scientific research. An extraordinary publication list works to support people from undeserved communities and walks to really amplify the voices of scientists who too often overlooked but also to support young people and getting into an ethic about science. So that people at different ends of that curric- his kizzie is still very young. Where saratoga established professor but both of them have this kind of extraordinary pathway to really ultimately creating the thing. That's going to save the entire world so suddenly. If i if i had according to about they would be in it. I think that. I mean how many people might out in my quarantine babo because i could keep going. There's no official guidance but the often cited wisdom is less than ten. I'm so primed and ready to tell you stories about everyone. I'm so excited about them. So mainly because i have been. She's someone who i wrote about right at the beginning of my wikipedia. A mathematician who gladys west. She was born in virginia in the thousand nine hundred and she went to college. She went to a historically black college and university to study maths. She goes off in becomes the teach She then eventually what the us government. Wes she did the early computations and calculations for gps so for all of the technologies that almost everything that we do day to day relies on. Now you know you get in your car keys your phone. You try and navigate took particular location. You use the technology that gladys west created. And when i made gladys west page in two thousand eighteen is really hard to find. Information about. Her book is what for the us government so lots of things are adopted. A couple of months. After i put the page live so after i'd finished writing it and put it onto wikipedia. She was selected by the bbc is one of the top one hundred women so she went into the kind of top one hundred women in the world for any intentional creation. Contribution ebba and when you're on a web page like fat when you're on a page so much traffic and insight people hop over to the wikipedia page really quickly so you could just see the numbers of page views of of the wikipedia. Page going up and up and that meant that more and more people contributed to it so grew story grew. How did that make you feel. I just loved it. I was reflecting on this a lot with with my parents lockdown wife. I kept going live. I kept doing this. And i find nothing more rewarding honestly than seeing other people get recognized then champion for what they've done so absolutely love to have quarantine bubble that so many things that i want us. Yeah and you're collecting. I suppose historical information across different websites and books to write these biographies. Has it ever feel like time travel. Yeah completely does feel like time travel. It's it's so it's so interesting. The things that i find kind of thrilling and exciting now feels such a kind of privilege in a rush to be able to get access to all of the resources that we can do. Now you know online libraries. Nine archives sites archived magazines scientific journals extraordinary places that that turn to for this and there are times when you just feel like fantastic achievement. So so if you see in a lot of the world's when women get married they take their partner's name so sometimes it's quite difficult to find out things about their lives if they got married and all of their publications in this new name. And when you find that one link that one connection that tells you that maiden name and then you can go back and find their phd thesis or who was there examining all this extra level of information. So when i get to that. I'm like jump off the sofer like this is great and say yeah. It's completely like a portal into another world. Right i mean. I've chills just listening to you. Talk about this kind of forensic reconstruction of people's lives and who they were outside of who. They married or other kinds of societal markers of that. Yeah a big part of it. I think a big part of my efforts wikipedia. Who i've met the people that we've trained editor phones is to not just make pages about women no make pages about people of color but to make them as good as the comparable page would-be about a white man. Yeah yeah you've been amazing way of connecting all these dots. I really appreciate hearing that I wanna ask you one one last thing. Which is i know that in a lot of ways just talking to you. It sounds like this project is part of such a bigger desire to see science really include nbc driven by all kinds of people. And what do you think it will really take to bring more women and poc's into science so that they stay. Oh such a good question and such a huge one. I mean they're very preliminary simple things that low hanging fruit. If you will know why we don't already have in place you know proper care and support for people who have caring responsibilities so whether that's you know elderly parents or sick parents or especially now in the pandemic who seeing the importance of the childcare and how that skin influence women scientific careers if they're having to work from home but i think more than that we need to really look a scientific institutions and ask really critical questions about why people are leaving. Why do we see. So few black professes. Why do we see so few women in position of leadership. Why do lgbt he. Plus scientists not feel comfortable being out when they're in the scientific workplace and then really put money to and take action to address those individual needs. But i think from a kind of how you get more diverse people into science. I really honestly think the answer is improving our education systems and really support our teachers better. Pay them as well as we pay are bankers so that they stay and so that they create kind of inspiring science lessons. Then go out and got this next generation to come in who keep pushing for this change that we want

Wikipedia Wick Wicky Sara Gilbert Sara Gilbert Kubat Gladys West Us Government Western Europe Silicon Valley National Institute Of Health North America Saratoga London Oxford WES UK Virginia BBC NBC
Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

Short Wave

10:06 min | 2 months ago

Creating Antimatter: Matter's "Evil Twin"

"Jeff. i have a lot of questions about antimatter. But can you just start with regular mater. What is that. Yeah so a refresher for who don't remember regular matters abroad category for everything. So you're matter i'm matter. The studios matter the microphones. Yeah i get it matter and we matter. It's a nice thought. Yeah and as matter were all made of atoms. So you're bunch of adamson the shape of an emily corn. And i'm tabatha the shape of a jeff brumfield now for antimatter. I'm actually going to let another jeffrey. Who knows a lot more. Physics denied to answer this one. His name is jeffrey hengst. And he's a researcher at our house university in denmark. And to i. I think of it as kind of an evil twin of the stuff that makes up our everyday world intriguing. Go on it is it is. It's just this kind of opposite matter. It's like this muir to everything that's around us so antimatter. It's here right now yet. I mean it's a little more complicated than that but anti matters real stuff and it exists in our universe and actually before anyone ever even detected it. They predicted it because math. The equations of physics demanded in fact it was discovered that way by coming up with an equation that predicted his existence. Nobody was really looking for it. And i am not going to attempt to describe the fundamental equations of physics on this podcast. Because i don't really understand them But hank says the closest analogy. He's got for us mortals to think about. Is this math problem. What's the square root of four two very but there's a second solution negative to allocate right because negative negative to is four so the way you just went straight to two. That's exactly kind of what happened in physics like there were these equations and there was a positive set of solutions for particles and negative said and everyone was like the negative set. What does that even mean. That's nonsense but it turned out there. Worthies negative particles. They did exist in. They're called antimatter. Oh okay so there's this theoretical idea of antimatter kicking around for awhile. Which kind of explains what it is. But what is it exactly. Here's the thing it really is like opposite matter. Protons remember protons. Yeah their positively charged subatomic particles. They are anti. Protons are negatively charged electrons their negatively charged and their anti particles are positively charged. This is kind of amazing. It is kind of amazing. And here's the best part. It actually lives up to the sci-fi analogy so just go with your sifi brain and i get it emily. You're more of like colin firth. Pride and prejudice bbc. You know no shame in it. There isn't there isn't i've seen it probably more times than you have in my life. But what do you think happens when matter and antimatter Get together when they actually meet okay. If anti matters the evil twin the fight they do will. They do like in a jane austen novel. They do. Well you're not too far off. I'm going to let the actual experts explain it to you. And i have a tendency to cancel each other out a minute. Where's this under. Certain conditions when to identify articles of matter. Antimatter meet these. Are your experts. Jeff captain kirk and is that leonard nimoy as relationship. Yes total complete absolute annihilation. Spock it is. That's right and you're right. That's star trek season. One episode twenty-seven original track the best track. But here's the thing eveline. It's actually a hundred percent accurate or pretty close so the universe won't end if antimatter and matter meat. But the two particles do disappear in a flash of light. The anti-matter can't exist in the presence of matter. The science fiction stuff comes in these things really do annihilate each other if you get together okay. So i've covered a lot of physics over the years and this is pretty much the only case where the sci-fi and the reality match although i will say annihilation is actually a lot less sexy in real life it's really Just annoying to have to deal with something that you have to make that the universe is trying to destroy and every every every turning point be an antimatter physicist it it is. I mean he's literally been doing this since the ninety s and like he does get a little frustrated. All right you said earlier that antimatter. It's here in this universe but this universe is full of matter and i don't see any antimatter lurking around. So where is it if it's existing theory but it's hard to find in reality. I don't get this you know who else doesn't get it. Every physicist on earth this is one of the fundamental questions the equation say there should be as much antimatter matter but in practice. Antimatter is actually super hard. To find and hank says nobody knows why there aren't any good ideas about this. I mean physicists. Do see little bits of antimatter here. and there. In fact anti electrons for i discovered in cosmic rays coming from deep space way back in the nineteen thirties. And actually i've got another natural source of antimatter right here in the studio emily in this room. Yes ready yes this banana. What are you talking about this real episode. This is an episode about nothing and tomfoolery. Hold the banana to make sure it's real. I'll explain yes okay so obviously. The banana is not anti matter. But here's the thing about bananas. Bananas are full of potassium. Which is really good for you. But there's also a radioactive isotope potassium into banana called potassium forty. This is a naturally occurring. isotope So some porsche. The potassium in the banana is potassium. Forty now here's the thing. Potassium forty when it decays releases an electron but very very very very rarely it releases an anti electron. So if we just hold this banana and wait for for. How long are we waiting. Okay we'd have to seventy five minutes. We're at ten minute podcast. Geoff just sit here for seventy five minute. What i'm hearing is seven part series on antimatter. Emily kwan and a meditation silence. That's right no so. On average this entire banana will spit out. One anti-electron every seventy five minutes. I think this really makes the point. Well right like antimatter exists. It's not some parallel universe but one tiny anti trump for trillions of banana adams is like even. That's a pretty rare thing to have. Happened and jeffrey wants a lot more than that. That's why he's at this giant particle accelerator cernan switzerland. Okay so tell me what. He's up to their well. Hanks wants lots of anti electrons. And in this is key anti protons. Hey so it turns out the anti electrons are kind of easy. You can find other radioactive sources Besides bananas that can make a lot more of them and then the elevator makes anti protons. And here's the thing so you have to very carefully hang us to bring the anti protons in the anti electrons together we call it s- merge it's a smooz merge merge but even after that merge they still end up with a lot of antimatter just disappearing. Thirty million anti protons. That's converted two hundred thousand or so trapped. Anti protons of those will get twenty or thirty that actually make anti hyphen that we can use well. Willow anti-hydrogen is that what i just heard. Jeff what is that. Anti-hydrogen is just one anti electron orbiting one anti protons and it's the antimatter. Equivalent of the lightest element on earth. So that's regular hydrogen willing to go to all this trouble just to get a few atoms of anti-hydrogen but why go through all the trouble you know of making andy hydrogen okay. So here's the thing. He's hoping to get some clues from anti-hydrogen about matter antimatter and the thinking goes like this. Hydrogen is the lightest element in the universe and hydrogen is probably the thing we know best. We've been studying it forever. We really understand it. So by looking very very carefully at anti-hydrogen. He's hoping that they can learn more about what's going on with antimatter. And that's basically what he's doing he's using lasers all kinds of stuff to probe this anti-hydrogen to see how it behaves. Well has shed any light on where the rest of the antimatter is. Not yet not yet. And so far. Anti-hydrogen is behaving exactly as predicted by all those fundamental physics equations. And so far with the places that we've looked and to the precision with which we've looked they're the same and that's kind of a problem because they also say there should be much matters antimatter unless they can find some sort of deviation it may not be possible to figure out you know where the antimatter went. So we don't have any clues but that's okay because he's just

Jeff Brumfield Jeffrey Hengst House University Jeff Captain Kirk Tabatha Hank Adamson Jeffrey Colin Firth Denmark Eveline Leonard Nimoy Jeff Jane Austen Emily Kwan Spock Emily Banana Adams BBC
James Chapman VP and GM of Music and Wearables at Qualcomm on The Opportunities of Aippods

The Voicebot Podcast

07:48 min | 3 months ago

James Chapman VP and GM of Music and Wearables at Qualcomm on The Opportunities of Aippods

"We just published the hereby consumer adoption report so been knee deep in this for a while a of late We just did a national consumer survey and October so we have really recent data. We put out a report. But i've been tracking this space in depth for years now in fact we had some some really early consumer survey data back in twenty eighteen. Sort of an early part. We talk about voice assistance. But i'm interested in the heroles or the your true wireless earbuds space just in general and i think it's really of high interest to my audience. Who are starting to wake up. To the fact that there's a lot of these devices is beyond The smart speaker and particularly the smartphone is really interesting but the smartphone without oils. Earbuds isn't really that interesting. I think for a lot of these stations. So so it's great to have you on You know given your background. But why don't we start out. Give people a little bit about your background. So obviously you're at qualcomm overseeing the highly relevant group but How did you get involved in this. You're a physicist by training. So did you always know you're going to be working at the silicon level Complete accident i stumbled into it. Come touchscreens graphics. Engines view listeners. Who who were at the raspberry pi on some of the silicon and the the blocks. I was some great colleagues on. I joined came to the radio. Cbs walls in two thousand thirteen Whole range of stuff they did. And of course of the full front was him. I think about point people realizing just just has special wireless soldier could become interrail realize why half the wise you you can get it. Wirelessly period of time as the asahi required by qualcomm's fantastic the engineering expertise of call common the breadth. The payers is just amazing. we megyn from day. One started looking around a digging around through the libraries finding while they have put into our new silicon. Which when i sing sing in the market now on very luckily very very privileged for me. I find myself running the voice music. Wearables business units Anything in this because wrapped around your wrist watch would would come with me and my team so very exciting place to be. A change is happening. Could well you've seen this. This industry grew up. Because i think he started Or very early in your career. You're working broadcom as well so you have. You've seen this over a number of years. Yes yes a lot of a lot of things going on but the the thing i think is amazing i think let me be a little bit brutally honest which perhaps he's unwise on these these accounts but if i look at t twelve twenty thirteen what was a headphone while it was. Maybe it was your little your little more headset. When you a hands free in the car maybe you put it on reached rounded back to get it when you listen to music but you know what else was it And then he looked. Today is small is wireless. Earbuds is in your pocket. It loss for hours and hours and hours know if you will when travelling very much. The moment travelling public transport rounded the big cities. You're more likely to see people with their butts in the with on. I think that's that's tremendous because it goes from a device that you you go and search out when he wants this to music device that you always have with you always have was literally on you On the processing and the silicon capability will put the interests devices. Means they are that they're becoming a was a bit like films becoming a real augmented piece of piece of hardware. You've got what you all the time offering you love. yeah. I i think it's if you go back to like twelve or thirteen. I think maybe i would add. I think i had like a set of bose or monster headphones. That i was listening to. So in those those would had some noise cancellation capabilities and in quality audio at us mostly just on the plane maybe occasionally at all I believe back in that period. Maybe a little bit. Before that. I had maybe a blue headset I've had a couple of job or heads that i would use. I would swap out if i was going to make a phone call so i had these multiple things. Those were pretty amazing and actually had this blue ant that actually had voice control. I could do a voice input like us a number but you had all these speed dials. You could use So and just to think about where we are today with the different solutions in the market. It's it's really been tremendous Just the the miniaturisation and the fact that we can have really high quality solutions all day. Long now i'm wearing some some bose headphones right now. Which i use to record because i like the way that it isolates me and sort of keeps all the back. Out nice microphones does all the gate and everything But throughout the day. Mostly i i have earbuds at and i have all different sorts and I use them for listening. But i use them for voices system. I use them for a lot of zoom meetings and conference calls. I think it's i think. Behavior has shifted. Maybe more in this space than any other over the last five or six years. I think when. I look at the what's driven it number. One is power consumption so if you look at our latest arrange of chips the fifty one hundred series. Thirty hundred series. We worked very hard last two or three years. The power time So it's it's you know two three four times less power than walls if you go back twenty sixteen seventeen. I'm what what what does that do. Well the battery get smaller ranch and the irony here you can shrink the battery and you can get the The lifetime to go so rather being maybe two three hours four hours. Maybe maybe more with a really big set of cans that easy work and i can put them in you. Ranked game four five six seven hours repair via but so it's not. It's not a kind of a concern that you you're going to use them. Use them up in the back in the case. And what am i gonna do. Can i rely on for a long time and the smooth and ally white and that does driven so fascinating things so number one given that i can put mine in my knees do i won't say yes potentially for for this bill. So now you know the voice ui. I'm won't once. I can wear them knocking tire and auto uncomfortable rival interface. I can go talk to the voice assistant. Thank goodness you know the the google's now's this wilted did all they did but the voice assistance have come alone. Am i living those feature films. I'm sitting there with this thing. In my ear unobtrusive comfortable lightweight. How gonna worry about the power On on yes. I'm getting this voice. She why we were very very closely with the likes of arizona. Google to make sure that we meet requirements. We got the right things you make it available to to our customers to end consumers so very exciting change in terms of the power consumption a low power we achieve allowing you to wear them all the time of the ones. He just wouldn't do it on. Be comfortable and then suddenly you've got this option to have a very exciting interface. You didn't have before to a lot of information through through the voice interface.

Qualcomm Megyn Asahi Broadcom CBS Google Arizona
Who killed Mohsen Fakhrizadeh?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

06:16 min | 3 months ago

Who killed Mohsen Fakhrizadeh?

"We start with breaking news. And iran's defense ministry has confirmed that one of the country's top nuclear scientists has been assassinated two diff- of muslim fucker. Saudi is very much proving to be one of those stories in which people will see whatever confirmations of their own prejudices and suspicions they wished to it might reasonably be argued that this description applies in the online epoch in particular to pretty much every story but it is especially the case with stories set in the middle east and which may would depending wh one prefers to believe may not involve israel. So it's best to start with what we know for certain. We know that molson fucker. Zodda was a renowned nuclear physicist a senior engineering of iran's nuclear program and a brigadier general in iran's islamic revolution regard core. He is believed to have been deleted of what was known as project amid the program. Iran established in the late nineteen eighty s to explore the prospects of iranian nuclear weapon and closed in two thousand three according to the international atomic energy agency. We know that he was killed. Last friday near absorbed a small town seventy kilometers east of tehran. And that he was buried with full state on. Who's on sunday law. Main hobby lobby. No optic not that big van owen ruling to the questions of precisely how he was killed by whom there is a bewildering smorgasbord of answers. While it seems clear enough that Was shot dead as the car in which he was. Travelling was the object of an ambush. There are conflicting reports of this assassination being conducted by a posse of live operators. Some of whom may or may not have died at the scene and or by some species of remote controlled weapon monotony iran bit who we bid and me. The enemies of iran have to know that the iranian nation and the country's officials a brave and intrepid enough to respond to this criminal action. As on a has dan in dommage in our yet caught on era by-pass off pigs around as to who might have done it. Iranian officialdom and iranian media have been quick to blame either israel or the mujahedeen e. Cock a curious cultish iranian rebel group which has been a persistent irritant to the islamic republic. And who currently appear to be based between iraq. France and albania. The has also been an amount of copy pasted umbrage directed at the united states or as president hassan rohani of iran prefers to address it the global arrogance on record. Israeli sources have feigned bafflement though the new york times has quoted an unnamed senior. Israeli official is suggesting that the world should thank israel. Four reside is demise. The mujahideen have been reticent. As of this broadcast the iran has yet to present any concrete evidence of their assertions. And if and when they do it will likely be impossible for any independent observers to verify them and iran does reflexively blame israel for pretty much anything it is only a couple of years since former head of iran's military major general signed fear is a body accused of running a network of spy lizards. But it's not like there isn't something of a circumstantial case to answer this year. Several sites in iran which might or might not have been related to iran's nuclear program was struck by explosions which did not appear coincidental and at least four other iranian. Nuclear scientists have met violent ends since two thousand ten to killed by car bombs one by a motorcycle. Bomb one shot dead. In most instances iran blamed israel and israel denied involvement while also making it as clear as it could be regarded even the faintest prospect of a nuclear armed iran as intolerable almost ziff inviting tehran to take the hint and a is at least arguable. Most infact saudis college was marked in two thousand eighteen when israeli intelligence highsted from a warehouse in tehran thousands of files pertaining to iran's nuclear program when israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu announced his feet. He mentioned zadeh by name. A key. part of the plan was to form new organizations to continue the work. This is how dr moosa farkas the of project about put remember that name a day so along with the questions of who and how there is another why in particular wine now whoever killed most fuck resolve will have known that iran would feel obliged to retaliate or at least threatened to retaliate. And that this would make any kind of diplomacy with tehran difficult. Whoever killed muslims will also have understood that a window to such engagement might have been about to open interior. Vashon sean medicare dishman salvage assassination shows. The enemies are experiencing anxious weeks feeling. That the pressure's fading away. And the world circumstances a change a heart. The camby share shadow. It's johnny you're gonna with the swearing in of a new american president who has sounded keen on returning the us to the two thousand fifteen nuclear deal with iran out of which the current president flounced of the possible consequences. All fockers ought is death to seem reasonably certain one that iran's nuclear ambitions whatever they may actually be will have been hinted at least some ought to that. Compromise with iran will be less likely someone somewhere will be considering this a win win

Iran Israel Defense Ministry Zodda Van Owen Tehran President Hassan Rohani International Atomic Energy Ag Middle East Albania Israeli Intelligence Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Zadeh Dr Moosa Farkas New York Times Iraq France Ziff Sean Medicare
Iran: Horror without end – Strikes and protest continue

WIOD Programming

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

Iran: Horror without end – Strikes and protest continue

"Protests on the streets of terror. On following the killing of Iran's top nuclear physicist, the London and ABC. Julie McFarland must inform me today he was the driving force behind Iran's atomic weapons program, the country's most renowned nuclear scientists, as well as a senior officer in that elite force, known as the IRGC in 2018. He was even named by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in a presentation about Iran's nuclear program and 10. Years ago, the Iranian government said that Israel was behind the assassination off four other of their nuclear scientists who were killed between 2010. On 2012. Now. Israel has never publicly confirmed or denied involvement in these assassinations, but has always said that they will never tolerate a nuclear Iran at ST

Julie Mcfarland Iran Prime Minister Benjamin Netany Iranian Government Irgc ABC London Israel
Ultracold Soup: Meet The 'Superfluid' States Of Matter

Short Wave

04:18 min | 3 months ago

Ultracold Soup: Meet The 'Superfluid' States Of Matter

"Or at quang. I am ready to go back to school with you. Which honestly dreer great. We would be good lab competitive. Yeah we will be competitive but we be great together. I think and so the science concepts. We're going to unpack. Today is states of matter. You know some of those other states of matter. You didn't learn about in science class rights so the physicist i called up to explain this is martin's veer line at mit. and what. i find hilarious. How martin is he said when it comes to his own kid. He actually prefers to keep this particular science lesson. Pretty simple to assam like. Oh yeah you the gas liquid solid bam. Leave it at that you know. He's seven and states of matter is really just a way to describe how a group of particles think atoms or molecules etc move which is sort of beautiful and collective and different from what you would gifts by looking just at a single particle and changes in temperature and pressure can cause those particles to move differently and change their behavior right. We see the super easily with water. That's right in the liquid phase water molecules slip and slide past each other but we humans quickly learned that if you lower the temperature the particles slowdown bam. We see is appear and we fridges. And we're very excited about. That actually was a huge deal hundred years ago to make ice and if we go in the opposite direction heat water. The particles move faster and farther apart and eventually the h. two o. Molecules breakaway and dissipate into the air as water vapor humidity. That's right it is already a miracle in itself. Water exists in these three different states that we can see those states at temperatures that we can reach as a humans in the kitchen. But here's the thing we can only do so much in our kitchen. Speak right speakers though there. But there's a limited range of temperature and pressure that even you can achieve in your kitchen mattie and there are states of matter beyond this okay like do you remember plasma who ya. Sometimes it's called the fourth state of matter and it can happen when matter gets heated to a super high temperature like electrons rips from atoms which actually allows plasma to conduct. Electricity super cool. Lightning is plasma. Plasma is wild. It is wild. Yeah and if we were to go in the other direction to an extreme if martin son were to ask dad what can happen at a temperature much cooler than ice. Is there something else. I might start telling him about these superfluid states of matter which is exactly what martin's studies at mit these superfluids states of matter that we're long predicted but not easily observed in nature. So how many states of matter are out there. Well we don't actually know martin want to even commit to a number. When i asked him this question he actually said ouch. The is apparently no end to the series of interesting new. Twist that nature gives us to to find your states of matter. We just are digging as we speak. We're digging into this all the time and that's because in theoretical physics. You can use math to predict things that experimental physicists haven't observed yet and i say yet because in the last few decades scientists have successfully coaxed atoms under extreme laboratory conditions to enter other states of matter states that could have useful applications for future technologies awesome. Okay let's get this. Emily like how do they do. This kind of lab can had to exist for these other states of matter to emerge. I'm so glad you asked. They had to get cold. Ultra cold we work in the neno. Kelvin regime for breakfast ano- kelvin. So you might ask what so. That's actually very called. It's a billion times cold interstellar

Martin Quang MIT Emily Kelvin
What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

04:49 min | 3 months ago

What happened at the University of Chicago during the Manhattan Project?

"Next week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of atomic bombs being dropped on japan. It's one of the most controversial decisions in us. History research resulted in the weapons of mass. Destruction took place at several locations but chicago became one of the main science centers. I spoke with writer. Terry mcclellan mcandrew about the work done in the state and the reasons chicago was a manhattan project site while there were several reasons wine wise. It was the home of arthur holly compton who was a physicist who was already working on some of this chicago is also seen as centrally located in the country. So that other manhattan project. Scientists around the country could excess it fairly readily also the university of chicago approved of being a manhattan project site and supported it. This work going on people unaware of it in a very busy location in a major city. It seems dangerous it does doesn't it It was a secret project and secrecy was something that was drilled into everyone's minds who worked on the manhattan project there have been some oral histories taking of people who worked on the project. And one was of william. J nicholson who helped. Create the pile as it was called. That was what became the nuclear reactor that developed the first self sustaining nuclear reaction at the university of chicago and he talks about this need for secrecy and how it was drilled into all of staff there there were known agents of the german government in and around the university of chicago and we were told that and that We were not to reveal anything of what you do. Don't take up with strangers If you're having a sandwich someplace or beer or whatever Watch out that people who may engage you in conversation. would be damaging to the war effort and that the they may actually be the enemy so one huge question that comes up about this manhattan project site at the university of chicago in the in. The middle of this metropolitan side is where danger. Was there a danger to the university chicago illinois even the mid west region and the physicists. I spoke to said in essence no the nuclear reactor that the scientists were developing at the chicago at chicago was very low powered in comparison to what we see today at most. It could have powered a two hundred watt lightbulb therefore it was not putting out the kind of radiation that one of our nuclear directors today could could do in there for the harm was not significant. Now there was some danger to the people who were in the room where that nuclear reactor was working one of the dangers. Although the scientists in charge had done innumerable calculations to make sure the danger was very small. There was still a worried that the nuclear reactor could get out of control and they took protection against that and they had what they called the suicide squad two to three men who stood atop the nuclear reactor with the cadman solution. So that in case it did run away and start to melt down. They would pour this over the pile and hopefully it would stop but as one. Scientists told me the suicide squad would not live to tell about it. The first nuclear reaction took place there and it was momentous you know especially when you think about it in terms of what would come later but at the time from what i read in your story to those folks sorta matter of fact it was a big deal but their reaction was a bit anti-climactic. They basically broke out a bottle of chianti and also signed the basket that the bottle of chianti was in and that was pretty much it. The physicists i talked to said that the lead scientists on the reactor enrico fermi was so sure he had done endless calculations he carried his slide rule around with him for those who don't know what a slide rule is. That was your pre computer calculator in the days and he cared around with him. He did endless calculations to make sure he knew what was going to happen with this nuclear reactor and so it went exactly as planned and in essence while it was an enormous event. It changed our lives. It changed science and international relations forever. The scientists there. Just pretty much congratulated. Each other broke out a bottle

Chicago Terry Mcclellan University Of Chicago Arthur Holly Compton J Nicholson German Government Mcandrew Manhattan Japan Mass William Cadman Illinois Enrico Fermi
Finally, a Room-Temperature Superconductor

Techmeme Ride Home

04:03 min | 5 months ago

Finally, a Room-Temperature Superconductor

"Not Exactly, the revolution that would result if we achieved cold fusion, but it is notable that room temperature superconductivity has been achieved for the first time quoting MIT technology review room temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity zero resistance without needing special cooling are the sort of technological miracle that could up end daily life. They could revolutionize the electric grid and enable levitating trains among many other potential applications but until now, superconductors have had to be cool to extremely. Low temperatures which has restricted them to use as a niche technology. I'll be an important one for decades. It seemed that room temperature superconductivity might be out of reach forever. But in the last five years, a few research groups around the world have been engaged in a race to attain it in the lab and one of them just one in a paper published today in nature researchers report achieving real temperature supercar activity in a compound containing hydrogen sulfur. And Carbon at temperatures as high as fifty eight degrees Fahrenheit thirteen point three Celsius or two, hundred, Eighty, seven, point seven Kelvin the previous highest temperature had been two hundred and Sixty Kelvin or degrees Fahrenheit that she'd by a rival group at George Washington University and the Carnegie Institution in Washington DC and twenty eighteen another group at the Planck Institute for Chemistry, in Germany, achieved two hundred and fifty degrees Kelvin or negative nine point seven degrees Fahrenheit at. Around the same time like the previous records, the new record was attained under extremely high pressures roughly two and a half million times greater than that of the air we breathe. It's a landmark says Jose Flora's leave us a computational physicist at the sappy Enza University of Rome who creates models that explain high temperature superconductivity and was not directly involved in the work. The ways in which electric is generated transmitted and distributed could be fundamentally transformed by cheap and. Effective temperature superconductors bigger than a few millions of a meter about five percent of the electricity generated in the United States is lost in transmission and distribution according to the Energy Information Administration, eliminating this loss would for starters, save billions of dollars and have a significant climate impact. But room temperature superconductors wouldn't just change the system we have. They enable a whole new system transformers which are crucial to the electric grid could be made smaller cheaper and more. Efficient. So to could electric motors and generators superconducting energy storage is currently used to smooth out short term fluctuations in the electric grid but it's still remains relatively niche because it takes a lot of energy to keep superconductors cold room temperature superconductors. Especially, if they could be engineered to stand strong magnetic fields might serve as very efficient ways to store large amounts of energy for longer periods of time making renewable but intermittent energy sources like wind turbines or. Solar cells more effective, and because flowing electricity crates, magnetic fields superconductors can also be used to create powerful magnets for applications as diverse as MRI machines and levitating trains. Superconductors are of great potential importance to the nascent field of quantum computing as well. Superconducting cubits are already the basis of some of the world's most powerful quantum computers being able to make such. Cubans without having to cool them down would not only make computers simpler smaller and cheaper but. Could lead to more rapid progress in creating systems of many cubits depending on the exact properties of the superconductors that are created it remains to be seen whether scientists can devise stable compounds that are superconducting not only at ambient temperature, but also at ambient pressure. But the researchers are optimistic. They conclude their paper with this tantalizing claim quote, a robust resume temperature superconducting material that will transform the energy economy quantum information processing, and sensing may be achievable and quote.

Energy Information Administrat Mit Technology Kelvin Enza University Of Rome George Washington University Washington Jose Flora United States Planck Institute For Chemistry Physicist Carnegie Institution Germany
Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded to 3 Scientists for Work on Black Holes

The Economist: Babbage

01:34 min | 5 months ago

Nobel Prize in Physics Awarded to 3 Scientists for Work on Black Holes

"Next came the physics. It's winners can boast they share an honor with Albert Einstein and Marine Pierre Curie Alex, tell us about this year's winners. So there are three winners this year for the Physics Prize. Goes to Suraj, penrose, who's a physicist and mathematician? He's one of the most prominent scientists in the UK. He's almost ninety years old. He's a permanent and everything from very mathematics to cosmology to material science. He writes puzzles. He's he's a real polymath genius and it's about time he wanted to Nobel prize. The other half of the Nobel prize goes to you Andrea Gez who is a professor of Astro Physics at the University of California Los Angeles and Heart Kansal he's an astrophysicist at. The University of California Berkeley and together the three of them win full increasing understanding of black holes. So Roger Penrose created some mathematical tools in the sixties that built on Albert. Einstein's general relativity the theory of gravity in the universe and several Japan rose created a way of using general relativity to predict black holes in the universe. So how they might actually form and then Andrea gas and reinhard denzil independently lead teams starting in the nineteen ninety s to track the orbits of Stars. Around. Sort of an object that sits in the middle of the Milky Way, our home galaxy, and there they were attempting to show that the object at the middle of Galaxy was indeed a black hole and they proved that with over twenty years of measurements

Roger Penrose Nobel Prize Albert Einstein Physics Prize Andrea Gez Pierre Curie Alex University Of California Berke Andrea Gas University Of California Los A Reinhard Denzil Suraj Physicist Heart Kansal UK Japan Professor
In Depth With Carlo Rovelli

After The Fact

06:41 min | 5 months ago

In Depth With Carlo Rovelli

"Carlo Ravelli thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you for having me you. are a physicist who I must say writes like a poet and your book the seven brief lessons on physics has has sold Is If something like forty languages around the world and it ends with this most amazing line that I would like to to start our conversation with if you don't mind you say on the edge of what we know in contact with the oceans of the unknown. Shines the mystery and beauty of the world. Is that science is that the pursuit of science for you? Yes. Definitely. because science. Starts I think both historically and in the life of each scientists a with a wonder and with the mystery. And in fact, I think the nature of science is to realize that we do not know things and therefore we're curious to go and try to. Find out and the nature of of scientists also the based on the discovery that we can find out things. We can discover things that we did not know there is a methodology to to science, but the scientific method is both something that leads us forward but also makes I. Pause makes us go take two steps back, reevaluate its science it seems despite methodology. Is Not Linear people talk about the scientific method. But I would say those less of a scientific method. Than what one usually think? It's like painting. Of course, there is a method painting you go to school and they teach you how to paint. But then the painter is the guy who does does not follow what is being taught to invent something else. and. In fact, in science, it has happened all over again. In the in the history of science that what was considered the the good mattered before it turned out to be insufficient and new things were found found out. Of course, there are many aspect of science which are. Pretty stable and that give it strength. Checking. Not Trusting ideas unless you find a way to confirm them. Try To base your information on actual data and and looking at the world observing measuring checking. Putting in doubt not believing the things you you believe him there's a beautiful line in by actor Galileo in the play in which a at the end in which in the play there's Galileo the one of the inventors of science so to say. With one of his young assistant and they got an idea in the assistant says. Now. Let's do everything possible to show. That is right and Galileo says, no, no no, let's do it. Everything possible to show that it is wrong. And if it is survives, we start believing it. fascinate yes. So you know. We are speaking at a time when the world of course is facing this terrible pandemic. And scientific research about this unfolding before our eyes are there lessons for us all in in what we're learning how this is unfolding as you say We we have learned things that we think are right about the virus and then something changes in our we have to we have to adjust our thinking how we can counteract it. It gets it gets up again to the point of Galileo right how do we prove ourselves? Wrong? We sued you tried of where find out where we were right I. Think Yeah. I. Think there are lessons and then and in fact it's it's it's an opportunity seeing how science works the first thing we all notice is that we don't know anything we are in the dark and that's a that's often the starting point of science. The second thing is we're not completely dark. The reason we are. Searching for a way to heal this. Virus and for a vaccines is because we have wasted ill illnesses that are extraordinary effective on the one hand we see the limits of science on the other hand we see the power of signs. Let me put in this way. Few generations ago not many maybe two centuries ago the average expected live the life expectancy of people where several decades decades shorter than today this is because there was a scientific method or some sort to that helped us learn how to deal with with illness and that's what is being used. The second point is that we see that scientists look in different directions, right one search, one methods, another search, another methods, and of course, each scientists of tries to believe or sort of believe be confident in the way he's going, but we don't know a priori who is right. However those convergence and that's the point. There are always being convergence in scientific. Debates in uncertainty so after the debate after the searcher. The knowledge that is acquired is definitely knowledge so it will take time, but it will come out. Perhaps. The last comment is that we all see how science is crucial I. Mean if there's anything that can save us for a lot of pain, the situation is knowledge. I chose science as my. As, the field where I hope I can in my in my info humidity and in my little. Being small contribute to the overall discussion but I have not chosen signs as the only prisoner from which to look at the world I. Think we should. We should use problems. We should look at the world through literature through our to politics too our leaves. So I think it's a coming together of perspectives. I went into sign slater in my life to come directly question only at some point. I stumbled innocence upon science and I fell in love with. It was a non rational choice. It was an emotional choice I started to study at school. Modern physics. Relativity quantum mechanics. All that and I said, wow, this is incredibly beautiful I. WanNa I. WanNa work this and then I realized that I was good in it and so I said okay this is this is what I do in my life.

Galileo Carlo Ravelli Physicist Slater
"physicist" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:48 min | 8 months ago

"physicist" Discussed on The Science Show

"You can't see them. And he goes on. Surely nothing is every bit as physical is something. Especially, if it is to be defined as the absence of something. Now. Is this really solid? Otherwise understood nothing to the absence of everything. And now, Lawrence Krauss assures us that nothing is actually the presence of an absence of something. And that he has physical properties. But, it can't really be like that either. For a best nothing can only be the virtual presence of an absence of something. This no objective reality remember. So we may well ask how virtual particles poppy in and out of virtual existence have physical properties. On this formulation, what can physical possibly main? Then in the fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene Columbia University I read that reality. The stuff of the universe is composed of six dimensional vibrations in tiny loops of virtual stream. In other words, the universe is like a ten dimensional pot of boiling. Bubbling Virtual Spaghetti made a virtual pastor in a virtual pot. But white shouldn't that also be virtual reality and don't the vibrations have to be virtual to? And if not, how does virtual spaghetti produce real vibrations. This time Max Take Mark Professor of physics at Mit has the answer. In his book, a Mathematical Universe he writes. Physical world not only is described by mathematics, but it is mathematics. Not Real, mathematics, not real objective mathematics, course, but virtual mathematics virtual mathematicians like Max mark. And Max take mark is not alone. Vlatko Vedra professor of quantum information science at Oxford. Writes something very similar. Information and not matter or energy or love is the building block on which everything is constructed? Moreover in apparent support of Stephen Hawkins claimed that the universe created itself. The drawl adds information in contrast matter energy is the only concept that we currently have the can explain its own origin. Anton Zeilinger professor of physics at the University of Vienna. Also thinks that reality is made of information. In fact, he thinks reality and information are indistinguishable. We have learned in the history of physics that it is important not to make distinctions that have no basis such as the pre Newtonian distinction between the laws on earth, and those that govern the motions of the heavenly bodies. I suggest that in a similar way the distinction between reality and knowledge of. Between Reality and information cannot be made. Max Plank, the father of quantum mechanics and recipient of the nineteen eighteen prize ventured even further. In an interview with science writer, John Sullivan keep proposed that everything is made of consciousness. I regard consciousnesses fundamental. Regard matter as derivative from consciousness. Everything that we regard is existing postulates concerts nece. Sullivan's interview with plank was published in the London Observer on the twenty fifth of January nineteen thirty one. Planks hid it again in Florence in nineteen, forty four. There is no matter as such or matter. Originating exists only by virtue of the existence of a conscious and intelligent spirit. This spirit is the Matrix of Olmeta. Now. If plank is right then, I suppose we should expect the large Hadron collider soon to turn up another new elementary particle, the fundamental interaction of the spirit or consciousness field. A plank bozon perhaps. In the ensuing years, planks view gained support from Fred Allen Wolf One time professor of physics at San Diego. State University. WHO IN A book entitled? Parallel? universes combined it with a wheeler feinman absorb theory. And concluded that the world we see out there appears physical form because information from the past, and from the future joins for a momentary flash of consciousness. Throw out either and nothing would exist as a solid object. So.

Max Plank Professor of physics Max mark Stephen Hawkins Lawrence Krauss John Sullivan Fred Allen Wolf Anton Zeilinger Brian Greene Columbia Universi Vlatko Vedra University of Vienna professor London Observer State University white Olmeta Florence San Diego writer
"physicist" Discussed on Science Friction

Science Friction

11:52 min | 1 year ago

"physicist" Discussed on Science Friction

"This is an ABC podcast. I'm up in a free country. I probably would not have become a scientist. It's not because I not interested in science. I've always been tricked by these most fundamental questions of nature. But I've also been tweaked by the governance of human beings. And that very young age growing up in China realized all the other career paths, I aspire to they were not possible because of the political conditions in China. I couldn't be John Lewis without a free press a politician without democratic elections or lawyer without a rule of law as science became the only profession within my interests. And that is accessible to me that I could pursue without compromise. The personal ease getting political onsides friction today. Welcome to the show on the Tesha Mitchell with a passionate story of the pursuit of freedom, and of science and human rights. Particle physicist. Dr.

China ABC John Lewis Tesha Mitchell physicist scientist
"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:26 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"I'm coming from a place. Which I don't fully understand. But it's cold awareness. Among key. Doesn't have the kind of awareness. We have is a place within us. Where is that within? Well, let me just just be a little physics with you. In the beginning. Was the void. And this was on the face of the deep. Now. What's that mean? If you're a physicist summit attack you now if you're a physicist how did the universe begin with the big bang? What would that come from? Where did it come from? No in the mini gaining scripture says in the beginning, avoid it's credit. And then he says over said let there be light. Beginning where heat flows through the cold receiving cold and temendous speed always perfectly. Tufik speed the speed of light so to speak, but more than the speed of light because light is being carried and producers of resistance, a small resistance, but it flows with gravity if flows where won't go into that right now while I'm trying to say go back to it. I'm trying to say. Is it? Everything came from. So if I use the word place, I can't find another word. It's not an aside. It's not an in this side where we are. Is out there. Just beyond. Outside the universe. You is outside the universe is not inside the universe because you have to have something absolutely still to make relatively relativity of motion possible..

physicist
"physicist" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on Daniel and Jorge Explain the Universe

"Hi, Maury cartoonist, and I'm Daniel particle physicist. And this is our podcast Daniel and Horry explained the universe in which a cartoonist and physicist try to figure out how to make the universe understandable to anybody. Yeah. And to the on the podcast, we are examining a very heavy topic. Gravity, and specifically why is gravity so weak and strange gravity as we said earlier is something which controls the structure of the universe. I mean, the reason the solar system looks the way it does is because of gravity the reason the earth is round is because of gravity. The reason we have galaxies is because of gravity. The reason we waste so much is because of gravity, right? No. No, that's because of late night. But it's such a fundamental force of nature, right leg. It's present in our everyday live. We spent a lot of time thinking about gravity, right? How not to fall down droppings? How to go up buildings go down buildings, right? These seems like one of the most important forces. I mean, if you ask people to name a force or what kind of forces the experience in their life gravity's, the one that's present in their lives. Right. You're climate upstairs. You're fighting gravity trip. You fall down. You're feeling gravity. You look around you the shape of things is controlled by gravity. And that's why it's particularly strange that gravity is the weakest force of all the forces. We've discovered it's by far the weakest yet into release strange to hear you say that really how can gravity be week. Like, you know, like, it's it's keeping the whole earth together. It's making the entire planet. Swing going Thurgau basically right without gravity. We would just shoot off into space. Right. It's a really strange. Situation. And there's other things about gravity. We don't understand as well. It's really strange. It doesn't play well with the other forces. It's very very weak. It's a total mystery signs, except that we have a theory which works beautifully, right? We can calculate. Exactly how mercury orbits a sun. We can send things in outer space and no with two millimeter precision, exactly where they're gonna land. We have a working theory that we can use. Right. But we don't understand it on a conceptual level. We have these basic deep questions about about what gravity is and how the universe works because of it. So it's a weird question. And maybe one that people had thought about before. So Daniel went out as usual and ask people on the street. Why do you think gravity so week? Here's what of random selection of folks who are willing to talk to me on a Tuesday morning had to say about gravity. I should. I was I was those are pretty strong. I I don't know. Because. It depends on this, and it's long range one. So that's why we feel it very weak. Most of the time. No, I have. No, I'm sorry..

Daniel physicist Horry
"physicist" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Move harriers. And so they called up. Theoretical physicists in the science that they were studying was quantum mechanics? It was actually quantum mechanics that made me want to become a theoretical physicist. So it's interesting because in a sense relativity, you might say was a means to an end for me, and it's a beautiful theory. But it was a means to an end whereas quantum mechanics was just as mysterious beautiful thing that I needed to understand. And so it was fortunate for me that it turned out that I was a physicist. So I knew I could get both six I could understand relativity to see how time machine would be built at the same time. You know, I could understand what it was like to be a theoretical physicist. Use these equations to understand how the universe works in a strange thing quantum mechanics. So that was really the people are surprised at that was actually my love for quantum mechanics is real interesting question, which actually. To become a theoretical physicist. Well, they're building some incredible things. The large Hadron collider at certain Switzerland. In French borders amazing now who knows how close they can come to building an actual time machine. In terms of the things you've done to try to construct one. Are you still at it? Or are you letting other people work on? No you have to remember member. I sit down with your medical physicists, right? That what I did was to Einstein had developed a set of equations. They're called Einstein's gravitational field equations, they're part of what's known as general theory of relativity. And essentially what that series says is Einstein's theory says that what we call the gravitational force really isn't a force at all. It's actually the structure of space, and what he meant by that in the simple analogy that I give to people is the fact that think of empty spaces being like, let's say like a rubber sheet like a trampoline and think of..

physicist Einstein Switzerland
"physicist" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"It chuck sivertsen abc news cosmos space and time travel science and technology brought to you by fear radical physicist futurist popularizer of science and world renowned.

physicist
"physicist" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Conversation what condition conversation wbz here for years dick summer for example still here still doing it six one seven five four ten thirty there's the toll free triple eight nine two nine ten thirty and a super excited about the newest episode of the jay talking podcast astronomy astronomy is not the dry astronomy and physics i accidentally took astronomy in college and it turned out to be my favorite course took it the very last course in the summer and i was just astonished by it and i was really astonished i guess the other night doug the astronomer and physicist who actually makes his own telescopes he actually grinds the glass for his own telescopes how's that for for a hobby beer making winemaking can bucci making any bringing up a notch telescope making something you probably could do if you're into it i wonder how he does it i think he does it at his house i'm not sure you invited me to go up there because i go up to new hampshire all the time i wanna religion to the puck i'm gonna listen to the podcast and i urge you to do the same thing mark just posted it it's galactic sized podcast as you as you will read jay talking podcast you can just do a one off on the computer just google it and play it you can subscribe get them all automatically on itunes or what have you got on your phone also and it's just occurs to me recently i i have one hundred eight travel videos one hundred and eight the yours to watch for free anytime.

jay doug physicist google
"physicist" Discussed on The Bible Project

The Bible Project

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on The Bible Project

"This in the notes but i'll just relate because it was really interesting this was about the development of the concept of force fields oh science right okay so and really it's the use of the word field okay right so you mentioned this was a physicist faraday michael faraday daniel fair day really important i know the last name faraday says michael faraday okay michael faraday there's whole institute you know physics dedicated to carrying on his legacy mid eighteen hundreds he's like pioneering physicist so he developed the concept of the magnetic field so what we're talking about is when a magnet the effect that a magnet has yeah like a you know the classic thing throw a magnum table with little pieces of iron around it yeah it exerts a force yeah or a force in attraction brings certain of those little pieces of iron business stick to it and there's a real estate around it in which it works there is a space around it where the attraction is strong enough to actually move it yeah so the whole point was about would we call that yeah what do we call that case so he developed the metaphor of field which was used according to oxford english dictionary at the time to use this an actual plot of land plot of land where everything in it is the same thing it's a cornfield wheatfield so to feel dedicated to a certain thing and everything in it's the same and then you can have field as a metaphor of like of study a field research field of whatever quantum mechanics so yeah so it wasn't that that was always a metaphor at some point fair day was like man something we need to talk about we don't have language for you so he adapted english word field and it actually changed its meaning because of magnetic field is not like a wheatfield because a wheat field doesn't have more wheat in the middle and less we on the outer rings what i love is that almost all languages that way correct that's right and that's that's always fascinat.

michael faraday physicist
"physicist" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on Science Friday

"Well i did fight very hard i think it's important yeah jodi jodi you're absolutely right yeah i'm not fighting i think we have over the last decade and we have ruled out a tremendous number of ideas about what a wimp could be but i think to say that it's completely dead is not a fair statement let me move on from the wimp to new thinking about physics and flip do we need new ideas are you're young you're young astronomer physicist theoretical physicist do you bring new ideas to the table that you're perhaps your your your forefathers i might say not been accepting of oh gosh i hope my advisers and listening yes so what's really interesting i think that me and probably the a lot of my colleagues we see ourselves as refugees from the large hadron collider so we are a group of of theoretical physicists who kind of cut our teeth in our phd's of building new theories for the higgs bose on and all of the promises of the nineties theories on ninety super symmetry extra dimensions all these weird ideas that we've kind of sold ourselves drinking the kool aid that when the large hadron collider turns on we're gonna find all these new particles and explain everything about the higgs and come twenty thirteen when we're all writing up our dissertations the discovers the higgs and it turns out to be the most boring possible thing from the point of view of new physics and i think a lot of the theorists on of my generation kind of had a bit of an identity crisis where we had to reevaluate what is the most pressing question in particle physics and not only what is the most pressing question but what is the most pressing question that we actually have a shot at answering experimentally in our lifetimes and so i think we've all brought a kind of tool kit for how do we approach models of particle physics to this new arena of dark matter.

jodi jodi physicist higgs
"physicist" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Yep so then let's start with who are you rob so my my background i mean in my core scientist physicist mathematician but then i actually left the hard sciences in expanded into like nba to get a little bit management experience in military officer for leadership experience event i went back from a phd actually financial economics is i thought that having the kind of the hard science than the econ background would just be a really nice combo to build especially to do what we're doing here i think it's a perfect combo so why i got into bitcoin i could say i came from just a heritage of libertarian cypher punks where bitcoin came from i just got lucky i guess being part of that community and you know getting into bitcoin early on and then from there i started getting involved in the community actually started doing active research for my phd in on bitcoin pricing and then that led me to actually be getting a little bit more entrepreneurial involved in the space then the more i got into it the more i just it just kind of sucked me in and then i was on a project called z classic working court team there and talking to a few of the other guys on the team we realize just kind of a big gap in the industry particularly in the governor inside in applying economics i think a little bit more thoroughly to different stakeholder groups in expanding the particular technology in a direction we thought just made a lot of sense so that that's where we we launched zan from that motivation right on so you're in the military you have your mba and you have a phd you're not a slender i can say i'm actually my my mom will tell you i'm still abd on the doctor which is all but dissertation so i teach and actually teach bitcoin to boxing courts but i still eat to defend my dissertation later this stall hopefully not would reynaud.

nba officer zan scientist physicist
"physicist" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"That this is our inert objects they don't they're not open systems they're really closed systems the way physicist look at it the thing that's unusual about physics is that it's a level microphysics level we can't see really what's going on in the levels we can see what's going on we see that systems are organized is open systems they require it's throughput this flocks now the ancients did that i believe they they inferred like i did that even though we can't really see what's going on at a micro physical level wouldn't it be normal that nature operates in a similar fashion in that matter and energy are example of open systems that the ether is really a never ending flux that's going on and as long as that flex continues the physical world is maintained you see that concept in hindu myths for example the idea of this new dreaming idea of dreaming as concept of process and as the dream continues the mayor is generated the physical universe and then when he awakens may dissolves now that it's not that there's nothing at that point it's just the physical universe those waves and either dissipate and the you realize all along you're vishnu dreaming so when you refer to ancients well this goes to i believe back to the ice age the source of this knowledge i believe that it was lost due to a major cataclysm that happened to the planet and there was a appears a major effort to encode this science of creation in myths particularly creation myths you find it in ancient egyptian myth of out tomb also in the story of us iras you find it in the crash the greek creation myth of house zeus and his brothers sisters created the world the universe you find it a mess up to tame ian creation myth babylonian creation epic it's in the east ching hitching metaphysics you find it in the tyrol also in astrology the first thing that killed me into this this ancient science was the taro i was explaining my theory of physics which is based on this idea of a reaction kinetics either either that's engaged in process and in certain way you know you can actually describe the processes that.

physicist
"physicist" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"You know he was he was just an awfully nice man and fun to be with i never to tell you the truth every time i went into talk with him i took in the list of questions mainly to do with what i was writing about him but at the end of the lists would be questions i really wanted to know myself the more the deeper more personal questions maybe well he had very slow communicating with them all never got down to those questions and i am sorry about that i wish that it happened i don't know we don't have any time there's one other anecdote i wanted to mention but i think we don't have time to we if you could get it in in thirty seconds comment that has com his colleague gary gibbons made about him last summer at a conference who may gary was a graduate student with him at cambridge way back when and gary gary came to cambridge thinking he was a brilliant physicist thesis i thought it was a brilliant physicist and i met stephen hawking and it was like salary meeting moats via for analogy vigil basu vermont and we have just a minute to go here i your last thought and and how do we encourage more scientists sort of pushing the directions at hawking win well you know so he was human like all other humans and had his pluses and minuses he was also lonely man sometimes to the later years of his life because it was very slow talking to him so my sense was not as many people talk to him as should have could have would have because it was just hard to do so but i think the thing that we can do to remember him in the positive light and what we can learn from is courage right he had courage and thaddeus the way in which people if people have courage they can do like him on the chief similar greatness i would say well as hawking himself once said he believes he was lucky in his condition that had ails had progress more slowly than is often the case it shows that one not need not lose hope.

gary gibbons graduate student gary gary physicist stephen hawking moats basu vermont cambridge thirty seconds
"physicist" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Scholar is to convey the fruits of knowledge to the broader public because in fact the broader public cares and is interested so you know yeah i've had the experience of being in cabs all around the world and the cabdriver when he finds out that i'm a physicist will turn around and start asking me questions about quantum mechanics or about 'cause molly or something and steven was really was passionate about conveying these ideas now now i have to say that if you read the brief history of time it's not always necessarily fully comprehensible to the lay public you know i gave that book as a present to my parents and the comment was it's really beautiful but we didn't really understand but sometimes it doesn't matter you know sometimes you read poetry and you don't really understand it but it's beautiful inspiring anyway well an nba to to the point that kid he was making that it was really really important for to hawking to make things as comprehensible as he could he came back and wrote a briefer history of time right and took out a lot of the technical details right and juno partly through that role by doing that in the heat i think i think part of the reason he so beloved is he became a metaphor for the human condition you know we're all tied hand and foot by being said animals on the earth you have to eat you've got to find housing does the daily life but you get sick you die but we all yearn for deeper and higher truths right now stephen hawking was even more challenged physically than most of us but he really exemplified they're dea that there are these higher truths and that you should try to learn them and then try to communicate them and he was deeply influential that way you absolutely hit the nail on the head that's kind of what more my mind was this morning when i had heard that he had died because i mean i just feel like his influence i'll tell you on me personally really had less to do with.

physicist nba stephen hawking molly steven
"physicist" Discussed on Think Again

Think Again

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on Think Again

"Thinking in is brought to you by the national association of realtors every business faces challenges whether you need more space a better location or a little more curb appeal a realtor a member of the national association of realtors can help you find the right place to grow so get what your business needs get realtor hi there i'm jason godsend you're listening to think again a big thing podcast mm back in the old days if your species was faced with the next essential threat you were stuck hoping for some advantageous mutation maybe an extra finn or a slightly more sophisticated eyeball outwitting fate was pretty much out of the question and as much as we might prefer to disco bingewatch something and forget about it there are several plausible scenarios whereby humanity could face extinction in the too close for comfort future happily thanks to our very large brains and thinkers like my guest today theoretical physicist michio kaku we have some options dr kaku his latest book is the future of humanity tara forming mars interstellar travel immortality and our destiny beyond earth welcome to think again dr kaku that v on so it seems to me that kind of related to see peace snows old idea of the two cultures rate that the humanity is in the sciences were separating off that we may be facing something similar with respect to technology knowledge e and the future i read a lot of philosophy and literature and so on and those people are terrified many of them of many of the things that you study and talk about and then there are many people on the other side of the spectrum who are extremely extremely excited about the future about what's emerging and technology about where we're headed well i think that we are evolutionary really uh hardwired to be terrified of the future and the unknown because our ancestors were timid monkeys every time they saw a tiger in the forests or the rustling of leaves in the forests they ran that's why we're here today precisely because our ancestors were terrified of the unknown and the future those that weren't if i eat enough because once in awhile there was a tiger lurking in the forest however how do we deal with things that aren't terrifying we deal with them in three stages okay stage one is we say resolves all my.

michio kaku physicist
"physicist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The academic ladder as a physicist what happened to your interest in time travel during those years the thing is is that even when i was a kid i knew that people were concerned about me because i was in this depressed state and so i was astute enough to realise not the tell him that i was wanted to build a time machine we could implement relay us exactly and of course when i was growing up the academic ladder you know i thought i tell my colleagues interested in building a time machine right not yet thank you were still thinking about our whole young progress so far in physics you put the idea of time travel no no no no see the thing is is that what i did was i developed the cover plan you have to the physics physics is a strange strange peace this what people call legitimate crazy ideas and then there's what people call crazy crazy black holes were legitimate crazy and other words in black holes it turns out that black holes or connected with on size work and black holes are connected with taught ron malott is theoretical physicist and author of time traveller the scientists personal mission to make time travel a reality coming out bull revisit one of the greatest time travel comedy movies of all time groundhog day and will even rethink time itself i man strain champs adds to the best of our knowledge from wisconsin public radio and p r axe.

physicist ron malott wisconsin
"physicist" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"Question uh your physicist aama physicists we have of course objective statements to make to the public however in your heart of hearts any heart of hearts what do you think is out there i first of all do intelligent beings exists in outer space be can they reach us and if they do reach us are they going to be peaceful what are your thoughts like late at night when you think about this if at night i i really think of much of anything but i i will say that the idea that you give in the movies that there somewhat like slowly don't look the same but there is some like i i you know that's what that's a little bit naive if you consider what we're doing in this century we're doing a lot of interesting thing from this country are you finally under any biology and so forth and so on but also we're developing machine that have cognitive abilities comparable to our our our own artificial intelligence and not yet artificial intelligence it can play go or our poker are kiss or anything but artificial intelligence that can do anything that human brain can do and in that sant uh what we're really inventing our successors the aliens the once were likely to hear from if they're even thousand years beyond us are 100 years beyond us they will have those machines to so i think if the majority of the intelligence from because most likely to be synthetic intelligent not soft squishy biological intelligence and consequently yet i i suppose we should be looking for signals coming from not being on some sort of planet with oceans anambra here's but from you know artificial intelligence machine and that makes our experimental very much more difficult one because i know quite know what to do about that mmhmm now let me ask you the final question japan's i'll well you probably get a lot of phone calls from people that say by humbug they're already here how do i know they're here well i visited a flying saucer the other day myself it went to venus so what do you say to people who are very sincere very honest but claim that they've already met the aliens what are your thoughts well.

artificial intelligence japan physicist thousand years 100 years
"physicist" Discussed on The Weekly Substandard

The Weekly Substandard

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"physicist" Discussed on The Weekly Substandard

"Well yes will english the doctor was she lee physicist the nuclear physicist who discovered cold fusion yes that that nuclear physicist right i don't know as always wanted to she was no christmas joe i was ways you actually second mention of movies which actually pairs that two of those characters has just like yeah nuclear physicists off in the world doing awesome research and if the two of them with their characters and i think they'll be awesome that also movie that would be a great movie did you can make it funny though you get you it is comedy oz hysterical like legally blond but with physicists and yeah do tiger cheek so speak uh speaking of deathwish it sounds like i hang up death speaking of test speaking of death come on its head honestly right you're transitions for it sounds like i backs as a deathwish for three d that's why said at healthy you go now this is a story that you picked up or which of you gentlemen that i saw the sunny eusought first so what's happening is that world so everyone who is a decent person hates three d the movies this is just the fact this is in fact of science everyone hates three d nobody likes it the only reason we tolerated as filmgoers is because the studios have decided that this is an easy way to soak money from us and they they jam all of the good screening times into three d slot so if you're just like showing up at the theater and you and you and i was amazed by this this is how a not insignificant portion of the population decides what movie they wanna see on any given night they go to the theater and they pick what showing next.

physicist filmgoers