18 Burst results for "paddy hirsch"

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:30 min | 5 months ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"The starting wage of fifteen dollars an hour and for context. The minimum wage in alabama is also the federal minimum wage which is seven dollars. Twenty five cents an hour which makes amazon starting wage of fifteen dollars an hour. More than double the alabama minimum. That is actually a big point four. Jim spits lee over the mercedes benz plant as he's watching this big amazon union. Vote play out it'll send a nami ripple but it's going to send one. It's going to let people know that. Hey even people fifteen dollars an hour. Seventeen dollars an hour can have union in their workplace. Bessemer warehouse workers will be voting by mail through the end of march. If this votes exceeds at an anti union place like amazon in alabama. This could turn a whole new page for both the company and the region to sell your from. Npr's business thanks for joining us. Thank you this. Episode of the indicator was produced by general hawks law and fact check by sam sai special. Thanks to claire. Miller and indicator is edited by paddy hirsch and is a production of npr. This episode of life can't were getting intimate exploring yourself really great way to one pass the time but also just to get to know yourself better understanding the power of touch and south pleasure. How self appreciation can spark deeper engagement with ourselves. And the world. Listen now to. Npr's life kit..

amazon Jim paddy hirsch alabama claire seven dollars sam sai end of march both Seventeen dollars an hour Twenty five cents an hour Npr mercedes benz plant one More than double fifteen dollars an hour Miller ripple npr point four
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:33 min | 6 months ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"The taco emoji for instance taco bell lobbied really hard for that one to pass the interracial couple emoji that was from tinder hiking. Boots brought to you in part by timberland's the beaker and microbe emoji popular this year. Ge funded those even the mosquito emoji mono- guests who pushed for that one was it like off the repellent people a good idea but no i think so bill and melinda gates foundation behind this one but jenny says the way that ford kind of went about the process kind of subcontracting their proposal to s seeming truck enthusiasts at an ad agency without any clearly to the company that has led her and others to call for a change in the emoji proposal process transparency. What's really important is to. We wanna know where that money generally is coming from air grenier at ford social media says the company did not intentionally obscure it's role. Ingesting the pickup emoji. It simply did not want to publicize it until it was a done. Deal at the time of publication dwayne. The rock johnson has still not responded to multiple requests for comment. But if you hear this mr rock please get in touch. We can always do a follow up. Call us if you want to know more about where emoji come from. A new documentary called the emoji story. Produced by jennifer lately is now available online. This episode of the indicator was produced by jamila. Still fact checked by sam sei. The indicator is edited by paddy hirsch and is a production of npr..

paddy hirsch jamila sam sei jenny ford dwayne jennifer bill melinda gates this year rock timberland couple rock johnson
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:30 min | 6 months ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Through eight routine food inspection. But carl said to me. This doesn't happen really unless a competitor tips. The fda off fda doesn't go around testing pasta boxes then. I reached out to a legal source who had worked with the fda before like. I don't want to give this person. Wakes very very much. Wanted to be anonymous deep throat. Exactly and he confirmed what karl had said. Which was that. Somebody put pressure on the fda. We reached out to the fda and they told us that they had discovered check. Oh bucatini iron deficiency through a quote routine enforcement activity. And also that. The case is still pending. We also reached out to check. Oh but all we got was an automatic response saying they wouldn't be responding. If you are a bucatini bopper or just bucatini curious. We are happy to report. That other brands now appear to be easily available online as for rachel handler. Who story you can also find online. She says she's going to keep digging into who might have done to check. Oh dirty though. Even the company itself phone answer calls. They think i'm the enemy. I think but i'm like no. I'm trying to get answers that the public wants from you because we love your pasta on the same side here exactly. I'm just trying to help you out. Help me help you help. America today show was produced by britney. Cronin it was fact. Checked by sam sei indicator is edited by paddy hirsch and is a production of npr..

karl paddy hirsch britney carl bucatini sam sei rachel eight America today
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:23 min | 6 months ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"This message comes from npr sponsor workday in today's changing world. Fast decisions need to be smart decisions. That's why workday delivers quick insights to help your finance team plan for what's next workday. The finance hr and planning system more at workday dot com. This message comes from npr. Sponsor fund rise making investing in private real estate as easy as investing in stocks bonds or mutual funds build a more diversified portfolio today at fundraise f. u. n. d. r. i s. e. dot com slash indicator the life of an astronaut. It sounds so awesome so adventurous astronaut. Doug wheelock says though most of the time it's actually pretty routine regimented. You wake up have breakfast do a bunch of scientific experiments and then you eat lunch. Then more experiments exercise dinner and go to sleep and of course there are no shops or movie theaters are banks or anything like that. So the economy aboard the international space station is all about trade. The interesting thing is with food. Of course the russians food supply is much different than our food supply. The russians is. Doug really loved the us deserts which were like brownies and cakes. And he's freeze dried packets and the american astronauts really loved the russian soups. Apparently the borscht is excellent. Excellent is a relative term. Of course doug says that aboard the space station. Most of the food is actually pretty bland. But every three months a big event would happen. Doug and his crew would get a shipment from earth and the resupply missions were a big deal remember. It costs hundreds of millions of dollars to send a shuttle to the space station. So when those shipments actually came says doug it was a very special moment and in those shipments would be like personal items letters from home loved ones. Yeah who cares. There was also this precious commodity just before they closed the hatch on the launch pad. They would throw like a bag of fresh fruit like oranges. Lemons apples vegetables as well aboard the space station. Duck says produce was like platinum. Yeah and when the shipments would right he says everybody would get together and the excitement was electric. We'd all get in the the node one. Which is our kitchen area and flowed all the fruit and vegetables. Okay so it's like christmas morning. But doug says everybody would only get one or two pieces of produce. Just wasn't that much of it and so here's where the trade comes in. Doug knew that the russians loved onions. They're great for flavoring food but doug loved fruit above everything else at. I'd say like mad. I would take an orange over this onion any day. You know fyodor. Your chicken was mike. Commander said hey fyodor What a trade an onion for do of a like an extra orangey goes all. You don't want your onion douglas's that orange trade legendary in his mind still because for doug that orange was not just a snack. It was a connection to earth. It was like his companion was funny. I had i at one point. I kind of laughed. Because i i felt like tom. Hanks and castaway with wilson. The volleyball hung onto like one orange for like it seemed like probably three weeks at a became sort of by crewmate. Of course the space station economy was not just about food though services. Were also a big part of it and different people aboard. The space station had different things. They could contribute because they had such different backgrounds. There were scientists engineers pilots so skill sets seriously skill sets became part of our commerce as well. Dug for instance has an engineering background and he says for him one of his least favorite parts of life aboard the space station. Where all the scientific experiments they had to do. Whatever their background. This was just part of what they did. Every day and the space station would typically be running more than a hundred experiments at any given moment scientific research about food plants medicines. It's just a full day and it's also part of the mission of the space station. But for doug honestly it was kind of a slog sometimes the way out of it economics doug discovered this a couple of weeks in his mission when one of the scientists aboard. The space station told him that there was a big problem she said. Hey the party's broken. I mean that does sound like a big problem. I feel panicked at least not what you wanna hear aboard a space station. That's for sure. No but doug background was in engineering. So he understands systems and he says fixing things comes really naturally to him and the scientists. This woman named shannon knew this about doug shannon looked at me. She said if you fix the party. I'll do all of your science for the rest of the day and i'm thinking that is a deal and a half. I'll take that deal. So i got my by tool bill called houston and said you know houston. We have a problem. The party's broken. Doug says actually the toilet broke quite a bit and whenever it happened whenever the toilet broke doug's economic value pretty much shot to infinity. I figured out that if you're out in space and you can fix the potty you're like lord of the universe but the real commodity on the space station's as doug was earth itself because he says when you see the whole planet against this backdrop of outerspace every day it just changes the way that you value things it just this raging ball of life in this vast desert of darkness. You know that takes root like very very quickly and it's like wow there's my planet everything ever known you know every word ever spoken. You know everybody. I've ever loved is down there and i'm not there and so that's when it really kind of strikes. You is When i talk to students and young children we talk about our favorite planet and things and i said pluto was my favorite planet. I said but then i went to space and now earth is my favorite planet. Thanks says when you're in space you start to crave all things earth and human evidence of life becomes the currency for example. Doug says you just want to see talk to other humans. Even if you don't know them you want to drop in on other astronauts video chats and see their families and talk to their friends. You don't care. Yeah because in space humans are a precious commodity and i asked if there was ever bartering around this like hey you can join video chat with my family for an apple indexes. Actually everybody needs human interaction so much. They don't really trade it because it becomes sacred and when you get back to earth doug says your idea of what's valuable is changed for ever. You know birds singing the wind blowing through the trees the smell of somebody grilling out know the the laughter of children. You know all these beautiful beautiful things that we see and we hear and we smell on earth are all gone and instead you have the sterile sound of fans running in the sterile smell of computer hardware like sort of like warm plastic kind of smell you know and when i first got back i would just like stand outside and kind of close by. Just listen you know. It's completely changed my whole perspective especially especially rain. I am just fascinated by rain now. I just i the smell of it the sound of it. I sometimes go out when a light rain. I've just kind of like take my dog for a walk in the rain. You know and just feel against your skin. A took for granted before you know. This episode of indicator was produced by dave blanchard and fact checked by sam tie. The indicator is edited by paddy hirsch and is a production of npr..

Doug wheelock Doug shannon earth one doug shannon two pieces sam tie apple three weeks pluto hundreds of millions of dollar russian doug paddy hirsch dave blanchard more than a hundred experiment russians today first
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:59 min | 8 months ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Own situations. This message comes from. Npr sponsor the capital. One venture card. Right now you can earn one hundred thousand bonus miles. You can actually use when you spend twenty thousand dollars in your first year. What's in your wallet. Limited time offer terms apply see capital one dot com for details. This message comes from. Npr sponsor avalanche providing cloud based sales tax solutions for businesses of all sizes valera automatically integrates with more than seven hundred erp and ecommerce systems learn more at avalon dot com slash indicator azn. So okay who to what is basin it. It looks like it's this man. Thomas bain yes Who was enough magician slush philosopher and he came up with this thing called days rule in the seventeen hundreds so this was a while ago. He came up with this rule. And what are the rules. Say with much how you can estimate the probability of one thing happening given the another thing has happened or is likely to happen. So the odds that you're gonna go see your grandmother and then you're going to kill her you know is one probability the odds that you're gonna go see your grandmother and you're given that you have. A negative test is a different probability. Okay neither zero. But they are different. And that's what i mean by daisy like you haven't there's a certain probability you have a test. It's a negative result. So usually is. You're not gonna affect your grandmother. So how is this coming into play now. Because we're in sort of this particular moment with kobe where the cases are surging cities like it seemed like things had been opening back up but now it sort of seems like the trend nationally is that they're closing back down so this play into bays and and risk and we live our lives and deal with the holidays will the ideas you want to update your probabilities in risk assessments as new data comes in. Okay right you know your risk assessments of what's safe to do are going to change if your community infection rate is two percent fifty percent right right so you want to account for that also coming in next year as say treatments like anybody treatments. Become more available that also might affect your risk assessment so it's always updating with new information in fact if you remember back in march when they said two million americans we're gonna die if it's been all this criticism about those projections. It turns out that some of those projections were right because they didn't account for human behavior that people night distance so that was invasion daisy and widow is like giving us new information. Let's adjust our probability estimates. It seems like everybody's gone one of two directions either. Like stay inside with the mask and have no contact with other people or through your mask to the wind. forget it. let's just live our lives. It seems like there's been sort of a polarization. So is there like a basin middle ground yet. If you're in beijing you would occupy the middle ground. Which is you adjust your behavior as risks changes information changes right like back to your grandmother projection. Like how risky is this. Would it change if she got an early vaccine right right so that would be a busy and like all right vaccines hundred percent effective. It's ninety ninety five percent effective or ninety four percents effective at your elderly. So maybe then you would be more open to it and this is going to be really important in the coming year or rolled out. Some people are going to have it. Some people don't take a while for community herd immunity so a risk calculations are going to have to be changing really rapidly as next year rolls on so. What would a thanksgiving this year. Well it depends on your risk tolerance and also depends on where you live and how you could easily travel. Okay right. you're in a really high breakout. Stay the you know. Probably the odds of infecting other people and worsening. Those spread is very very high. If you're somewhere where it's less risky and you take a lot of precautions like getting tested. You know traveling by car still not a guarantee but probably a lower risk and is you want to when you make those decisions. Incorporate is a said like if i have a negative test. What is this not hero. But certainly lower than if i don't so what about you for your thanksgiving what are i know. You live here in new york What are you are your thanksgiving plans. Are they basin. They are an struggled with it. Because you know i you know. My mother doesn't live very far away. And so i can get there easily but like you don't have to get on a plane. No i get on a train. I've already gotten one rapid test. And i'm going to get a second one morning of leaving and i chose to go on a more expensive train. That is emptier. Where you can guarantee your own unseat. So i am taking. I'm taking a in approach. Okay and so. Your mother is obviously has not gotten a vaccine because nobody really has. She's in a higher risk group. Maybe so you have like sort of tried to mitigate risk in the kind of transportation you're taking and you're getting a couple of tests yes to to test one morning of and again it's not a guarantee. I'm definitely taking more risk than if i sat at home but as i said i- mitigating the risk to some extent. How do you think as a country. We are handling the covid. Res-q that we're facing right. Now i feel like it's a little like it's sort of government wise. It's such a hodgepodge of different cities and states having different reactions. And i mean when you're looking at this as an economist who specializes in risk like what you see. Well i think biggest failure. Policy-wise is the lack of testing. But also i think the other huge public health failure that people talk about a lot less is a risk communication i. I'm a very small school. That believes people can make good decisions but they have the information presented to them in ways. That makes sense then. It's natural to them and it makes sense in the problem is is you get sort of very mixed messages. You get either. It's fun go about your life or g you know this is terrifying. Never leave your home. And i think that's been the big public health failure that we're not really talking about right. Do you do any other. Economists things for thanksgiving do you like. I don't know. Divide the pie especially or something. Oh yeah i'm an economist. All the time even getting testing. It's a three hour. Wait where. I live net to get a test in new york and and i got so. I was in line the other day after three hours and got so annoyed. Because then i learned that there's a private clinic that bertin exorbitant fee. We'll just test you for for for money. There's no wait so then like in line being like what the value of my time and is this worth the fee that i thought was outrageous. So am i splurging pay for tests instead of taking one of the free. They're free. But like i notice those talking to people aligned that no one else was thinking about. Opportunity cost the way. I was business three or four hours of your time. Well happy thanksgiving alison. Thank you for talking with us. Youtube and i hope you have a great time with your with your mom. We'll be very busy on. This episode of the indicator was produced by nick fountain. Fact checked by sean sylvania. The indicator is edited by paddy hirsch. And his a production of npr. On the next episode of louder than what bobby schmertz case reveals about how conspiracy laws used against black and brown defendants group of growing up in an old press neighborhood with no organisation making no money. It's not a gang. Listen now to the podcast louder than a ride from npr music..

Npr new york Thomas bain paddy hirsch beijing Youtube kobe bobby schmertz sean sylvania nick fountain
A Face-Punching Legal Battle

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:31 min | 8 months ago

A Face-Punching Legal Battle

"The ufc has an overwhelmingly dominant position as the biggest promotional organization that runs fights in mixed martial arts. It likely made close to a billion dollars in revenues last year. And that's estimated to be as much as ninety percent of all the revenues in mixed martial arts and it achieved that dominant position both by successfully managing and promoting the sport but also by buying out all of its biggest rivals in getting all of those top fighters from its rivals to fight for it. So you have. These numbers are not public but these estimates come from nash analyzes the business and finances of mixed martial arts for the website. The bloody elbow. He's our guide to this world and is the lawsuit filed by the former fighters against the ufc has unveiled all these documents. That show what the fighters get paid. We had an inkling. We had an idea but now we have like concrete numbers. Okay so here. Are some of the points made by the fighters and here are some of the. Us's agreements i the fighters argue that they simply get paid a much smaller share of the ufc's revenues than athletes and other major sports leagues. And this is true. Those new documents from the court hearing revealed that fighters get paid roughly twenty percent or less of ufc revenues in a given year for the major basketball baseball hockey and football leagues athletes. Get paid close to half of what they're leaks make and in boxing the other major combat sport. It's even higher close to sixty percent of boxing. Revenues goes to boxers. And one of the reasons john says is it. There are several major. Boxing promoters trying to sign fighters it's just a more competitive market so for the fcc. The fighter has to pitch to the of c. To hire him to give them a fight because he needs to be in the afc to make money were in. Boxing promoter has to find a fighter and convince him to let him promote them. Because he's the person drawing the money in response to the fighters. Ufc's arguing that even though it's fighters getting smaller share of its revenues. Those fighters are still getting paid more money over time because the ufc is making more in revenues over time so the overall level of the fighters pay is still going up and john says if the us seaward some other kind of company that response might be enough to win the case if the fighters are just like other workers and their pays going up. Why would it matter. If the fighters are getting a smaller share of the sports revenues than the athletes in other sports. What makes this case different honest with the plaintiffs argue is that the fighters aren't workers like a typical worker on a factory line. The fighters are the product and as the product. That's being sold. They deserve a share of the sales. Dmc has also argued that nick martial arts is still a young and growing sport should not be compared against established. Sports leagues plus. Dear makes the case that a big reason it makes so much. Money is not because of how great it's fighters are because of how good the you have c. is at putting on big lucrative fight nights that effectively. Ufc has a special ingredient that it adds to its fight cards john. Nash is a little skeptical of this one. But what is the special sauce is a little confusing. When of would claim it's their production. It's the way they things but then can you be more specific because you know. Boxing does the same thing they they promote fighters they put on events they they make packages that you know all that stuff that seems to be part of the special sauce is done by other other promotions plus john says if the ufc does have a special sauce and the specific fighters don't matter too much. Then why did the ufc go to such lengths to buy out its rivals and get their fighters and why does the ufc put restrictions in the fighters contracts that prevent them from fighting for other promotional companies. Look there's lots of other complexities in this lawsuit. For example the ufc also makes its fighters except the sponsorship deal with reebok and keeps a lot of the money from that deal the fighters say they could get their own sponsors which they used to be able to they would get paid more but really we're just scratching the surface here on this lawsuit and it probably has a long way to go anyways. But what is clear is that the lawsuit is a fight. About worker power the former fighters say they lost power to negotiate their pay because a ufc made the market for their talent less competitive the ufc disagrees and has argued that it should not be punished for being a successful company by the way we emailed a spokesperson for the ufc about the lawsuit. They have not yet responded. What's also clear right now. Is that the financial life of a lot of you. Have fighters is really hard fighters who are not highly ranked will sometimes get as little as ten thousand dollars for a fight and finders will have at most a few fights a year and they pay a big share of their earnings to their fight camps. The places that run their training and provide coaching things like that and so these former fighters are basically suing the ufc for what they believe they are owed what they argue they would have made if the ufc had allowed a competitive market for their services. Nate quarry one of these x. fighters says they're also hoping that the ufc has to change. Its approach to paying fighters going forward. We deserve our seat at the table. Whether it's talking about sponsorships whether it's negotiating our purses whether it's being able to fight for someone else free agency that's what we truly need in the sport where the fighters will have the ability to really test out the free market and see what our values this episode of the indicator was produced by jamila huxtable. In fact check by sean sal donya indicators paddy hirsch and is a production of npr.

UFC Boxing John Nash AFC FCC Hockey Basketball Baseball United States Football Reebok Nate Quarry Jamila Huxtable
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"That there would be all of these players who would try to market tests of dubious quality. And market them in such a way that it would potentially mislead the public and potentially be super inaccurate. That's what happened in telluride Colorado Jackson. Hole Wyoming Aspen places that bought up thousands of antibody tests for manufacturers in China hoping to get information that might reassure visitors, and maybe even help them open for the winter, but then they had to abandon the. The tests because the results were so unreliable, not to mention. Even if you do get a positive test result, there's currently no evidence that having antibodies actually makes you safe from getting reinfected. Yeah, and that is the case of tests that were developed in the most rigorous way then there's this whole other category of tests that were developed with maybe less rigor. That finger prick test. You took at the SPA. It was created by a company called Ray Biotech I. I went to their website. It looks Super Legit, but yeah. I mean anecdotally I wasn't. I didn't feel certain at this was the most reliable diagnostic coulda gotten dwayne Mariner who was administering test was clear that the results should not be taken as a guarantee I. It's like I said it's not for definitive evidence. It is merely a marker in merry gives you maybe peace of mind to not sit. Sit around your house with a mask on the test cost me one hundred and fifty dollars, which you know is not nothing in most of the experts I talked to stress that unless you're getting tests done in a very high quality, rigorous clinical laboratory setting. You probably can't place too much stock in the results I mean. Do you worry kind of about giving people to task in a they see that they have a positive and then maybe they're going to go act more more irresponsibly like. Concern for you in terms of giving people may be too much peace of mind Yes, and no, that's why I do stress that you should follow these guidelines on this is not a replacement for safety and health. Recently, the FDA has upended standards a bit for WHO's allowed to sell these antibody tests, but they're still letting tests be sold without the normal potentially months-long vetting process that you would normally have for something like this, which means that a lot of people are potentially getting data that. Might be helpful or really might not only looks like your tests done. You Sir. Do not have any antibodies. So what does that mean? You probably have been exposed and you probably haven't been sick in the last three or four months. All right so I. Have to be extra careful, then it would be wise, extra careful. End of the day I think. I'M GONNA keep wearing my mask i. think that's a good move. This episode. The indicator was produced by Dario Rafi on and back checked by Britney. Cronin edited by Paddy Hirsch and the indicator is a production of NPR. It feels like nothing in the news. These days makes any sense, so Hassan Hodge turned to his father and his faith for answers he's don't worry about the number of questions. Just worry about which questions become more clear and solidified comedian. Hasan bin Hajj on how his spirituality is getting him through. Listen and subscribe to. It's been a minute from NPR..

NPR Colorado China dwayne Mariner Hassan Hodge Dario Rafi Hasan FDA Paddy Hirsch Cronin Britney
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:09 min | 1 year ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"That we can and like. I said I WANNA make sure that you. You say something to those ladies overdid office. Because I I tell them all the time which I appreciate them but I think once you let them know what good job they're doing till appreciate it more thank you. I will make sure I do that today. Yes please do sterling and Gary are in this weird position where they are both suddenly depending on the government for their livelihoods. The government ordered an economic shutdown which cost sterling his job and now sterling is waiting on the government to pay him the unemployment he was promised by. Congress in the cares act. Gary is waiting for that money. In the form of sterling's rents and the rent of his other tenants to be able to pay his mortgage to the bank and the bank is waiting on that. Money and investors are waiting on that money and the entire economy is kind of waiting on that money to stabilize the millions of businesses and people who have all had their lives turned upside down by the coronavirus pandemic one rent. Check is kind of a link in a chain that connects the entire economy but the most vulnerable person in that chain. The person with the most at stake is sterling Lunceford. Who is still having trouble breathing? And who is still waiting for his unemployment check and for him. Time is running out within the next thirty to sixty days. I'll be completely broke. I won't have any money at all. No income no way. No no anything within the next sixty days. If I don't get something coming in like that uninformed something I'm going to be broke. This episode. The indicator produced by Darius Rafi on the indicators edited by Paddy Hirsch and is a production of NPR. Let's all close our eyes. Take a deep breath. Let it out and listen to NPR. All songs considered it's music podcast. But it's also a good friend and guide to find joy in troubled times here. All songs considered with new episodes every Tuesday and Friday. Wherever you listen to podcasts..

Gary NPR Paddy Hirsch Darius Rafi Congress
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"The government would likely have to consider a full lockdown for now he says Sweden is sticking to its guns and he points out. There is one huge advantage to their approach. That it is sustainable. These some issues we could keep on doing for months maybe years for whereas under says things like keeping kids out of school forcing businesses to close. That's not really sustainable for all that long. Sweden's approach on the other hand. He says is far less disruptive to people's lives and to businesses soap bar manager. Ostra Toernell says he's glad for his part that the economy has stayed open. He says the club staff is kind of like a family. And even though soap bar had to lay off ten people it was still able to keep most of its core staff. Oscar says that with the smaller crowds. The club is not making much money but it is scraping by along with a lot of other businesses in Sweden. We might be be on the right path other note basically Isabel Limbo today. We'll see you know as the weeks. Go by in the meantime. Oscar says he will keep going to work making sure. The bathrooms are clean all the time making sure the tables are far enough apart and you know playing when people start to get Hansie and when it doesn't work. He says he breaks out the big guns. If large groups gets together I just turned him using down then then. No one thinks it's funny to dance to a song when it's when the music is really low so people go back to their seats. Basically this episode of the indicator was produced by Dr Raphael on check by Britney Cronin the indicators editor is Paddy Hirsch and it is a production of NPR..

Sweden Ostra Toernell Oscar Hansie Paddy Hirsch Dr Raphael Britney Cronin NPR editor
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"It's the biggest commercial distillery in the state and we make vodka And Gin and rum. I'm detecting a bit of an accent just thirty. But I'm just a wee bit. Yeah just a wee bit Gordon. Open Porch Jam two years ago. He's applies a lot of local bars and restaurants released. He did until a couple of weeks ago when they all shut down. I mean everyone in the rational business down here right now and the bar tree as well is just absolutely free fall their businesses falling apart. We haven't taken a booze older and two weeks and Gordon. The timing was especially bad. He had just been in the process of making deals with a bunch of national distributors. I was in the middle of advanced investment conversations with business in New York and Illinois and Florida in California that we want to execute this year. And then this crazy. Karuna fighters stroked on everyone and the market crashed. Of course it just went radio. Silent Gordon was looking at no money coming in and probably having to lay off all of his workers but then he had this idea a couple of Friends of Mine Gordon. It's really hard for us to gone. Sanitize we can't get any and I was running red walgreens with my seven year old one the and it was all gone. Then Gordon heard that the government had created an emergency regulation that would let distilleries like his pivot to making hand sanitizer. Yeah distilleries are perfectly positioned for this because the main ingredient in hand sanitizer is alcohol so I took it upon myself to look at how difficult it was to me. And then I mean my chemist of course than I realized that was there was nothing that was particularly difficult. Gordon realized that if he could convert his distillery into a hand sanitizer factory he could keep on all of his employees even hire some more employees and also help battle corona virus. I said listen. We're not going to do this. Half we're GONNA literally stopped making alcohol. We're going to repurpose or whole business. We're going to war on this thing. This is a wartime effort and like his attitude wartime effort. Gordon is currently producing around one hundred thousand liters of hand sanitizer per month. Which still is not enough to meet demand it have. You had a lot of orders. Zhenya destroyed swamped. Gordon says the hand sanitizer is selling for around thirty five dollars a gallon. He's not hugely profitable but it is enough to keep his business. Going into to fort. Louis would have been really tough for was to survive. Young Company and no demand overnight is particularly entertaining. Call to think about the really real thing about the way. This is all beginning to fall into places that I've had people approach me to invest in the company. Lost Twenty four dollars. Gordon says they were excited to invest in his hand sanitizer business and they were even more excited when they found out that he normally makes booze which I understand. I I get the enthusiasm gap. Who needs a drink? This episode of the indicator was produced by Camille Peterson and Britney. Cronin our editor is Paddy Hirsch and the indicator is a production of NPR..

Gordon Louis Paddy Hirsch New York Camille Peterson Zhenya Cronin Young Company editor NPR Illinois Britney California Florida
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Okay Darius everything's looking good right now. Stocks are going up. People are quitting their jobs as doctors or engineers or whatever to trade on the stock market. Obviously this could not last well. As you'll recall people were using the system post dated cheques to create this market but then as the stocks started to go down people started trying to call in those checks they went down to the bank and said I wanNA cash this check check because I'm not sure that this is going to be worth anything soon. And it quickly became clear that there was not enough cash to cover all of these checks and so the government stepped stepped in. They put together this committee and said we're going to look at this and everyone said great. The government's got it under control and they met over a weekend Monday. They made an announcement. There would be no bailout and at that point. All trading stopped. Just a stunned reaction paralysis. I imagine this. The third largest stock market in the world in an instant grinds to a halt suddenly worthless. Nobody knows who owes always what to WHO who is bankrupt. Who is solvent? It's just this this mess. They could all of the dealers under house arrest and and everyone was told no capitals Louts League Kuwait until it's all sorted out so the government scrambling and the collapse of the sugamo stomach. It destroyed the Kuwaiti economy. I mean it plunged the country into a recession that lasted almost ten years. All but one of the country's banks were insolvent in the end all of the losses adjusted for inflation totalled nearly two hundred and fifty billion dollars which for reference with five times the size of the Kuwaiti economy. At the time so this would be the equivalent of losing one hundred trillion dollars if it had happened in the US Suba Araya's who was a prominent businessman man. Like I said he says when it crashed just affected everyone. That was the biggest thing that ever happened. In Kuwait everything went went when and whether it's a stock or whether it's appropriate to everything thing when when I think there's an interesting lesson in all this and I think it demonstrates demonstrates the two forces that are kind of battling each other at the center of capitalism which is you know the forces of financial innovation and sort of human. I'm an engineer. That can't be stopped and the forces of financial regulation and trying to earn a bend that ingenuity so that it fits into some kind of master plan and I don't think Kuwait's mistake was seeing the value in financial innovation. I think the mistake was thinking that they could somehow separate that from the rest of the economy. You're never gonNA be able to contain human ingenuity. I think that the most you can hope for is to try to find some balance between control all in chaos very nicely said Darius how the Sukhoi menaka explains the world for at least financial history. thanks man. PODCAST was produced by Darius roffe on edited by Paddy Hirsch. The indicator is a production of N._P._R...

Darius roffe Kuwait government Suba Araya Paddy Hirsch sugamo stomach capitals Louts League US engineer
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:25 min | 1 year ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"The most underrated trend of the past past decade ready. I'm ready all right. Well you know. I hope our listeners in our listeners. Ready exactly our top underrated trend brand of the decade is the spooky consistency of US economic growth. So the economy has been following a weirdly steady path all decade-long along but that consistency it sounds like a pretty positive thing but it is both a good and a bad thing. That's right it's good. Obviously because the economy has at least continued. Can you growing the entire decade rather than stumbling back into a recession but the consistency is bad because the pace of that growth has been very very slow. And that's especially especially when you consider how devastating the last recession was and so a lot of people a lot of workers and people who want to work have only just recently started benefiting from the economy's recovery even though it is more than a decade old and here's some indicators demonstrate both sides of the story the US economy has now been growing for one hundred twenty six straight straight months including this month. which makes it the longest economic expansion ever but on the other hand throughout the expansion? The economy's only been growing at an annual pace of about two point three percent. That is the slowest pace of growth for any expansion. Going all the way back to the nineteen forties. Now take a look at the unemployment rate. The two thousand ten's will we'll be the first full decade in which the unemployment rate has fallen every single year. That's going all the way back to win. Records were first kept in the late nineteen forties and this sounds awesome right right. I mean falling unemployment means more people getting jobs. This is all good. It should be awesome but hold the celebrations because the decline in the unemployment rate has been super gradual Joel. Not until eight years into the economic recovery to the unemployment rate fall back to where it was before the recession. This means that there were a lot of people who could not find work after the recession. Who have only recently found good consistent work and there are other signs of labor market health? It did not get back to where they were until just this year. This is a horribly horribly longtime to wait and you can look at a bunch of charts showing these and other trends. They all kind of look like straight lines and we'll post the charts at NPR dot org slash money if you WANNA see more but the overall impression they give is one of constant but very slow improvement and this is harmed low income workers the most at the same time they see. I got to say. Hey you know when you think about all that stuff that happened in the past decade the stuff that we listed when we started the episode yeah it is kind of amazing that the US economy just kept going right on through it. It's like the tortoise and the hare like slow and steady. Yeah except like. It's bad that it was so slow. Yeah but it also could have been worse. It's sort of like a big Mac. Is I think the way to describe the past decade but like more like a mess. Give me like a map of the next. I'm kind of hoping that that the upcoming decade can kinda like reverse these things we're like the. US economy grows at really fast awesome pays and it helps workers and society's most vulnerable and everything is calm everywhere else Like for math too. Yeah Yeah exactly and also economics journalists like you and I could use a decade of you know good good news. We might lose our jobs but I would. I think it's worth it. It would be worth it. This episode of the indicator is produced by Rafi on our intern. Is Nadia Lewis. Our editor is Paddy Hirsch and the indicator is a production of N._p._R...

US Paddy Hirsch NPR Nadia Lewis Rafi intern editor
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:28 min | 1 year ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"This message comes from? NPR sponsor state farm. Why do you need state farm renter's insurance because it helps protect stuff landlords? Don't like your furniture that gets drenched by a broken pipe. State Farm Renter's insurance find an agents or get a quote at State Farm Dot Com about two years into their stay at a Kenyan refugee camp after fleeing Somalia Mustafa Nor and his family found that they had been selected to be resettled in the US and initially they had mixed feelings so in the country select you. You're notified two years in that. Hey you know. United States has selected you and that has in the refugee camp that always comes as a great news center. Santa about bad news because Because the United States takes the longest to process innovating they have a hard process. They have hottest scrutiny. Hot above ranch aches six. And he's right. The vetting process for refugees coming to the. US is intense. There's multiple interviews and background checks and security checks by different branches of the US government. It's fingerprints tests for contagious diseases. It can take years from office family. It took a decade but eventually as with other refugees who make it through the whole process assess. The family was paired with a resettlement agency. Mustafa and his family were paired with Church World Service which has a branch in Lancaster. It's nonprofit that receives funding funding from the federal government and from private donors and it sets up refugee families with a few months of housing some counseling services food and clothing and then they tried to US find your job right away because once you around here you have to start paying your bill for the government for bringing you a lot of people. I don't know this but yes refugees payback the US government for the cost of flying here from the southwest big family. Those were not cheap flights around eleven twelve hundred per person so a family of ten ten people. You get a bill of almost ten thousand dollars. Mustafa says he found Lancaster City. Lancaster County unexpectedly welcoming to his refugee family and to other refugee families and that in fact is the city's reputation in two thousand sixteen before the trump administration started limiting. How many refugees could come to the US? The number of refugees were resettled. In Lancaster. City hit a peak of four hundred and seven as a share of the city's population. That's almost twenty three times more more refugees resettled than in the US as a whole which is why. The city was labeled the refugee capital of America by the BBC. So why is Lancaster able to resettle so many refugees. One reason is resources. For example Church World Service. The Resettlement Agency is able to partner with local organizations to provide services is beyond just the basics beyond the initial housing and food and clothes for example. There's a nonprofit that provides health care to refugees. English language tutors the school district and in universities to help with education employment programs and companies that will actively try to hire refugees and train them. She masto Prieto runs. The Lancaster Office of Church World World Service and she says that all these resources make it possible for Lancaster to accept even the hardest cases. Like when there's a huge refugee family of ten or fifteen people or when a refugee has a medical issue and can't work or if a refugee only speaks a really obscure foreign language there are no cases in this area that we that we would refuse so we do have the option when cases sent to us by our national office to say they basically. They're saying will you accept this case so we always do and it's not just tangible resources. There's something else that has given Lancaster the ability to absorb refugees. Its history starting. In the early eighteenth century entry members of the Mennonite and Amish churches were fleeing persecution in Europe and started moving to Lancaster. The county still has a huge amish mennonite population and and the value of welcoming people in need of a new home has remained Steve Noel. A professor at Elizabethtown College spoke with us at the Mennonite historical society which features exhibits exhibits about the Amish and Mennonite history of Lancaster. Well in the in the late nineteen seventies and early nineteen eighties. For example Mennonites in this area were were deeply involved in resettlement of refugees from Southeast Asia. from from Vietnam Cambodia Laos and that's that was motivated both by Christian humanitarian concerns and also concerns that as Mennonites as conscientious objectors pacifists. I am in fact Mustafa's own experience right after arriving in Lancaster reflects this my first ever job. was I worked with Amish. I used to work for a company that build moved garages and sheds so used to install windows. He did well enough at this job installing windows for these sheds that he was hired by a company called E. Impact Marketing working which provides marketing for amish companies in the area in which trained Mustafa in Web design. Mustafa would end up becoming their head web developer and then he started thinking thinking more broadly he started a company called bridge which is a website where people can sign up to have dinner in the home of a refugee family in the area. The refugee family will cook the meal and share their story and the family will also said a fever. The dinner which it gets to keep bridge charges service fee which is how it makes money. Mustafa's office original pitch for bridge. One A business plan competition which provided the funding to get started. My feature was done I was gonNA instead of instead of free training or giving refugees a new skill. Why not give them a plot from where they can on an income with what they already know and we'll have their culture under food and part one we? We explained how refugees and immigrants contribute to an economy by helping its population grow and giving new businesses more people to sell two into higher Adamo MIC. The Lancaster based economist. I says it stories. Like Mustafa's also demonstrate the more subtle ways to immigrants and refugees contribute a move into neighborhoods that others might find less desirable herbal and they start interesting businesses and they really contribute to the diversity of consumer experiences downtown and you can in downtown like stir. You can eat into Vietnamese place. You can meet on Nepalese place. There's just a huge amount of writing. Her Moustapha says his company is making money and he even has plans to expand into neighboring in York County and he adds. His story shows the symbiotic relationship between the Lancaster economy and it's refugees and it goes something like this. The success of the Economy Konami makes it possible for the city to offer resources to these refugees so that they can prosper and they're prospering feeds right back into the success of the Lancaster economy. So what happens happens is warning refugee person comes here the community. This community has done a very good job of harnessing that refugee person as a whole from employment to training to the job opportunities to internship training. So I I went through those different circles of of coming here sieving. Welcome Hi finding a stable able job and then how developing a skill. Which is the development web development using that skill to create a company? Now so it's a great circle on. It's it's a something which is very I don't WanNa say unique. What's special about Lancaster? Lancaster is now a pretty good place to get it by. This episode of the indicator was produced by Lena Sons Gary fact check by Nadia Lewis. Our Editors Paddy Hirsch in indicator is a production of NPR.

Lancaster Mustafa United States Lancaster Office of Church Wor Lancaster County Lancaster City Resettlement Agency State Farm Renter Church World Service NPR federal government State Farm Dot Com Somalia Paddy Hirsch masto Prieto Europe Santa BBC
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:22 min | 2 years ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"None of this is saying that inheritance is your destiny, but it saying it comes close to what I say in the book is we've moved to that nirvana of the middle class. It true talk. Chrissy. But this doc, Chrissy is headed Dettori meritocracy you essentially a born into it. And then the effect of this is I guess a backlash of sorts the effect of this is to leave the people in the mixed neighbourhood who can't move. It leaves them more frustrated more, you know, sensing that capitalism has a wonderful set of opportunities. But they're not opportunities for me. And so what accompanies all this, and you see this in the United States is social destruction innocence, the breakdown of families growing divorce rates growing, pregnancies, of course, the opioid epidemic to to some extent. These are all social tragedies that fall on the comic tragedy. What are some solutions to our current s- situation? Well, I would argue that obvious onces ought to have more growth in the areas that are falling behind. So it doesn't matter that the country's growing at three percent. If the coastal cities, New York's the San Francisco's are going growing at five and six, but you know, steal Sedale annoy is growing at minus one or two. So what we need is more a better distribution of growth, especially in the areas that haven't recovered since the financial crisis. Now, what sometimes people immediately jumped to his that means we need centralized place based policies, we need this economic jargon for saying the policy should be targeted at a specific area. For example, the option it is owns the administration has come up with which essentially reward investment in some of these areas is touted as a way to spread activity, but but think of one of the major. Recent events when Amazon basically was told by the residents of of queens that it was not so welcome even though it was. Yeah. I mean, this is what every Luchetti supposed to be dying for right, more jobs. Good jobs. The reality is perhaps those jobs want appropriate for that community. And instead of that being jobs for the boys in the in the neighborhood or the girls in the neighborhood. It could have been jobs for outsiders. The bottom line is when we look at examples, Amazon, what should have worked what everybody has been touting as the answer community turned around and said, no that's not the answer we want and that should make us think. Thank you so much for coming on and talking about your buck. It's so interesting, you must come. This episode of the indicator was produced by Dr is RAFI on edited by paddy Hirsch, our intern. And fact checker is willa Ruben and the indicator is a production of NPR..

Chrissy Amazon paddy Hirsch willa Ruben United States Dettori intern NPR Dr San Francisco Sedale New York three percent
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"So if one week you only work thirty two hours, you are still considered a full-time worker if you usually work thirty five or more hours in Amandus case, she says she works about twenty six hours a week. So Amanda, you would count as part time. And now this brings us to question. Number three. It comes from Michael as you guys have discussed many times, the unemployment numbers do not tell the whole story in a prior sewed Heather Boucher said she would look at the employment rate. Instead. So I took a look, and it seems that the employment rate is significantly higher than it was in nineteen seventy nine and is about where it was pre two thousand eight so I have two questions on this one. Why was it? So low in the past does this mean that most households now need multiple income sources to is there really that much room for growth from here when it's near its peak seems like higher this number is the more desperate workers are for jobs. Thanks and keep up the good work. This is another great question. Thank you, Michael. So okay. Let us take a step back for a second the employment rate. This is simply the sheriff people in a certain group who have job and here, the indicator we like to look at the prime age implement rate that is the share of people between the ages of twenty five and fifty four who have a job. Now, these are people who you would mostly expect to be working because they're old enough to have graduated from college. But in general, they're not old enough. To have retired. And Michael ask about the year nineteen seventy nine so let's look at that year back then roughly seventy five percent of people in that age group that we just discussed twenty five to fifty four years old seventy five percent of those people back in nineteen seventy nine had a job right now. It's about eighty percent. So yes, it is definitely higher now than it was back then, but this is not really a fair comparison. It's not apples to apples because back in nineteen seventy nine. It was still very early in the trend of women entering the workforce in huge numbers, but that trend peaked roughly in the year two thousand so we think a better comparison is to compare the employment rate that year in two thousand with the employment rate now, and what that comparison shows us is that the employment rate for people between those ages of twenty five and fifty four with still higher back in two thousand than it is now in fact, if the employment rate were is high now as it was back, then another two and a half million. People would have jobs. So actually, there might still be a lot more people out there who would take job if they found one that suited them. Exactly. And also Michael asks if the rising employment rate means it workers are becoming desperate for a job. Actually, we think it's the exact opposite jobs are desperate. Exactly. The more workers that find jobs, the more desperate that companies are to hire new workers because there are just fewer jobless workers to choose from. And so companies then have to offer higher wages or other kinds of compensation to get those workers to lure them from the jobs that they have. And in fact, we've been seeing some of that trend recently. So that is that is all of our questions, please keep sending them in even if we can't respond to all of them. We do love seeing them. They're all Valentine's dust, even if they're not. That's the way we look at the cat's. Okay. I consider criticism jest of Valentine finding Tway. This episode of the indicator was produced by Constanza yard, oh and edited by paddy Hirsch, our fact, checker interns will Rueben and the indicator is a production of NPR..

Michael Amanda Amandus Valentine paddy Hirsch Heather Boucher Rueben NPR seventy five percent fifty four years thirty two hours twenty six hours eighty percent one week
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Were not being processed you're in the shutdown small businesses, therefore might have changed their plans for the future in ways that are really hard to know. And thus also just hard to quantify a third example of an indirect or uncertain cost of the shutdown is that the federal government probably lost some of its credibility as a stable employer. This could mean that it will have to pay workers a little more on the future to hire them and keep them on staff. Lure them away. From the private sector because workers will demand more money to take a job that feels less stable to them than it might have before it. A fourth example is one that's really quite close to our collective planet. Money, indicator heart, some of the government agencies that publish economic data close during the shutdown. And so there has been a big delay in the release of economic indicators that some businesses rely on to make their decisions about how much money to spend or invest this loomed. Very large indicator Cardiff has been talking about this quite a bit. I mean when there aren't indicators coming out and the name of your podcast indicator. We we've had some notice about it. You're noticing meetings about it. And finally, there is probably some economic damage that we don't understand yet. It's just too early. For example, a lot of people who work at national parks were furloughed. And so there's been some damage to the parks from trash accumulating, and some other things and cleaning up that mess might actually cost more money than it would if the parks had just been regularly maintained for those five weeks, plus the parks lost money from entrance fees that they might never get back. But again, it's too early to know one point made by the show is all these negative effects, both the direct and indirect effects likely become worse the longer shutdown goes on, and that's something to keep in mind. Given that the government is only reopened for three weeks and the clock is ticking. And if the president congress don't agree to a spending deal within that time, a whole new shutdown will begin and thus a new set of indicators, those indicators. We will pose the CBO report at NPR dot org slash money. This episode was produced by Constanza Yaro and edited by paddy Hirsch will Ruben is our intern and the indicator is a production of NPR. Now, you can actually stop listening. Right. We're it's over. Right. You listen to the close to the close. Good music.

federal government Cardiff Constanza Yaro CBO NPR paddy Hirsch president intern congress Ruben three weeks five weeks
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm David green. And I'm Steve Inskeep. The end of two thousand eighteen was time for anxiety. If you own stocks, the market plunged only to soar days later, and then slip again. But there might be less cause for concern that it seems here's Stacey Smith and paddy Hirsch from NPR's planet money indicator podcast market volatility is measured with something called the Chicago Board of options exchange volatility index or the vix the vix also known as the fear index. It's much better name, but a little terrifying. The reason it's called the fear index is because when investors are afraid they contend to start acting erratically like buy-sell, wait, no by volatility. Like we've been seeing recently can be really stressful unless you're Georgetown economist Jim angel. I kind of enjoy the volatility. Really? Yeah. I mean because this is the stuff I study, right? I'm a nerd Jim says. Has this volatility is happening because there's just a lot of uncertainty right now. There's a lot of big important stuff. Feels like it's up in the air, both politically and economically. What's going to happen with the government shutdown? What's going to happen with trae foreigners? And many people think that a recession is coming just housing. No healthy. So says Jim there are reasons to be super worried, but one of the things that he told me is that volatility is actually normal and healthy in the stock market. Jim says the extra volatility that we're seeing right now worries him a lot less than what happened to the fear index in twenty seventeen twenty seventeen was actually one of the least volatile years for the stock market ever stocks listed this slow steady March up and up and up and up when the markets are too complacent and everything looks really good. That's when you should be worried so Patty to sum up the first reason to be optimistic. According to Jim angel in spite of all this volatility is it a certain amount of volatility is healthy. The second reason to be optimistic. According to Jim is that when people are scared and stock prices fall, those stocks get cheaper. It means I'm going to get better prices when I buy stocks at the end of the month is part of my normal retirement plan. So if you. You are saving money for retirement through work in a 4._0._1._K plan over four three b Jim says, a volatile market can be good news. Depending on who you are a fall in the stock market is great news for young people. The fact that stock prices have come down means that when they take this month's paycheck and buy some stocks with it. I get more shares than I got last month. But this brings us to the bad news. If you're close to retirement a falling stock market or a really volatile stock market is really hard to deal with because you don't know if you should pull your money or keep it in or move it into safer territory, we call that period when people in their fifties and sixties the retirement red zone the red zone. Yes, Jim says if you're in the red zone. What you have to try to figure out right now when the markets are really volatile is this is temporary blip. Or if this is signaling a-coming drop in the stock market. Of course, knowing that is not possible. So you just have to guess, I'm not a very good soothsayer or astrologer. So I would say consulting people who swatter the pigeons and look at the entrails for a better forecast and don't buy stocks during mercury retrograde. And that is the point right? When people don't know they get scared, and then the stock market kind of wigs out and jumps around. Just like it's doing.

Jim angel Steve Inskeep David green Stacey Smith NPR paddy Hirsch Chicago trae Georgetown Patty
"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"paddy hirsch" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"We need to listen to a final clip near the end of the movie and in this scene. Rachel has just told Eleanor that Nick had proposed to marry her Eleanor is stunned. And then Rachel says that she turned him down. Eleanor is again stunt only fufill winning. There's no winning. You made. Sure of that. Because of Nick chose me would lose his family. And if he chose his family, you might spend the rest of his life resenting, you what Rachel has realized that her standoff with eleanor's different from the card game seeing the card game. If both players bet all they have one player will win everything and one player will lose everything. But that's not the case here, if both Eleanor and Rachel stay entrenched in their full antagonist towards each other fighting to keep Nick for themselves. The neither of them is going to win everything either Rachel Mary's and unhappy Nick who lost his family or Eleanor gets an unhappy. Nick who lost the love of his life. The only way both for Rachel to stay with Nick. And for Eleanor to have a son who doesn't resent her is if Eleanor gives her blessing for them to be together. Rachel sees this clearly, but Rachel also needs Eleanor to see it. And the only way that could happen was if Rachel turned down Knicks proposal, and then made it clear that she had turned him down because she cares. So much. Much about him that she doesn't want him to lose his family therefore proving to Eleanor at the cheap does care about family after all. So in this case folding was the winning strategy. All it said like there was something a little annoying about the ending in. It's like what about Rachel's career? That's true. Like, I guess she's marrying a happy, Nick. But he was also signaling to Eleanor that she'd be prioritizing Knicks family, and I'm just curious to know what that means for like Rachel's career as a game theory like did that ending mean that eventually they were in fact in a move to Singapore's that Nick can run the family business. And also, by the way, like why didn't Nick prepare Rachel for the game theoretical buzzsaw that was like waiting for her in. Singapore was unbelievable overall. Let her walk into this Parana pits without saying anything jacking. Oh, yeah. My family. You know? I mean, I guess listen they're like Jillian airs. So maybe they'll just by university and Rachel teach it still it was kind of annoying. So I am ran. Yeah. I read that Iran that theory by Michael Chang. And actually he said he thinks Rachel is going to be just fine and not just because he's marrying into a family of billionaires or whatever could Jillian ours. I'm not as worried about Rachel navy's. You are. I feel like she's shown, you know, part of that CENA's this show Eller. You know, I'm good at this. You know? And so I think she totally has the resources wherewithal and cleverness since she thinking to be able to negotiate well in the future to that's right game theorists can win came there. That's what they do. We'll see in the sequel. Are we producer is Dr Raphael are winning editor is paddy Hirsch, any indicator is produced by NPR and especial thanks to the university of south Florida website, which has kept track of all the places that economists have appeared on screen, and which inspired this series as a lot of pride for me there. Because USF, of course, is based in my hometown of Tampa, Florida..

Rachel Nick Eleanor Rachel navy Rachel Mary Knicks Jillian Michael Chang Singapore paddy Hirsch USF Parana pits Florida Tampa Dr Raphael NPR Iran university of south Florida producer editor