35 Burst results for "parkinson's"

Crystal Loverro Is in a Constant State of Healing

Brain Burrow: Digging Deep into Psychology and Horror

02:11 min | Last week

Crystal Loverro Is in a Constant State of Healing

"So i'm very pleased to welcome on the program today crystal vero and i'm going to hand it over to crystal with the typical open ended question. Who exactly is crystal aveiro. I think you saw for having me market so pleasure to be here So who am i. Let's say well. I am an actor. A model of producer martial artist acting is my first and most passionate love in terms of what i consider myself and what i do. I grew up in binghamton new york. Which is upstate our south of syracuse. For those weren't super familiar with new york city so i started my career In college in psychology. That's why like super excited to be here because psychology is also huge huge. Love of mine sweitzer. Before i decided chase my dreams an actor so Yeah i got i. I went to courtland It's also in upstate. New york kind of a small town. Not a lot of people know about. But i there for year For psychology and then i transferred to binghamton university. Which is from my hometown on. And i switched over to neuro science. And i ended up graduating with a bachelor's of science and neuroscience. While i was there i did a lot of research on parkinson's disease. Actually the shirt. I'm wearing worked for the podcast. It's big brain. I got it from science twenty-six teen which is awesome neuroscience convention We were in san diego so after i graduated My thoughts words to go to med school to either be neurologist or cardiology list but you know as much as i love medicine and i was an emt and loved. The i loved the field. I didn't find myself very fulfilled. Feel like it was what i was destined to do

Sweitzer Binghamton Syracuse Parkinson's Disease Binghamton University New York City Upstate New York San Diego
How A Tiny Dog Helped Me Find My Way

Does This Happen to You

02:16 min | Last month

How A Tiny Dog Helped Me Find My Way

"My dog's name is pepper. And i got him in the spring of two thousand six which is also the year. Both my parents had cancer. I was almost old enough to rent a car. But not quite. I lived at home with my parents. Well i lived with my dad most of that year because my mom was receiving cancer care out of state but more on that later. My dad also had parkinson's disease. I had graduated college three years before and in the inbetween time. I'm not sure exactly what i did. Other than quitting law school after six weeks checking out books from the library and surfing the internet which must have been boring. Because i probably had a super slow connection and there was no twitter. I also started working at a tennis club. Maybe ten to twelve hours a week. I was existing. But i didn't have anything close to a clear direction. Then my mom got diagnosed with a serious type of cancer. My dad got diagnosed with a less serious type and everything suddenly felt super dark. Like hell the florida skies become ferociously black when the massive summer thunderstorms descend. I don't remember what was going through my head during that time. I didn't keep a journal. And the only thing i'm good at remembering is random sports stuff but it seems likely. I felt scared and isolated while my mom was away undergoing multiple surgeries my dad and i- cohabitated in our traditional fashion. We mostly kept to our respective of the house and bumped into each other at mealtimes and when he wanted me to drive him to lows or the driving range so maybe. It's not so surprising that i decided i needed a dog to keep me. Company the chihuahua. All my parents got me. When i was five had died three or four years before so naturally the only type of dog i considered getting was a chihuahua

Parkinson's Disease Cancer Tennis Twitter Florida
Paul Flores Booked on Murder Charge in Kristin Smart Case

What's On Your Mind - Encore

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Paul Flores Booked on Murder Charge in Kristin Smart Case

"Obispo, California Sheriff's Office has announced arrest in the 25 year old case of missing college student Kristin Smart. Paul Flores, who was last seen with her and long considered a suspect and his father, Ruben, was arrested for a charge of murder. With zero bail, meaning he is unable to bail and Ruben Flores was arrested as an accessory to murder with the bail of $250,000 Sheriff Dian Parkinson.

Kristin Smart California Sheriff's Office Obispo Ruben Ruben Flores Sheriff Dian Parkinson
'Prime suspect' arrested in student's 1996 disappearance

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 2 months ago

'Prime suspect' arrested in student's 1996 disappearance

"A man who attended Cal Poly university in the nineteen nineties has been arrested in connection with the murder of a female student who vanished nearly twenty five years ago the sheriff in San Luis Obispo county California says they've considered forty four year old Paul flora's likely to be the suspect for years he was the last person seen with Kristen smart when she disappeared in nineteen ninety six returning to her dorm from a party announcing on K. E. Y. T. T. V. the rest of Paul Flores for the murder of Kristen smart and the rest of his father Ruben Flores as an accessory to the murder sheriff Ian Parkinson says they've executed dozens of search warrants in recent years and now have evidence linking the suspect to Kristin smart he vows they will continue to search for her remains we are not going to stop until Kristen has been recovered police say new witnesses came forward in the case after hearing about the podcast your own backyard I'm Jackie Quinn

Kristen Smart Cal Poly University Obispo County Kristin Smart Paul Flora K. E. Y. T. T. V. Ruben Flores San Luis Ian Parkinson California Kristen Jackie Quinn
2 Suspects Arrested in 1996 Disappearance of Kristin Smart

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

2 Suspects Arrested in 1996 Disappearance of Kristin Smart

"Arrests have been made in connection with the 1996 disappearance of Cal Poly student Kristin Smart Cave be Kay's Jensen. Reiter has the latest nearly 25 years later in murder charges are finally being brought against the main suspect in the Kristin Smart case. I'm here this afternoon to announce the rest of Paul Floors. The murder of Kristen Smart and the rest of his father, Ruben Flora's as an accessory to the murder. San Luis Obispo County Sheriff in Parkinson made the announcement from the Cal Poly campus, not providing any details as to what evidence finally led to those arrests. And this is probably a question I will answer at this point. That we have not recovered Kristen. We will continue to focus on finding her remains regardless of any court

Cal Poly Student Kristin Smart Kay's Jensen Kristin Smart Paul Floors Kristen Smart Ruben Flora Reiter Obispo County Cal Poly Campus San Luis Parkinson Kristen
Will Selecta Biosciences be the Next Top Platform Biotech?

Breaking Biotech

05:38 min | 3 months ago

Will Selecta Biosciences be the Next Top Platform Biotech?

"The first company. I wanted to touch on is news from july lilly and they're huge company. Say like a large mega cap at one hundred and eighty three billion dollars and what they recently presented was the full data set from their molecule demand in alzheimer's disease. And this is a phase two trial looking at this antibody that targets a specific epoch on the amyloid beta approaching and this episode is only visible in established plaques. Now i don't want to belabor the point about the amyloid hypothesis which i've done in previous videos. Suffice to say that a number of different molecules have been attempted in this indication in specifically the mechanism of reducing amyloid plaques. And they've all failed and what we're seeing here is that in this multi center randomized double blind placebo controlled trial. That donna had a significant is what they're showing here in the air score but not a very profound impact on cognition and so they looked at this primary outcome the air score and this is a combination of the as well as the ads. Ads and so eight ask cogs general measure of cognition whereas the ads. I is a measure of activities of daily living. So they did a combined score with that and demanded mobs improvement led to a p value of point zero four so technically significant. But i'm not sure that if they replicated the stayed in a face. Three trout necessarily be positive. It is an interesting thing because when you look at the actual aid. S cog thirteen score. We don't see any significant change. It is better in indiana but not by a significant margin and then the mse score is basically no difference between the two so this is another data point to suggest that perhaps the amyloid beta hypothesis isn't one that these companies should be looking at and the last thing i wanted to show here. Is that the one thing that they do. See a significant change in the amount of amyloid in the brain and so the pet scan here to show that the dynamic treated group has a significant reduction in the amount of amyloid plaque in the brain compared to placebo. So the drug is able to reduce the emily beta plaques. But it's not able to improve cognition really as much as you would expect given the effect is there so i wanted to bring this up because there is an upcoming. Pdf date for biogen's advocating mob and this is going to be a huge movie for the stock and it was originally supposed to be in march but it was delayed until june seventh of this year. So keep your eyes on that. I don't know if i'm going to make any position on it. I think that the fda should not approve it given the results from the advisory committee but given that the so many is on this pdf. I feel like there's a chance at the fda could overlook that and end up approving drug. So it's definitely jairo word. Play and i would treat it as such and proceed likewise so that is eli lilly. I wanna quickly move on to another company in the alzheimer's face called novus and i touched on them in my previous video and what we heard in the last week was that they announced positive face to data and this is interim data showing the nbs for one or another name for the molecule is positive in improved speed and coordination in parkinson's patients. And this is a twenty five day treatment. Nine patients were in the treatment group and five or in the placebo and on the announcement of this data. I think the stock was trading around one hundred fifty maybe two hundred million dollars market valuation and went up to around two fifty three hundred before settling around two hundred and fifty million dollar market cap so big move up in the stock and i'll tell you the data. The ceo explained that the study was power to investigate a difference of twenty to twenty five percent in biomarker levels not to demonstrate efficacy making this data that much more significant so to provide some context. And why i think this is interesting. Is that i in my previous video. Didn't really seem to bullish on a novus and the reason for this is that it reminds me very closely other types of amyloid beta drugs because this drug reduces app the precursor protein to amyloid beta. So my rationale is that if they're targeting the same emily data pathway. Given that there's been so many molecules that have failed previously targeting that pathway. I don't expect that this one is going to be any different now. Having said that. I decided to take a position because we've seen over and over again. That companies have been able to spin face to data in a positive way that leads to these big increases in the sock even though in phase three there's an eventual failure so i decided to take a position in stock and i have been rewarded handsomely so far and i'm going to hold on to see the rest of the phase two data so to get the actual data here in one test that measures the speed of execution. The results were statistically significant. P equals zero point zero four showing that while parkinson's disease patients are slow in coding. Boxes met with an s four. Zero one improves their performance. In these same patients other test that measures coordination showed an improvement in their movements and was almost statistically significant peak will s- appoint zero seven. Then they say in all end. Es up tests performed the placebo group either stayed the same or performed worse than at baseline instead the a b s four zero one group either stayed the same perform better than at baseline and as we know. Md s up drs is a specific tasks that measures severity and progression of the disease.

Alzheimer's Disease Parkinson's Disease Jairo Lilly FDA Biogen Donna Indiana Eli Lilly NBS
James Levine, who ruled over Met Opera, dead at age 77

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 3 months ago

James Levine, who ruled over Met Opera, dead at age 77

"New York Metropolitan Opera conductor James Levine has died of natural causes in palm springs California according to his physician Levine was seventy seven I marches are a letter with a look at his career James Levine conducted for the Cleveland Orchestra in Chicago's Ravinia festival but his claim to fame was presiding over the New York metropolitan opera for four decades he conducted two thousand five hundred fifty two performances and built the orchestra's world class reputation he was forced out in twenty sixteen due to Parkinson's disease and became music director emeritus he was fired in twenty eighteen over allegations of sexual misconduct Levine had planned to perform this past January in Italy but the concert was canceled because the corona virus pandemic

James Levine Levine Palm Springs Cleveland Orchestra New York Parkinson's Disease California Chicago Italy
Continuing to Navigate the Neurodegenerative Disease Subsector

Breaking Biotech

03:47 min | 3 months ago

Continuing to Navigate the Neurodegenerative Disease Subsector

"The first thing. I want to mention of course is what we're really dealing with here when we're looking at specifically companies in the next generation space. Now i'm going to belabor the slight even less than i did last time basically for good phase three data. I feel it'd be good. Expect a company trade between at a minimum really of ten to twenty billion dollars market cap and for companies. That are kind of earlier in the pipeline. I would say they've shown some good phase one b or some good early phase two a data. We can expect them to trade around at one billion dollar market cap and that seems to be the case so far and there's obviously tons of information that we can use to say whether or not they should be trading at a higher value or a lower value than that. But that's generally what i'm going into this with and using the data that's available out there. You can really make your own assessment. What you think is a fair value for some of these companies but anyway just to show this slide quickly because we need to know what we're dealing with here so keep all that in mind as we look at the market cap of these different companies. Today and the first company. I want to touch on. Is a company called aspira. Fire ticker symbol. Ha they closed on friday. The fifth at nineteen dollars and eighteen cents a share giving them a market cap of seven hundred million dollars they're q. Three twenty twenty net loss was eight point five million dollars and they had a q. Three twenty twenty current assets of two hundred thirty two million dollars and then they also didn't offering in february of this year adding another hundred three million dollars to their balance sheet their q. Three twenty twenty current liabilities. Sit an eight million dollars and to give some background of the company they went. Ipo in september of two thousand twenty at seventeen dollars per share so they're not trading it too much of a premium for matt but for anybody looking to take a position in the short term. I do want to remind you that. The lockup occurs on march seventeenth and an additional twelve million shares. That were previously locked up from the ipo are now going to be added to the flow. Which is at twenty three point. Seven million dollars today. so companies. That had this lockup expiration. I caution against taking a long position in only because the dilution. That's going to occur after the lockup is going to put some pressure on the stock price so keep that in mind but the company is looking at commercializing an asset that targets the hypothesis that growth factor pathway also known as the met receptor. And they're doing this to try and treat different. Cns disorders so there specifically using compound called a t h one zero seven and this was previously known as andy x one. Zero one. seven if you're looking in the literature and they're trying to treat alzheimer's and parkinson's disease but this and then they also a small molecule version of this where they're going to be looking at neuropsychiatric disorders like depression. And there's some benefits to using a small molecule version verses the other version using a t h zero one seven. But i'm not going to focus on that. I'm really just kinda talk about the molecule. That's going to be treated for alzheimer's and parkinson's disease and before we do that though i did want focus a little bit on event related potential and a touchdown this on a couple other episodes but i wanted to go a little bit more in depth because the main readout that a fire is focusing on is this p three hundred data point and so what event related potential is a quick primer. It's a q. Eeg measurement but it's a functional version of that so a lot of companies will show a q. e. e. g. measurement of just baseline brain activity. And what this does is it. Just measures brain electrical activity and q. E. e. g. sanford quantitative electro So the baseline measurement is useful. I guess but what's more impactful is actually do a sensory event which is a better surrogate for actual cognitive ability.

Aspira Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Matt Andy Depression Sanford
Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio titan, dies of lung cancer at age 70

The View

03:55 min | 4 months ago

Rush Limbaugh, conservative radio titan, dies of lung cancer at age 70

"One of the most dominant figures in talk radio in an architect of the conservative media movement. Rush limbaugh passed away aged seventy from lung complications lung cancer complications. There's been an outpouring of tributes along with a lot of criticism of his decades of controversial comments. So the question is how will you remember my start with joy. Well i did work. I worked at a radio station in. Nineteen ninety-one ish around that time. Wabc radio and he. I came on at ten. I believe and then he was on at eleven o'clock so i was engaged with him quite a bit in those days over the years. He's called me more bihar. Which i thought was interesting. I guess he was saying that. I was like b arthur in the in the show. Maude who was a raging liberal. I presume that's what he meant. And i consider that a badge of honor to be compared to maud. But it's interesting. I worked with him. I worked i've interviewed ann. Coulter many times Janine pirro has been on the view trump has been on the view. I went to his wedding for marla You know these people have gone through some kind of metamorphosis of of weirdness over the years and i was getting used to come on the show. She was actually fun. Ann coulter is basically. I consider her a comedian. I don't even consider her a pundit and we all know what trump was like before you know he was a democrat. So what's what happened to them. And i answer is money. Money is what happened to them. They have thrown at so much money at them at fox for example and various places that they could not resist the money so they go on the air and they spew their hatred their prejudices their lies as rush limbaugh for the almighty dollar and they fool americans into believing that they are authentic authentic. I know these people. They're not real right. So sonny what do you think his legacy will be. Well i been listening to to everyone. Eulogizing rush limbaugh. And i remember listening to him as a kid growing up and for me. He just normalized Hatred he normalized racism. And you know. I think he really weaponized. White male grievance and you know he sort of hard in these rural white listeners people sitting in their trucks and in the middle of america and in the south and listening to rush limbaugh and this is someone who called our president barack. The magic negro. This is someone who talked about an nfl football game as a gang match between the bloods and crips. This is someone who made fun of michael. J. fox's a parkinson's disease this is someone who likened a thirteen year old chelsea clinton to a dog. You know this wasn't someone who Was a nice person. This is someone that spewed racism and hatred yet. He is now considered. I guess the most influence the an influential person and building the modern republican party and conservatism. A to me. That's not something to be proud of. I mean how is that. A reflection of conservative values i thought conservatism was about small government and family values and if family values is making fun of black people and a child and a disease. I don't know where the the republican party is. I think his legacy is that he paved the way again for the modern republican party and trump is

Lung Complications Lung Cancer Rush Limbaugh Wabc Radio B Arthur Janine Pirro Bihar Maude Marla Coulter Ann Coulter Donald Trump ANN Parkinson's Disease Sonny FOX Limbaugh J. Fox Chelsea Clinton Barack NFL
Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

Science Friday

05:27 min | 4 months ago

Charting of the Human Genome, 20 Years Later

"We're talking about challenges for genetic research. 20 years after the first draft of the human genome was published with my guests, Dina Zelinsky, a bio infirm, a Titian with the Paris transplant group. And elite scientists for civil tech and crystal, soc and indigenous geneticist bioethicist with Vanderbilt University and the Native Bio Data Consortium Crystal I introduced you as a co founder of the Native Bio Data Consortium. Which gets to an issue we've talked about in different ways on this program in the past indigenous sovereignty over genetic data, please remind us how big an issue this is. Yeah. So when we talk about precision, medicine and health were always promising that the next advantages and innovations will be conferred to those individuals that contribute the genomic information. The pandemic has shown that preventive healthcare and structural barriers to access to health care probably highlighted more about health disparities than this UN pronounced supposed to future advantages of healthcare. Indigenous peoples have You know, willingly or unwillingly contributed their didna for the supposed betterment of humankind Need I remind everybody what happened after the completion of the Human Genome Project. We had the completion of large scale diversity projects such as the Human Genome Diversity Project and 1000 genomes project, which were denounced by over 600 plus indigenous nations worldwide that went to United Nations because they were concerned. About privatization and commercialization and exploitation of indigenous genomes and what has happened to those biomarkers collected from indigenous peoples from Central South America. Those bio markers are now freely and openly accessible to companies such as ancestry, Didna and 23 Me ancestry. Edna has hosted revenues over a billion dollars every holiday quarter since 2017 so we always have to ask yourselves. What exactly are the protections? Really? This data privacy and commercialization. The rate of technology outpaces our regulations, these new technologies and while we think that these protections are conferred by laws, which is the genetic Information nondiscrimination Act Last change. Companies are bought and sold. So we have to ask yourself what's the commercial value? The data that we're being asked to freely give away and how can we look to communities and empower communities to self directed decisions that are being made using their data? Dina, you contributed your data, and you gave it away freely. Do you not feel the same kind of threat here that exist? Not quite in the same way. No individuals of European ancestry make up the vast majority of genetic studies, and that's really problematic because they only make up 6% of the population. And I, I completely understand the threats to underrepresented populations. We should be sequencing these underrepresented populations, but we should be sequencing them with the idea of Making genomics research more equitable of giving back to these communities, not just taking from them. That being said, I can't even explain how useful data like that from the 1000 genomes project has been. I've used it in most of my projects. I have whole human genomes at the tip of my fingers. When I'm accessing this data, as well as other scientists, I think We generally have good intentions, so I currently use it in a study to better understand Parkinson's disease. That being said. I think in many cases, a lot of this data has restricted or limited access for researchers versus commercial entities. I agree here that we we really should limit what industry can or cannot do with with our data. Krystal. You mentioned preventive care and the pandemic. The human Genome Project. I remember promised to tell us everything about her genome. Doesn't this sort of tell people Hey, we know everything about you now and ignore the nurture part of the nature nurture debate. What I can tell you as a geneticist. My first skepticism and what I always tell tribal leaders is that genetic data is just the easiest type of data to collect. But genetic data does not. Predict as much about disease risk than we think. Other things such as access to care, cultural factors, colonial factors relating to help probably contribute more to the health differences and outcomes than actual genetics itself. Things like diet environment and lifestyle are things that we should be looking at. And definitely socioeconomic status by factors. But these are the hardest bits of data to collect. And so we really can't build truly robust models without looking at these other factors related to health. So looking at genetics and biological factors is sometimes a little bit of a cop out. You don't necessarily properly convey the limitations of genetics and biological research to the lay

Dina Zelinsky Native Bio Data Consortium Human Genome Diversity Project Central South America Vanderbilt University Human Genome Project Paris Edna UN Parkinson's Disease United Nations Dina Krystal
How the San Francisco Comunity Music Center is thriving in the pandemic

Voices of the Community

07:16 min | 4 months ago

How the San Francisco Comunity Music Center is thriving in the pandemic

"Of our counters died from complications due to hiv and aids. I'm the remaining survivor. There are many who supported a stirring that time but having navigated losing dancers choreographers audience members weekly similar to what we're seeing now and yet the differences so many people were unaware and didn't care you can tell. The pain still sits with me the trauma and i think that we are in that now. We will be in that period of time. I would say decades of time where we will be sitting with. What wasn't done. What was left unsaid. What was not attempted for the safety of people over profit. This is the co founder and executive director of dancers group wayne hazard. The dancer group was born in the middle of the aids crisis and has over the decades into a service organization providing wrap around fiscal sponsorship programs and services to incubate and support artists and the dance community as well as their historical roots at presenting unique grassroots base. Dance to the san francisco bay area. I'm joined remotely via zoom by wayne hazard the executive director of dancers group. Thanks for being here win. Thanks george it's my pleasure on martin luther king junior day twenty twenty one yes quite a solemn day and quite a powerful day so segue to our first question. Which is i think. The audience probably doesn't know dance group which is an interesting can of service group model. So if you could give us a little background on the dancers group and some of the really unique the of eighteen programs while it's my favorite topic obviously vance's group has been around since nineteen eighty two and we were founded in san francisco's mission district. We really started out. As a collective of choreographers of dance makers looking to have support space and camaraderie and ways to be in relationship to one. Another and really. That hasn't changed thirty nine years later. I like to call us now. Hybrid organization. Because i think it kind of clicks with people one and two. It's kind of what we do in terms of providing direct services to dance makers dancers those interested in dance and we also present dance at timmy's and i say that in that way because we do commissioning of work but we also have large programs of the your leg bay area dance week where pretty The pandemic we had twenty two thousand people in the spring. Take free dance. Classes all over the bay area from hip hop to who led to back to tap to beginning movement classes. Were children to adults. Dance for people with parkinson's you name it. We probably haven't morale-booster over the years so the services we do really are about you know supporting people where they are classes. Discounts performance information discounts on those and. Then we provide direct services to dance makers through our fiscal sponsorship program. We have over one hundred and twenty five dance companies dance projects that fundraise under us so each year close to one point. Five million raised less than we redistribute through expenses back to those entities where over generally pandemic times of three hundred thousand people attend those company and artists activities classes and performances though this last going on ten months with covid nineteen and so much of obviously performing arts and dance especially is a personal experience. How has the dance group dealt with the covid nineteen and economic meltdown. And then how do you feel like. It's impacted all of the dozens of dance. Performance groups that you incubate and work with big question. I'll start by saying that. Dancers groups founders along with myself win through the aids pandemic in the early eighties. All the way into the nineties and still continuing today as a worldwide pandemic beget really not seeing that way. Because of i think broadly and it's changed a bit but seeing as a gay male disease. Two of our founders died from complications hiv and aids. I'm the remaining survivor. There are many who supported a stirring that time but having navigated losing dancers choreographers audience members weekly similar to what we're seeing now and yet the differences so many people were unaware and didn't care you can tell. The pain still sits with me the trauma and i think that we are in that now. We will be in that period of time. I would say decades of time where we will be sitting with what was done what was left unsaid. What was not attempted for the safety of people over prophet so specifically to your question. I think one of the first things we did as an organization is aboard said. Are you okay and we. We talked a lot. We said to staff your job is there. We like many organizations applied for support both private foundations and others to help us navigate this time. We are very fortunate in the bay area to have major foundations. Like the hewlett some rain ins and haase's and fly checkers Really step forward and then we just looked at getting information out early on also. Many organizations were creating cove relief funds and the area had going. i and i was approached by a donor. Saying here's a large took money. Let's get this out to dancers. And i said well what if we join forces with theatre bay area would if we not created just one more fun but just was able to get more money to one fund and so the funder liked that the donor like that theatre bay area. Love that inter music. Sf joined as well and so there's a performing arts workers relief fund on theatre bay area dot org site it's also on dancers

Wayne Hazard Aids Dancers Group Parkinson's HIV San Francisco Bay Martin Luther King Vance Timmy George San Francisco Haase Hewlett
Advancing Cell Therapies Beyond Cancer

The Bio Report

03:19 min | 5 months ago

Advancing Cell Therapies Beyond Cancer

"Thanks for joining us as a pleasure to be here. We're gonna talk about regulatory t cell therapy and cinema bio therapeutics efforts to develop these for autoimmune and degenerative diseases perhaps we can start their. What are regulatory t cell. Therapy's and how do they work sure So this is a feel that has Really over the last two decades exploded in our understanding of the importance of these cells in controlling everything from allergy to organ transplant rejection to autoimmune diseases. In basically what to rags. Dr is a very small population of white blood cells largely circulating in the blood but also present in tissues and these cells have the capability and capacity to actually shutdown unwanted immune responses perhaps most Typically in patients that have a defect in these cells called apex patients They'll usually die within a year or two of massive autoimmune and allergic responses unless they get a bone marrow transplant from a mother or father that That gives back there to population so these cells are really essential to controlling tolerance in the immune system preventing immune cells from attacking and destroying self tissue. You see these. Potentially addressing large populations of people with autoimmune degenerative diseases potentially how big a market re talking about an. How effective are we today in treating these conditions. Yes certainly this is a very big bucket ranging everything from rheumatoid arthritis to multiple sclerosis type one diabetes and over eighty other autoimmune diseases Up through including degenerative diseases like ls potentially alzheimer's or even parkinson's disease and the reason is is that so many of these diseases are mediated by uncontrolled inflammation. People don't fully appreciate the fact that the immune system is playing an active role in a of of diseases outside of the more classic immune diseases so when you think about market potential it's almost impossible to To ferret out what the actual size will be in reality. of course These cells are gonna be used. I in diseases that are highly morbid and potentially a strong medical need either as disease class or as individuals and we hope to start out in diseases that are clearly a fall within that that rubric but ultimately one can imagine cell. Therapy's being a new pillar of medicine where you can think about them. In a variety of immunological settings where you wanna give a treatment once or a couple of times and then have a long-term living drug that will suppress unwanted inflammatory responses.

Autoimmune Degenerative Diseas Autoimmune Diseases Sclerosis Type Degenerative Diseases Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Allergy Rheumatoid Arthritis Diabetes
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:21 min | 5 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"Here's a slide that salata the conditions that many parkinson's patients deal with on a regular basis That are going to affect our sleep in. Bya eludes us. I bring my own sleep disorder on my medications. But i'd like to take a look at what what we How often we see these things. Bryner these any of these things part of your sleep disorder Frequency of urination certainly wakes up at night. So it's part of the part of the mix i would say and on the issue. We were talking about with different types of dreams. I think anxiety does play a role there. We'll talk later about management of this but reducing stress over the peer over a period of years. Certainly has changed the character of my dreams. If you're acting out a dream and it's very benevolent benign in some small thing. It's not really that big a deal versus terrifying nightmare. That you're acting out so I think reducing anxiety and stress reduction in general again as part of the management of this but it certainly an issue that that leads to were sleep for me a year in clinical practice. So how often do you find that. Parkinson's patients that are that you uncovering that. The part of their sleep problems due to some of these things that are honest. List it so. It's very very common Like medication side effects remembers medicine like dopamine agonists. That can make you very sleepy than there's medicines that can keep you up. So things like selene. And metabolize into an amphetamine and the reason why we have patients taken in the morning and the noon hour is that it can keep you up and so it can cause insomnia that way and then remember. Remember that you've got the your motor symptoms of pd. But you've got the non motor symptoms like the bladder like the urgency and frequency of urination. That can keep you up and anxiety which can also be part of the non motor symptoms of parkinson's disease the as your leave dope wearing off. Not only is the tremor and rigidity coming back but so are the non motor symptoms in many times. That is a free floating anxiety. Some patients have a panic attack and that can interfere with sleep as well if it's happening at that. Time and many off periods happen at night so pain and discomfort in many patients..

Bryner Parkinson Bya parkinson
Understanding Space Station Science

Innovation Now

01:01 min | 5 months ago

Understanding Space Station Science

"Orbiting about two hundred fifty miles above our planet. The international space station is the only laboratory of its kind during the past two decades. The station is supported scientific discoveries and historic breakthroughs. Here are just a few fundamental disease research related to alzheimer's and parkinson's disease cancer. Asthma and heart disease the discovery of cool burning flames invisible flames that burn two and a half times cooler than a candle. The development of new water purification systems vital to humans everywhere methods to combat muscle atrophy and bone loss fluid research for applications from advanced medical devices to heat transfer systems three d. printing using human tissue and the ability to monitor our planet from this unique vantage point space station. Research helps us explore farther into space but it also makes our world a better place to live

Alzheimer's Parkinson's Disease Cancer International Space Station Asthma Heart Disease
Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

Goodbye to Alcohol

27:17 min | 5 months ago

Goodbye to Alcohol - Series 3 - Episode 10 - Mary Anne Shearer - the Natural Way - burst 01

"It was his guys talking roland hydra one year and end the sky was the and he came up to me after he said like. I'm here to help me recover from alcoholism. I don't want to rehab. I've just come to detox. My buddy what. Can i do to stop caving. Alcohol acid right. This is what you gotta do. Every morning you get up and you have as much fruit and a nice handful of narrow nuts or seeds with just eat as much food as you can stuff. Your face doesn't have to be early in the morning but it must be a first meal of the day and eat as much as it. If it's a box of mangoes and eat the box of mangoes op done that. Eaten a box magazine taya watermelon. And you might do that for three months and eventually what happens. Is you end up eating one mango in. It's really sweet sausage. I into stuff your face. Full of lucas. In every natural glucose fresh fruits nuts every time. You crave alcohol. Just reach out for some dates or some raisins or even like a hundred percent pure grape juice or you know have sparkling grape juice. It satisfies your cells needs for glucose that craving will stop welcome to goodbye to alcohol about calls from wealth without wine with you. Want to say goodbye to alcohol. Revie said goodbye. Twelve called over the on just so this is the podcast few. We've got recovery stories to in spy experts to inform you plenty of advice on how to drink and change your life. Hello hello and welcome to the good. By twelve coal podcast. My name is john goran. I'm the founder of wealth without wine. And i'm your host for this podcast. My hero wealth without wine we help people to change their relationship with alcohol over the past five years. We've helped hundreds of people to do just that and we created world without wind because we believe it's really really halt to change your drinking alone so wealthed without wine wit all about community each week we're going to feature a community voice just to give you a flavor of the also. Try his somebody from one of Subgroups hello everyone. So i have a little friday when which happened last night Myself my family celebrated thanksgiving with our american bamiyan states Remotely and it was the first time in twenty-six days at i would becoming face to face with an actual bottle of wine so i was a bit concerned and i knew that i had to have some safety precautions. Set in place for myself. So i had my phone Close by me. So i could contact group if i needed to My also got some alcohol free wine that was recommended by this group and And the support of my family so my mom and i enjoyed some lovely alcohol free wine. Which actually wasn't as bad as i thought it would be. We served at super chilled and it was actually super delicious and refreshing. We skype with a family overseas headed delicious meal and i didn't have a drop of alcohol And then at the end of the evening we weren't bid. I finished off my class of savvy. Rich in the candlelight listening to some chile music Went to bid and the biggest one of all was waking up this remembering exactly what happened last night and without a headache I'm super proud of myself. Never ever in a million years thought that this was possible. But it did it and today is day. Twenty-seven machine all a fabulous wonderful weekend wherever you are in the world if huge cut to join our woman welcoming community and get a bit of support. Just go to weld without wind dot com and click on the membership top. So let's get my guest today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet listening to all calls from weld without wine. Marianne take me about you just mentioned alcoholic parents. It that intrigued me wondering if that was one of the reasons why you want it to research to health unle- to healthier lifestyle was that of a trigger. I think it. I think it was. I think you know even mentioned to some one time that i want to try to get drunk when us fourteen and jank moms cara pheno one and didn't like the way i felt i felt out of control and i think that sense of not being in control of my immediate environment and i wouldn't say i'm a control freak but i needed to be common working properly and audley at the sense of order i think that comes from growing up in the chaos of alcoholic appearance at home and my mom was a party animal. She was functional alcoholics. She could party all night and go to work the next day in absolutely fine my father however party will not and he wouldn't work for six months and that was you know he'd worked for six months and then not work for six months to a year or two years so we grew up with that sort of chaotic and then my parents got divorced because my mother said she had four kids anita fifth one. My father married. Somebody was crazy as he was. You know do things like pour petrol over my stepmother and threatened sitter a lot this crazy stuff that chaos does makes you want to live an ordinary that the thing. That really got to me when i was a kid. My mom had this medical encyclopedia. And i would pour over at the age of four hundred. All these gory. Pictures of people as innocent large thyroid landed was like the size of pumpkin and the knicks and these open ruins and at sit there and cringes kind of not. Wanna look at them. But it's fasten. The human body fascinated me from a very early age. My mom was kind of forward thinking as much as she was a party animal. She told us we couldn't chew gum or drink. Physical because our brains would fry and and we went lottery comic books either. So i had the sense of trying to do the right thing I think it also grows up with you know you grow up with a parent. That's a bit narcissistic. i think. Alcoholism in a sense is a narcissistic habit. Because you just carrying about a million myself. And i'm trying to numb my pain. You know not thinking about the responsibilities of life you know growing up with it. I had the saints. That i wanted to please my mom and do the right thing so i was considered the goody. Two shoes in the family just always trying to do the right thing in an nfl had to take it back to pregnancy was a need to just have off in my life Feel like yeah. Things went as chaotic. As they've seen. We moved a lot as kids. You know doing a geographic alcoholic. Parents do that things. Don't work you just move somewhere else. Yeah i've i've come across two different reactions when people have Parents they are do what she did. And react against the kale. Some won't control an order in their life all they they tend to say well. You know sin family. I'm bound to be that as well and then kinda give up unsolved drinking as well so Is that been your experience as well. Do you think people tend to go. A different one of two was party. Animal ended in two brothers. That partied hard. I mean they crashed a few calls when they were aided. And that god they've grown up and grown out of it and They've so but very working my two brothers especially very sober and very hard working And and i just think. I think what you you learn the learned behavior sydney. I look at myself is it. I may not have been addicted to alcohol. But as very addicted to sugar so ahead addictive side to me that anita to the sugar made me feel good in that space. So i suppose in a sense. I was doing much what people do with alcohol when us feeling unhappy or was feeling sad or on feeling like a done something. Well i would reward myself or console myself with suga whether it was fragile candy or cake. So is scream. It didn't really matter how much as i said. Even propane sugar staying out of the sugar bowl. As i got older. I became health conscious. South for made fudgy using brown sugar. That was really good. But you're that that that needs that sense of of you don't you you know parents at properly as if you growing up in an alcoholic home so you learn. The navy is that that it's a k. To satisfy yourself for full let need with a something in a with some people it could be gambling. All pornography will with made was shook end and food as a compulsive overeater. And the only reason we're glad clinically obese of always been physically active and and if i was not eating properly and exercising. I wouldn't ever sleep. I would. And i think that looking at having dealt with so many people in our family and with people have met of the years that alcohol sometimes puts people to sleep just eventually knocks you out so eventually do sleep when you're very active brain not taught how to look off draw brain. How what does alcohol do to bring. What is caffeine due to the brain so one minute drinking coffee over here and then that's like over stimulating central noticing. Make all your nerve cells five. Ab rapidly and then you'd having alcohol too. Because that's a natural depressant than you take the to calm you down and put you to sleep and then you wake up the next morning and you hung oversee start with the coffee again in the brain goes into overdrive. Then you would lots of sugar into the coffee. So you just getting on this treadmill and i think i think if we were taught the staff about how everybody body reacted to sit and things from when we were kids. Part of the reason assorted school is that we would understand how our body worked and figure stuff out pretty soon and make good choices. But that's me probably being idealistic as well if you were talking to someone. That was drinking super too much. They weren't really aware of what it was doing to that office. That brains. what what would you tell them. How would you summarize the home that it does to us. Gee i'm the first thing we know. Is it really damages the central nervous system in the brain. And we've now these quite a lot of research showing that parkinson's disease which michael j. fox got a really young age and he has a. He was a big drinker. Huge drinker everything. I've read on him. The alcohol played a big role in. He's laughing was younger. That can damage your central nervous system. and it doesn't do it alone. Units alcohol and sugar and bed diets and bed living but alcohol plays a huge role in that. It really affects a whole lot of things affect your central nervous system in your brain so you don't handle stress well and lacewell you handle stress. The more you're going to drink because it numbs you. Eugenic feel you can just numb yourself. you stop feeling in dozen courage assistant behavior because it becomes all about my feelings and my stress and my money to numb in. I mean we all know this. We would go without food in a hassle appearance drink and i've seen it in other families. The mother a single mumble drink because she's lonely or because she feels a failure whatever. Her reasons are and there'll be no food in the fridge. Another normal alcoholic friggin. Look on his nets moke in there in a piece of cheese. And that's about it if you lackey Most just don't have food in them. And i know as kids if they was cheese enough ridge. We would flatness in like half an hour because he's a no win. The food was going come which didn't help but encourage things like a compulsive over eating so a central nervous system and that's the one side the other side that in a fix and impacts really badly as the indicating system and that's a system that controls every single part of the buddy janice it controls your liver your lungs your kidneys digestive tract your muscle tone. You sleep your menstrual cycles. Your facility these nothing. It's not in your breathing. Your lung function your hair. Growth your nails. You'll skin it it. It affects every single part. The endocrine system produces hormones in different parts of the body in those hormones may chemical reactions take place which makes the body function properly. Have alcohol's interfering with it function because what it does is it actually pushes your blood sugar up really really high so you feel like good on alcohol woo and then your blood sugar over produces your body produces over produces insulin. 'cause you're about to go into a diabetic coma and in your body's designed to repeat itself over produces the insulin brings it all the way back down and as it starts to slide mcdonagh feeling really tired immaculate and sleep and pass out if it gets really bad And then you you. You might have something like coffee or tea or another drink to try and raise your blood sugar again so when you blood. Sugar fluctuates fitting brain and central nervous. System your endocrine system and your immune system and you can understand the not explaining this very well with the whole covid. Nineteen they send. People are drinking and having caught accidents but alcohol suppresses immune function. That's what it does. So the government instead of educating everybody in showing us adverts over and over which i think would help better than just locking everybody down and telling you you know these content touch alcohol reagan so ridiculous. You can't buy alcohol during the on the weekend so everybody's just by way more so every restaurant selling wine under the counter to the clients you know because they can't make money selling food during lockdown. It was bizarre to see the activities that going on at the end of the day understood. Exactly what it does. And how it suppresses immune function we must take these things a little bit more seriously than being wrecked on the knuckles suck educate people that teach them the stuff so i think other thing that it does and this is fascinating. Refined sugar does exactly the same thing is alcohol does just desert loose something called reactive hopper blah seamier. Which when the blood sugar shoots up to high we over produce insulin and brings it right down so down so far down your blood sugar that the part of the brain your frontal lobe that controls moral behavior planning and forethought will just shuts down completely. Okay and the part of the brain that takes over as part of the brain that controls aggression appetite and sexual function. And i think this is probably really important to help people understand these blackouts that they have so you can have a blackout but you not passed out you just living life. I mean. I know a girl that poured wax all over yourself. Hot wax in that state couldn't remember how she got burned from this x. She took all our clothes often. Did this is absurdity. Because the people that were they told her what she does. She could not believe she did something like that. I had a woman that came and spoke to me. Because i was when i speak often speak about the stuff because it played such a role in my life and how important it is to make. Sure you're getting the right kind of glucose about in a while. And she came up to me after she said. I'm embarrassed to raise my hand and tell you what i do but cannot speak to you privately. Acid short can understand when she told me the story. She said i'm going to tell you. I'm very very committed. Christian person go to church regularly. my husband's actually involved in the leadership of the church. We go to bible study on wednesday nights. We go to between one and three services and the sunday we we're involved in the charitable work and stuff but she says periodically. I wake up in another town or another suburb in strange man's bid. And i have no recollection of how i got the and i say to you consume and she said. Nah don't i said are you a sugar addict. And she said yes osama title sugar addict and it does the brain. What alcohol does we. You just black out completely. Obviously you've got to be extreme amounts of sugar to do this but alcohol does the same thing you drink. Extreme amounts you'd binge drink and the knicks thing you wake up and you in somebody else's bid and like how the hell did you get in the shame of all of this is worse than you start drinking again and this whole thing goes on so what happens is when the primitive brain takes over. You either going to get aggressive. You're going to just eat and eat and eat canoe appetites. Just nothing's gonna be enough or you. Could your sexual function could take over. And you become extremely promiscuous and that's clearly very dangerous because besides possibility of fathering all mothering a child you could end up with terrible sexual diseases. So it's it's a huge problem and people don't know this until somebody like me comes and tells him and nobody studies this. Because you take the average psychologist or psychiatrist. Dr they studying medicine and how to cheat you when you sick with medicine and surgery than looking. And what is the cause of all these problems and vivian often. It's a physiological or physical course an and utrition is something that's kind of just ignored and net. That study was done with reactive. Hoppy glycemic was done by women. Called baba read stood. She lived in the united states and operated in stable municipal area and she was in charge of the juvenile delinquent and criminal juvenile delinquent and the prisoners. The adult prisoners in the end the juvenile delinquents and she found that of them something like ninety three percent of the people that she'd work with suffered from this reactive hypoglycemia and in that state of blacked out. Where you can't remember what went on people will kill the family. They'll the children we ask you. Yeah then they will beat somebody into coma they'll be do the most. They'll they'll commit a crime. And they have no recollection of course when you committing crimes being something people like as easy to say you lost your mind and you can't remember but it's an actual condition where you had no recollection of went on. It's completely blacked out. You listening to reply to alcohol. The podcast from world without one if eat lights join our tribe. Please check out website. That wine don't cold so yeah. Apparently those many people in child but have done that have a blackout killed somebody. You cannot in jail recollection too. Many people in jail i mean. Can you imagine Horrendous but blackouts very common in all community. We talk about the loss of people have blackouts. I used to have the have them as well Boston is like all it was a walking talking blackout because I was with some friends for afternoon. And apparently i seem quite normal. You know i was walking around talking. We'd walk quite a long way together. I have no recollection. I mean we'd been drinking since frightful Drink but i. It just hit me over the edge. I lost an entire. And you know i used to have blackouts where the end of the evening was a bit fuzzy Quite remember how it may be. But this one was really serious Hated the idea thought woking talking blackout the fat my brain was so alcoholic couldn't even make memories nazi Absolutely terrifying and here's the thing that people don't understand is that you'll cells and your buddy a designed to consume glucose. Nothing works in your in your at salable. You got thirty seven trillion cells in your body. They desperately need glucose they needed to make. Atp a denison triphosphate which is what creates energy your monaco andrea desperately. Need that your every little organ nelio in the plasma critical in these tiny little things inside the cell that you can't even see with your naked eye it needs glucose your brain and central system can't work without glucose and if you're not getting enough you going to crave alcohol or sugar and barbara read stood say we knew feed children refined sugar growing up on any level. She said you're actually preparing them for alcoholism because they get into the cycle. The blood sugar going up and it's coming down and they feel that the sugar satisfies and then you you graduate from a kid to adolescence or young young person in your twenties wait sitting stuffing faced with ice cream and chocolate says locked kind of interdict so will have a drink and it does. What sugar to to you. And now you recognize that. Except that the alcohol gives you even a bit of feeling takes you higher disrupts you lower so if we understood that we need need proper glucose for body's natural glucose and and so often when i've done a talk i actually say to the audience and i remember reading this one year at a secrets convention at sun city outside johannesburg. The were probably five hundred people Woman and i said to them. Okay if you do any of you crave sugar and they've just everybody put the hand and i said when you craving sugar. What is it that you put into your mouth. What is it you put. And what is it that you actually craving an attempt to get the point across. Imagine yourself in the garden of eden and you craving something sweet. What would you eat. And there was a stately silence and this woman blonde voluptuous woman sitting in the front rows in this deep voice. Adam evan rumor osc that christian. I'm thinking this woman. It was really funny at the time. But it's just interesting because i've often christian in los angeles of austin in the republic of hot bay of austin zimbabwe of austin the uk. Austin all over the

Roland Hydra Revie John Goran Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Marianne Cara Pheno Google Anita Maryanne Tonsillitis Parkinson's Disease Knicks Lucas Johannesburg Skype Headache
Managing your time effectively

The Tropical MBA Podcast

05:05 min | 6 months ago

Managing your time effectively

"Let's talk about time then. In the next thing i was thinking about what are some effective time hygiene or time habits that we can about to institute in the new year. And you know there's just so much of this thinking in the entrepreneurial world that the idea is to just go out there and to work all the time to sort of sacrifice other areas of your life. I caught myself seaney. Lan must describe how he puts ninety hours a week into his business. And i have a hard time relating to how that's possible and the reality is it's i almost feel like a little bit ashamed to it in the light of how this kind of hustle culture is so glorified but i spent more time. You know working on businesses. When i had a job and i sat in a desk from eight. Am in the morning until seven pm at night. Then i do for the businesses that we've run together and part of that is having good time hygiene and focusing on the things that count tell you what my trick is. Dan and it has been the last three. Years is just have a kid because that will clean up your act immediately. It's kind of a joke but it's kind of serious which is like there's a limit now on my time. That was never there before so when people had said to me in the past like oh man. I got so much more disciplined with my time. When i had a kid. I can totally relate to that so i guess what i would try and tell myself before is like how could i engineer that into my day like pre kid because actually used to pull it on must end like you used to make fun of me for it. You'll be like oh. This diesel just like sits down for like twelve hours and the reason i did that is because i kind of enjoyed it and one hand but on the other because i was like super inefficient and the way that was approaching some of these problems so it worked out because they didn't have anything better to do and certainly that's a okay position to be in. If you want to sit there for twelve hours you can do it. If you don't have much else going on which i didn't but now i can't afford to do that so i just have to be a little bit more deliberate about the way that i spend my time. It's weird because like besides being braggadocious on youtube about it. No one's keeping track of this stuff anymore and no one cares right and so it doesn't matter whether it takes fourteen hours a day or four. It's really a matter of practicing the fundamentals simply asking yourself. Are you being efficient with your time if your being efficient with twelve hours a day and what you want to do is grow the biggest company in the world and become the richest person in the world. Then more power to you. Know that's really cool a couple of things. I mean for me. My time hygiene habit in two thousand and twenty one is calendar in a lot more and the strategy essentially is time boxing and time. Boxing is an approach. That leverages parkinson's law which suggests that task expands to the amount of time that you a lot to it and this is particularly true in knowledge. Work and men. You've been through this a million times. Essentially you finished the task by the deadline. Yeah and especially in knowledge based businesses where there are these moving grey lines as to what constitutes being finished. I think time. Boxing is a really excellent approach. The so typically in my calendar has been only for meetings meetings blank space and in two thousand and twenty one. I'm going to get more serious about time. Boxing and putting in projects deliverables deadlines and areas of focus in the calendar. You know one of the small examples started happening in our businesses one of our team members. Alison i would set aside an hour to work together on our sales literature every week and it was simply a matter of like. That's a time hygiene thing. This is a very important thing it tends to get put off and we think it's important so how about we just work on an hour week together and keep each other motivated. This is something. I really wanna explore in two thousand and twenty one interesting. I mean that is a real example. And that's something that we've talked about behind. The curtain with our businesses like ourselves pages needed to be updated. And i like the conversation that we had is like. This is an ongoing project. And so you know with these habits. Die ideas like identifying what's valuable and then making it a habit one of the thing. I'll add to hygiene dan and this is something that i implemented in twenty twenty as it relates. A time is a bedtime. I to stay up really late and i know. Sometimes you're up late to text. You still be up but it is rare. These days dan that i stay up twelve thirty. The reason for that is because i get up later and then i can't be productive during the day as much as i'd like to be. I don't know. I guess this is being part of an adult or something. I don't know. I've always kind of you know moon lighter on the night owl. The best stuff happens at night really. It doesn't for me the best things that happened at night or like more interesting so i cut myself off. And this is one of the habits that i implemented for twenty twenty. I'm looking forward to in twenty twenty one as

Seaney Boxing LAN DAN Parkinson Youtube Alison
K.T. Oslin, country singer of ‘80's Ladies,’ dies at 78

Atlanta's Morning News

00:18 sec | 6 months ago

K.T. Oslin, country singer of ‘80's Ladies,’ dies at 78

"Award winning country artist KT Oslin dies in assisted living After struggling with Parkinson's and coronavirus, Oslin wrote a string of hits including 1988 cm, a song of the year eighties ladies. He made it in Nashville after an early career on Broadway singer Shelley Wright calls her a pioneer in the industry. Gosselin was

Kt Oslin Parkinson's Oslin Shelley Wright Nashville Gosselin
A Musical, Emotional Memoir on Caregiving

Fading Memories: Alzheimer's Caregiver Support

03:05 min | 6 months ago

A Musical, Emotional Memoir on Caregiving

"I am excited to introduce today. Don wendorff he is the author of caregiver carols. And i'm gonna let him finish the title of that book because it just slipped my mind like normal but thanks for joining me don a musical emotional memoir and you can order your own copy. That doesn't have the sticky notes. I like mine with this ticket. But you can get them with without. I like the color. You're sticking ups their pink. Yes expert joining me. And so tell me about your caregiver journey. And how that led you to the book and then we'll talk about a book a little bit okay. I was sorta care arranger in part-time caregiver for my father who had parkinson's and some dementia with that and my mother who had alzheimer's they ended up both in a care facility and then for many many many years seems like many many many years for my late wife. Susan who originally was diagnosed with alzheimer's. You know after the million dollar workup off and it made sense. I mean she had all the stuff. it's i was. We were pretty convinced that that's what it was later turned out. That hers was vascular and she had had all sorts of little mini and maxi strokes and continued having strokes. And eventually i even Retired to become full time. Caregiver that i got by with the actually people from church helped her out at no charge to us saintly eighties then. I had some hired help for her good while but it just became too much and so eventually i retired as a. I was a psychologist and marriage family therapist. So you know. I was dealing with emotional difficulties and problems and issues and stuff all day long and then coming home and dealing with that all evening long and i was tired so that makes sense and i always talk to people about putting together their care team and that's one recommendation is. You don't always have to hire people especially in the earlier years of the disease you. Can you know find neighbors friends family. People in church people can do on it. All the above verse. I actually saw took care of her by phone. But you know eventually got to where somebody needed to really be there. And so Yeah we had a number of france at odds may have grown kids at that point so that they helped out some But you have. There's more help available. And i finally got to a point where i i really needing some pretty serious help. And i went to the pastor of the church. And i just said steve. I'm drowning over here man. I need some help. It okay and he called a team of ladies together. They said okay and they wrote out a schedule. They alternated in a came all day long while i was at work the time and they did that for a couple of years.

Don Wendorff Parkinson's Alzheimer Dementia Susan France Steve
K.T. Oslin, country singer of ‘80's Ladies,’ dies at 78

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 6 months ago

K.T. Oslin, country singer of ‘80's Ladies,’ dies at 78

"Singer and songwriter KT Oslin has died at the age of 78. As NPR's NEDA, who'll be reports husband was the first woman to win the Country Music Association Award for song of the Year. The year was 1987 and the song was eighties, ladies. You want three? Man. Was from school. Also, It was 45 years old when she recorded that song, just one of a string of country chart topping hits said also learned her three Granny's. Austin grew up in Texas, but moved to New York, where she performed in musicals and toward with Carol Channing and Hello, Dolly. Awesome songs were recorded by Brandy Clark, Dusty Springfield, the Judds and many others. Katie Olsen retired after releasing her final album in 2015. She had been diagnosed with Parkinson's Nedda You Libby, NPR news Rolling

Kt Oslin Country Music Association Awar NPR Brandy Clark Carol Channing Katie Olsen Austin Dolly Dusty Springfield Texas New York Nedda You Libby Parkinson Npr News Rolling
"parkinson" Discussed on RISE Together Podcast

RISE Together Podcast

08:06 min | 7 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on RISE Together Podcast

"I'm curious. I am aware of parkinson's only because of the experience had with my grandfather. And i don't know that i was that familiar with it maybe outside of mohammed ali. But i don't know that. I knew a ton about it. I'm curious if you had a lot of knowledge of what it was or if it was not into your diagnosis that you actually came to understand what it is and what it means. You mentioned that. I knew nothing about parkinson's except at i have. My previous wife has a brother. His schizophrenic and has parkinson's is the pills that he took a game partners. So i i've written about him. And yet i had no idea that it certainly is going to be about me But he has to walk with a walker. I i saw extreme parkinson's and when i got got parkinson's i thought. Oh my god. Is that gonna happen to me. If it is it is and your first question is how am i going to cope. Am i going to let that is not. I can't beat it. But but am i gonna be able to accept and then again. My father and mother came into the picture. I thought about the ways in which they were they were up with each other awful hitting each other screaming each other so on all that stuff but towards the end of their life the last ten years they became kind they became generous. He didn't pick at each other and incense parkinson's parkinson's is remembering those those days in the way in which they begin to love each other. That's beautiful that's beautiful. I know in the book. You talk about the concept of the dark unexpected for you. The doc unexpected was parkinson's can you just share with listeners. A little bit about what this term means for you. The spanish position they come with their instruments. The case of instruments the torture. And in a way you know that's going to happen Everybody has the suffering to go through in different levels. It lives inside you. You know that your children are hostages to like you know that you're going to have times when you when you develop sickness but you don't know when unexpected. Yeah when you when you talk about it as much as no one expects a diagnosis like parkinson's or cancer. Frankly anything else. Are there different. Experiences between something that ends up being a chronic illness versus something unexpected. Like the sudden passing of a spouse or family member. Are there different lessons that you learn when you realize the thing that you are going to be living with forever versus something that has the rug pulled and has you having degrees in a different kind of way you. My son died of cancer and the pain of that was certainly equal to or better bigger than the pain of parkinson's but it stops not. The pain doesn't stop but they at the event happens in stops he winds up getting cancer and dying and being buried and then you mourn for him and with cancer Another possibility of some cure coming in and parkinson's or Mostly the loss of memory. Alzheimer's go china. it's gonna get worse and worse and worse it's not going to just come to a point. Where and then you. You read the iranian people on an internet now saying if you just get into boxing or if you just get into dancy or running or or go to a gym you can fight it you can you can. You can walk better you can. You can have less muddiness but you can't really stop the progression. You can slow the progression but not stocks and it's gonna it's gonna take you. I admire people. Who can Can accept as i would love to. Except i want to read you three lines here. God help me except what's coming to me helped me join with coming to the strange music of a dance. I wanna dance to the new music new coming through the ballroom door. Teach me to dance. He might quite the dance. I'm talking about god acceptance you. That's a big and h- and hard and heavy when you're talking about something as big and terminal as what we're talking about but there's beauty in releasing yourself to acceptance even as feels impossible threat. Exactly you have said that. Parkinson's has been a teacher and that allowed you to explore new ways to live explore new ways to right. Can you talk a little bit about what. The learning process has been like for any listeners. Who have not yet themselves experienced something like you have. It's been a teacher to me as a writer to be freer not to look for the wrong kinds of rewards in writing. It's like going into meditation or into into a spiritual discipline. One thing we haven't spoken about is exhaustion. Let's talk about it. I begin one of my essays. Saying i'd write about my exhaustion parkinson's but up to exhausted some chief symptom doc. Isn't the shakes his torpor sluggishness lethargy thickness in the head and what it feels like when you get the flu and then from that what happens when you you go to discussion group or a reading grip and we talk about ideas and i used to be mealy clever. I'm not clear anymore. And i have an idea i try to say it so everybody knows a little slow now and so i started. Explain the idea that. I haven't realized i can't and i'm i'm i'm stuck with the idea. Everybody's really kind to me. In the old days when i had snappy answers and clever clever repartee doesn't exist anymore. I can have something clever on in writing but in talking really hard. Yeah your identity identities. Changing i mean in real time and we'll continue to over to. I'm slow. I used to be fast fast. I i'm now i'm slow in my brain is muddy and if i wait a long ago i can get the idea out but the idea isn't in the full tournament originally in imagined it. Yeah i'm trying to think what would people in who are listening to a podcast on parkinson's what would they about.

parkinson's parkinson parkinson's parkinson cancer mohammed ali Alzheimer's boxing china Parkinson flu
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:17 min | 7 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"And that's why there's so much excitement around the genetic causes because you can really pinpoint for a sub population what the causes are genetic point of view against a little trickier when you're When you're looking at the the environment there's so many different confounding variables that you want to Want to control for that. Really understand if it's a pesticide or Air pollution. so we're taking a very holistic approach in all the work that we do is just genetic in other work that were they. Were doing supporting us just around the environment because we do think that there's something in between it. It's that attraction between Both which makes people are probably susceptible to getting parkinson's disease We have for example launched request for applications and asked researchers send an application set specifically address environmental causes. We're going through those going through those reviews in picking those types of experiments that we think could really help us better understand what could be environmental causes of the disease. Which if they are real in one of the things that we've been advocating for through our policy work is that for some of the environmental toxins that have been linked to parts to try to get these taken out of the environment in one particularly called paraquat. We've been doing a lot of work for And we're still you know pushing so this is an area. I think where a patient community could help to keep putting pressure on to get some of these toxicants out of the environment that we know could be leading to neurodegenerative diseases like parkinson's so a couple more questions in the remaining time marco. I think you're gonna take on related to parkinson 'isms and how do Ps p lewy body disease parkinson's A lot of therapeutic pipeline. We're talking about is their opportunity that that some of those drugs could have effects across these different diseases. There there are a -tunities at least parking Are aspects in symptoms of parkinson's are individuals. That are not officially being diagnosed with parkinson's disease and that gets back to just the challenge. It is to to diagnose in differentiate between someone who has parkinson's some of those showing Sodium symptoms So for example a good way to kind of definitively know if if you have parkinson's is that the parkinson's treatment such as a leonardo who actually in the individual in that diagnosis made said i deal with a lot of time diagnosis. Our for for parkinson's so bartolotta these different types of Diseases tap into either commoner different types of of brain circuitry and there's a lot of effort at 'em jeff f. The try to be able to better measure these. So for example there are certain diseases that are a little bit more linked across that protein which mentioned earlier called alpha clan..

parkinson parkinson's disease Diseases
"parkinson" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

08:42 min | 9 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Don't mean as actually Porton floor. Facilitating. Synoptic city there, and there's a couple of forms that are developing. In that stratum. Ltd is the predominant form that's thought to be occurring in stratum particular motor control The issue though is that fundamentalists practice. So practice with dopamine as an enabler so don't. Robbing you losing functional and physical connections and we see that we know that that's happening. So the behavioral issue is probably that the circuit itself. Now, the reason we care is because there are other circuits evolved in motor movement movement through space, and one of those things is a frontal straddle circuit as an example and kind of keep that simple because there's other circuits in interacting with the prefrontal frontal system but the idea behind the frontal straddle is sort of volition movement. So my my ability to kind of update movements my ability to move into new spaces in actually my ability. To learn new movements so That's sort of what we call a bullish aspect of movement. So have the automatic movement you had the act ex movement, they're happening together all the time right and so if I'm losing my authenticity, if I'm losing that circuit hard because of doping depletion, I can compensate I can absolute concept by by kind of adapting towards a more volition type of movement and. If you ask Patiala Parkinson's they, they all do that. They'll tell you I have to think more bump and so the reason that's also interesting because at same circuit, many of those same circus had sort of a dull sort of dual behavior has a cognitive behavioral aspect of it of of what we called executive function, which is planning processing although sorts of things that. You're also kind of doing day to day. So there's sort of saturation effect capping here. I'm now depended on it more and I'm also using it to plan my day. So is that sort of the tipping point right there I've saturated and now that I can't do it anymore now that I'm I can take much for me to fall because now I'm using. It already also winters or firing, and now I have know now I have to hold plates and walk to the kitchen or something like that kind of supersaturated that frontal system and non falling right. So so that's why this whole idea of compensation threatful if we bring it up to the circuit level that may also begin to explain this that makes sense and finally. On the back end the idea of the world of cerebellar. Film also plays A. Role for motor control for motor. Planning. For a cognitive aspect to it as well, and the idea here is There's a lot of good data that shows for example in Parkinson's models that when we have it, just the beginning aspects of learning excise. That's our Bellum is on fire it's lit up like light bill. So we have to other circuits that are trying to put adapt, and so these are kind of principles, but we're going to talk about in just a bit but the whole idea of what? Is the fundamental aspects of brain change in homies stasis, which is reaching a new level balance or or. homeostasis stasis so that brain can function if you will. And what's interesting? Is that you begin to see like those are all sort of contributing to the Parkinson's and features right. So the dopamine depletion with the loss of ultimate tizzy, and then these other competitors circuits is that good or not good is I contributed some symptoms or not contributing to some symptoms so changes bring changes that happened the brain because of injury or in this case, dopamine depletion leads to lot of adaptation, some of which is good in terms of behavior and some of them not desirable. So it has kind of an interesting concept for the point of view that it may be kind of for some of these compensatory strategies that may be alive for some threshold at the same time, it may be causing some problems down the road, right? Yeah. Definitely. You're kind of touching on the things that that Seem to be to be important with with exercise and practicing. Certain types of gold, base. Expenses but I kinda wanted to ask you a little bit about before we get into that just you know. How many how many people I mean worldwide in the US have Parkinson's disease and maybe some of the the the environmental versus genetic causes of Parkinson's disease or what we know what the field knows. Right. So I mean I think in general. So the ideas that one hundred over the age of fifty have Parkinson's these and Don't know the exact. It's the second leading second-leading. Yeah. Definitely. The second right behind Alzheimer's and I think in terms of genetics genetic. So in general, we think that. Genetics play. Certainly the genetic risk factors, but in terms of strong genetic contributions. Most that data seems to be young onset by young women younger than thirty five, for example, not as common over the age of thirty five although now certainly recognizing that there are these risk factors like lark to, for example, where there may be running in certain ethnic groups. That where there may be some. Predisposition right to twos genetic mutation but the still in general I, think the ideas that most of these genetic predispositions are happening in younger onset people and that in the older in again older being anybody over the age of thirty five says an example or over the of forty at least that there's probably a mix between as environmental genetic factors and we've heard that again. By some work by a number of very. Important Best Gators who've been able to show us. That epidemiologic data, which is the idea that there has been some higher risk and in rural settings and in urban settings the idea that environment does seem to play a role. and. So in general, we would say still in Parkinson's these that it is sort of There's a number of different risk factors maybe genetic as we get older those genetic influencers. May Have some specific role in certain certain populations in general but that we would say that it's environment overs factors and maybe even things that play a role in genetics. that. How that are related to metabolism how we metabolize, for example, if decides right and and also the other genetic aspect of it is still questions related to plus this itself repair mechanisms is another example. So you can see that it gets complex pretty fast in terms of what genetic factors may be in what environmental factors may be and I think. I guess the point is people are beginning to recognize the Parkinson's may be kind of a common final pathway of a number of mechanisms which kind of makes it challenging away because it is late, every single one of those targets can be can be hard because it may not be one single doctor sample likely. Yeah. I was talking to you before we started rolling that basically the field seemed to really advanced back in the nineteen eighties s when you know this this precursor to our neuro talks and empty was found to basically 'cause Parkinson's symptoms and people I guess chemists. Synthesizing. It or even think IV drug use. It was actually the jugaris chemists seem to not get the problem drug users right? Exactly and the basically this This. This neuro toxin essentially inhibits mitochondrial function. Across the blood brain barrier. Affect, all sorts of you know. Bring regions and dopamine neurons. the thing that was very disturbing was the similarities between some of these insecticides and herbicides rotenone. Essentially have the same mechanism of action. Can cross the blood brain barrier right absolutely and are used as. Animal. Exactly, they're very effective. Aren't they? Yeah. I think the thing about that that you know obviously that the final of the. In the nineteen eighties so to clarify essentially what happened was. In the nineteen eighties, there was A. Outbreak, if you will of Parkinson's and what was so unusual about it is that these these particular individuals and there about eight individuals let's say that presented around the bay area and various emergency rooms had essentially developed Parkinson's futures overnight and nothing like that ever been seen, and there was sort of some really interesting investigative work that had been done to try to. Identify, what was the commonality between all these individuals and what they failed right off the bat was there had they had been heroin users and that they had gotten some access to some synthesized heroin essentially that had been tainted with this pro toxin. If you will be sort of pro toxin, it gets delivered to the brain and there it gets converted to MPP plus..

Patiala Parkinson Parkinson dopamine Parkinson's disease heroin US executive Alzheimer mechanism of action genetics.
"parkinson" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

05:16 min | 9 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"Hello everyone I'm sitting here with Dr Sell pet singer who is a clinical psychologist who specializes in Parkinson's disease she is at the University of Southern California, , where she splits her time between clinical care and research one of the reasons I reached out to just sal is because I'm particularly interested in some of her research on the role of exercise and Parkinson's disease. . Excellent. . So Can you talk a little bit about? ? What Parkinson's diseases <hes> maybe just from from a basic standpoint. . Absolutely. . So Parkinson's disease is a progressive degenerative disorder. . It's a disorder that affects individuals that are over the age of fifty generally speaking. . So we consider it a disorder of aging. . and. . Generally speaking, , we think of Parkinson's disease as a problem with mobility. . In fact, , clinically that's how we tend to recognize it and most people when they're trying to are feeling that something's changed its often because of mobility problems and what I mean by that is slowness people will describe feeling slow dragging a leg. . And or stiffness. . So it has a kind of a set kind of motor movement big strong moving component. . then. . Of course there's tremor I think one thing though that people in general don't realize trimmer isn't necessary. . So tremor definitely brings people into see neurologist and and <hes> certainly can be Parkinson's tremor can have other causes besides Parkinson. . So generally speaking, , it's really more I'd say about the slowness and the stiffness and it can affect any part of the body meaning it can affect lakes and therefore costs. . So walking an example, , but it can also affect the hands in arms where people can actually feel that they can't use arms well, , they feel that things are taking longer to do. . And sometimes, , that might even be associated with some pain element of pain. . So as I mentioned, , Parkinson's is as sort of recognized as a motive problem. . What we're realizing recognizing more over time is that there's what we call it non motor issue meaning on motor related phenomenon that occur and some of these non motor phenomena can occur even before the motor and people don't connect it necessarily with Parkinson's examples of that may be loss of smell. . Now again, , some of these other features are not specific. . So none of these are specific. . Kind of evaluating everything together. . But the non motor features as I said could be the smell teaches and smell. . Other non motor. . So that means things that aren't affecting mobility. . Could be mood, , for example, , society depression back we're now realizing recognizing these number papers that have come out you know years ago that excited pressure may be predate motor symptoms, , two years, , and then exactly depression me manifest in functional things like not be able to drive in a car in the on the highway feeling really anxious about that. . Any family members may comment that the person just seems a little bit more depressed. . So those things are now really well appreciated and recognized <hes> other things that are nominated that again, , me precede motor features or even what we call the autonomic nervous system. . The autonomic nervous system is part of the nervous system that involves <hes> or innovate smooth muscles. . So this is things like your gut. . Your heart. . Your sweat. . Glands. . And those smooth muscles are part of your your gut in your blood vessels when they're not acting normally or behaving normally, , it can cause disruption in your gut like constipation. . So constipation again, , in retrospect we find people may have problems with constipation even before they describe a note problems with movement of blood pressure changes in blood pressure may be dropping him blood pressure or heart rate abnormalities because of. . Changes in the innovation to the heart. . These are all kind of examples of nominal that aren't necessarily specific to Parkinson's disease but kind of come to once we see the motor features we can say, , Oh yeah before that, there , were these other sorts non motor features that were really predating it. . So the point is, , is that Parkinson's certainly more than that and <hes>. . We're appreciating that more and it finally. . I would say now really coming on the forefront again, even , more is a cognitive issue of Parkinson's and I think what we're recognizing again, , cognitive issues a pretty predominant in Parkinson's literature sort of all over the place but essentially, , the reporting about forty percent even upon diagnosis may already have some cognitive issues. . Now, , that's not the same thing as dementia. . So this is called mild cognitive impairment in cognitive impairment is defined by the idea that a person may be noticing memory related issue or their family members noting that but they're not functioning paired meaning. . They can do all the Adl's but they themselves were noting this and we can actually pick that up on some diagnostic testing as well <hes>. . So these things again haven't quite there's some understanding of why this may be happening <hes>, , but they're certainly part of park disease. . And also the idea that they are very much interrelated. So. . . Motor and cognition probably had some relationship to in terms of the idea that cognitive issues can sometimes contribute to more motor problems or cognitive issues can get you more mood related issues. . So they're they're not really separated. . They're very much interrelated and we'll begin understand how and why that may be happening either from a chemical point of view from circuit point of view

Parkinson Parkinson's disease dopamine degenerative disease Disease University of Southern Califor Dr Pet Elba Dr Pet Singer skateboarding Yoga
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

02:23 min | 9 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"So I try to I try to confuse my body and do something different every day so whether it's Strength Training or cardio dancing boxing swimming just try to kind of keep things different and and and test every part of my body. That's really what I try to focus on and and if nothing else it just you know is good for general even if it doesn't necessarily slow the progression but I like to think that it does and there have been many studies show that does. The other thing for me is this is I guess more of a psychological part of it is it. It's kind of motivated me to live more in the present instead of thinking or wondering you know where I'll be in ten years or fifteen years. I really try to focus on where I am now and enjoying then enjoying my friends and my family. Thanks so much over. So, we are coming to the end of our our So I'M GONNA. Sort of stop the QA now a couple of things First of all, thank you everyone for being part of our community and for joining us today and a big thanks to our panelists for for for sharing all their information and insight today So we'll be sending link after this call, we'll be sending a link to the Webinar so you can watch it on demand if you'd like to watch it and we listen and if you missed a few parts when. It listen to it again I know the few questions in the in the feed about the role of environmental factors and Parkinson's disease, and we actually have some some prior webinars that have touched on that topic. So you can find those in our on demand list as well. Please do mark your calendar for next Thursday with an art which will be on October Fifteenth and I'm excited to say are a favourite moderator Dave Iverson will actually a special appearance. To bring us an important episode going into the election that's coming up in November we'll be discussing Parkinson's policy priorities and the power of the government and making decisions that impact people with Parkinson's in their loved ones, and so we really hope you'll be able to tune into that to that women are. So with that, we're going to end the call and again thank you everybody for listening. Thanks for listening. Community members like you are bringing us closer than ever to a world without Parkinson's disease, learn.

Parkinson's disease Parkinson Dave Iverson
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:51 min | 9 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"See a number of people asking essentially the same question in different ways and this one's I'm GonNa, send you Joe a lot of questions just to kind of about different family. I guess I was the way I would call it a Parkinson's disease You know both parents have disease. What does this mean for my risk? Does it skip generations? You know uncle had it things like that and I thought maybe could you talk a little bit more about when you look at a family where there's Parkinson's disease? What geneticists? What are you looking for? What sort of what when you see something what what does that tell you and how do you sort of approach that and thinking about looking for a Potential gene it might be linked to Parkinson's. Yeah. So that's a very good question actually because you know we we we wanted to keep his short and not very complicated I. Didn't really get into the details but but yeah, these genes that we were talking about you know some of them are inheriting different patterns of world some of them you know having only one variant either inherited from the mother or funded on chrome the father you know to either increase the risk in the case of va, for example, or cause disease in the case of Sino. Korean. For example but others you actually need to inherit too. So he has to come wandering the MOM and Dad and you know the first type is called a dominant and then the second type is called recessive So so when we looked at our family, we always considered both options, right so sometimes, you'll see, for example, the both parents are healthy, but then they have a kid that my have Parkinson's disease. Those usually are receptive on usually the the kid will have the disease early with an early onset recessive genes. Most of them cause a early onset Parkinson's disease. So the younger it is. Usually, the more we think about this recessive or these forums where you have to get two different variants So yeah when we looked at our family, we always start to look that You know first second degree relatives that are affected in the family the obviously the more number of people affected in the family usually will be rafer suspicion of being genetic caused, but you always have to remember that you know families also share environment. So for example, you have a family. That lives in now farm all exposed to pace. This is he is because there's a family history doesn't mean that you know he's always genetic, but also raise a flag right on and we always want to studied those those families but I, yeah, I think it's very important to remember that the these variants are inherited in very different ways and they have different effects. So so it is there it's complicated. That's why we have to go to school for so long. To try to understand all these mechanisms and all these about you behind it. Right. But But yeah, in a simple way again, we look for for what we call family agregation. So many different people and different generations are affected with the disease with similar symptoms similar age of onset..

Parkinson Parkinson's disease Joe rafer
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

04:11 min | 9 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"All, right. So what's next for genetic? Research. Obviously, we've uncovered a number of genes. We're learning more about the genetics ultimately the biology of Parkinson's needs but still a lot more to learn and I you know what a touch on a few. Points and maybe go back to the NACHO and talk a little bit about one important part of genetics which is that a lot of genetics in Parkinson's done to date is really been just a subset of the population particularly in particular European Caucasians and a lot of the work that we're doing now is making sure that we understand the genetics and everybody would Parkinson's disease and I wonder not joking he's not a little bit more about some of the work that you're doing and really trying to expand our understanding Parkinson's really globally in sort of in a more diverse for people with Parkinson's. Sure and you. has clarified that unfortunately, there's not a parking since Feel problem it's all over across the all these is You know there's being a huge representation of non European population. So it is be issued only in Parkinson's disease, but in any other diseases and the good thing is that we're you know we're working towards changing this hopefully much faster than other diseases that we can said they example but yeah, I think you know we already talked about some of the various that have been identified associated to parking. And the truth is. These studies that have been done without a thousands of patients I'm talking about almost thirty, eight thousand patients and you know over a million controls those include only individuals that are highly from a European advocacy background and they're they're many reasons why these this has been done this way you know but I think ultimately, you know it's something that we need to fix because not only. You know we wanna be able to treat everybody you know with the best drugs apply to their ethnic or does genetic makeup. But you know we also want to understand better to disease and we we believe that these publishers have been studying the key to find new genes. So as you said, new genes, new therapies more understanding that disease. So we can provide better care and more opportunities for people to you know hopefully, be able to One day cured is they see so So we've been working on on Latin. America. Latinos. Are One of the populations that are very, very underrepresented this bag the fact that there's a lot of them in the in. The US. The fastest growing minority. So you know there's a lot of them in the US we need to be able to again proved provide equally good healthcare to to them so So about two thousand, hundred, six, we started working in in Latin America to try to getting up samples to be able to do this type of studies right because unfortunately as we mentioned some of these genetic have very low effect. So that means that you need to have thousands and thousands of people to be able to even see them So so we're trying to gather days and we've been working on it for about fourteen years now to the point where..

Parkinson Parkinson's disease US Latin America America
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

03:38 min | 9 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"K. Two gene again, which makes a protein called there to the. Gene and office nuclear gene, and there are companies that are now making drugs that target the altered mechanisms. Underlie these genetic differences and and how they lead to Parkinson's disease that are in various stages of clinical development We talk about the different stages of clinical development you make your the word stays one as two, and also phase three Those are just the different stages of clinical testing phase. One is usually sort of early safety testing phase two is sort of early efficacy testing seeing if the drug is actually having a benefit and then phase three is sort of the ultimate test where we're actually looking to see. If those drugs are actually having real benefit and a large number of people So for these three genes, we actually have a number of trials that are ongoing for the K.. Two a gene for example, we have two companies, Denali and. That are both making drugs that target this mechanism and our testing those in people with Parkinson's now We also have a lot of efforts looking at mechanisms targeting GPA, with companies like Sanofi, genzyme, other companies, eastgate bio another company called licensed therapeutics that are developing different approaches to targeting GPA..

Parkinson Sanofi Denali genzyme eastgate
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

02:24 min | 9 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"I think more information is better some people when they're about to have a kid, don't want to know what gender the kid is I would want to know, and in my case, I would want to know as much information as I can about my own body and I am. I think it's just helpful in general because I'm a numbers guy and I think that if the more information you have in the more numbers, you can crunch the more data you can collect and potentially the more therapeutics you can come up with down the road. Things over. We Need I. Know You have kind of an interesting story and your journey I think was a little little different from offers and wonder if you could walk us through that Sarah. I'm and thank you very much and over it's tonight to. Hear your story. I've seen your picture on Michael J. Fox foundation Brochures and booklets and everything, and it's nice to meet you and hear your story Yeah for me so much more recent journey. my father had Parkinson's. Very, mild and He had other things going on. So it wasn't the most prevalent thing in our lives and kind of forgot about it. And then I had started working in hospice became a medical social worker went back to school late graduated in twenty seventeen and started working as A. Hostile social worker in January of twenty eighteen and one of my first patients had. and stage Parkinson's and. Most people don't get to that stage necessarily, but there she was. And I was looking for a way to help her be more comfortable talk to her sister about the possibility of therapy and her sister said, well, that won't work because she lost her sense of smell a long time ago and I thought. Well, I want my smell sense of smell about five years ago. And then I was remembering. Well, let's see my father has Parkinson's disease and started looking up some of the Early symptoms and Counted off about five of them I had myself..

Parkinson Sarah Michael J. Fox
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

04:40 min | 9 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"Of carrying some of these genetic changes doesn't necessarily always mean you're GonNa get Parkinson's and probably a lot of reasons for that in you looted to some of them even some of the sort of quote unquote more higher risk genes always necessarily guarantee that you can get Parkinson's, and I think this is an interesting. We can talk about this maybe in later on, we talk about the future of genetics but that there probably are a lot of factors including other genes that. In combination might oxy protect you from Parkinson's even if you carry some of these, some of these genetic changes that are normally linked to the having disease. So we can talk about that more near the end of the of the call today but I think that's a another point that you raised. All right. So let's move on time. So I WANNA. So now that we kind of have a grounding at least in sort of genetic basis Parkinson's as it exists today let's let's talk a little bit more. You know with people who actually had gone through this journey of. The genetics linked to Parkinson's and and sort of have gone through genetic testing. So before we kind of Go to our panelists I mean, there's a couple of quick points here. you know? When you think about getting genetic testing, a lot of ways to think about this and I think one of the most important things versus to ask yourself WH- why why do you WANNA get genetic testing not everybody necessarily wants to to go through this journey is important. I. Think when you when you think about these kinds of a decisions dachshund talk to your doctor, it's good to talk to A. Genetic Counselor you know talk to your family members make sure you understand again the reason for awhile you want to get you netted testing, but once you do make that decision, there are different ways that you can. You can go about getting genetic testing. You can actually go directly through your doctor and and actually have a genetic test sort of ordered as if you would, as you would any other medical.

Parkinson A. Genetic Counselor
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:52 min | 9 months ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"These from biology standpoint. On the how many different players and that's only the genetic part, but there's also an environmental part, right. So there's a huge combination of things that really have to happen in most cases for somebody to develop the sees you know. Thanks thanks for that and you know so I think one of the ways we like to think about it just you know the slides sort of prevents are provides a little bit of that sort of concept is this sort of range of genetics again, and so we can think about you know those genes that you know are pretty rare but you know have no carry a high risk if you have those particular changes verses. Those that are lower risk and and you know but maybe an aggregate and and more frequent in the and people but maybe an aggregate increase your risk, can you talk a little bit more about that concept again because I think again, that's such a powerful thing when we think about. you know Parkinson's genetics rise. Exactly. So I think we need to different say those two things that I was trying to explain before you know the ones that will be after stated through familiar forms, which is you know very few and maybe even like less than five percent of the patients are caused by one of these rare variants right So you're you're playing maybe in lay terms I I I always liked the thing about the genome is like all different buttons that they're playing pigs. has rights if you run into if. You walk into a coffee, you see all these buttons. So our south are Kinda like that. It has all these different jeans needs to be turn on and turn off and really th. There are Kinda like two types of button. So there's both of that are completely necessary for the plane to to function. Well, right it's a pretty simple. You can think about the button that turns on and off the engines semi something goes wrong with that. You know the plane won't fly or if it's lying, they might belt flying which. Is You. Know is is it has a big effect that's what we usually call genetic how having a big effect or a huge impact on in this case, a a disease risk or Yeah. This is risk but they're older variants or other buttons on the plane. Worried something goes wrong. You know it may might get uncomfortable but he's not he's not enough to to become a problem right? So you can think of, for example, the as you're going off and we I think we all have been plane where to as he wasn't. Working or the heat was too hot and I mean, it makes it uncomfortable but you know in terms of genetics, those various don't really caused a disease per se..

Parkinson
"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"parkinson" Discussed on The Michael J. Fox Foundation Parkinson's Podcast

"Parkinson's You know first and foremost we know that there are a lot of biological neurochemical changes that result from the disease process that characterizes Parkinson's. So we see changes in sort of the amount and the availability of the feel good chemicals called neurotransmitters that are available in the brain we. Also see changes or traffic jams or interruption across them. The highways that connect different areas of the brain as well as you know, some decreased activity in certain brain regions that are related to mood. But in addition to those biological neurochemical changes, they're also behavioral factors and cognitive factors that are implicated in moods. So what do I mean by that? So when I say behavioral factors, you know what a person is doing or Not. Doing. in response to the various and very real challenges that they're experiencing. You Know Day in and day out doesn't individual have kind of enough exposure to the people places and things that provide them with a sense of satisfaction or reward or meaning or productivity in their day to day. Parkinson's can really change the landscape of the day and we really have to think creatively you know think outside of the box sometimes build. A better box to figure out You know how we really can expose ourselves to those life experiences that are going to enable us to feel good about ourselves. You know. So as an individual exercising are they engaged in, you know meaningful social connections do they have hobbies or leisure activities that enable them to feel good about themselves so we really need to look kind of behaviorally and what an individual doing as well as consider. You know how they're thinking about themselves and their world and their future You know what Parkinson's May mean or not mean for them and their ability to you know to cope with the changes difficulties that they are going to be experiencing from time to time. So really depression and anxiety or are multifactorial the biology sets the stage, but individual reacts and cope with the changes and the challenges that Parkinson's per presents. Also plays a really important role. So you know learning coping skills to best manage stress negative feelings as well as becoming aware of you know how we're talking to ourselves. What are the messages that we're giving to ourselves? You know are we speaking to ourselves with the same kind gentle you know compassionate tone that we would speak to a dear friend or are we being overly critical and harsh towards ourselves? And oftentimes those self critical messages play a very important role in maintaining these negative mood states. There's been incident if you look at the laundry list what were some of the things that you were experiencing and head this little changed over time for you I mean the sleep problems are definitely initial who are. Really. You know I worry all the time. Just mood swings And and just feeling feeling really down.

Parkinson
"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

11:22 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Locations around the twin cities here in Minnesota. So Dr if you had a client with Parkinson as far as DHA supplementation, what would you make as far as recommendation or what have you done? Oh, well, at least sixty HA lease. You know, six hundred milligrams of DHA at least. And then I have them eat a couple of eggs. Yes, because organic eggs, grass-fed eggs, grandson chicken night from for what you know from the west. In the pastor, they have about one hundred milligrams of DHA per gig. So then you're getting a couple more hundred, right? So that's a great idea and choline and all these other marine who seen your vitamin a good idea. So that's a good idea. Yeah, and all that. Good fat, right. Exactly where your brain. So today we've been talking about Parkinson's and back to our topic at hand. You know, as a nutritionist, I, you know, have to share this research to that was published ten years ago in the journal of movement disorder. This two thousand eight research found that people who had the lowest all the all cholesterol often referred to as the quote uncle, bad cholesterol were at the increase risk of Parkinson's by about three hundred and fifty percent. That is just shocking. Yes. So again, these are lizard Clinton had really low bad or quote unquote bad. LDL cholesterol had three hundred fifty percent increase risk for Parkinson's. You know, in the book grain brain David POE mater Dr. David Pomona said, when cholesterol levels are low, the brain slim simply doesn't work. Well. An individuals are a significant increase risk for neurological problems as a consequence. And he's a neurologist, yes. A well-known urologist writes in has some personal investment because of his dad in this topic, right. So you're hearing it from both from a clinical point and from a personal point, right? So so we need that good cholesterol for healthy brain. Definitely. Yeah. Just yesterday I had a client and she was told to try to get her cholesterol as low as absolutely possible, which is scary, right, man. I mean. There's lots of research about how that too low cholesterol really negatively affects us. And you know, Dr promoter goes on to say that all d. l. cholesterol is not the enemy. Like we've been told, and the problem actually occurs when we're eating a lot of carbohydrates, and then that leads to accidents l. the out. So to explain this a little bit further, the access sugar processed, carbs, Brad's pastas crackers. That leads to accidents l. the oil molecules and that's going to reduce their capacity to deliver cholesterol to your brain south. And that might cause your brain function to really, really suffer. So yes, our brain needs cholesterol, fat and political. Exactly. So protecting our brain cells from damage is so complex and unfortunately in a weed. You know, we'd have to run into the next shoulder planner. Be here for a whole day I go. Right. So one of the things that we want to you know we have already talked about is certainly people need to have sufficient vitamin d. Yep. And we also talked about Lear, you just talked about DHA the mega three DHA. These are great things for your brain, and we just have to just keep going and talk about this more in detail. And so let's go now to the next part where we want to talk about, what do you eat to help to reduce some of these symptoms? Right. You know, we understand that Parkinson's is a movement disorder, but it's the lack of movement or constipation that is the most troublesome for many Parkinson's patients. So sometimes constipation is the first symptom experienced by person with Parkinson's and my recommendation for this lack of movement in your intestinal track and bowels and other, you know, shaky or stiff movements is to reduce stop and eliminate sugar and grains from your diet big, big step. That's a huge in a lot of, you know what? I find a lot of Parkinson's. These are the foods that they want to eat. They don't rave food. And so as a big step, it's a hard one, but it's a critical one in it's where I've seen some of the most benefit exactly with reduction of symptoms in relation. To Parkinson's, which I thought it was also as we were is, is reading more of the research, putting the show together that one of the first symptoms is constant passion. I've seen that and we don't know for sure that afterwards when once they've been diagnosed constipation is a big issue for a lot of people with Parkinson's and sugar and in processing processed grains. So we're talking cereals and bagels and breads pasta for they're all high sugar inflammatory for everyone, but in relation to the issues with bowel, I mean, can drive more of that issue now constipation. Yup. We say a lot of clients with constipation, a lot of we do unfortunately, but always always tell them make sure they drinking enough water, eight to ten glasses a day hydrate at colon. And then you also really wanna be avoiding those the hydrating beverages. So one Cup of coffee, totally fine. But six to ten. No, that's just too much. And really dehydrating, of course, pop throw that out the window. Yes, but here's some other practical ways prevent that constipation. So leeann mentioned cereal concentrating. No. Starting your day with cereal is only gonna make things worse, which two eggs saute some spinach in their use coconut oil or butter to saute that spinach Soto at just a good amount of fiber in there. You get that beneficial fat, and then some foods that are really concentrating. Cheese. Now that sad for people to learn bananas and. Paphos all constipated foods. You know when I worked with clients with Parkinson's constipation has always been one of their first concern's. So in addition to eating eggs or meat and vegetables, sauteed in butter or coconut oil, I recommend that they supplement with a probiotic befo bacteria, two or three times a day, the more the better and a bedtime. Take a different product called acid off less. And that seems to balance out and help a lot of people. Well, it makes a lot of sense to Dr because if we know you know, in the coal in, there's a lot of bifida bacteria in the colon. It's the bit that's a major bacteria that really, really helps with that regularity. Make sure you have the right type of bowel movement. Yes. Yeah. You know, in my go-to for constipation is to add on top of that is to add four to eight capsules of mixed magnesium. And this myth. Magnesium has some citrate which is good more regularity and bowel movements than glysophate, which is really highly absorbable, which is good for our muscles in me, lack station of our colon. You could start with, you know, two three per day usually have haven't taken at bedtime an increase if necessary. And if you get too much, magnesium, you'll get loose stool. So that's kind of the the no two. If you're. A little bit too much. So mixed Nick knees. Eum is very helpful for all also very helpful for getting a good night's sleep as well. So that's and I think that's the other thing that people with Parkinson's disease sometimes struggle with is their sleep. Yes. So you get a twofer? Yes. They tend to have lighter states of sleep like they don't get good deep sleep. Yes. And the magnesium is a great support for that. Yeah. Well, it's it's break time again. Okay. So you're listening to dishing up nutrition. We are pleased to be offering our weight and wellness classes, theories this fall, starting Tuesday, October second, and Thursday, October October. Fourth. If if six classes is in the evening aren't really not convenient for you, and maybe that's one of the reasons why you haven't signed up for this class of this point. You really may wanna think about in sign up for our weekend weight and wellness seminar. On the weekend of October twelfth and thirteenth. That's a great jam packed weekend full of great information register in for the weekend series and also are a regular six weeks series. You can do so on our website, our office. And if you do buy Tober, fifth, you'll receive an early fifty dollars early bird discount. You know, I think of the weight and wellness theories as nutrition one, oh one, everything you need to know to stay healthy and it's taught in our way that will motivate you to make the necessary changes. You need it really. Once you know that information, it's hard. It's hard not to know what to do. You know collar office today at six, five one, six, nine, nine, three, four, three, eight, or go to our website weight and wellness dot com to sign up to end or to get your answers. Questions answered. We'll be right back. Welcome back to dish. Attritional. Dahmer's bottom we mentioned before in the show, Parkinson sees is a very complicated neuro degenerative disease and symptoms vary greatly in from one person to another you. Everybody has different symptoms. One thing we know for sure is food matters when it comes to calming the symptoms of Parkinson's. That's a big step for people to think about in of course, I encourage individual nutrition therapy appointment for anyone suffering from this disease. So call six, five one, six, nine, nine, three, four, three eight to set up a personal to our consultation. One of the things I wanted to put out a reminder then on November tenth, we're having our menopause survival seminar and that's a whole day on Saturday. November tenth know I'll be there along with registered and licensed dietitian. JoAnn in nutrition 'age cater Chris, and we have a lot of information

Parkinson constipation Minnesota journal of movement disorder movement disorder Clinton degenerative disease Brad Lear David POE Soto JoAnn Dahmer Nick knees Eum Chris
"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

05:49 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"The risk of Parkinson's disease. Now, think about this. This study was done eighteen years ago. Yeah, and I don't see it being flashed across the TV screen or it's not front page news, right? But it should be. It should be. And you know, really Dr growing up on a farm as the as a young one. Right. Did you realize the typical type of large scale farming is one of the most dangerous occupants of occupations you can have really as a farmer, you know, using these chemicals because of the large exposures to these chemicals while you know? It's really interesting. I think my dad was well, a hail of, I don't know he, he didn't believe in doing any of these chemicals. Right? I mean, I think all of our neighbors believed in them, but he didn't. And so we didn't get that exposure which now is I look back? I think he was really so knowledgeable so ahead of his time that I fake him for, you know. Yeah, you know, working with a few, my Parkinson's clients myself. Unfortunately, a lot of them have been farmers and they have some of them have realized that maybe some of their chemical exposures specifically, there was talk about roundup being maybe one of the reasons why they develop the condition unfortunately and have stopped stopped. So it's interesting just before we started the show today, you were talking about going to a seminar to learn more about this eight, which is the active chemical around up? Yes, and and that it isn't just farmers being exposed to it is right. So the largest consumption of of roundup this life is eight is a commercial use. So it's what we're buying at Menards or at Home Depot, and we're using spray weeds on our lawns in our or. Our crops, maybe we have a garden. So that's where the that's where a roundup makes most of it sales. We think a lot about the farming piece which is critical and important, but it's it's really, unfortunately all around us, but in you know what? The my neighbors have a service that comes out. Yes, and I know that's what's being sprayed on their lawns. So I don't let my dogs walk on their lunch. Are are. So I live in in the heart of the city and I and I live next to a complex and the complex used to spray there on we, we share a lot. I mean, we basically share our our yards together and the community itself last year went together and had the the building stop using the roundup on the line because they wanted to be they have a hubby hive on the roof and the u. of m. wouldn't allow them have the beehive if they had round up on the line. So I was very happy because my kids would go and me only a couple of feet away from us. And so we know it's hard to avoid these exposures. I think one of the other places that we should caution people about is the golf course. Yeah, right. And they don't even realize that they're getting exposed and some of my clients have quit golf golfing because of that. Yeah, I have clients I've talked to about that you, yeah. Okay. We'll get on with. All right. So in two thousand five, the report, the environmental working group or also knows e WG found that DDT is still in them Bill cords of babies. Even though this chemical was banned decades earlier, this clearly shows the facts of toxic pesticides are long lasting, sadly this toxic chemical, maybe with us for another hundred years and continue to affect our health. You know, just think of it sixty thousand more cases of Parkinson's every year. Wow. Yeah. The residue really stays for a long time. Okay. You know, before we get onto any more details on this, we got to go to break, okay, you're listening to dishing up nutrition. And today we are discussing nutrition for Parkinson's disease. There is no cure at this time for this complicated neurodegenerative disease. But as with all chronic conditions, food makes a diff-. Prince certain foods seem to increase symptoms while certain foods, calm symptoms. Stay tuned as we share valuable information about the foods that can calm, Parkinson's symptoms and next week, be sure to tune in as Cassie and Jennifer discuss when to use probiotics and prebiotics will be right back. There are some things we wish for you to do what everyone else can do hop in your car. Go to work flip right into a movie seat. Now there's a perk by Keith jeans right off the rack dance at the next wedding to love shack, play tag with your kids and hear them say that was the most awesome day walk your dog dog or both. Just because he can comfortably fly coach all the way to Japan be there on graduation day, especially if it's yours and you got your MBA meet your greatest love and ride off into the sun. This is your life go live it. You've. Only got one. If you think you've tried everything to lose the weight that's keeping you from your best life. Think again, learn the new science of weight loss in the nutrition for weight loss program at nutritional weight and wellness onsite or online. You can do this. We'll help you. You're not alone. This is a promise not just upon join us at weight and wellness dot com. Welcome

Parkinson m. golf neurodegenerative disease Menards Home Depot Keith jeans Japan Cassie Jennifer hundred years
"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

Dishing Up Nutrition

07:01 min | 2 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on Dishing Up Nutrition

"Welcome to dishing up nutrition with license nutritionists and dietitians from nutritional weight and wellness weeks plane. The connection between what you eat and how you feel. Stay tuned for practical real life solutions for healthier living through real food nutrition down. You got to make a mom last just down. Addition, nutritional, this show today brought you by nutritional weight and wellness. And our topic for discussion is nutrition for Parkinson's. I'm Darlene Kevin. I've been a certified nutrition specialist and a license nutritious since nineteen Ninety-six. So over the past twenty years, I worked with hundreds of clients as you know. Know. But honestly, in all those years, I've only worked with just a few clients with Parkinson's disease. It is interesting to note that Parkinson's disease is affects almost a one million people in the United States. Yeah, but six million worldwide, which is interesting. And I think he's even more shocking that every year now this is every year sixty thousand people are diagnosed with Parkinson's in. I think that number is increasing every year. Yeah. So you know. So when I was preparing for the show, I couldn't decide if we should talk about how we can prepare our clients in our clients immune systems to protect us and them from Parkinson's disease or pay. Should we talk about nutrition, how it can help to calm down some of those symptoms. So I decided it was important to do both, and we actually need a longer show for this. And Romy run overtime. So possibly just hang in there with us, you know, because you know this neuro degenerative disorder is very complex and we want to explain how nutrition can be useful both to preventing this disorder and to reduce some of the symptoms. You know, I have the pleasure of working with two co-hosts this morning. They're gonna keep me together. I know. I, I wanted to sleep Wetzel. She's been on the show many times and she's a licensed nutritionist with a master's degree in nutrition and has been practicing nutrition therapy for how many years Levin here. Eleven years, you know, and I know that her clients appreciate or knowledge. I hear it all the time and her ability to listen and understand what they're going through. Leah. We both understand that Parkinson's disease of the very complicated neuro degenerative disease. And I said at one more time and I got it out. And honestly, at this point, there is no care, right? That's that's kind of shocking and kind of sad. So as a nutritious, I wanna start our discussion by talking about what we can do to protect ourselves from the damage so that we can avoid getting Parkinson's or another neurological or neurodegenerative disease. How can we actually protect ourselves? Yes. Well, high NAR high. View with you this morning scrape tabula. Yeah, and I totally agree that you know, we really need to talk about them portent of a strong cell membrane and really underlying that that's why this is so important, you know. And that's something we, I don't think even people think about, I know how do you protect that cell membrane, right? Or how do you keep yourself healthy? Your first line defend right. Also, I'd like to introduce our other co hosts today, joining us today is Britney Thomas and she is a registered in licensed dietitian, and she's been practicing nutrition for the past seven years. Right. Britney. What are some common symptoms that people with Parkinson's disease experience? Good morning, first of all, Parkinson's disease. It's a type of movement disorder, and it happens when nerve sows in the brain don't produce enough of the brain chemical dopamine. So that's. Kind of interesting Brittany, it'll it's like your brain cells. Your nurse cells are not producing enough dopamine. I mean, Yep, very low. And it's when those dopamine levels become very low, that people start to begin to see those Parkinson's symptoms. You know, we talk about dopamine and a lot of our classes don't. We do so low dopamine is also associated with addiction. Yep, depression, eating disorders, low energy, low focus. I mean, we could go on and on depression. Depression dopamine is an important Niro transmitter that affects both movements, our bodies movements and our behavior just this little chemical mazing yes, mazing in when those nerves thousand the brain don't produce enough of the brain chemical called dopamine. Symptoms often begin to appear infrequently. This symptoms will start. Showing up on one side of the body. And then as the disease progresses later, both sides of the body might be affected. So that's interesting, too, isn't. It is it is, you know, a person with Parkinson's may start with trembling hands or maybe trembling legs or trembling, Java or arms. There may be stiffness of the legs or stiffness of the arms, and the trunk of the body movement is slowed and poor balance and coordination start to show up Nassau's symptoms. We can do worse than people often have trouble walking talking or even just doing simple everyday tasks like cleaning or cooking. And then later people may have trouble swallowing speaking and then the depression release that's in. So you know, Parkinson usually begins around the age of sixty, but has really been known to start much earlier in it is. More common in men than women. And since there is no cure for Parkinson's thus far as nutritious, I thought, how can I protect my brain from this neuro degenerative disease and this damage that is occurring? Yeah. So here's an interesting study was reported in the international journal of narrow toxicology in the year two thousand that found that chronic exposure to some very common Pistole sides significantly increases the

Parkinson dopamine Parkinson's disease degenerative disease neurodegenerative disease Darlene Kevin movement disorder Leah Britney Thomas United States Depression international journal of narro NAR Romy Wetzel Levin poor balance
"parkinson" Discussed on podnews

podnews

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"parkinson" Discussed on podnews

"In the latest pod news. I happen to be forty six year old. Happily married proud dad of a nine year old with a great career and Parkinson's. I shake yet. I can't shake this. So what do you do with life? Gives you Parkinson's. You tell your story while you still can ten million people have been diagnosed with it, but few people know much about it when life gives you Parkinson's launches tomorrow co hosted by Larry Gifford a thirty year broadcast veteran who was diagnosed in August twenty seventeen. It's with curious, cost, Parkinson, Canada, and Omni studio. Paul squad is a new app designed to help small independent podcasters build that audience, his more efficiently on social media that hoping together feedback from as many podcasters as possible. And you can sign up to be part of the beater on their website. Podcast addict is now adding support. This podcast links, the author announces that the start the app is looking for patriot tippy and anchor link. WCHS rather than the rally quos payments standard, but who knows what the future might be at the end of the AB podcast up front last week was a chat with Bob Pittman who is CEO and chairman of media, and y'all Mon who CEO of National Public Radio willing to it in print form his a question from the moderator, how do you ensure the podcasts don't cannibalize terrestrial live radio? You'll guests are an opportunity feel podcast growth, say, radio public, a two part series, and in a survey, adobe analytics claims that forty eight percent of US consumers. We'll have a smart speaker by the end of the year. Apparently thirty two percent of US consumers have one. Now, the Lincoln tech crunch article to the full research is no longer working. If you'd like to dig a little deeper into those surprising numbers. Oh, and the US military have develops a microphone and earpiece that clamps to your teeth. You will find more details on this at pulled news dot net.

Parkinson US CEO Larry Gifford Bob Pittman Omni Canada Paul adobe chairman forty eight percent thirty two percent forty six year thirty year nine year