35 Burst results for "pailin"

From Twitter to Palantir, Losses in Technology Stocks Stack Up

CNBC's Fast Money

01:37 min | 4 months ago

From Twitter to Palantir, Losses in Technology Stocks Stack Up

"On the one side. The reason highflyers crashing back to earth. They just check out. These moves fastly. Fc twilla draftkings all plunging. Those names now down at least thirty percent from their all-time highs on the other side the old school value name cisco ibm dow oracle not just today but many are trading at or near all time highs so in this tech tug o war. What side do you bet on dan. Well right now. It seems pretty clear. I mean the pandemic winners right some of these high valuation high growth names that were really well situated during just the unique situation during the pandemic they pulled forward a lot of demand here and now they're faced with decelerating metrics forward on all sorts of occasions. You have fastly down there. Facet was down twenty five percent today. It's still trades at about ten times next year sales so the demand and the pace in which these companies were growing in last year into this year are just not sustainable at these valuations. I throw a whole nother group though in their mail. We've seen some huge. Ipo's over the last six months or so airbnb. Door dash snowflake pailin tear and those stocks are down thirty forty percent from their recent highs. And they'd be more comparable to the oracle the dell the ibm and the cisco and i do think that as a really interesting relationship here that you're seeing rotation out of these high valuation names into cheap names that are more stable that don't have the growth just a bit more defensive here.

Oracle Cisco IBM DAN Airbnb IPO Dell
Why a Dystopian Future Is Not so Far Away

Wild Wild Tech

01:54 min | 5 months ago

Why a Dystopian Future Is Not so Far Away

"Russia i've been spending a fair amount of time recently watching star trek deep space nine which i love because i think it spends more time on the kind of non human characters than the other series like in a recent episode. We learned that this kadarshian. Who'd garrick who lives on. The station has been lending capacity literature to the human dr. Julian share so that he can kind of learn more about that culture and we see him every one of these books except this book comes in the form of like a little like a little stick like the size of a pen kind of like a usb stick. Except i went and looked it up on. The usb stick wasn't invented until five years later that's so cool. It's funny because you've rented like this chicken or egg situation where like star trek has future stuff and then this happens but like also the people who make things like this also love star trek. So you start to wonder like did they wanna make this star trek thing real or iino was star trek just sort of like in that wavelength and ahead of its time in a very smart way. They've also got like what star trek communicators which are very much like cellphones right touchscreens. Where a big star trek thing they all have these like little tablets like way before the ipad came out right and siri. They talk to their computers. We talk back to them you know. Do you want to do something. Funny about the usb flash drives specifically hit me. Please say the their about who actually invented it. But the singaporean company that holds the patent for the thumb drive is cold trek two thousand international bats. Incredible it's funny to remember that cutting edge tech companies are also like run by huge dorks. Who loved the stuff i do. And sometimes that's uncomfortable when you have like surveillance companies named after pailin tier which is the lord of the rings thing all gross.

Garrick Russia Julian
What is the Clubhouse app?

Talking Tech

01:30 min | 7 months ago

What is the Clubhouse app?

"Brett. Remember when you were kid and you wanted your own clubhouse in the backyard well now. There's a lot of buzz around a new online clubhouse and we ever pailin colleague terry collins here today to fill sin terry welcome and by the way listeners. Terry is fairly new to usa today. So you can expect to hear more from him here on talking tech and on our mobile app on usa today and on that usa today. Cop so terry. What is clubhouse. A mike umbrella. Thanks for having me in usa today really appreciate clubhouses bid on social media audio only invite app where members chat and debate on topics ranging from business tech politics professional networking sports music religion. You basically name it. It's it's it's there. It's been around for almost a year. It's been seen a lot of attention as membership is seen a sudden surge most recently thanks surprise and well attended chats by chest. Ceo elon musk. Who talked black. Tentative the controversy Robin hood over the game. Stop trading turmoil. We just saw and then also facebook. Ceo mark zuckerberg. Who of course you know. He talks a lot about the virtues in virtual reality so it seemed quite a in membership. It's been up the uploaded more than eight million times for awhi- more than doubles total earlier this month and almost nearly three million downloads. The us At checker banning. So it's it's becoming quite popular app you've heard about it. This is why

United States Mike Umbrella Terry Terry Collins Brett Ceo Elon Musk Ceo Mark Zuckerberg Robin Hood Facebook
The Biden administration is inheriting working COVID-19 hospital data

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:54 min | 8 months ago

The Biden administration is inheriting working COVID-19 hospital data

"The biden administration is inheriting at least one thing around covid nineteen. That's working hospital data from american public media. This is marketplace tech. Molly would on the first full day of his administration. President biden signed an executive order designed to ensure a data driven response to covid nineteen and future public health threats. Now the administration already faces a big choice around cova data in july. The trump administration directed hospitals to stop sending data to the centers for disease control. And instead send it to the department of health and human services and hhs asked the data analysis company pollen tear to harmonize this whole massive information at first hot mess but by the fall the system was really working and now is tracking relations at least really really well. Alexis matter goal runs the kobe tracking project at the atlantic. He says the biden administration should try to ignore the messy politics in favor of the good data. You know part of it is. Cdc is seen as less political organization versus hhs in which you know it's seen as more a part of the administration did not have standing apart. You know one of the things. I really learned this reporting is that description is not totally accurate. In all cases you know the people who built this new hospital data system. They're all career civil servants. And so it really takes getting pretty deep inside these agencies to really understand the dynamics within these very complex organizations so what choices does the biden administration face around this data collection right. They could try to push the data collection for hospitalizations back into cdc into this sort of less flexible and older system or they could keep it inside. Hhs and to one of the things that i've been really worried about. Is that sort of to do this. Sort of abstract good of having the data collection be you know in the place where it belongs that you actually take away the system that working really well right now and that's incredibly transparent for the public. Do you have any sense from the one week by administration has existed of which way they might go. You know. I think the real thing is that the vaccine data is on right you saw. Cdc director will lemke saying you know she wasn't sure about the vaccine data right now and i just got to say i mean that was a system that was designed and built inside the cdc. I mean this is arguably the first major pandemic to exist in the big data age right like it. Sounds like you're saying there's just a skill set there that might not have been developed. Yeah it's not. As if the cdc doesn't collect of course cdc collects tons of data bud for different purposes. It's one thing to need rough and ready data to make decisions today. It's another thing to collect data for research projects over time in which you really want like precise answers but you have a lot of time to develop. Those data sets the questions. Do you ask the process that you build in the pandemic response. I would say by primary criticism of the cdc on a bunch of different levels is they've just moved too slowly. It hasn't seemed enough flake crisis. I mean the early example of that for me was in the very early days when the cdc had put up there cova tracking apparatus. They just didn't update it on the weekends. At a time when cases were like doubling like they stop updating on friday. They'd updated on monday. And there'd be twice as many cases as when they stopped you know. And i just thought to myself like guys. Everyone is working the weekend right now. Like we need to know what happening. The public needs to understand what's happening. You can't just take the weekend off. And i'm happy to say that the vaccine tracking the cdc is doing. They're updating it over the weekend you know. It's like right so so maybe this is a good. Maybe this is a good sign. You know that the administration cdc maybe as reinvigorated and has some renewed sense of purpose and are treating this like the crisis that it really is. Talk to me a little bit about palin tear and its role in this data collection because pailin tier is a name that inspires some dread either in the book or with respect to privacy and transparency. Like what do we know about. Its role in this data collection and how much transparency there is in in what they can. Use this data for to pailin here. It was co founded by peter thiel Who i think for a lot of democrats become sort of a republican supervillain and peter thiel and pailin tier have a lot of government contracts. People are rightfully worried about the extent of their reach into the federal government. But here's the thing people used the fact that. Hhs is data system which is called. Hhs protect was built by pollen tear as a reason to move data out of hhs. The problem is that. Hhs protect actually grew out of a cdc system also built by pailin tier also nih. They also use talent here so we have a system in which pailin tier is pretty thoroughly threaded throughout our public health surveillance infrastructure. Which in my mind. The way that i would set it up if i were doing this. Probably not on the other hand. It's not really an issue of hhs versus cdc. They both used talent here. Right pal to your says that they don't use that data that's that's flowing into system. They built for anything else that they basically just built the database in their hands are off it for what it's worth. Do you think we have that in writing somewhere in federal contract that may over tax.

Biden Administration CDC HHS President Biden Pailin Molly Alexis Lemke Atlantic Peter Thiel Palin Federal Government NIH
Leadership Amid Chaos

Squawk Pod

02:18 min | 9 months ago

Leadership Amid Chaos

"In the wake of wednesday's violent breach of the us capital business leaders have spoken out. Condemning the rioters effort to disrupt american democracy. Some of those leaders like famed activist investor. Nelson confessed that his support for president. Donald trump is a mistake. What happened yesterday is a disgrace than i as an american. I'm embarrassed you know. I didn't vote for trump in sixteen. I voted for him in this past election november. Today i'm on sorry. I did that. The national association of manufacturers a trade group that has been supportive of the president's economic agenda went out in front wednesday calling vice president pence invoke the twenty fifth amendment and begin proceedings to remove donald trump from office and keep him from ever running again over the last four years and this last year of two thousand twenty in particular business leaders have weighed in on politics again and again corporations and our public spheres are intertwined like never before. We've seen the very richest of americans billionaires express preference for candidates. Investors like stephen ross. Peter thiel and new york real estate developer. Richard lefrak have all unapologetically supported. President trump over the years pailin tear. Ceo alex carb famously aligned himself with the trump administration in the company's preliminary ipo filing august of twenty twenty. He called out fellow silicon valley giants for being unpatriotic. His company has contracts with the pentagon an ice but this week speaking to the washington post carp struck a different political tone. There's certain monica of adult leadership necessary to run a significant organization of any kind whether it's a university newspaper a church synagogue or mosque this this is below that line and we shouldn't tolerate in some ways. Donald trump may have helped bring these people deeper into the political sphere. These business leaders one's who've praised him and ones like apple's tim cook who quietly worked with him have proved crucial to the president's efforts and successes in office from woohoo market tweets to corporate tax cuts to president trump's unorthodox involvement in corporate dealmaking. We're looking at you tiktok so all this means what ceos have to say matters

Donald Trump National Association Of Manufa Richard Lefrak Ceo Alex Carb Trump Administration Silicon Valley Giants Nelson Stephen Ross Peter Thiel United States Pentagon Washington Post New York Monica Tim Cook President Trump Woohoo Apple
Laurie Garrett on COVID-19 in the USA

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

06:23 min | 10 months ago

Laurie Garrett on COVID-19 in the USA

"Joining us now. Is laurie garrett. She is a health policy analyst and pulitzer prize winning science writer. Who has been a real voice of reason for us over the course of this crisis laurie. It's really nice to see you. Thank you for being here so you and a lot of other public health experts. They called this back in the summer when the white house decided they were going to take away from. Cdc and have the trump administration. Have hhs collect this data in instead. It really does seem to have been born out in the months since how big a problem is this. How much better off would we be. If we had real data we could count on well. First of all rich we really all agreed to of gratitude to charles pillar who has doggedly covered this story for science magazine for the last three months performed brilliantly and one of them really important things that he has surrey. Thank all of a sudden you are coming on my television for which i apologize talks. And he and he and one of the things that he revealed was that deborah burks was really behind this. She wanted more control of the data she didn't trust. Cdc and claim that the data was sloppy by moving it into hhs they actually then barbed out to private companies. One was a private firm called telegraphing. Biggest client they never had and the other was pailin tier which of course not much later went public on the stock market tear was engaged to sort of massage and analyze the data on the result was of course at the hospitals. Were thoroughly confused. Who are we supposed to send data. To what form are we supposed to fill out. How do we do this. What computers are we supposed to us and for a long time in the summer right after this all started we really had almost no data related to rely upon at all Eventually the federal government started really pushing hospitals around. And said you're gonna lose your medicare contracts. We're gonna take your medicaid and medicare patients and throw them at another hospital if you don't start reporting data to us. Whoa alright swallow hospital start flooding data in. But what's the reliability of the relevance of it. What does it really mean. now. Here's where the the crux of the problem is if your job is to decide how much. Ppe needs to go to arkansas. Or how how much dexsa. Methadone needs to go to south dakota if your job is managing the national stockpile and determining whether or not reading to crisis level of shortages of protective gear for nurses for example. You need to know what's the hospitalization rate. What are the trends. look like. What's the use rate. Well you don't have any such data to rely on right now. It's just a total mess. There's no It's a mess at all levels if the federal numbers don't jive with the state numbers the state the numbers don't jive with the county numbers. The private hospital sector is reporting a different way than the public hospital sector. I mean this is just chaos lawrence this problem or how fixable is. This is a problem. I know that it was a relief to a lot of people to see the list of names who have been advising the incoming president on cova thus far and we've heard sort of reassuring and science based public statements from them during the transition thus far but when they dig in and start to do this work is this a. Is this something that can be is. Is this something that can be undone. Will they have to build this from the ground up. The cdc essentially be put back in charge of this in a way that will just sort of quickly rationalize the state and make it useful again. Will rachel raw. Really anxious to see who biden is going to name as the next. Cdc director and also the next hhs director net will go a long way to helping to answer your question. What we don't really know because the transition team is only just had a few days of access to get inside the cdc. We don't really know what the state of these kinds of programs is now inside in other words. Is it all still in their computers. Are there still personnel. There could reactivate the cdc's tracking system or was it utterly dismantled. And we don't really know the answer to that question right now laura after. Get your reaction to the news tonight. Dr scott atlas has resigned from the white house. I personally was not shy about talking about the fact that i was alarmed to see him in the position that he was in the white house given his stated public views on the virus. What's your reaction to the fact that he's now resigned. It's great. I think that he had a very negative impact on affairs inside the white house. And on our national response and i'm not sure he's going to be welcome back at stanford the stanford faculty have voted to denounce him condoleeza rice his faucet. The hoover institute is indicated some dissatisfaction with his performance. The what's interesting to me is the timing. why now. why did he put out a statement today. Dated for tomorrow and i just wonder if it's in any way connected to the fact that andrews nel who was really the architect of this whole herd immunity approach for sweden Was pushed aside this weekend in sweden. As that country's death toll and case numbers have soared. And there's a strong belief in many sectors of the swedish government that listening to end. Anders was a mistake and also conversely that boris johnson finally rejected of the sort of heard immunity approach that many of his advisor to add been advocating and about three weeks ago started tough lockdowns and since they've been on three weeks of lockdown. They've seen their case load plummet by third

HHS Laurie Garrett Trump Administration CDC Charles Pillar Deborah Burks White House Science Magazine Pulitzer Laurie Surrey Will Rachel Raw Federal Government Cova South Dakota Medicare Dr Scott Atlas Arkansas
Unpacking Palantirs Public Debut: CEO Alex Karp

Squawk Pod

19:51 min | 1 year ago

Unpacking Palantirs Public Debut: CEO Alex Karp

"This is squawk pod I'm CNBC producer Katie Kramer today on our podcast. unpacking Pailin, tear the high profile highly secretive software company has operated quietly for seventeen years and it's finally on the public markets. And -ticipant I I think for maybe the past ten years CEO Elon on why it it took. So long my lawyers will shoot me what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a longtime before other people building and how he expects to become profitable with a small, but mighty and mighty controversial of customers. Well, how can you have the Super Valuable Company? They're only a hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond. Yeah. But one, hundred, twenty, five most. Interesting institutions in the world I would ask people who are watching this to make a list of the institutions they admire in the world, and then roughly figure out if they're using pounder that interview plus the politics behind listing journalist Joanne Lipman fits a company that is very, very closely aligned with the trump administration. There's a huge question here about what happens if trump does not win the presidency it's Thursday October first October twenty twenty the year is still twenty twenty squawk pot begins right now. Good morning and welcome the squawk box right here on CNBC. I'm Andrew Ross Sorkin along with Joe Kernan Becky off today. Today on the PODCAST volunteer goes public analytics company that is usually described as secretive debuted yesterday the direct listening selling new shares on the New York Stock Exchange covered live on CNBC how tears for trading why secretive well here is named after magical orb and Lord of the Rings. But in seventeen year history, it hadn't made much public volunteer received early funding from the venture arm of the CIA and provide software products designed to crunch numbers. One of these programs is called Gotham and it's for government clients. Who Need to organize an understand massive amounts of data. So surveillance predictive policing, possibly rooting out potential terrorism threats, Pailin tear works with US Army Navy Department of Homeland Security and it's working with health and human services to help track the spread of Corona virus case data that we just recorded. We can immediately narrow into emerging hotspot counties, notable backers of talent tear include investor, and Co founder Peter Thiel who has gotten attention for his conservative politics and support of president trump in the two thousand, sixteen campaign. Evening. I'm Peter Thiel I'm not a politician, but neither is donald trump as well as his work technology companies. He was facebook's first big investor other pollen tear backers include wall streeters like Hanlon and Stanley Druckenmiller when talent tear filed paperwork with the SEC to pursue publising listing earlier this year it's called the swan event is finally got a sense of the books turns out pollen tear had never turned a profit and. A, huge chunk of its revenue came from its three biggest clients which are anonymous in the first six months of twenty twenty. It's revenue of nearly half a billion dollars a big jump from the year before this was addressed by pollen tear CEO, Alex Carp investor roadshow, which true to carbs personality, and true to the weirdness of twenty twenty was virtual and started on cross country skis. Welcome to Powell, tears investor day. We're very proud to have you here. Carp is an Orthodox for a CEO. He has amazing curly hair. He uses the modifier super allot super cool and speaking to potential investors. He made the pitch for the importance of Pailin tears purpose. This way of looking at the world war literally savior situation and in many cases Save Your Life Allen to has moved beyond. Just government clients fifty-three percent of its customers are in the private sector big name businesses who use a software program called foundry include Airbus Merck Ferrari and United Airlines but it's work for governments here and others around the world stuck to its reputation allentown faced criticism from privacy groups and for its work with the US Customs and border. Patrol. Tracking immigrants at the border. But Carp in the company not backed off in. That s one filing the leader of this highly valuable tech uniform said, Pailin tears work is different in his view software missions to keep safe may have become controversial but companies built on advertising dollars are commonplace and carp took aim at big tech culture directly writing quote our company was founded in Silicon Valley. But we seem to share fewer and fewer of the technology sectors, values and commitments. Helen tear moved its corporate headquarters to Denver and its shares headed to Wall Street. If you think, we are going to change our internal culture drastically if you think we're going to work with regimes that are not allied with the US enter abusing human rights if you think. that. That the future is going to be a super rosie place where the past ways of supplying software are going to work because enterprises and governments do not need to be reformed you should not invest in pounder. Andrew. Ross Sorkin has interviewed Alex Carpet number of times. This conversation was reported Wednesday yesterday right after the first trade for here on the New York. Stock Exchange. We've had lots of conversations over the years. This has been probably one of the most highly anticipated offerings or listings in a very long time. Almost every year that we would talk in Davos I would invariably ask you are you going to go public? Are you gonNA list and invariably you wouldn't. So let's start with why now? Well, first of all, thank you for having me and I and I really would like to thank all the pound tyrians who stuck with us and built this company and our investors you're stuck with us and you know over the years we've been skeptical about listing and for lots of reasons, we really needed to build our products. With enough protection so that we would be ready to launch them into the public space. And we built we built out PG government and foundry product and and built a way to maintain them so that we wouldn't have to scale the number of people and. You know we've reached a base where where our company's very significant and we believe being in the public space will help us with our clients and help us grow and quite frankly I believe the people apparently who built this company over seventeen years. Deserved a access to liquidity. So we we decided this would be great time for us and so far. It's been a really interesting process and and our clients are embracing it. So it's a really good time for us and I'm very, very grateful. Outlets. The single biggest question that investors ask about this company is seventeen years in while you know may have an operating profit, the company unto itself is still not profitable. So so walk us through what the path to profitability looks like. Well, you know we build these products years before people build them, and that takes money and what you see in the cove it pandemic crisis is we had built this way of going to market with foundry, which would allow us to literally supply an enterprise with a completely new stack of products within six hours and maintain them. And what you saw when we did that is we grew the company forty, nine, percent, forty, nine percent off of a seven, forty, three base and the divergence between expenses and in growth is dramatic. And we're just going to be very very focused on on an invigorating, our software offering. But when you're growing forty-nine percent off of a seven forty base. I think that's a pretty strong indication of what the future could hold and we're super proud of that and I think you're seeing that people are taking a look at our financials and our our company is often been used viewed as complex and. Needing explanation both moral and financial but it turns out our financials are quite simple and you look at this dramatic growth with flat lining expenses and I think that gives investors comfort and it certainly makes me feel as. Co Founder and CEO that we made the right decision to invest heavily over well over a decade in building software, the way other people don't to build it and you see the results do you think the profitability is at twenty twenty, two, proposition twenty, twenty, three proposition can I put you on that? Well, you you can push me but of course, my lawyers will shoot me I can tell you what I can tell you is we are very very focused on building software a time before other people building, supplying it and I think that are year I. First Half of the year growth will be reflective of the future and if I'm right. That will answer all of your interesting questions and we'll be interviewing. You'll be interviewing me again maybe not a Davos but virtually, and we'll see how we do. Confident confident we'll do well. Alex, one of the other questions people ask is how to comp your company meaning what are the comparable should this be considered a technology company as SAS company or should this could be considered a much more traditional consulting company? Can you speak to that? Well I think what the investors are seeing is they're asking the question at this point they used to ask is this is this a company that built software for the government and how do they build it? Of course we always sold this as a license. Then they saw our margins of the first half of the year round eighty percent. So I think the real debate now is. Move significantly away from is this software services because although people think we're very smart, we're not smart enough to get eighty percent margins off of a services company. The question then is, how do you comp it and honestly I think that's something investors will have to figure out. We're not focused on that we're focused on we are going to be the most important software company in the world. And people will figure out what valued over a long period of time and we're very comfortable with investors toying around it could be like this. It could be like that. We are going to deliver the best software. With the morals most efficient way of delivering it investors will decide what's that. What's that were is worth to them and I think you'll find a number of years that will be a consensus. Palette. Here is a truly special software company that is arguably the most important software company in the world. Alex has everybody knows You have contracts with various government agencies, obviously and some of the bluest of the blue chip companies in America today, but it's a concentrated list of about one hundred and twenty-five companies. About Twenty eight percent of the revenue actually comes from three of those clients unto themselves. Two thirds of the revenue comes from the top twenty. How much of a risk does that pose on one side but also when you think about the opportunity on the other, if we're having a conversation like this in in twelve or twenty, four months, how much do you want that list to increase in size or do you just want to keep that group effectively and a effectively raise the margin or cost for those clients? And grow that business. Well, we want to do all the we're going to do all of the above. So interesting about our client list people people ask, well, how can you have the super? Valuable Company they're only one hundred and twenty-five customers to which I respond but one hundred and twenty-five most interesting institutions in the world. These aren't just any institutions. The literally, I would ask people who are watching this to make. A list of the institutions they admire in the world and then roughly figure out if they're using, we don't go out and advertise our product, but I would say the list of our clients is the single most impressive institutions in the world I've ever seen we. So we want to keep these clients. Also investors will of noticing in the one that well over ninety percent of our growth in the first half of the. Year came from our existing clients. What does that mean our existing clients? The most important clients in the world are really happy that's what it means. So of course, we're going to expand those really happy clients who happen to be the coolest people on the planet, and then we've built this product which has gotten very little attention called Apollo Apollo allows us to maintain and deliver software to any number of clients with essentially. Not growing our our force apparent and force at all. So we're planning now that we have Apollo to grow the number of super cool customers all over the world, and we can do it without raising our headcount, and so what you're going to see is we're going to continue building with our clients why they're the most interesting clients in the world and they clearly based on our numbers like us and some of us. We are going to expand our client base. Why? Because now with Apollo, we can deliver the whole stack in six hours. I don't think any other company I've ever seen in the world can do that, and we can do with efficiencies that I don't know any other companies going to do because we can do this with a small number of people sitting in our office that we have maintaining, updating and providing them with new products we built. So they don't have the Frankenstein monster that takes two years to build and has to be maintained with either human hours like in the government contracting case or by purchasing new product or compensating sales people or behind. It people you don't even talking to you can actually buy one stack. So we are going to increase revenue with current customers, get new customers and continue our march. Alex how easier heart is because I know you've talked about trying to keep things in in terms of the platform if you will how he's your heart it for four clients to leave in terms of the churn. Well, as I mentioned, ninety, five percent of our revenue comes from existing customers. So customers, obviously if a customer wants to leave they, can I think the main reason our customers stay besides the fact that the output is very significant as they look at this product, we supply foundry the average customers paying less than six million dollars and they compare it to buying twenty products paying ongoing licensing. Fees. You can't get out of or building something over years, and the last thing they compare it to is we're not delivering a roadmap. Most people are living roadmap of what are you going to get in a year we're delivering a product after six hours so customers can leave. But what you see in the numbers is they by and large don't, and it's not because of my charming personality. Alex well, let me ask you a different question. We've had lots of fascinating geopolitical and philosophical questions about the role of technology and Pailin tear itself as well as the approaches silicon valley has taken. I'm curious in terms of risks how you think about this Amnesty International as you know, criticized, the company recently for its role of working with ice. How much of that does that pose a risk to the larger business? Especially, the corporate business at a time when we have corporations at taking both political positions and also being oftentimes being socially at activist. To Your Business Well, look the fact that we take positions that are sometimes controversial can cost. US clients. But it also gets us. Clients because when we talked to a client and we say look we're going to work with you. We're not gonNA walk away just because the winds change and this is super important especially to our government clients if you're supplying special forces and army and the US, those clients have to know that they will not be left on the battlefield. Because a because Silicon Valley has decided they don't like the warfighter. So of course that costs revenue many of our decisions of cost US revenue we only work in certain countries we've walked away from work because if human rights issues we've said, we disagree with very prominent human rights organizations and we engage in dialogue but also by the way is a reason why I Think people who are watching this may consider investing or not investing. We are not going to stand up here and say we're for everybody we're not going to pretend, and by the way we're going to try avoid jargon. We will actually tell you what we think it's not going to be created by fifty media people it may have to be carried by a couple. Of Lawyers but one of the unique things about power tears, we actually say things and we actually stick to them and that's something not everyone likes but many of our customers do and by the way I think it is a reason why ninety five percent of our revenue comes from customers because when we tell them, we're going to deliver we are going to deliver. Alex. One of the other questions now you all republic company. But as you know, you have three tiers of stock classes of shares that is and to some degree there have been critics who said, this is effectively a private company masquerading as a public company. Can you speak to the decision to structure the shares the way that they are structured and how governance experts and folks should think about that I think it's important for government experts to look and make an deliver opinion but I would also ask them to consider the environment we live in pound tear has been in silicon valley up till recently for seventeen years and in silicon. Valley. Defending the. warfighter providing our troops with technology that allowed them to come home is very controversial. I do not believe a company like ours that makes really consequential decisions for government clients and non-government clients could be run without an F. share structure and I understand there's criticisms investors look and say, well, why should talent you're having F. structure? What is my? What is my what? What can I do if? I don't agree with them. The primary reason why we fought for an structure and we asked investors to buy into it was we need to be able to go to our especially our Intel and defense clients and say, we will not just blow with the wind. And does shares for a company like ours gives us a unique ability to have long-term commitments to the most important clients in the world, both commercial and government, and that's why I believe they're super important, and I also again would encourage people if that's not something you're comfortable with there are many shares to buy. We don't have to buy challenge your shares. You should buy shares knowing that these shares reflect our views. Alex we've often had these conversations in Davos where globalization has ruled the roost but as you know so well, the world seems to be shifting to a globalized world, a splinter net if you will. How do you think long term that will affect the business of here We made this decision, which is actually a secret only because no one believes it's true which is that we didn't solve the problem of fighting terrorism. We solve the problem of doing data protection and fighting terrorism, and the architecture we built both PG and for foundry will allow a super set to work with subsets, which means if the world's splinters and every country has its own jurisdictions, it's GonNa be very hard for normal software companies because they're not built to do that but it's going to be very good for Palette here and finally Alex. Decision five years from now today. How would you measure success? Here, what would be the metrics which measure it? We know they're there obviously financial metrics but I'll tell you Powell cheer has recruited and retained I believe the most interesting most talented most ethical people I've ever met and we work I've interacted with thousands of institutions and in five years when meet I think he'll say to me. Wow, that wasn't just you saying that because it was the right thing to say it's actually true. And the products that will build over that period we'll we'll. We'll be unique and they will tilt the course of history. In favor of things that are good and noble. And will not avoid the complexity that's necessary to do that outlets. Carpool. You lots of luck and we do look forward to having that conversation hopefully in five years. But hopefully sooner than that. Thanks so much Alex.

Alex United States Silicon Valley Davos Twenty Twenty Donald Trump Andrew Ross Sorkin Carp New York Cnbc Powell Joanne Lipman Peter Thiel Gotham Us Army Navy Department Of Hom
Palantir shares jump 30% in stock market debut

CNBC's Fast Money

01:08 min | 1 year ago

Palantir shares jump 30% in stock market debut

"Tear making a big splash in its first day of trading on the New York Stock Exchange shares of the secretive security company rallying thirty one percent today. Get right out of Josh slipping out west with born Pailin tears big debut Josh. So Brian Pal is showing accelerating revenue growth but what is this Cup path to profitability? Here's what CEO APPS Carp. Tell. CNBC. It turns out. Our financials are quite simple and you look at this dramatic growth with flat lining expenses and I think that gives investors comfort and it certainly makes me feel as a CO founder and CEO that we made the right decision to invest heavily over well over a decade in building software the way other people don't build it and see the results. One potential riskier only a hundred and twenty-five customers. But saying he's fully confident that he can expand business with existing customers and attract new ones. There's also the question of corporate governance with founders controlling just under fifty percent of pound tears voting power carp says, that's necessary.

Brian Pal Josh CEO Cnbc New York Pailin Co Founder
A tale of two direct listings

Equity

11:11 min | 1 year ago

A tale of two direct listings

"Hello, and welcome to equity shot are quick hit on breaking news I'm Natasha Mascarenas and today joining me to talk about a tale of not one. But two direct listings on the same Damn Day is Danny Creighton. How are you Danny doing? All right this is exciting. You know we went from a world of no direct listings to an occasional direct listening to multiple direct listings in the same day. So it's an exciting exciting morning. We can finally stop breaking up spotify in slack whenever we say the L word and reinvention Asana, and pollen tear, which are the two news heads we got today it's zoo of curiosities. But lots of great stuff to talk about where where do you WanNa start you WANNA. Start with Asana or palate here. What's more interesting to you I think I have to start with pollen tear and my big question is you've been tracking it through every. You know crazy filing, your high level thought was this a successful debut on the Stock Market for? Today I think it's a definitely a success. You know the stock from January two, thousand, nineteen onwards trading at around five to five, fifty, a share, and then in the last two or three months that price jumped to about nine dollars and sixteen cents as of September first, and so you know when when the reference price came out yesterday from the New York Stock. Exchange which was quoted at seven dollars and twenty five cents. A lot of people were like, wow, that's like a significant drop from nine sixteen like what happened particularly also last week we had the Wall Street Journal reporting they were looking for a ten dollar referenced price. You know none of those numbers were really good but look it's trading. Now it's live as we're. Doing the show, it's ten dollars and sixty one cents a share I'm. So it's better than all the numbers we heard before and it's up fifty percent on day one. So so part of me feels like this reference value was actually chosen precisely to give it a pop on day one you know if they were targeting ten bucks on Day One, this is sort of what they got and so a little bit of a lower reference price might have given them a little bit more of A. Psychological boost on on day one. So I, I think overall to success. Do you. Can you talk me a little bit about how we're trying to value the company right now I feel like I'm seeing a bunch of different numbers out there. Do we have an understanding of its fully diluted market value? We do there's still a little bit abate mostly because Peletier gives multiple numbers for the number of care. So it gives us one point six, billion shares outstanding two point one fully diluted two point one billion fully diluted than two point five billion fully fully fully diluted and so. I would say that its current share price, we would call it around twenty, four, billion in evaluation, which is an uptick from its its last rounds. Again at you know for a seventeen year old company to have the sort of strong debut on Wall Street I think it's pretty good. All things considered. Okay. Cool. I'll put a pin in Pailin tear, but I do want to talk about their lock-up period later, run me through Asana numbers I. saw it opened at a five point two billion value. Yes it's on a similar story. So yesterday, The New York Stock Exchange released a reference value of twenty one bucks per share. It zoomed straight out onto the public market. So it debuted, it's currently sitting at twenty eight dollars a share up thirty three percent on day one so far it's up to about I. Think it peaked at five point, two billion, and as of now is more like three point five, three point seven, five, billion market CAP. But again, that's actually significantly higher than his last valuation, which was an inlet late twenty, eighteen around one and A. Half billion dollars so either oke across the board I think both of these issues you know there's always a lot of risk drake listings. As you pointed out Natasha there haven't been that many is this sort of a novel mechanism. They're still a little bit unclear and exactly how they work, and so it's great to see again similar to slack spotify you know these are two enterprise. Companies to again totally different from the more consumer is random companies particularly spotify, which has tens of millions of consumers who might be retail investors buying into the stock. Most people haven't used the Sauna and certainly must people haven't used Pailin tear and so to see the kind of strength on the markets and the first day is is enticing for other companies considering the direct listing model. Right There I feel like pollen tears total customer base was what one? Hundred Fifty, company, hundred, twenty-five customers. That's a lot of customers Doing Gospel distanced. Something it's probably my favorite statistic about the company and I think I saw Dan Prime tweeting the other day that you know it's no longer going to be a secret of company. So we can stop calling it as such. This is the end of that right that confrontation about pollen tear for. So long we've been having well I, I will say. This about an hour ago. So may not be true today. A ASANA has an investor relations page like a standard like every company who publicly trades Peletier does not like it actually does not have as as of an hour ago that I looked up I could not find an investor relations page for here, which which tells you everything you need to know about the company I, feel like that is like in a beautiful one sentence or describes his relationship with investors, but but I think you're absolutely right you. Know despite the fact that only one, hundred, twenty, five customers despite the fact that took seventeen years three hundred grew it's growing from seven hundred, forty, three, million in revenue last year in fiscal year twenty, nineteen, it gave a revenue projection for twenty twenty about one point, five, billion to it's a growth company. It's SAS more and more SAS today than it was in the past where it was more services driven. So again, it's a positive story despite all the kerfuffle around its governance the last couple weeks do you Do you feel like the direct listing method might now take on more popularity. I. Mean. Maybe in some way, but can we even is? Is it enough of a success? You'd think that other companies might follow suit now that it's not just spotify that that did this. I think the more the merrier right I think Palentinian particular raised capital round back in. July right which was sort of what I was told from some insiders essentially the IPO that was the IPO and then direct listings just the actual market exchange. So I think we're GONNA see more companies taking this approach of bifurcating the capital, raise the float that you would normally do a IPO and just the actual just GonNa Start. Trading today and you know I think that that allows you more time to create the right narrative the right story of and also separates what is a a pretty intense kind of crisis driven process the road show getting the company ready the SEC filings separating out at out you don't put all your eggs in one basket. You can do it in stages and I think more and more companies undertake that approach going forward. My question to is and I'm sure our listeners are curious is with all direct listings. There's no shares offered by the company when the when it debuts and so when we see these prices I, guess how much of them are they vanity metrics much of their HABITA- goals, how important are they for us to care about and think about? I wanted to be precise. So there are no new shares offered by the company. So there's no dilutive in an IPO generally have fifteen, maybe twenty percent new shares offered to the public. There are no new shares but many of the insiders have to pay taxes capital gains they actually do have to sell shares. So you know so far this morning already thirty five, million shares of have already been traded and We have on Pailin tear thirty, two, hundred, and thirty million. Shares sold today, right? So already, there's a market, there's clearly tens of millions of shares being sold. So these prices are real or Israel as any other IPO in which people are you know figuring out what's going to happen? You know the next checkpoint for both of these companies is gonNA come in a couple of weeks when they report their next quarterly earnings and I think by then you'll start to see the analysts get comfortable the companies understand the next steps and what's happening after. And you're speaking with Dustin Moskovitz later today the founder of Asana. So any questions on that? You can kind of tease out right now. Well, I was told. The pure folks. About our stock imagery because apparently no longer has sideburns to. Join, the Line of people that complain but it's like you know there's the old line about taking a haircut. Up Thirty, five percents of they actually gained hair on the market today speak. Clearly. sideburns maybe somewhere else. But? No I. THINK WE'RE GONNA be really interested because some unique company in which its founders, Dustin Moskovitz who Justin Rosenstein, who both met each other at facebook actually majority of the company outright right. We just never see or very rarely see tech companies where the founding to CEO's and and COO own like outright majority like not just a majority of the voting because of class, a class B shares but they just outright own about thirty two percent of the company I believe doesn't owns thirty six. Percent of the company outright and just knowns around sixteen point, one percent and so to me like I'm just curious because it's just a different path for a company it was a slower growth company capital much more efficiently grew much more methodically and the founders sort of maintained ownership over time in a way that most other founders do not think the other. The other thing to put out here is Asana has no lockup though the similar to spotify Ed to black as listing all the shares are available for trade to anyone. Who any insider anyone who owns a share of on this morning can put it on the market and sell it Here is the complete opposite pallares pioneering this new kind of fusion of the IPO and the direct listing one would argue maybe the worst of both of those processes but actually a direct listing with a lockup and so only roughly twenty eight to twenty nine percent of pollen. Tear shares are even available for sale at all with the rest in lockup and market standoff agreements that will expire over. The next calendar year. So you know there's a lot more to wait on right. There's not as much liquidity with Pallares could actually harm the stock price. They might be a little bit inflated right now because there's limited number of shares available for trade, we'll have to watch and see but again, it'll be interesting to see if other companies start to do a directing the lockup because clearly Palin tear has not suffered tremendously using this model. So again, another tool in the tool chest and uber do something similar with lock-up period. mean. They did like all IPO's. Underwriter from a bank, they have lockups in place mostly to make sure that there's not a mass rush to the exit. They don't want hundreds of millions of shares at any price willing to be sold. They WANNA, kinda manager coming out because they're putting oftentimes their own money up through the green shoe at stake, and so again, that's what made direct listings unique is that there wasn't this lockup employees are free to do on day one through whatever they don't have to wait six months as is customary. So again, we'll see kind of where the the system lies in the future. As you know, the New York Stock Exchange also got approval to do a direct. Listening with a capital fundraise so we've gone from this world of like there's an IPO and that's the only way to go public to. You can do a direct listing, a direct listening with a lockup, a direct listening without lockup address listening lock-up in a capital fundraise like you can do anything you want. You know it's it's the it's the Netflix of going public. So to speak I, see the headline now airbnb goes public through a through a pollen tear style direct listing. It's just going to happen and it's going to be horrible but we will be back here to talk about it as always every shareholder gets a free party house for one night so. That'll be the new innovation going on there, but but that's a sonnet that is Pelham Tear Ford they an and we'll have more to come in the next week.

Spotify Natasha Mascarenas Pailin Dustin Moskovitz Danny Creighton Founder New York Stock Wall Street Journal Airbnb Peletier SEC Dan Prime New York
Palantir Plans to Go Public

Squawk Pod

02:10 min | 1 year ago

Palantir Plans to Go Public

"Details on one of the most anticipated public debuts of the last few years, data analytics company. Pailin. Tear. Technologies has released its prospectus to debut on the public markets in the filing pound here reveals that plans to list on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker he l. t. are and will pursue a direct listing rather than a traditional IPO, the same unconventional route taken by slack and twenty nineteen and spotify two, thousand, eighteen the company said it lost about five hundred eighty million dollars last year despite a twenty, five percent increase in revenue from the prior year. Tear was founded in two thousand three by a group of Silicon, valley entrepreneurs, including CEO, Alex, Carp, and Peter Thiel became wealthy as a founder of pay PAL and an early investor in facebook, and just in case you didn't know I did not until today Pailin tear the company was named after a magical or in the Lord of the rings that lets you travel. Vast distances. Here's Andrew Ross Sorkin with more in the filing co Alex Carp said quote our company was founded in Silicon Valley and by the way now, it goes to take on a shot at Silicon Valley but we seem to share fewer and fewer of the technological technology sectors, values and commitments from the start. We've repeatedly turned down opportunities to sell, collect or mind data of technology companies including some of the largest in the world have built their entire businesses on doing just that. Carp recently announced plans to move its headquarters from Palo Alto to Denver in part because of. This value issues talked up how also clear on its stance on China. Says we not work with the Chinese Communist Party and had chosen not to host our platforms in. China. which may limit our growth prospects. Company proposed three classes of stock, a Class B and Class F which will be held voting trust established by its founders including Peter Thiel with just below fifty percent of the total voting power for that stock that's similar to voting structure of other tech giants, clean facebook, and Google. So if you're concerned about the power structure. That is that is something they do share in common with with the rest of the

Alex Carp Peter Thiel Silicon Valley Facebook Andrew Ross Sorkin Founder Silicon Chinese Communist Party China Palo Alto Spotify New York CEO Google L. T. China. Denver
"pailin" Discussed on The Darren Smith Show

The Darren Smith Show

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"pailin" Discussed on The Darren Smith Show

"Was mean times on these xylophone. Okay, but that was the status. Of all, sad baseball moments that we've had for three months. I envisioned this podcast. Of course. It was Thursday me no video. I'd imagine of this but I imagine him like in his pajamas. Okay at the table dejected, Harris shoveled just notepads everywhere an empty bottle whisky right in front of him just three days growth hopeless, just done. Yeah, but takeout food boxes piled up on his desk. Just he's. He's over it over it. What is with the phone in that? That's the right thing. That's the thing that sort of looks like a quarter of a piano and you play with a couple of drumsticks. With a couple of things on the end is that? Gosh and then the way he starts. What was it? What was the first word that he says maybe? Finally. Mercifully someone. Get Jeff has passed and maybe if you see Jeff Pailin. Mercifully. You want social distance, but. Maybe. That's part of the problem here. It's been a long time. Maybe Jeff passed and hasn't had anybody to hug in three and a half months. He's talking about this versus that, and now mercifully, maybe finally with xylophone playing in the background one more time, just the beginning of Jim because Gosh. It's.

Harris Jeff Pailin baseball Jim
Israelis And Palestinians Are Quarantined Together In Hotel Corona

Morning Edition

03:09 min | 1 year ago

Israelis And Palestinians Are Quarantined Together In Hotel Corona

"About two hundred people Israelis Palestinians religious non religious all recovering from covert nineteen all forced to live together in a hotel in Jerusalem until they're not contagious anymore the patients call it hotel corona it's all being taped and people at home are tuning in including NPR's Daniel Estrin the very first guests to arrive at hotel corona is nineteen year old are you sure I will shop she's a janitor at a hospital that's where she caught the virus more and more guests check into the hotel and one evening she hears dinner announced over the hotel PA system it will basically yeah and she looks for people to sit with their religion Jewish was together she sees the religious Jews or with the other religious Jews the secular with the secular and the R. was together I usually grew up in a Bedouin city in the desert she knows about sticking with your own kind but she lands on an older religious Jewish couple im Rahmen genome Amman they was laughing all the time so I chose them I'm not sure what the knowledge that she might not I'm I'm sixty six it's been a couple decades serving in the army he told me he thinks he got the corona virus as orthodox synagogue in infected his wife so they sit together and eat and then they sing together one of the key PA one in Asia yeah this simple act is unusual in a country where Jews and Arabs tend to live separately I should document sis on her phone which began happening a lot this hotel corona people filming themselves dancing sunbathing together the images go viral and get picked up by the Israeli news I she says she starts having conversations she's never had before I asked them about them religion like above the Jewish people like why when the women get married she started to cover her hair and wide the guys wearing Vicky bug and they explain me aloft the Jews in the hotel ask heard the most sensitive questions that a Palestinian citizen of Israel can face like do you consider yourself more Israeli or Palestinian but the question here felt friendly genuinely curious they didn't judge me like I am IBM I most of them I am that no I am human that you can talk to me like there is no difference between us but then there are fraught moments too like when I was walking back to her room and the guy collapsed he's looks like a Vincent van Gough he's gone to Pailin bearded an orthodox Jew now having an asthma attack on the hallway carpet I usually rushes to help the wonders am I allowed to touch him like I am mom moves them I maybe I'm I cannot talk to him I cannot touch him maybe if she helps him he'll be offended so she calls the medics but until they can get on the protective equipment and enter the hotel they need her to step in and I ask give them medical what I have to do do you think you saved his life actually maybe I

"pailin" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"pailin" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"So I want my favorite guys that we've had on the air for years and years of John of the X. Chalabi a of course is a former New York congressman a Republican I'm not sure if he still registered Republican or not he might be eight independent like mere libertarian he seems more libertarian when I talk to him but he's always gives us the inside scoop in Washington John thanks for swinging by today problem I love to be back on I am remaining a Reagan Republican Party that doesn't have many of them left us from outside not a libertarian and hang out on my party or not at all like words out of the moment the long happened see party patriots remember how they were that they were saying like three years ago they're just gone with the wind whatever actually it was actually ten years of was it really yeah yeah I'm interested politics because they won the house for the Republicans in the first mid term of Obama and you know people can get what what that was all about it was really two times it was federal spending and that's why the tea party was inside the Republican Party they were upset with how the Republicans ran Congress and to thousands had hemorrhaged money and they hated obamacare and how that thing got past dirty deals in the middle of the night Christmas part Harry Reid and Senate Democrats and two party came up and that the tea party was a precursor of Serra Pailin and then of Donald Trump ten years ago to read the writing on the wall back then these people it was grassroots back then it was but it was also it was also as far right wing and Bernie Sanders left wing lawyer they got a little bit and it's also it's just it's doomed yeah exactly because it's what it stands for the complete hypocrites they now that they have power they have the house and Senate for years in the White.

"pailin" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"pailin" Discussed on 600 WREC

"When you're on the Ben Ferguson show hello it would have been I just want to call upon check in right quick actually show let I wanted in both the eight hundred pound gorilla in the room Serra Pailin Serra Pailin I ran as John McCain's running mate yes if you remember during that time he was savagely attacked I mean it was it was it was brutal what they did to her and her family was outrageous it was similar to what's going on with a president trump right now very similar circumstances Hey you know he never whine he never moaned about it he just stood up here at at the rallies he said he had to say he stood up he said dear at the debate and took took Joe Biden on head on expose them for the the the the the the fall of fairy tale story tell it he is and it and it was just it was just it was just outrageous how but in the end the Republican Party just go overboard it was just out rod I D. like David I do like that nobody I mean not many people can you weren't and look let's be clear you weren't the only person that didn't like it and noticed right there was a lot of people that noticed how the Republican Party has some that say that she went a little bit off the reservation and and she got a little bit too extreme for the Republican Party at that moment in time and and that's a reason why they you know they throw overboard I don't know if I buy that I think that I I will say this I think what were her biggest down fall as being a leader in the Republican Party was she over exposed herself and she tried to cash in on every opportunity to make money after that presidential run and sometimes you have to protect your brand and I think she over expose yourself and then people just kind of got annoyed with us here pay when I cry I'm out here like you know doing the reality TV shows and all that stuff I think she did not manage her brand well I and I think she over exposure stuff and I think that's the reason why people got tired of her very quickly the point I'm trying to make is this right is what is the point I'm trying to make it if you look if you look at if you took terror paler and you put a one a track right next to of president Donald J. trump then you look real closely you'll see a lot of similarities no doubt in the yes yes and if it even if even if you remember when when he was one of the first people that endorsed all of Donald Trump absolutely yeah it is and it's like you know I look at these other women today because of the shortage need hello replaces all this kind of stuff you know is is really comical to see that they're supposed to be a diverse party the Democratic Party they're supposed to be the party of diversity and inclusion right isn't that what they claim but they quite now if this I've a diverse and inclusive how in the heck did they end up with two they have an eighty year old white males at fighting for the top of the ticket how did that happen it happened because their lawyers did not as diverse as they pertain to bait the diverse party is the Republican Party and I will fight anybody on that tooth and nail with a diverse party and we need to take that back from them and stop letting them own that may not look at the only white men right now that's that's what got me to understand I mean this is the old white man party in part by the Democratic Party everybody make that clear this is the old white man party and I'll say one more thing and I'll shut my mouth would get up this fall did you remember seeing that clip with Donna Brazile which you would have to run a McDaniel Ronna McDaniel small town township hello during dinner the RNC chairwoman and again that's the Democratic Party when you point out what they're doing I am there and and their lack of diversity this is that's not exactly what happens that's what happened so thank you all right brother they love one eight hundred four seven four nine seven three two Raymond you are all actually Raymond hold on hit the wrong button I'm gonna Randy you're on the Ben Ferguson show hi Randy how are you hello you said America has women there are no women in America they're all ignorant judgmental crap and if anybody comes on air Sander women there are a lot higher that's all they are I'm not I have no idea what you're talking about right now you're there are women in America I don't understand why you're saying there's not women in America they're not real women they're not real women the joy you talk about the democratic candidates using women in general because your what if everybody listening right now I think you just said that there's no actual women in America which is crazy there are really women a real woman is brave and stands up and loves people okay so all right all right let's reset here your what your commentating on right now is you're saying that these democratic women that are claiming sexism is the reason why they were elected you're saying those are not real powerful women no no all no more not just damn normal none of them all they want to do is pick on somebody in Bali safari around they never grow up no more you're saying they never grow up and you're referring to the democratic candidates who are you referring to are all females in America if I stayed there you will you'll never let me get this clear you're saying that you will never vote for a woman for president regardless of party hello especially bills on Merrick and woman all American female thank question are you married no I'm not okay I'm not I just want to say I'm not surprised I'm just I I am not surprised at all thanks for clearing that up one eight hundred four seven four nine seven three two thank goodness and the mass majority of Americans are not like the.

Ben Ferguson John McCain Serra Pailin Serra Pailin
The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

Science Friction

09:21 min | 1 year ago

The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

"The first three minutes of the universe doesn't expansion simultaneously Teini Asli everywhere not zero second but close the first hundred of a second hotter than the hottest star blew hot bruting rooting halt. The nor Smith Says Earth was not found or heaven above but in a yawning gap. That was grasp but no way there were no vikings kings. No Vanilla no lampshades but there was Lego like for life in the first three minutes of the universe everything started added to come together. ferment began to develop lips to form the word poem. one-star dreamed of turning away and now they're just so it could have time. I'm to shape clay. The universe became a rogue gallery of Jigsaw fighting for space and in quiet moments. Mango juice squeezed from the heavens and sparkled like Shaq suits. There was the first spoonful of the CARTWHEEL GALAXY N G C one. Three six five with its. Jim Like bots spiraled wills sentence hyperion Jupiter's moons pulsars born cramping the styles of the middle. I molecules began collecting just so that the wood Po Quaid could be part of this missing in the first three minutes of the universe. Atoms rose dancing and just like the poet. Rumi said they were dancing like madmen. Happy on miserable and they just kept on dancing lover. Melvin poet and performer Alicia. Sometimes there with her pace the first three minutes of the universe and Tesha Mitchell joining you for science friction. We're at this end of the universe you are about to in Canada. I eight poetry cosmos a biological artist who grows organisms as living artworks and a rat performer. Whose lyrics ricks pulse site with? Science Professor Oren Katz is co-founder of the Tissue Culture and art project and director of the University of Western. Australia's influential art. Science lab symbiotic. Baba Brinkman is a new york-based rep performer and playwright whose awesome Rep God's to science audits range from climate change to consciousness and Alicia sometimes is most recent show. Particle wave gathered audiences under planetarium dimes times. These three creative experiment is pushing the elastic boundaries of both at n science and shared a stage at the quantum words festival in Perth. Recently cently he's Aleisha reflecting on those first three minutes. What we want to do when we passion about and scientists connect with an audience? And I I have that problem I'm full of hyperbole and scientists aren't and I love that about them and they care about the mess they care about the facts and I hear all that and I read all that and then I'm just like oh his blitz. He's some poetry so I remember Reading Steven Weinberg's book the first three minutes of the universe and it's full of great fact so this was my interpretation mango juice squeezing from the heavens technically correct Richt by the way the physicists would disagree in that universe buddies taking a obviously a poetic license. But that's what I as a poet what I can never find the right words and the reason the movie dirty dancing connected so well with me. Is that moment. That one of the main characters is carrying a watermelon win and she goes up to Patrick swayze who she likes and says. I carried a watermelon. And that's all she can say and that is what I am like so often. I can't find the exact words and I love that about science that they can find words really matter and in a scientific communication or scientific paper hyper words mean everything but I love as a poet. I can sort of pie around with that and Taika Pot. Isn't it interesting that you draw contrast because as I often think when I'm reading your work that infect poetry and science scherer conciseness and brevity of language precision each word gets placed with intent. And yet your thinking of the relationship is quite contrasted. I totally understand what you're saying. And Brevity is so true and as a poet and I'm sure poets in the audience. They can understand this. Every word matters this and carries it's white but the thing is how do you communicate dark matter. Or how do you communicate Nebula something in biology or does I mean I can never find the right words. I love in contact. A film inspired by. Carl Sagan's book by the same. I'm Nice Cellular pinup boy. I'm so glad it was there. I didn't know you were gonNA talk about him. When demon haunted world is such an important political inspiring because well the Jodi foster character Elliott Airway says when she's thrust into space they should have center poet and finally why Korea I get to go in space so maybe on Amazon or something? I'll get to go just to ago. Mango juice everywhere. Do you feel like you could take sides. Or is that that's not your raisin for you all the Wanda I'm about to wonder in storytelling. I do understand that sometimes the failure of can you just beautifying science and that is somehow not enough and and that's why I love what so many people do is they take it apart in question and what aren was hanging is just so incredible what they do but I yes yeah so just like the storytelling and I really need to communicate it to audiences so they can just take away a little bit of wondering their pocket full of wonder. Hey John Adams Americans said you never learn if you have a poet in your pocket. I just loved that I said what are you trying to do with. I've seen your show particle wave. which takes you inside a planetarium? Describe it for people but also what you're hoping to do with that piece it's musical visual Poetic Extravaganza yes. I loved canvas of the Planetarium Dome and from when I was young and a lot of you would feel feel the Siamese diaby lie back. And you've got this gorgeous. Almost three sixty canvas above you and so I wanted to use that canvas to sell tell held. The story of gravitational waves got to work with a lot of scientists and I recorded a lot of scientists and I want the general public to coming and have a sense of awe four so it mixes poetry music visuals just to tell the story from general relativity some black holes look lookit to kill an and just sort of pint pitcher and I want people to come out and say well I might go read up on that but I had a science instinct come in an eighteen year old. He said that she walked in wanting to do chemistry and came out wanting to do gravitational wave astronomy. And I'm like my works done. That's enough poet delicious. Sometimes there when you think about rap song lyrics what comes to mind politics. Maybe six drugs love last year. American crime and punishment. Absolutely what about science though not really well here as Baba Brinkman canadian-born and and married to a neuroscientist at some point these graduate in comparatively chat court the science bug big time and he's now a renowned science communicate through he's rap gods to things like climate change evolution human nature religion and culture my first rap theater popularisation project CHAUCER's Canterbury Tales and a An evolutionary biologists in England saw that and he said good job. Now do you think you could do for Darwin. What you did for Chaucer and the first time I was introduced to do a performance which was at the Darwin Bicentennial Mark Pailin? The biologist introduced me by saying. Don't worry I checked his lyrics. You're about to witness the first ever rap performance. That's peer reviewed house like peer reviewed rap. That's the best idea ever confession. Spend my whole life perplexed. By Religiousness Front doorstep debating with Jehovah Witnesses I was a teenaged empirical thinker a spiritual seeker obsessed with rap. I considered it liberal research. This was the medium the Daca thinking speaking flipping ridiculous speech over beats like every weekend weekend my CD collection became my personal gospel. I wasn't apostle I think part of it was an unexpected side effect of doing science. This communication rap projects and that side effect was that I became way more gangster rapper

Baba Brinkman Alicia Vikings Teini Asli Shaq Rumi Smith Patrick Swayze Steven Weinberg Po Quaid Planetarium Dome Carl Sagan Canada Australia Tesha Mitchell Taika Pot Perth JIM
Interview with Alex Karp, CEO and Co-founder of Palantir

Squawk Pod

06:45 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Alex Karp, CEO and Co-founder of Palantir

"This is walk. Thought this next segment is the conversation. Andrew had with Alexander Co Founder and CEO of Pailin. Tear the Tech Company provides software and data services for well a a lot of groups as you'll hear but it's probably best known for its relationship with the US government also quite controversial Given the company's role full working with the government in defense on ice with our allies with corporations there's always been view. It's a very secretive company in two thousand nineteen gene alone. The company signed one and a half billion dollars in. US government contracts one of those contracts in eight hundred million dollar deal with the Army Peletier beat out fortune. Five hundred company Raytheon for that one marking the first time that a venture backed firms received that caliber of recognition from the Pentagon and possibly more than anything else though. It's the company's Partnership With Immigration and Customs Enforcement that's created a stir until valley as well as internally Turnley at Peletier Alex Carp founded the company alongside a few other entrepreneurs including famed venture capitalist. Peter Thiel he co-founded Pay Powell and founders fund and invested in facebook anyway. Alex is he is one of the most unique interesting people in the world of business. He rarely does interviews but luckily for us. He's speaks Andrew. I gotTa tell you it's every time I have an opportunity to speak with him and really we've been able to do it now and you'll hear Davos you're just sort of blown away by the things that he says so here. It is Andrew. Ross sorkin annual interview with outs carp mark. CEO of talent here in the Alpine ski town of Davos Switzerland. Arc's thank you for doing this. Thank you so this was a very big year for you. We have a number of contracts. This is true we did very well so what happened. Well the long version is about five years ago we looked at our product offering and decide to rebuild our core offering for the government start with a commercial product which can be used to commercial and government and revitalize tragic going to market and and we saw the results Last year but dramatically this year and so that ended up with two very very large contracts that are public number of contracts that are not public and commissioner impact. That we're very proud of just so we're clear that's released publicly. One point five billion dollars in new contracts with that's true to you speak about those contracts. Let's well two of them are public. One of them is essentially. Give the DOD glow operating system in software with a on a timeline that otherwise I wouldn't be realistic so transformed the way. Decisions are made inside what amounts through the largest data organization in the world in timeline. That is very very aggressive. Another there is a little more classified and And we're we're just pouncing forward. The Core Mission of our company always was to make the West especially America the strongest longest in the world. The strongest ever been And for the sake of global peace and prosperity and we feel like this year we really showed what that would mean visit today. Do you believe is being driven by the government work versus the corporate. Well in the last couple of years most of our revenue has been commercial. Most of our clients have been government the the government government work inside and outside America's so strong Because of how it compounds that it's gone from being sixty forty commercial government to probably probably fifty fifty the impact of government. Work is the thing we are obviously the most proud of and is the past year. This sort of larger geopolitical Nicole conversation around. What does that into the business? Well you know decoupling. And and and strict regulation is a bonanza for pounder when we looked at what what did what should be done with data fifteen years ago. Most people aren't thinking about it and instead of thinking of this simplistic problem with aggregation of data. We thought about data's how can you aggregate and disaggregated this aggregate disaggregation meaning. How can you have silos while at the same time being able to call up at a granular level of what you're allowed to see in that silo? And what does that mean at a political level as Countries and states both need to have a horizontal view but want to have a more vertical view. They need Assad for platform that can allow a two countries to work together without sharing all all the information or to jurisdictions to work or to companies that for example a global company will have data stores in America data stores in Europe. Where only a subset can be shared in our architecture is is quite frankly built to deal with that and was built fifteen years ago to deal with that and revitalize five years ago so this decouple these these this decoupling world combined with Regulation quite frankly also combined with deep skepticism towards consumer in the valley is very much helping us. WanNa get to the sketches of the valley and just a moment but I wanted to ask you specifically about the protests this year about your work for ice and that ice this contract and what it's meant for your business we as everyone who's followed our company knows we take what amounts to strong but often Controversial positions the position of our company from the beginning was we're GONNA make America and the West Song and safer by integrating world class software into what amounts to legacy I see do systems one of our contracts at ice and there's an we started this contract under Obama and obviously there's a lot of concern legitimate concern about what happens on employer how it happens and what is the enforcement. Look like certainly diminish part of our work Finding people in our country who are undocumented. But it's a legitimate intimate complex issue. My personal position is We acknowledged a complexity people protesting whom I respect also dogs complexity is an issue that that is controversial and complex enough that the small island in Silicon Valley. That would love to decide what you eat. How you eat and monetize all your data should also decide who lives and your country and on what your conditions? There are elections. There are rules. They should be enforced. A transfer of one presidency and other and the the view of Silicon Valley that we get to the decide should not be the way the site of course this led to protests. My House has been protested for many months almost every day. Our officers protested many Palestinians who do not just follow what I say but are critical people. protested against internally. Some people were so upset about it that they left. These are very hard decisions. I I respect the people that that reside they can't be involved in this but we have a position. Are you comfortable with the trump administration's approach on the border.

United States America Andrew Silicon Valley Founder And Ceo Davos Partnership With Immigration A Raytheon Peletier Alex Carp Peter Thiel Davos Switzerland Ross Sorkin Alex Pailin Facebook CEO Alexander Co
Monty Python star Terry Jones dies aged 77

Doug Stephan

01:16 min | 1 year ago

Monty Python star Terry Jones dies aged 77

"So speaking of Terry Jones member a Monty Python he was one of the co founders these people are funny this they define for me anyway what's funny and they're vulgar her up but in the end Terry Jones in live three or four others either in this John Cleese Michael Pailin Neier Eric idle my god he's the funniest son of a gun I think I've ever been around in my life just a he spent a whole morning with me on the year one day have three hours with his guitar in the studio we had a bleep every other for instance every thing they save a has a straight face he just looks are what do you what's the problem they can move and these guys were all like that sherry he's only seventy seven been battling dementia for a quite a long time so he was on Monty Python and the holy grail is in the TV show in the movies the wife of Brian have body had dementia for the last four years or so at his wife and his children have the put out a statement saying quote we have all lost a kind funny warm creative and truly loving man who's uncompromising individuality that's it what a wonderful way of putting the fact these guys are

Terry Jones Brian John Cleese Michael Pailin Eric
Monty Python star Terry Jones dies at the age of 77

Kentuckiana's Morning News

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

Monty Python star Terry Jones dies at the age of 77

"Jerry Jones the much loved member of the comedy troupe is died at the age of seventy seven in a statement his family says he died after a long extremely brave but all was good humored battle with a rare form of dementia with Eric idle John Cleese Michael Pailin Graham Chapman and Terry Gilliam Jones form the group was a market humor helped revolutionize

Jerry Jones Michael Pailin Graham Chapman Terry Gilliam Jones Eric John Cleese
"pailin" Discussed on AP News

AP News

12:20 min | 1 year ago

"pailin" Discussed on AP News

"Yeah 8 if there is a need for a new 2 organised were middle aged to elderly woman Terry Jones was the go to member of Monty Python longtime writing partner and fellow bison Michael Pailin describes Jones is the complete Renee songs comedian created things serious books children's books marvelous come well I assume ways in the ways of science says Jones died after a long battle with a rare form of dementia which gradually robbed him of the ability to write and speak join Terry Jones was 77 he just even known she

Terry Jones partner Michael Pailin
'Naughty boy': Monty Python star Terry Jones dies at 77

AP News Radio

00:44 sec | 1 year ago

'Naughty boy': Monty Python star Terry Jones dies at 77

"Yeah eight if there is a need for a new two organised were middle aged to elderly woman Terry Jones was the go to member of Monty Python longtime writing partner and fellow bison Michael Pailin describes Jones is the complete Renee songs comedian created things serious books children's books marvelous come well I assume ways in the ways of science says Jones died after a long battle with a rare form of dementia which gradually robbed him of the ability to write and speak join Terry Jones was seventy seven he just even known she

Terry Jones Partner Michael Pailin
"pailin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We've done business owners so far this week and how they are dealing with Brexit. We've done workers as well. And what Brexit is going to mean for them voice. We haven't really heard yet though is just a person living in this Brexit economy going to work getting her kids looked after trying to help manage your household. So the other night we went out to west London to see Frida zombie at her flat. She's a communications manager at the university of west London. Junior partner have two little boys as an auto. You have good names for you. We were a fan of Pailin James. Yeah. How's life who expensive? I mean. Yeah. London's one of the most expensive cities in the world to live in escape move, more expensive and wages on following suit. Unfortunately, so when you look at the British economy big picture, what do you see? I'm nervous. I'm really really nervous. I mean, we're an institution that relies heavily on international students with Brexit. It means that that number is going full, and that could have an impact on. The the amount of money that the university get from the government could have an impact on sign many different things. And ultimately, it could mean that we don't have jobs anymore. Maybe they need one less communication specialist. Exactly. Yeah. That's that's how you know. Anything marketing is always the first budget that they slash isn't it. So I'm there from nervous about the feature of my boys and how they'll be able to travel freely in Europe. If they wanted to study in Europe, if they wanted to take up languages. If the option available to you too many more you've been here, your whole life has what does it mean to you? Then that England the UK somehow will not be part of that other Greek continental experiment. She's really disappointing. It was such a progressive thing to be a part of an meant the same many opportunities available for everyone not just us. And then we saw a massive influx of different coaches different languages, different experiences, which helped us no end. You know, I think people forget that. I think that people forget that when they go to restaurants there served by these migrants that they're so against and they do say much like the NHS, for example, like the health service is so heavily reliant on migrant workers. And I to dissuade them from coming here seems so backwards to me. So what happened? Think of what happened? Over there in the states. I think. People are really disillusioned by government. They feel really powerless. And I think that they saw Brexit as a means of taking back the power. So when you're going to the market, and you buy veg in you, get your chickens or your clothes or whatever. Are you ready to start paying more for that in case? Or if this whole deal Brexit thing app, we haven't even prepared for it to be honest. I mean, we watch what every single penny that we spend, and we try to shop in the discount shops like little and Al D. Now, we haven't even prepared for what might happen. So now what I mean? I know that's a vague question. But honestly, that's kind of the vibe I've gotten all week is now what? Nc? I just I think that anyone can consider what that looks like I think I think that's boy was stolen to build this because the unknown is just t- frightening to deal with. As just a wait and see. And I wish that we didn't have to wait and see we. Thank you so much. I really appreciate it. Thank you for coming guys. This final note on the way out today. More of an observation really as forty some odd years of European economic integration really starts to come apart. We set up at the top of the program today, and I will repeat it here that the political back and forth of Brexit is not our story, but you have been hearing all week, even as the political paralysis piled up that the economic effects have already started to bite higher costs companies worried about having enough workers or sourcing their supplies people. Having any sense of where their economic futures might lie the defining characteristic of Brexit in this week that we have spent on the ground is that people here, whether they are levers or remainders are just tired of it a thousand and eight days since the referendum. They just want to know. Marketplace is supported by crowd street, where accredited investors can review and invest online and dozens of highly.

Brexit west London UK Europe communications manager university of west London partner Pailin James NHS England Nc Al D. eight days
Oculus was supposed to bring virtual reality to the masses. What happened?

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

05:45 min | 2 years ago

Oculus was supposed to bring virtual reality to the masses. What happened?

"This. Marketplace podcast is brought to you by wigs N a premier platform bringing private markets to the public get access to tech unicorns like Uber. Airbnb and more sign up for free today at equities N dot com slash tech. And by send pro from Pitney Bowes, send pro online software makes it easy to save time and money print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pound scale when you visit PB dot com slash tech. That's BB dot com slash tech. Oculus was supposed to bring virtual reality to everyone by now what happened from American public media. This is marketplace tech demystifying the digital economy. I'm Molly would. Virtual reality is the technology that beeps on promising in about the last decade. The promise has seemed so much closer, especially when Oculus came along looking like such a game changer that Facebook dropped two billion dollars on it. In two thousand fourteen Blake Harris is the author of the history of the future Oculus, Facebook and the revolution that swept virtual reality. And his book is really two stories. I is the story of how Oculus and all of ritual. Reality tech has kind of stalled and second is the role that Facebook played in that stall. I I asked Harris where Oculus sits right now, they're in the top two in an industry of too. So that's commendable at least there in the industry. But, but certainly not where they expected to be, you know, as part of my research, I ended up spending three and a half years researching reporting this book, and I was actually going over an Email from Mark Mark Zuckerberg to the Oculus CEO, Brendan rebe from a month or two before they choir them, and Mark was saying that he. Estimated there would be fifty to one hundred million VR headsets about five years from that. And so we're almost at the five year, Mark. And there certainly are not, you know, there's probably one or two million VR headsets out there. And that's you know, one twentieth. The expectation was. Wow. Well, so then I wonder is it a book about how the having the good technology is not enough. Having the best technology is not always a winning formula expectations is a big part of it and messaging is a big part of it too. And I think the backlash to the acquisition of Oculus by Facebook. It was a good indication of how poorly handled that messaging, and how the VR community felt about Facebook being involved in this thing that you know, all technology is intimate but VR's incredibly intimate. It's it's on your face. It it can track your eye movements. There's cameras in your house. So Facebook be involved in. This was really nervous to a lot of people. Let's stare down that hard reality that the tech maybe is just way harder than anybody gives it credit for and that that it was the ultimately like a lack of of software and a lack of really truly immersive experiences in motion sickness and right. I mean, are you bearish or bullish on virtual reality overall? I'm still more bullish than ever and part of that as emotional, you know, when people take off the virtual reality headset after the first demo, so many people, I know my wife included says, wow, I just saw the future that's the future. And you don't even really know what that means. How do you make a business out of something that we all agree is very cool. But what is the value to that? Is it entertainment is productivity. You know, that that is why you still see Google and Microsoft and apple on these other big tech players still just dipping their toe into virtual reality and augmented reality because there's not really, you know, money to be made there. But also, there's still doubt that it's ever going to be. The future. Blake Harris is the author of the history of the future, which is out now tomorrow, we'll talk more with him about that Facebook acquisition, and how technology aside Oculus core community never really forgave the company, and how Facebook's vision for the future of Biard might have been too much too soon. And now for some related links. The book is of course, also detailed story about the controversial Oculus founder Palmer lucky who got himself embroiled in the politics of the two thousand sixteen presidential election. Two was also sued for half a billion dollars for intellectual property theft related to the creation of his Oculus headsets. Anyway, that guy Palmer lucky has a new company that develops virtual reality and artificial intelligence tech. And it reportedly just got a big contract from the Pentagon to work on that TAC as part of the government's project maven project maven is the only sort of secret initiative to develop better artificial intelligence and image recognition for military drones. It is also, of course, the project that famously caused such outcry among Google employees that the company canceled its Pentagon contract to develop military tack. Palmer lucky is new company has funding support and former employees from Peter Teal's founders fund and his data analytics company Pailin tier? Palate. Here, of course, is a big provider of tech to the defense department and police agencies. I'm Molly would and that's marketplace tech. This is APN. This marketplace podcast is brought to you by Sunpro from Pitney Bowes, San pro online software makes it easy to save time and money, no matter what you ship or mail print shipping, labels and stamps, right? From your desk and access discounted rates. Try it free for thirty days and get a free ten pounds scale when you visit PBA dot com slash tech. That's PBA dot com slash tech.

Oculus Facebook Blake Harris Pitney Bowes Mark Mark Zuckerberg Molly Google Airbnb Guy Palmer Pentagon PBA Sunpro Biard Theft Brendan Rebe CEO Founder
What's next for WeWork?

FT News

04:47 min | 2 years ago

What's next for WeWork?

"Today. We're taking a look at we work last week. We learned that one of the company's major investors scaled back a planned investment in the shared office provider. Softbank is detailing its bed on we work the Japanese conglomerate announced Monday, it's investing an additional two billion dollars in the co working start up a step back from the sixteen billion dollar investment. That would have given SoftBank a controlling stake. We work also announced last week that it's rebranding itself as the week company. VFAT's Eric Platz spoke with Andrew edge cliff Johnson about the implications of soft bank's decision, which might mean sooner than expected peo-, Eric. Can you set the scene? What exactly is we work? I'm what pitches would be making to investors. And so we work as rapidly growing property company that has really pitched itself as tech company. They now have offices in more than twenty countries. They have more than four hundred thousand office space users they like to call the members, and they're now generating more than two and a half billion dollars in revenue on an annualized basis. So it's nothing to scoff at and they're known for their office with Instagram art boutique, coffee beans, what are infused with grapefruit or raspberries. I've been to a few of them. It's all about kind of the community space and people interacting, and that's what they've the pits themselves to office tenants also to investors like J P Morgan tier price and fidelity that you know, this is not a drab office space or the traditional landlord that. You've message in the past. It will sell as much nicer than orifices. So this pitches clearly worked we works managed to raise enough money to become one of the world's most valuable private companies. But it starts to thousand nineteen with news of another major investment. And yet this one didn't have quite the same response. It seemed to raise more questions than previous rounds. What exactly happened it did? So at the end of last year, they were in really detailed negotiations with SoftBank and it Saudi-backed vision fund where the two were expected to invest about sixteen billion dollars into we work who's going to attain the same valuation of about forty two billion dollars. But what the Saudi backed vision from going to be doing was buying out. Earlier investors, like J P, Morgan Wellington and others. Now investors within the vision fund balked at this. They said, you know, this is a huge investment for what's actually not really a tech company, which is more a property company. At least that's how investors that we spoke to it's seen it. And so what ended up happening was SoftBank kind of started curtailing. Those discussions and at the same time they had an IPO of their mobile unit in Japan that went quite embarrassingly at dropped more than ten percents on its debut. And then at the same time, you saw tech shares broadly in the market declining. And suddenly SoftBank showed a lot more hesitancy than they did at the end of last year. So when they started this year, the sixteen billion dollars got slimmed down six billion dollars and evacuate them down to two billion dollars with really only half of that being a new investment into we work in the primary market where they're actually buying new sheriff's from the company and another billion of that is actually buying out, employees and other investors who are ready for an exit. And so while this did raise the valuation to forty two to forty seven billion dollars, depending on how you calculate it. It actually did raise a lot of questions about soft bank's willingness to invest billions dollars more into the company and so any private company of this scale. And we looks only about nine years old. This point will raise speculation that is going to have to public sooner or later, but particularly given that backdrop of weaker public markets way on soft buying Conway on. Speculations for what's a reasonable some money to put into a company like we would what does this do for expectations of possible? IPO of we would think this definitely changed the discussions within we work about how much runway they had as a private company because if SoftBank isn't going to be pumping billions of dollars more each year for the next few years into it to fund its losses. They're going to need to tap public investors at a certain point, and what they did last year was they raised seven hundred and two million dollars in public debt markets, and that was a way to both familiarize the market with we work and also to give them the kind of rigor of quarterly reporting standards, which is something Adam Newman has derided a bit as not long-term enough focused, but it has given the market and idea of what we work is it's familiarizing them with things like community adjusted EBITDA and other financial terms that they may not understand. And now it looks like just given that there's some nervousness about what SoftBank will keep putting in. They've really ready themselves for an IPO when we talked to sources booth in the company, that's what they've said. Whether they go this year or next year. That's an open question. I think they're gonna wanna see what happens with Uber lift companies, like Pailin tear and slack. That are ready to go before them to see how the market accepts their debut.

Softbank Eric Platz Japan Adam Newman Conway J P Cliff Johnson Morgan Wellington Andrew Sixteen Billion Dollars Two Billion Dollars Forty Seven Billion Dollars Forty Two Billion Dollars Sixteen Billion Dollar Six Billion Dollars Two Million Dollars Billion Dollars Nine Years
"pailin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

03:40 min | 2 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Zero seven one you're going to get yourself some free food. Back to back to the movie chat. Okay. So. Harris. Would I wanted to talk about? Okay. We were talking about the Golden Globes and how it was kind of. It was really sort of lacklustre this year in a way that I don't know we've experienced much before. But I'm while I'm kind of fine with lackluster because I don't I'm a I'm a viewer that doesn't need bets. Like, if we've got some hosts, we got some jokes, and then we're going to the awards right away. Which is kind of what you win. I like it. I'll take a montage or to especially if it's looking back Carol Burnett. Jaffrey eventful isn't a bad thing. It's not a bad thing, especially when award shows are always claiming to be too long. Let's clip through this. Yeah. That's that's a fair point. Now, can we talk about because we haven't had a chance to discuss sort of the other news of the week regarding award shows. And that's the news that likely the Oscars will have no host this year. I think that's a bad move me. I think you need a host whether it's one or two or maybe multiple just to kind of keep the show going. So there's some sort of flow some sort of structure, and I don't I think people keep thinking that you need a big comedian. I don't think you need that at all. I think you just two people. The audiences really love. I mean, you could talk you could have someone like Chadwick Rosemary, Michael Jordan, or gal Gadot, these superheroes. That people have seen their movies. They know who they are to them. Maybe start the show off. They don't have like a a bad history on Twitter or anything like that stuff like that or get some Hollywood legends to just come in. And we can celebrate them in the past. I've said like they need to do something different. This the era of the word show has passed. But I actually think it's less. It has less to do with the reality or the inefficiency or there's something wrong with having one person hosting it. I think the problem is actually us the audience. I think our expectations are like that's the problem because people have this like, it seems like we have these like it has to be something amazing. And they have to do a tremendous job. I remember growing up watching the Oscars not particularly having strong feelings about a particular host other than they were funny. Right. Billy, crystal always did. This song montage of all the best picture nominees, and it was always super funding. And I remember we'll be Goldberg way to come out in a variety of big costumes like that was like the costume nominees or something like that. I remember that remember Jack Pailin. Pushups you had David Letterman doing the oop Oprah Uma crappy bet, you know. So, but what I'm saying is like, honestly, it's not because there was no social media. It sort of was it just was what it was. And we all had an awareness of it. Because we watched it all together. But we didn't have this need to feel like we were armchair quarterbacks for every darn thing. Like, you didn't have you didn't. There wasn't a need for your opinion to be voiced across the world. Right. And now, I think our expectations are such that like one per we put all of this expectation on one person's ability to entertain us for three hours. And that's what people remember from these award ceremonies who was the host. And if they were successful or not. Yeah. Yeah. So I I'm not sold on the fact that we need to change the show. It's that we might need to change our expectations. Now, one of those is easier to change than the other. That's of course, the format, but I just don't in. Colleen, I talked about this. I'd be curious. What you think Paul if not a host, what could you possibly do that will make people more interested than having a host while one of things I love that. They did a copiers go was they had past winners come out, and then present the winner. So I remember one year was like five of the previous best actress nominees than present. It was like Marion Cotillard around..

Jaffrey Carol Burnett Golden Globes Harris Marion Cotillard Twitter David Letterman Colleen Chadwick Rosemary Jack Pailin gal Gadot Goldberg Paul Billy Hollywood Michael Jordan three hours one year
"pailin" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

TED Radio Hour

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on TED Radio Hour

"So you're saying this technology didn't even exist five years ago. I mean, how fast has become a huge deal. So when I started my PHD Jennifer's that was two ten. You wouldn't find a single mention of crisper in, you know, delay media unless it was talking about a vegetable crisper, but in the scientific literature, we're really talking doesn't articles. So is about maybe one month was coming out. We now are at a point today where every day we have around five or ten articles being published, I think you won't boom that find a biologist in the world that doesn't know about crisper, and you probably won't find many left that aren't actively using crisper how to study whatever biological question they go after in their laboratories because ultimately we're interested in understanding how life works and if we know that DNA encodes life, then what better than a tool to rewrite that DNA. And study what the effects are. Okay. The technical details of how crisper Kashtan works are complicated. Crisper, for instance, is an acronym for clustered regularly. Inter spaced short, Pailin dramatic repeats and cast nine is the key protein that makes it all work. But would you need to know is that crisper cast nine makes it easy and relatively inexpensive to edit genes in precise ways. Any genes in any living thing from bacteria to people coming back to the four letters of DNA. About those eight hundred dictionaries filled with the same four letters..

Jennifer Pailin five years one month
"pailin" Discussed on GSMC Bible Study Podcast

GSMC Bible Study Podcast

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on GSMC Bible Study Podcast

"Well, today it's September ninth and I, this is silly, but I like to write September ninth this year because it's nine, nine eighteen and obviously nine and nine at up to eighteen and I just like random number sequences like that, that workout, you know there was that week in August were all the dates were. Oh, what does that word? When it's the same front and back Pailin room and not that any of that has anything to do with any of our Tex today. But it's just my random thought for you for the day and there you have it. So why don't we talk about some bible verses or some bible passages because that's what here for not for me to talk about my weird fascination with number sequences. It is the sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost, as I said, and we have lecturer techs signed for this Sunday. So in this part of the episode, I'll be talking about the Old Testament lessons and this week, those come to us from Isaiah and psalm one forty six. Then on the second half of the episode will air on Wednesday. Then we'll talk about the New Testament lessons from James and the gospel of Mark. So let's go ahead and turn to that first lesson coming to us from Isaiah chapter thirty five versus four through seven, eight. And those verses are as follows. Say to those who are fearful of heart be strong, do not fear here is your God. He will come with vengeance with terrible recompense. He will come to save you. Then the eyes of the blind chilly opened and the ears of the deaf Unst the deaf unstopped. Then the lame shall leap like a dear and the tongue of the speechless, sing for joy for waters, shell, break forth.

Isaiah Pailin lecturer James
"pailin" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on Here & Now

"Called their laser program which is a precrime analytic program that essentially tries to identify people likely to commit crimes he's our chronic offenders in pailin tears very good at stitching together databases that's been out a list of these people for patrolman on the streets to watch and pullover for bad tail lights or jaywalking and keep an eye on them and it can get a little spooky from there well and as you point out in your story sometimes it's doesn't always get it right some people are targeted again and again by police right i mean there's no algorithm for redemption really i mean in this case you can't go to pailin tier or the police department and say the data is just plain wrong you have the wrong person so we write about a person in east los angeles who did grow up and spends a lot of time with members of a gang there but swears that he is not a gang member himself but he's been continuously harassed because he was in a car one time when the cops pulled up he was sitting with a friend who's a was in a gang and the cops came back and shot a photograph of this young man sitting in the cars and literally said to him welcome to the gang database and since then he's been harassed pulled over stopped thrown up against the wall multiple times cops will take notes ask questions see what he'll tell them about neighbors and other people around there and he protests he's not part of the gang but it doesn't seem to register but pailin tear in the case of lapd is only aggregating data that the lapd already has access to it's not actually collecting data so what's the argument against that well it provides a certain level of mission so i mean as the name of the lord of the ring.

los angeles lapd pailin
"pailin" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on Here & Now

"The wall street journal reports today that the data firm cambridge analytica has told employees that it is liquidating and they should vacate the office the company which was at the heart of facebook's data scandal announced earlier this month that it couldn't find any buyers would cease operations but cambridge analytica isn't the only firm of its kind have you ever heard of pailin tear it was founded by billionaire peter thiel who also cofounded pay pal and its clients include the cia nsa j p morgan chase merck and others peter waldman has been looking into pailin tears and investigative reporter at bloomberg news peter welcome thank you so first of all what is palling tier what makes it different than other data firms so pelham tier is a silicon valley startup it began in two thousand and four it does heavy duty datamining basically it connects farflung data points from different places different databases depending on what it's client needs or wants and i guess what makes it different is that it can really see things in connect things in spin out analytical we call them spider grams graphical depictions of how data points connect so it can connect you with your car with your cell phone with your aunt with your friend with a crime you may have committed with a bank balance you may have it's quite good at bringing farflung things together and it actually gets his name from lord of the rings in which pailin tear is a seeing stone give us an example of of one of the uses of pailin tier so i think probably the most controversial use is in law enforcement and specifically at the local level with police and sheriff's offices or let's say the los angeles police department for example which uses pound here quite intensively they use it for something.

cambridge analytica facebook peter thiel investigative reporter The wall street journal cia peter waldman bloomberg los angeles police department
"pailin" Discussed on TV Avalanche

TV Avalanche

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on TV Avalanche

"Coach almost got revived remember this embassy now into a new coach a couple of years ago and for some reason it became the only show that did not get a revival in this decade yet people got upset about it and there was a little backlash in and eventually network said fine we're not going to revive coach but now i mean if they waited two or three years they could have snuck it in their interests under the cover of all the other shows are getting reboot it's everybody murphy brown you need to tell the egg if you're gonna do that there's no reason you can't bring coach baroness blow up it hauled up a sec uh look i got no problems with coach murphy brown is like a great show coach in out coach was not a great show no i'd i'd yet murphy brands better so the coach fine i just mean as far as bringing back notable shows from the early to mid nineties sure and i think that there are actually probably her subtropical things you could do with coach daughter clearly is suffering from ct and i don't know how you tell jokes about it but you can certainly till stories about it so and there's coach there's there's plenty of things going on in pailin sports that are loaded with possibilities that the i i think i've just talked myself into the stupid coach reboot i think when we're done recording you're going to write like an outline for what the coach revival would be and the first thing you have to answer is has he gone back to college or if he still coaching the pro team in orlando twenty years later now he w evac thought zia nick in situation okay i got it i could see that naturally all right so now that we've veered into talk about college football nick sabin in timely television show us miller and 90s let's let's switch topics a little bit you and i we talked about this a little earlier in the week him you put in our outline doing kind of atd quarteryear checkin where little early four epa tvs getting nuts in the next couple of weeks and we wanted to make sure we got to it when we could and as we were getting ready we put out a conference.

"pailin" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on Kermode and Mayo's Film Review

"Okay the tomobe i just find he said he is a single man and then get to some extent that will refer back to things like american shake shakilla it much richer getting this one's anyway so what we have here is a tale of an impossible artist so it's it obviously drills influence from the red shoes and there's a we see court law pailin pressburg renate is also the tail of somebody stepping into someone else's shoes so we think for example of in a hitchcock and rebecca and that kind of you know the strange going into some way which is which becomes a prison and it's also a tale of a cracked masochistic love affair which immediately reminds me of punchdrunk love and i should say that i think this is paul thomas ansens best film since punchdrunk love and you know how much i love punchdrunk love i think this is now on a par with it on teetering on the edge of whether or not this is actually my favorite pulled on both sides of ville whether it's dislodged punchdrunk love which i have loved for a long time and i in a way i won't know until of let it settle but i have now seen phantom treads at four times and every time i say i see more in it will i love about it is punchdrunk love was a film which referred very often to uh to poppa you know they had that use of that he needs me he needs me he needs me which is referring specifically to the film adaptation of popoy with robin williams in shatti devout yep cut okay this is absolutely laced through with threads from tales so there is curse of there is talk of curses and superstitions the superstition of the wedding dress that he says very early on when he was making the wedding dress he's nanny wouldn't help and do it because they only superstition that you touch a wedding dress you won't get married in the end he said he sister helped into the written elm says and what happened to her that you get married he says no and then we learned that one of the things he's been doing since early ages stitching things into the dresses that he makes he says you can highlight things in the lining of garments messages coins little things i'm one of the messages that he puts into the lawn.

robin williams rebecca paul thomas ansens
"pailin" Discussed on Equity

Equity

01:49 min | 4 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on Equity

"And again as we were just talking tourism a list that we you and i talked about a year ago this time and analyses of little ideas yes on that way underperformed right so i'll just start from the that the top snap for sure went right but pailin tear spotify vice pinterest uber dd slack drop box we work garbage right door none of this got out and out even go one better there's a list for expected two thousand and fifteen ipo address at the same time what three years ago now airbnb box they went okay drop box no go daddy they went pailin tear pinterest snapchat spotify square they went stripe buber vice i ask predicts it was as if this was jeremy something or another i don't ever everyone got everything wrong i mean that's the epochal having payment covering ideas for almost six years now i've noticed the every single year everyone who works in the ipo business says that the next year is going to be stellar and that all those companies are finally going to go through everything is looking up but i've realize there's a strategy here because it's all about the perception that the ipo window is open and so if they pretend like the ipo windows open than me we will convince some of those ipo's to throw the greater fool theory concerned that's another like no matter why a lot of the ipo experts will tell you it's going to be a huge year whether that's true is a separate question this here was mediocre at best i would say is actually worse than mediocre snap was the first ipo the year and that was in march so january and february we didn't see any and partly because of apt.

jeremy windows spotify pinterest airbnb ipo three years six years
"pailin" Discussed on NASCAR Live

NASCAR Live

02:00 min | 4 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on NASCAR Live

"Instead pailin challenged his team to dig deeper work hard and prove the skeptics wrong members of that team recall proudly to this day what they accomplished over the course of the next five races they raced up front and finished in the top twelve eggs each event setting up a showdown between quickie and bill elliott in the finale pitted a motor speedway good afternoon everyone from the atlanta motor speedway well today could be the most emotional res that nascar has ever had now that races best remembered as the landmark event in nascar history not only for what happened in the thai championship race but also because the 500mile reid was the final one per seventime champion richard petty and the first for future champion jeff gordon go eckes plans for the event were simple lead the most laps in the race thereby earning five bonus points at the final pitstop allen trail the elliot on the track he needed track position so he ducked down to pit row with just his gasman tony gibson waiting to connect the gas can go over the wall no tires just an away goal was only three twenty nine three second point twenty nine suck at one quickie returned to the race he found himself running second behind bill elliott that's how they finish that day and those five police points for leading the most laps earned alan colmes wikki his one and only nascar cup championship here comes alan kalicki out of turned over four the new winston cup champion all he needs to do two hundred feet he does it across aligned and alan go with one was to cup championship allen lost his life in the plane crash the next spring put that sunday afternoon in atlanta georgia alan colmes quickie inspired us all to never give up.

nascar reid richard petty jeff gordon tony gibson bill elliott alan colmes alan kalicki alan pailin atlanta allen georgia three twenty nine three second two hundred feet
"pailin" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on Stuff To Blow Your Mind

"Rats live unknown evil star it implies like rats may live on a good store it would feels like it should have there should be some wisdom in their right plasma rats bica where someone's like man i just have merely down about the state of the world today well you know what it what they say rats live anew evil star right on yet has that fortune cookie vibe but anyway so there the segments of dna that read the same forwards as backwards in in between them so that's where the the term inner spaced comes in the eye and crisper in between these pailin dramatic repeats our segments of dna that exactly match the dna of viruses that are bacteria killing viruses like bacteria fages so in a similar way to how your body makes antibodies so you're immune system can target and destroyed germs that have already infected you in the past a backed curium makes copies of viral dna in its genome so it can recognize that viral dna in the future and destroy it uh but how does this happen well i mention that crisper is shorthanded sort of a short hand for a tool kit of genes and proteins associated with crisper in wild and one of these systems is the crisper cast nine system this is one of the main ones that's actually being talked about when people talk about crisper so cast jeans are jeans their crisper associated genes which is were cast comes from and like all jeans they're also made of dna and they're part of the genome as so dna of course creates proteins and proteins can do work inside a cell so cassidy in a makes dna editing proteins if you think about.

immune system cassidy
"pailin" Discussed on The Nerdist

The Nerdist

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on The Nerdist

"What can there is pakistan eight seventy eight hundred as a nice new'miracle pailin drama quality to it's this episode brought to you by square space whether it's a portfolio to showcase your work if you want to make a store to sell products and services or our blood just to show your ideas because social media is it's just to finite in terms of what you can express then square spaces what you need they're going to give you all the stuff all the tools to make your next moving into a reality also great templates customize features it's not going to look like a cookiecutter blog like in the old days readjust sort of dulecha microsoft frontpage ninety nine or whatever it was just built ourselves put this here put this here and every website look the same you can customize the crap out of your square space say in they'll help you if you need support they've got support for you you just add or arranger content with applicable mouse and if you need help just shoot just let them know and they will they will get you right back on track start your free trial today square space dot com into the upper code nervous to get ten percent off your first purchase i want to say that in i guess a little over a week from the time this is coming out june twenty four twenty five in mountain view california in silicon valley which is very appropriate because of the guests on up our guest today i detained t festival we have so much amazing stuff all in one day you could go for twelve hours and just have a full experience you can get a comecon the exhibitor booths are going to be amazing sky bound ob they're a bunch of comic book artists a bunch of people displaying their wares we also have panels we have just announced we have a future rama panel enemy x panel enemy enemy in the magicians harmon town mystery side cedar 3000 a nervous podcasts then the comedy stage garfunkle and notes michael jay dimitri martin me april richardson a bunch of people that you know bans weaser okay go carseat headrest immune it's.

social media california pakistan michael jay twelve hours ten percent one day
"pailin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

Rolling Stone Music Now

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"pailin" Discussed on Rolling Stone Music Now

"So that it becomes all the more mystery because techniques into my heart somewhere between the version it's on the bootleg series in the verdon us on the album he filled it with lines from like humphrey bogart movies and even according to clinton haillan there is one line and that song that is from a star trek episode so the mystery becomes more intense because pailin earth if he was scribbling them in front of you in the lyrics in in in the studio how on earth was he pulling these lines from movies and tv shows its bizarre unless you remember star trek playing in the studio which could actually solve this for us they would tv an earlier hit a walk with blood bogart marathon if he if you remember you play he could you know he could i mean literally home little thing i think everything he he read it e l a lot of it he did scrip will assure you that road things that he's saying i'm so that doesn't mean that a lot of the other one he didn't get for movies and tv i don't know i mean you can really tell them but literally he was right can lyrics bright some something burning tight connection for sure but you know like it is thirty two years ago the only got a what was sort of the state of his sobriety or lack thereof was he like drinking that you could tell was well let me let me put it this way one time let picked up a couple jet thought was mikey and it was is and there was a lot there was a lot run the that t he he was drink it here in drinking room you know not like not with the bottle in i i mean he i i did mouth monkey aero that that that sorting.

humphrey bogart clinton mikey thirty two years