17 Burst results for "peter sokolski"

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:40 min | Last week

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's merriam webster's of the day for july eighteenth. Today's word is perry spelled p. a. r. y. Parry is a verb that means to ward off something such as a weapon or blow it can also mean to evade something such as a question by an adroit answer. Here's the word used in a sentence from golf digest by alan ship. Knock when someone referred to juan as boss. He parried not yet but he was just being literal ones first day as ceo was still a few weeks away but the announcement on february seventeenth that he would take. The job had already sent a bolt of lightning through an organization that dates to eighteen ninety four. The word perry which is used in fencing as well as in other applications was borrowed from the french verb pay meaning to ward off or to avert and may specifically have come directly from the plural imperative of that word palais p. a. r. e. z. The french likely borrowed the word from the italian pereira. Meaning to prepare adorn avert shield. Or keep out. That words source is the latin word paret meaning to supply provide or make ready an ancestor too. Many familiar english words among them prepare repair. Emperor separate and apparatus with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit marian webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

merriam webster perry Parry juan italian pereira alan golf peter sokolski marian webster
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:44 min | 8 months ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Webster's of the day for november twenty six. Today's word is vital spelled v. ict ual vittal is a noun that means food usable by people as a plural vittles. It means supplies of food or provisions. Here's the word used in the mill on the floss by george eliot. Why she's hungry. Poor little lady said the younger woman. Give her some of the cold vittal. You've been walking a good way. I'll be bound my ear. Where's your home. If you're hungry for the story behind the word ville get ready to dig into a rich and fulfilling history. The word derives via the middle english and anglo. French word vitae. From the late latin plural noun victoria aaliyah meaning provisions and ultimately by way of victis meaning nourishment or way of living the latin verb v. Very meaning to live. Vera is the source of a whole smorgasbord of other english words such as vital vivid and survive. It's also the root of violent v. I a. n. d. another english word referring to food. There's also vittles v. I t. t. l. e. s. a word. That sounds like it might be an alteration of the plural vittles v. Ict u. a. l. s. both are pronounced the same but which is actually just an earlier development of the middle english vitae. That was served before fiddle with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit marian webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

Webster george eliot Vera peter sokolski
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:30 min | 9 months ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Mary looks tres of the day. Four november twelfth. Today's word is advocate spelled a. b. e. g. At abney gate is a verb that informal english means deny or renounce or to surrender or relinquish. Here's the word used in a sentence from the christian science monitor by deborah tannin if the goal is only ensuring balance than journalists can feel their work is don when they have reported accusations flung from each side abnegating the responsibility to examine the validity of the attacks. There's no denying that. The latin root negara has given english some useful words the verb which means to deny is the source of the noun. Negation a synonym of denial. In time people concluded that if there was a noun negation there ought to be related verb adam negate and so they created one by a process called back formation and the process of trimming and affix off along word to make shorter one other english offspring of new garay include. Deny negate and renegade. With your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit marian webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups..

abney gate deborah tannin christian science monitor peter sokolski Mary
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Merriam Webster's word of the day for October nineteenth today's word is D.C. Spent also occasionally checked its way into more general usage to refer to deceptive or evasive moves or actions with your word of the day I'm Peter Sokolski

Merriam Webster Peter Sokolski
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Merriam Webster's word of the day for October fifteenth. Today's word is belfry spouse b. e. l. f. r. y. belfry is a noun that means a bell tower especially one surmounting or attached to another structure. Belfry can also mean and he's not quite right in the Belfry with your word of the day I'm Peter Sokolski visit Marian Webster Dot com today for F- initiatives wordplay and trending look ups

Belfry Merriam Webster Peter Sokolski
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Merriam Webster's word of the day for October fourteenth today's word is teric outer or less initiate circle or relating to the outside external here's the word used in a sentence as a specialist writing Boundary Exo T. E. R. I C. Esoteric is an adjective that means suitable to be imparted to the public it can also mean belonging to the initiated alone it descends from the Greek word for within. So with your word of the day I'm Peter Sokolski visit Merriam Webster or a broader audience a net faces the challenge of producing an esoteric synthesis of complex information the word exa teric derives from the DOT com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups

Merriam Webster Peter Sokolski
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"The Merriam Webster's word of the day for October first. Today's word is mitigate spelled. Mit I G at mitigate is a verb that means to cause to become less harsh or hostile to mollify it can also also mean to make less severe or painful to alleviate or to lessen the seriousness of to extend you wait. Here's the word used in a sentence from time mm-hmm by Alejandro de la Garza more important than treating migraines once they come on is avoiding episodes to begin with says diamond that means is taking steps to adjust your work routine and office environment as much as possible in order to mitigate this specific factors that prompt episodes. The meaning of the word mitigate is straightforward enough. It is most often used to talk about making something such as a problem symptom or punishment less harsh or severe sometimes however it appears where the similar looking word militate is expected that word which is often followed by against danced means to have weight or effect as in your unexcused absences might militate against you're getting a promotion. The two words are not closely closely related etymologically mitigate descends from the Latin Verb Meaty Garay meaning to soften whereas militate traces to Mealy Tareh another Latin verb verb that means to engage in warfare but the confusion between the two has existed for long enough that some usage commentators have accepted to mitigate against just as an idiomatic alternative to militate. If you want to avoid criticism you should keep mitigate and militate distinct with your word of the day I'm Peter Sokolski visit Merriam Webster. Dot Com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups and.

Merriam Webster Alejandro de la Garza Peter Sokolski
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Mary looks tres word of the day for august twelfth. Today's word is plaintive spelled spelled p. l. a. n. t. i v. e. Plaintiff is an adjective that means expressive of suffering or whoa melancholy. Here's the word used in a sentence from billboard dot com by mara ryan stein stevie wonder did perform plaintiff cover of the john lennon classic doc imagine for his penultimate number a statement piece that he's inc on his tours since the nineteen nineties and which he noted as being still relevant despite originally coming out in nineteen seventy-one like its relative the word plant plaintive is often used to describe sad sounds a plaintive wail for example is a common use plaintive and plan geant along with relatives plaintiff and complain ultimately derive from from the latin verplank array meaning to strike to beat once breast or to lament this latin verb led to plant a word that came through anglo french to the english meaning lamentation plant is the root of the middle english word plaintiff meaning lamenting or complaining which gave rise to plaintive active as well as the noun plaintiff with your word of the day. I'm peter sokolski visit miriam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay replay and trending word look ups.

john lennon Mary peter sokolski
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Merriam Webster's word of the day four November fifth. Today's word is mordant spelled M O R D A N T. Morton is an adjective that means biting and caustic in thought manner or style. It's a synonym of incisive. It can also mean acting as a mordant as in changing the color of something with die or it can mean burning or pungent. Here's the word used in a sentence from Churchill a biography by ROY Jenkins when clementine tried to tell him that the result might well. Be a blessing in disguise Churchill maintained his normal standards of Morton, twit by replying that at the moment, it certainly very well disguised, the etymology of the word mordant, certainly has some bite to it that word which came to modern English through middle. French ultimately derives from the Latin verb morjera, which means to bite, in modern parlance, Morton usually suggest. Chests wit that is used with deadly effectiveness more dairy puts the bite into other English terms to for instance, that route gave us the tasty word morsel, meaning a tiny bite but nibble too many of those and you'll likely be hit by more dairy derivative remorse meaning guilt for past wrongs, which comes from the Latin word remorse dairy, meaning to bite again. With your word of the day. I'm Peter Sokolski. Visit Marian Webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word ups.

Morton Merriam Webster Churchill Marian Webster ROY Jenkins Peter Sokolski clementine
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Merriam Webster's word of the day for me, your teeth. Today's word is nascent also pronounced nasons and spelled N A S C E N T nascent is an adjective that means coming or having recently come into existence. Here's word used in a sentence from the Washington Post by Chris impact. Bazo starts by upending the world of books with his startup. Amazon using the nascent internet to challenge brick and mortar book chains like Barnes and noble. The word nascent comes from NASCAR since the present participle of the Latin verb Naski which means to be born, it's a relative newcomer to the collection of English words that derive from that Latin verb. In fact, when the word nascent was itself, a newborn in the first quarter of the seventeenth century, other Naski offspring were already respectably, mature words like nation, native and nature had been around since the thirteen hundreds in Nate and Natal since the fourteen hundreds more recently, we picked up some French descendants of Naski name spelled N E with an acute accent on the I E in the seventeen hundreds and renaissance in the eighteen hundreds. One of. Our newer Naski words is paranoia tala jersey, which was first used in the late nineteen sixties to name the specialized branch of medicine concerned with childbirth with your word of the day. I'm Peter Sokolski. Visit MAry Webster dot com. Today for definitions, wordplay and trending word ups.

Merriam Webster Washington Post Amazon Peter Sokolski Naski NASCAR Nate Barnes C E N T Chris
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Merriam Webster's the day for may seven. Today's word is decimate spelled D E C I am a T decimate is a verb that means to select by lot and kill. Every tenth man of it can also mean to exact a tax of ten percent from to reduce drastically, especially in number or to cause great destruction or harm to. Here's the word used in a sentence from the Kansas City star by Casey L Paul's we must do everything we can to eliminate the diseases that have the potential to decimate our population. If we do not take action. The connection between the word decimates and the number ten harks back to a brutal practice of the army of ancient Rome, a unit that was guilty of a severe crimes, such as mutiny was punished by the selection and execution of one tenth of its soldiers, thereby scaring the remaining nine tenths into obedience. It's no surprise that the word for this practice came from the Latin day Chem meaning ten from this route. We also get our words decimal and decade as well as December so named because it was originally the tenth month of the calendar before the addition of January and February in its extended uses decimate strayed from its tenth meaning and nowadays refers to the act of destroying or damaging a great quantity or large part of something with your word of the day. I'm Peter Sokolski. Visit MAry Webster dot com. Today for definitions, wordplay and trending word, look ups.

Merriam Webster Casey L Paul Kansas City Rome Peter Sokolski ten percent
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Mariam Webster's worthy day for April thirteen. Today's podcast is sponsored by spice islands, not all spices are created equal, so spice islands buys many of their spices whole from around the world for spice tips and recipes and to print a coupon to try spice islands for yourself. Visit spice, islands dot com. Slash Mariam. Today's word is aegis also pronounced ages and spelled A E G I S aegis noun that means a shield or breastplate emblematic of majesty that was associated with Zeus and Athena. It can also mean more broadly protection or controlling or conditioning influence aegis also means auspices, or sponsorship, or control or guidance, especially by an individual group or system. Here's the word used in a sentence. The matter will be dealt with under the aegis of the ethics committee. We borrowed the word aegis from. Latin. But the word ultimately derives from the Greek noun aggies which means goat skin in ancient Greek mythology and aegis was something that offered physical protection, and it has been depicted in various ways including as a magical protective cloak made from the skin of the goat that suckled Zeus as an infant and as shield fashioned by face this, the bore, the severed head of the Gorgan Medusa the word I entered English in the fifteenth century as a now referring to the shield or protective garment associated with Zeus or Thenia. It later took on a more general sense of protection and by the late nineteenth century, it had acquired the extended senses of auspices and sponsorship with your word of the day. I'm Peter Sokolski visit MAry Webster dot com. Today for definitions, wordplay and trending word ups.

Mariam Webster Peter Sokolski
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mary webster's board of the day for january twenty first today's word is extenuating spelled e x t e n you a t e extenuating is a verb that means to lessen or try to lessen the seriousness or extent of by making partial excuses to mitigate it could also be used to mean to lessen the strength or effect of here's the word used in a sentence from david copperfield by charles dickens if i did any wrong as i may have done much i did it in mistaken love and in my want of wisdom i write the exact truth i would avail me nothing to extenuating now you've probably encountered the phrase extenuating circumstances which is one of the more common ways that this were turns up in modern times extenuating was borrowed into english in the late middle ages from the latin word extenuating twos the pass part of simple of the arab extenuating ira which was itself formed by combining x with the verb tenu ria meaning to make thin in addition to the surviving senses extenuating once meant to make light of and to make thin or emaciated although those senses are now obsolete the connection to tenywa ray can be traced somewhat more clearly through them extenuating is today mostly at home in technical and legal contexts but it occasionally appears in general writing with what may be a developing meaning to prolong worsened or exaggerate this meaning which is likely due to a confession with the words extend or accentuates or both is not yet fully established with your word of the day i'm peter sokolski.

mary webster david copperfield charles dickens peter sokolski
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mariam webster's word of the day before january first today's word is fate also pronounced fat and spelled f e t e there is a circumflex accent shaped like a little hat but sometimes used on the first e fate is announ that means festival or a lavish often outdoor entertainment fate can also mean a large elaborate party here's the word used in a sentence to celebrate her parents 50th wedding anniversary eileen through and evening fate to which she invited all their friends and family members fate is a word worth celebrating it's been around since middle english when it was used in a manuscript to refer to fates spectacles and other worldly vanities since the nineteenth century fate has been doing double duty also serving as a verb meaning to honor or commemorate with a fate you can honour fate by remembering that it entered english from middle french and that it derives ultimately from the old french word fest meaning festival a route that not surprisingly also gave english the word feast because of its french ties you will sometimes see fate spelled with a circumflex above the first e as that's how it appears in french with your word of the day on peter sokolski happy new year to all of us from marion webster visit mariam webster dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word look ups.

mariam webster peter sokolski marion webster
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mary webster's word of the day for december 31st today's word is antipathetic spelled at t i t h e t i see a l antithetical is an adjective that means being indirect an unequivocal opposition directly opposite or opposed it can also mean constituting are marked by anti thesis pertaining to the rhetorical contrast of ideas by means of parallel arrangements of words clauses or sentences here's the word used in a sentence from the new york times by david mix it's telling that the library at the circle is a gorgeous but unused relic being alone with a book is something antithetical to the plugged in networking that preoccupies the company's workers the words antithetical an anti thesis entered english in the 16th century their etymological paths passed through late latin and ultimately lead to greek the greek words anti tiffin i and antef thesis mean to oppose and opposition respectively the oldest sense of the english word anti thesis refers to a language pattern that contrasts parallel ideas as in action not words or a time to plant a time to reap and to third acl can mean constituting or marked by such language patterns for example you could say the phrase action not words is an end to fed acl construction in it's more frequent use however antithetical describes something that contradicts the law gic or spirit of something else as in a policy antithetical to the company's mission with your word of the day i'm peter sokolski.

mary webster new york times peter sokolski david
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"It's mary webster word of the day for december thirty today's word is pillory spelled p i l l o r y pillory is a now that means a wooden frame for public punishment having holes in which the head and hands can be locked it can also mean more broadly a means for exposing one to public scorn or ridicule here's the word used in a sentence from esquire by dwight garner when i was in college in the 1980s the general store down the road shamed deadbeats by posting their bounced czechs next to the cash register it was a pillory of sorts a wall of shame in days gone by criminals who got caught might well have found themselves in the stocks which held the feet or both feet and hands or a pillory both of those forms of punishment and the words that name them have been around since the middle ages we latched on to pillory from the anglofrench word pillow he which has the same meaning as our english term but the exact origins of which are uncertain for centuries pillory referred only to the wooden frame used to hold a near do well but by the early sixteen hundreds folks had turned the word into a verb for the act of putting some someone in a pillory within a century they had further expanded the verb to cover any process that led to as much public humiliation as being pilloried with your word of the day i'm peter sokolski.

dwight garner peter sokolski mary webster
"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

01:33 min | 4 years ago

"peter sokolski" Discussed on Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

"Today's word is fruition spelled f r you i t i o n for wition is a now that means pleasurable use or possession enjoyment it can also mean the state of bearing fruit or realization here's the word used in a sentence from vanity fair by william make peace thackery wife and husband had nothing to do but to link each other's arms together and wander gently downwards towards old age in happy and perfect fruition the word for wish in must come from the word fruit right while not exactly fruition and fruit are related both ultimately come from the latin verb fru we meaning to enjoy but they were derived independently the original meaning of fruition had nothing to do with fruit rather when the term was first used in the early fifteenth century it meant only pleasurable use or possession not until the 19th century did for wish and develop a second meaning the state of bearing fruit possibly as a result of a mistaken assumption that fruition evolved from fruit the state of bearing fruit cents was followed quickly by the figurative application to anything that can be realised and metaphorically bear fruit such as a plan or project with your word of the day i'm peter sokolski is it marion wednesday dot com today for definitions wordplay and trending word lookouts.

wition william peter sokolski