35 Burst results for "ovarian cancer"

All Your Genes Are Belong To Us

Planet Money

09:43 min | 3 months ago

All Your Genes Are Belong To Us

"The story of gene patenting kind of starts in the nineteen seventies when scientists figured out how to modify genes in a lab until nineteen eighty living. Things mostly couldn't be patented but that year the supreme court said i guess. These new modified genes are inventions. And pretty soon after that the patent office started granting patents not just on those modified genes but even on genes that scientists had just managed to isolate an extract from the body which started this huge genetic goldrush hundreds of new biotech companies popped up and suddenly the human genome started to look kind of like an uncharted surveyors map with hidden treasure. Worth millions of dollars just lurking out there in the genetic code by the early nineties. One of the biggest genetic treasures was the gene responsible for most cases of inherited breast and ovarian cancer the b. r. c. h. Gene and women with the brca gene have up to a seventy percent chance of getting breast cancer. Compared to about just ten percent for the general population. There was an enormous international race to find this gene and when myriad genetics was founded in one thousand nine hundred one winning the race to find the brca gene was a top priority geneticists. Sean teigen was one of the first people hired at myriad genetics. I had never heard of myriad. In fact i was roughly employee number. Ten sean and myriad hoped that if they could find this gene they could diagnose people at risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer and create tests and treatments for it nasa whereafter in the end is to add years to the lives of the people who buy you know unfortunate chance inherited a mutation in one of these genes. The trick to locating this gene is to identify families where breast cancer clusters. And then if you compare the dna of the people in those families who got cancer versus older people in the family who never got it. It will probably lead you to the gene and in the race to find this gene. Mary has a huge head. Start mostly because of its location in salt lake city. Utah has this comprehensive database of anyone who's developed cancer in the state. It is also home to the mormon church which famously keeps extensive genealogical records show. They're thinking when if just cross-referenced reference those two databases they'd have themselves a ready made pool of promising dna candidates and then they could get straight to mining for mutations sean and his team at myriad get to work. They are working around the clock all hands on deck. How did you guys think about what the stakes were for you. Guys you know in this race returned to arrive there. I i was merely an existential question for the company. There wasn't any doubt about that. It was like if we can find this than the company is going to be successful. And if we don't find it we're probably gonna shrivel up and go hundreds of other scientists around the world were also looking for this gene if myriad doesn't want to shrivel up and go away they have to get to it i after four long years of mining. Dna myriad finally strikes gold they find the mutated gene living on chromosome seventeen from what is now known to be base pair. Forty three million forty four thousand two hundred ninety five to base pair forty three million one hundred twenty five thousand three hundred and sixty four myriad extracts and isolates gene and almost immediately stakes its claim on it by filing a patent but profiting off of that patent turns out to be a whole other problem. There's just no good way to make a drug or treatment based on this gene so instead they focused solely on making a test that would tell people if they have the gene. Though even tasked will be hard to make money off of because brca is like say cova testing where you might get tested over and over or a drug the take every day you know the same person will use a particular patent drug again and again and again and again but they get the information that they are mutations carrier wanted to. They don't need to have that test again. It's done so. The prophet situation is different. Myriad cooks up a solution to this profit problem i. They will make the cadillac of tests the very best cancer gene test of all time and they will charge a premium for it then myriad starts using. Its patent to do what happens. Do best to create a monopoly if anyone else tries to make comprehensive diagnostic test based on their brca genes including some researchers myriad says kindly cease and desist last piece of the prophet puzzle. They get to work driving up demand. Genetic testing for breast cancer was relatively new thing. People didn't really know about it yet. So myriad launched a big marketing campaign aimed mostly at doctors and clinics. But then they test out something that hadn't really been done before with genetic testing breast cancer runs in my family. My mother my dad's sisters. I wondered if it would be inevitable. The trade marketing their test directly to consumers talk to your doctor or visit brac now dot com myriad says they invested around five hundred million dollars to develop and market the test and that they didn't even turn a profit until two thousand eight and says patenting. The gene was the key. That's the only way myriad could get the time and money needed to create what they deemed one of the most sophisticated genetic tests to date attest that gave more than a million people information about their risk for breast and ovarian cancer. But as you may remember not everyone saw myriads business model in the same positive light first of all that direct marketing to a broad swath of consumers less than ten percent of women are even good candidates for this test so there were concerns that myriad was encouraging all of these people to try to get a test that most of them don't even need that cost thousands of dollars before insurance and back at the. Aclu that lawyer. Chris hansen by the mid-2000s he'd spent a few years learning all about gene patenting and looking into the ways myriad was doing business and he had a few concerns of his own for example. Chris says people who did take myriads test might have been getting a false sense of security because his cadillac of tests. The original version of that test did not screen for several dangerous mutations in the gene which came to light after they'd gone to market so that even if you are a result back from myriad saying you're fine you weren't necessarily fine which you know. Science is a process of learning but once myriad realized its mistake and fix the test if customers wanted to take their new and improved. Test that identifies mutations that was gonna cost extra and chris says myriad police it's gene patents so aggressively that no other comprehensive. Brca test was available. So if you were worried that myriad had missed something. There was no way to get a second opinion myriad. Genetics was the only place in the country. You could go if you wanted to be tested other labs could could technically do be. Rca screening were not allowed to do so because of Myriads hat myriad told us. Look we only actually filed two lawsuits against our patent but scientists. We spoke with told us that myriad also sent out a ton of letters that threatened legal action which had basically the same effect of shutting down testing efforts and many scientists were already frustrated with myriad because the race define these genes in the first place had been largely collaborative among scientists around the world and yes myriad had found the gene i but they've done it with the help of everyone else's published work and then they used their patent rights to essentially claim testing for it all to themselves and because really only myriad could test for these genes only they could gather certain kinds of really valuable new data about inherited breast cancer they collected and years of data most of which they also didn't share with the rest of the breast cancer research community. They had this gigantic database of brca one jeans and the various variations of the brca jeans myriad refused to share that database with the scientific community. We spoke to the folks at myriad and they told us that they didn't want to share their genetic database with the broader scientific community out of a concern for patient privacy. They say the pricing of tests has always been proportionate to the costs of developing and bringing them to market and they say they're patent strategy was in line with others in the industry. But chris's concerns went. Far beyond myriads business model far beyond myriad used it's gene patents for him myriad was just a symptom of a much more fundamental issue. The real problem to chris was that genes could even be patented at all. The notion that some private company to own a part of my body and i can't look at it without paying a royalty to some private company seemed to me blindingly obviously a civilization and when chris hansen sees a civil liberties issue. He knows what to

Breast Cancer Ovarian Cancer Sean Teigen Cancer Supreme Court Salt Lake City Cova Nasa Utah Sean Mary Brac Chris Hansen Aclu Chris RCA
Designing Immunotherapies that Can Overcome Recurrence and Resistance

The Bio Report

05:38 min | 4 months ago

Designing Immunotherapies that Can Overcome Recurrence and Resistance

"For joining us. Inviting me this great opportunity in great pleasure. We're GONNA, talk about cancer immunotherapy and bio clips efforts to develop a multi mechanistic immunotherapy to overcome the ability of cancers to develop resistance and. The immune system perhaps, we can start there. What are the challenges? That immunotherapy is facing and how to tumors grow resistant and and evade the immune system. Let me start by saying that's three different questions first of all anti-cancer immunity. And Immune evasion mechanisms are. Just being discovered. And we don't know the immune system especially in the micro the tumor micro environment is much like a black box. So if we want to reset that immunity, we have to learn a lot more about what is in black bought the black box in right now, what we're doing is we're using things like adoptive cell therapy like car T.. And we're using. Checkpoint. Inhibitors and we're. Using. Antibodies and all these different things you know. Vaccine's against the civic tumor antigens. We're using these things to help initiate some sort of passive nudity in that tour micro environments, and the reason that we have to do this is because. A lot of people you know give the tumor itself malevolent characteristics I could you know inveighs nudity and what? Happens is that these are very fast growing cells there's a there's a deficiency in the beginning. Of either the self control of the immune system. That allows the cells to grow aggressively in when you put pressure on them using therapy trying cure them. the ones that aren't specifically attacked by that therapies continued to grow. And so. The the challenges on what is the therapy that can keep the tumor suppressed not recur later on and in in how you approach those kind of therapies to radically eight the tumor once and for all. You Know I. Think Dan one of the. Well known but Unhappy Facts about cancer is that Many cancers likely to reappear later in life immune. Immune system. Hod diminishes as we grow older You know it reminds me of how we knew originally that the immune system played such a huge role in cancer in that is that when we used immunosuppressive drugs or when people had immune deficiencies, they tended to get tumors also. So it's a very complex question and I think people are doing the best. They can to the best that they can to approach it. We know a lot. We know a lot more than we sued, but there's still a lot of things that we don't know. How big a problem is recurrence and resistance with regards to immunotherapy is today. So it depends upon it depends on the indication For, the most part and the reason is is when we can treat those cancers in if a patient fails standard of care most times, they have recurring tumors. So for example, in in ovarian cancer on A. Upwards around seventy percent, eighty percent of. Patients. Are Resistant to the standard of care, which is usually platinum drugs. And one of the exciting things about ovarian cancer is that. For the first time with Immuno therapies. We've been able to you know change that A. Change, the outcome for many of these patients, and so we're we're hopeful. you know other. Other therapies. For, say breast cancer and prostate cancer. Are Fairly well tolerated by patients, and if you catch the tumor with early diagnosis, there's a better outcome. So I look at it actually our technology we specifically approach this really difficult question of refractory solid tumors. In the reason we did that is because ninety percent of all cancers are solid tumors. But. In Clinical Trials Only about thirty percent of clinical trials directed toward solid tumors. And And we found that to be not only a challenge but a huge unmet market need. So. So When we think about refractory solid tumors were thinking patients that have Gone through standard of care their tumor becomes resistant to standard of care. And Once they're resistant to standard of care, the tumor may reoccur. So that's the. That's the indication in the tumor type that were addressing with our therapy.

Solid Tumors Cancer Prostate Cancer HOD DAN
Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

Living Healthy Podcast

09:05 min | 5 months ago

Dr. Richard A. Van Etten: Cancer

"Please welcome to the show Dr Rick van how you doing. Thank you very much Andrew and Brittany I greatly appreciate the opportunity to be able to come and talk to your talk your listeners today. Yeah. Well, thank you for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to us. So we're GONNA be talking about obviously cancer and how you can prevent cancer do your best to prevent it. But as I mentioned in the Intro, most likely someone knows someone who's had cancer or they've had cancer themselves even it's pretty it seems like it's touches a lot of people but can you kind of tell me how many people does cancer impact on a yearly basis? Well. Thank you for the question Andrew. The lifetime risk of getting cancer is approaching thirty eight or thirty, nine percent. So more than one in three Americans will get cancer during their lifetime. So that explains what you said that basically almost everybody is either been personally. Involved with cancer knows a close family member or a loved one that's been stricken by cancer. So some of the statistics nationwide in the United States, there's about one point seven million people diagnosed each year with cancer. And they'll be about unfortunately six hundred thousand Americans will die every year of cancer. Here in Orange County it's interesting that cancer has overtaken cart diseases, the number one killer, and as soon gonNA happen nationwide. So a very very. Prevalent disease what kind of has led to what's led to that trajectory? Why is that happening? Well, actually the the the death rate from cancer has been falling and it's been falling significantly over the past fifteen or twenty years, which is a success basically for the research that's gone into it through the National Cancer Institute and other mechanisms. But the fact that cancer is now the number one killer has actually also reflected progress in cardiovascular disease. So doing which used to be the number one killer. So we're doing a better job at preventing. Heart disease through the things that you know about treatment of the risk factors like high lipids, blood pressure, diabetes et CETERA. Right? Interesting. Okay. All right. So we got some work to do on the cancer and Kinda catch up. And, that generally, like I mentioned usually happens through education funding, which we'll talk about in a little bit What types of cancers are the most prevalent today? I know that you specialize are a believe in like blood cancers by what are the most prevalent that people run into so we can talk both about incidents, which is the new diagnosis that we have each year and prevalence, which is the number of people living with the disease at any given time. But the top four in both categories are pretty similar. So there's breast cancer which obviously predominantly affects women but also can affect men. Then there's lung cancer there's prostate cancer which obviously is a male cancer and the last one is colorectal cancer. Those are the big four. Close on their heels are diseases like skin cancer and melanoma that's particularly relevant for Orange County where we have two hundred and eight, hundred, ninety days per year rate. And after that come some blood cancers that I specialize in, which is mainly things like leukemia lymphoma and Myeloma Okay. What kind of leads to these types of cancers occurring out of those top four that you mentioned, what? What's the biggest contributor to people getting? Is it? Is it just genetics you got bad genes or something in your lifestyle or in your the world around you I guess causing it. So they're. Probably, equal contributions both from genetics and from lifestyle. Okay. When I say genetics I mean the cancer is principally in the opinion of a lot of primarily a genetic disease in the cancer cells have acquired mutations that contribute to their malignant or cancerous phenotype, their ability to grow and attack the body. Most of those mutations are acquired in other words they happened just within the cancer cell and they're not inherited. So you don't get them from your mother or your father. Now there are exceptions there are well defined cancer susceptibility syndromes the most the one that may be most familiar to your listeners is the bracket jeans Brca which segregating families particularly people, of Ashkenazi, Jewish descent that are inherited either from your mother or your father, and greatly increase your risk for developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer so that the risk for women who doesn't ever bracken gene mutation is about one about eleven percent or one in nine during your lifetime. If you inherit one of these genes, it's virtually almost everybody will get breast cancer ninety percent risk over your lifetime. So, this cancer susceptibility syndromes are very important the need. For instance when there's a new cancer diagnosis, you need to take a careful family history and in some cases be referred to a genetic counselor to determine whether testing family members is indicated. Yeah. Well, that's interesting that you bring that up because my wife actually we went through that process, and so she was found her mother had breast cancer and through that process they found out, she had the bracket gene Brac to and then and so my wife decided because they kind of give you choice like do you want to get screened? Do you not like you kind of have? Do you want to know more or or like not and stay naive to it I guess and so what I've discovered, we went through it and is interesting out of the split my wife got it and her sister didn't so the fifty, fifty there and. It. Seems like. It's I think my opinion is it's good to know because now they're just more aggressively screening her and is that typically the case when you find out about something like that, you're more your screened even more regularly than the average person should be. That's right. A change basically changes the surveillance. In it not to make it more complicated. But there are some genes like the broncos where the penetrates which means that the chance of actually getting breast cancer. If you have the have, the mutation is very high I think there it's pretty straightforward to decide whether to get screened. Right. There are other mutations that can be inherited that don't increase the risk that much increase it above the background, but it's not nearly as high and there it's more complicated to try to decide what to do about that. But. My advice to your listeners is to seek the advice of a NCI cancer center in a a qualified genetic counselor. Those are the people best qualified to help guide you through that decision making process right? Right. When you're going through like you said they ramp up the screening process if you had the genetic mutation but how does how did we get to discovering these genetic mutations I? It sounds like you kind of have somewhat of a background like you discovered or help discover this protein that was causing leukemia right and. How does that process even work? How do we make these discoveries? How do you make these? Discovery I was involved in is one of these acquired mutations not inherited, but it came about from studies done many many years ago actually nineteen sixty that showed that patients with this particular type of leukemia had an abnormal chromosome in their blood cells. And when to make a very long story short when that was tracked down, it was shown that the chromosome was actually an a Barrett. That was acquired in these cancer cells that lead to the expression of this abnormal protein. And that protein. Hasn't is an enzyme which means that it has a ability to catalyze chemical reactions. Okay and that particular reaction stimulated the growth of those blood cancer cells. So. That led a drug company, which is today is no artis to develop us a drug a small molecule inhibited the action of that protein. And that That drug which has the trade name GLIVEC revolutionized the treatment of that leukemia so that in the past everybody died of this leukemia, unless you had a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. Today everybody takes a drug likely. And most people go into remission and when they do, they have normal age adjusted life expectancy. That's example would that's Therapy likely that can do to cancer right? So does this all come from these discoveries? Does it come from just? Tons of data over decades like this one you're saying, it came from research started in the sixties and this didn't have until the early nineties. Is that right or wealth the the The structure of the protein was discovered. I'm saying Circa Nineteen, eighty-four which I got involved. The drug development efforts took place shortly thereafter I'm and the was FDA approved in two thousand one. So it's been on the market now for almost nineteen years I and there are many many other efforts in other cancers that are parallel parallel that. The thing that's happened today is because of our new technology and the genomics and the ability to determine, for instance, the genome sequence very quickly that's accelerated the progress that we can make. So what took forty years from sixty two to the drug being approved now can be done in a couple of years. Wow. Everything's happening much much faster. That's awesome. That's great news for those of US living right now.

Cancer Breast Cancer Lung Cancer National Cancer Institute Orange County Leukemia Andrew Dr Rick Van Heart Disease United States Broncos FDA Myeloma NCI Lymphoma
Johnson & Johnson to stop baby powder in U.S. and Canada

News and Information with Dave Williams and Amy Chodroff

00:42 sec | 10 months ago

Johnson & Johnson to stop baby powder in U.S. and Canada

"Deal Johnson's baby powder will no longer be available in the U. S. and Canada Scott Kerr explains why the company's ending sales of its talc based baby powder demand for Johnson and Johnson's baby powder has steeply fallen off in recent months the New Jersey based company faces more than nineteen thousand civil cases alleging its talcum powder caused users to develop ovarian cancer or mesothelioma an incurable deadly cancer that strikes the lungs and other organs the company blames the declining demand that what it calls misinformation around the safety of the product and a constant barrage of litigation advertising officials with the world still biggest maker of health care products says the talc based powder will still be sold outside of the U. S. and

Johnson New Jersey Scott Kerr
J&J to stop selling talc-based baby powder in US, Canada

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 10 months ago

J&J to stop selling talc-based baby powder in US, Canada

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the world's biggest maker of health care products is ending sales of its talc based baby powder in the U. S. and Canada Johnson and Johnson will no longer sell its iconic talc based the Johnson's baby powder in the US and Canada demand for the product in both countries has fallen sharply amid thousands of lawsuits claiming the talc based powder caused ovarian cancer through use for feminine hygiene or mesothelioma a cancer that strikes the logs and other organs in a statement Johnson and Johnson said demand for the talc based powder declined in North America due in large part to changes in consumer habits and fueled by misinformation about the safety of the product the company maintains the overwhelming majority of medical research indicates talc baby powder is safe and doesn't cause cancer hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi United States Canada North America Mike Rossio Canada Johnson
J&J to stop selling talc-based baby powder in US, Canada

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 10 months ago

J&J to stop selling talc-based baby powder in US, Canada

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting the world's biggest maker of health care products is ending sales of its talc based baby powder in the U. S. and Canada Johnson and Johnson will no longer sell its iconic talc based the Johnson's baby powder in the US and Canada demand for the product in both countries has fallen sharply amid thousands of lawsuits claiming the talc based powder caused ovarian cancer through use for feminine hygiene or mesothelioma a cancer that strikes the logs and other organs in a statement Johnson and Johnson said demand for the talc based powder declined in North America due in large part to changes in consumer habits and fueled by misinformation about the safety of the product the company maintains the overwhelming majority of medical research indicates talc baby powder is safe and doesn't cause cancer hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi United States Canada North America Mike Rossio Canada Johnson
J&J to stop selling talc-based baby powder in US, Canada

AP News Radio

00:38 sec | 10 months ago

J&J to stop selling talc-based baby powder in US, Canada

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting Johnson and Johnson will no longer sell its talc based baby powder in the U. S. and Canada Johnson and Johnson has announced it is ending sales of its talc based baby powder in the United States and Canada the decision comes under the weight of over nineteen thousand lawsuits filed against J. and J. alleging its talcum powder caused users to develop ovarian cancer or mesothelioma a cancer that strikes the lungs and other organs of the cases that have been tried J. and J. has won twelve and lost fifteen there have been seven miss trials Johnson and Johnson says it will continue to sell its talc based powder outside the US and Canada I might cross the

Mike Rossi United States Canada J. Canada Johnson
Lung Cancer Screen Could Be Easy-pee-sy

60-Second Science

03:16 min | 11 months ago

Lung Cancer Screen Could Be Easy-pee-sy

"This is scientific. Americans sixty seconds science. I'm wait gibbs. All imagine getting screened for early stage lung cancer simply by taking a deep breath from an inhaler and then peeing into a cup. Sangita Baccio a professor of Health Sciences and engineering at MIT described. How that might be possible in Ted Talk? She gave in two thousand sixteen. What if you had a detector that was so small that it could circulate in your body? Find the tumor all by itself and send a signal to the outside world. It sounds a little bit like science fiction but actually nanotechnology allows us to do. Just that his idea was to invent nontoxic nanno probes. That doctors could put inside your blood or lungs or guts to detect a tiny tumors. When they're easier to treat before they grow big enough to spread throughout the body and damaged vital organs. I dream that one day instead of going into an expensive screening facility to get a colonoscopy or a mammogram or a PAP smear that you could get a shot. Wait an hour and do a urine test on a paper strip in two thousand seventeen bought. His team reported a proof of concept experiment in nature. Biomedical Engineering that demonstrated Nanna probes like this working to detect early stage ovarian cancer in mice and now the group has refined this technology further to create a screening test for lung cancer. That is more sensitive than the C. T. Scans used today. The team of Harvard and MIT researchers described their work in the April first issue of science translational medicine lung cancer accounts for nearly a quarter of all cancer deaths in the US each year in large part because most cases of lung cancer are not caught until after the disease has already spread to other sites yet win lung. Cancer is caught and treated early the majority of patients survived the disease for at least five years but ct screening for lung. Cancer is not widely used around the world. Because it's expensive. And more than ninety percent of positive tests turn out to be benign growths not cancer. So this kind of screening leads to a lot of unnecessary and invasive biopsies in. Battista study which was done on mice genetically engineered to develop lung tumors very similar to those seen. In people the Nanna probes were able to detect tumors about fifty times smaller than other screening methods and it produced. No false positives. The NETA probes are designed to release reporter molecules when they come near certain kinds of lung tumors. Once released the reporters pass into the blood get filtered by the kidneys and then exit the body in the urine. The group is now working to repackage the nano probes into a form that could be inhaled as a powder or through a nebulizer if that succeeds then the technology will have to proceed through several years of clinical trials before it could be used to screen people for lung cancer. And I hope that what this means is that one day we can detect tumors in patients. Sooner than ten years after they've started growing and that this would lead to earlier treatments and that we could save more lives than we can today with early detection.

Lung Cancer Sangita Baccio MIT Nanna Biomedical Engineering TED Reporter Professor Of Health Sciences United States Battista Harvard
JAMA Study Finds No Significant Link Between Talc Powder, Ovarian Cancer

AP 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

JAMA Study Finds No Significant Link Between Talc Powder, Ovarian Cancer

"The latest now on cancer and baby powder U. S. government led research has found no strong evidence linking baby powder with ovarian cancer in the largest and Alice this to look at the question health concerns about talcum powders have prompted thousands of lawsuits right women who claim as best as in the powder because their cancer the U. S. lawsuits have targeted leading baby powder maker Johnson and Johnson although several juries have reached multi million dollar verdicts against the company they have been overturned or are being appealed Johnson and Johnson says its power is routinely tested to ensure that there's no it's best service the findings were called reassuring in an editorial published with the study in the journal of the American medical association I'm sure

Cancer Alice Johnson Journal Of The American Medica
High-risk men should get prostate cancer checks

BBC World Service

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

High-risk men should get prostate cancer checks

"Cancer experts in the U. K. say men with a high risk of prostate cancer should have extra checks every year from the age of forty scientists believe regular tests can help diagnose cancer what it is yet to treat health correspondent James Gattaca has this mutations in part about DNA called brackets you can increase the risk of prostate cancer in men and women it increases the risk of breast and ovarian cancer the team at the institute of cancer research said around one in three hundred people have such mutations however men are likely to have been tested only if there is a family history of such cancer the scientist told a conference in Glasgow the man with brackets you mutations will more likely to have aggressive cancers and to get them at a younger age they argue regular blood tests from age forty could help support team is Ellie while they are still easier to

James Gattaca Scientist Glasgow Younger Age Ellie
Exclusive: J And J's own expert, working for FDA, found asbestos in Baby Powder

Mark Levin

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Exclusive: J And J's own expert, working for FDA, found asbestos in Baby Powder

"They say it's save Johnson and Johnson says fifteen new tests from the same bottle of baby powder tested by the food and drug administration found no asbestos earlier this month the company recalled about thirty three thousand bottles of baby powder in the U. S. after health regulators found trace amounts of asbestos in samples bought online the FDA says it stands by the result of its cast Johnson and Johnson is facing several lawsuits from women who claim the baby powder because ovarian cancer and

Johnson FDA
BRCA gene mutation assessments too low for women, experts say

America's Morning News

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

BRCA gene mutation assessments too low for women, experts say

"While breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women Brock for breast cancer mutations are pretty rare according to the United States preventive services task force brought the one and brought it to me cations only occur in an estimated one in three hundred five hundred women and account for just five to ten percent of breast cancer cases and fifteen percent of ovarian cancer cases the U. S. P. S. T. F.

Brock United States S. P. S. T. F Fifteen Percent Ten Percent
Missouri appeals court overturns $110 million Johnson & Johnson talc verdict

America's Morning News

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Missouri appeals court overturns $110 million Johnson & Johnson talc verdict

"Missouri appeals court has overturned a one hundred and ten million dollar verdict in a case alleging Johnson and Johnson products containing talcum talcum powder because the Virginia women's ovarian cancer the appeals court ruling at Tuesday reversed a twenty seventeen judgment on behalf of Lois slant as she is among many whose lawsuits claim Johnson Johnson's talcum powder contributed to their cancer the appeals court ruling said the Saint Louis court where the case was heard lacked jurisdiction noting top products used by slump were made in Georgia and purchased and used in

Missouri Johnson Johnson Saint Louis Court Georgia Virginia Lois Ten Million Dollar
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:31 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on KTOK

"Females with ovarian cancer breaking news a plaintiff who used a talcum based powder and died from ovarian cancer has been awarded compensation over claims that the manufacturer new decades ago that it's Telkom based power could cause cancer and failed to warn consumers if you or a loved one has been diagnosed or died from ovarian cancer and used talc or Telkom based powders you may be entitled to substantial financial compensation medical studies have linked the long term use of Telkom based powder to ovarian cancer millions of women have been unknowingly exposed to these toxic substances if you or a loved one is used to help or talcum based powders and have been diagnosed with ovarian cancer or died you may be entitled to substantial financial compensation act now time is limited to file a claim for a free consultation and free information call eight hundred two six four seventy twenty six that's eight hundred two six four seventy twenty six again that's eight hundred two six four seventy twenty six this is an advertisement paid not attorney spokesperson injury help desk dot com is responsible for this advertisement principal office Los Vegas Nevada attention all business owners who rent or lease space including storage space stop wasting your money paying someone else for your space you can now see a ton of money and own your own building with the incredible sale prices from general steel that's right start saving money every month on renting space for mothers just call eight seven seven ninety two steel to see how general steel can help you save money our fifty year structural warranty buildings are custom designed for your needs and save you a ton of money call eight seven seven ninety two steel taken from a successful entrepreneur if you need to expand or start a new business unit general steel great team in the competitive pricing is the reason I went with general steel call eight seven seven ninety two steel now and you can get any of our popular quick construction structures including a forty by sixty foot building or a fifty by one hundred clear spend building fast and easy call eight seven seven ninety two steel. eight seven seven nine two seven eight three three five eight seven seven ninety two steel what I learned on my tour of the Pentagon this afternoon at five Lee Mathews and the drive newsradio one thousand Katie okay. hello. Seoul. on loan from god. simply safe home security system here.

Telkom cancer Los Vegas Lee Mathews Pentagon principal Seoul. Katie attorney fifty year sixty foot
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on I Don't Get It

I Don't Get It

08:22 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on I Don't Get It

"I really i put him to the test with the insignificant health part of the bows and i feel like he's shown me that he's gonna stick by me and take care of me um i won't go into the gory details of some of the things he did for me astor surgery but some of the nastiest grosses tasks he helped me with that was i knew then i had a partner for life could depend on we've had to really focus focus on our relationship and try to figure out housings are going to be different going forward we were really focused on having a family now that we can't have a family is okay what do we do next so we focused on traveling and we travel we it's all about seeing the world that's incredible carried you through the chemo treatments we were speaking sharon about her sort of bald is beautiful mantra do you have do you currently have all your hair or have you we lost a lot of your hair so the chemotherapy that i started taking a earlier this year did make me lose my hair however i became allergic to the drug that caused me to leave my hair so they switched me to a new medication and semi hers rang back in uh what we're sorry it's really thin but it's kinda spiky and fun book you're looking at the paris i fun you are a person you are spokesperson for the american cancer society tells what you do for them i visit different aren't events arounds theoretically any location but in reality southern california to talk to people about the importance of raising zing money for the american cancer society i myself was fishery of several different programs that they offer i'm not only was able to get chemotherapy education classes which really helped me my husband understand what i was going to go through and what it was gonna be like in how to prepare ourselves hopes for it but i was also able to stay at hope lodge so when i i look like a ronald mcdonald house is very very similar there are places for cancer patients and their caregivers to stay when the most effective treatment is a place that's far away from their house when i first got diagnosed i couldn't get into any local doctors in southern california a for at least two and a half weeks scene and a half centimeter tumor didn't wait wait wait the world that doesn't make any any patients that weren't like wait i'm was mind boggled explained yes so i called i said i had this scan showed in eighteen and a half centimeter tumor i really wanna get into see name the doctor her and the earliest appointment i could get was two and a half weeks out in southern california i tried UCLA city of hope cedars sinai UC irvine and i just couldn't get in so the day after my scan about four hours it's after i started making phone calls in this local area i said too bad about this i'm getting in the car and we drove to the mayo clinic in arizona so is this a common thing for people who have to do i don't know i i don't know that it is i think i'm saying i'm in a unique situation where my insurance allows me to go anywhere i have family history my sister has some hurt issues and have been seen by doctors at the mayo clinic in phoenix so i knew a new is a good place to go i knew doctors were readily accessible i was able to get an appointment there four days later i drove there the day after my skin and by the time i got there i was already already in pain before i left my house but when i got there the paint was worse so i went to the ER at the mayo clinic and they said you can't wait till friday you'll be seen tomorrow morning wa seven days after i had my skin had my surgery to remove i call all the component parts of my abdominal so i i was very aggressive some people wait i chose not to for me it literally saved my life my oncologist surgeon said at the rate the tumor had grown between the time of the scan and the time of the surgery seven days later if she forecasted that grows out she and a half weeks it would pressed up against my cardiac comedy and i would have been dead no oh my play it shared you also share your tumor grew the size of a grapefruit yeah i i also in a really fast amount of time it had a normal gynecological them there's just like we were talking there's no test but the manual exam like he felt my ovaries and there was nothing there well august to end of october so yeah two or three months later i have a grapefruit size tumor for like i wonder why i buy a logically happens that makes it grow so fast i'm not you know what my gynecologist also in the oncologist said because there's no way to know when it started we don't have had it for ten years and it was just super slow until something who knows what triggered it to get extra initially at bag more aggressively yeah still i don't know about your situation kerry but carry my dad is a doctor and he makes me pay extreme amount of money each month for my insurance so that i can go anywhere in the country to get treatment wherever the best treatment is and you just made me thankful that i spend that not much i'm very grateful that i worked for a company that has such good medical yeah that's really lucky i have no medical it it brings up the issue of how how messed up the health care which has nothing to do what we can do on health care and the next uh-huh bonds are that we wanted to talk about the sponsor it's been very loyal to our podcast i've been very loyal to them had a photo shoot with them yesterday it is fun the box that i did a little promo for yesterday you guys are going to be mind boggled by it but right now the fall box is still get the fox there's have you worn garfield i just i'm obsessed with this and it came with a travel yoga mat can't i can't even tell you see how class pass so i never have to rent yoga mats now because i have my own and it's easily transportable so q. and then there was that franc- i'm sticks that i got it came with an eyebrow pencil eyeliner into creamy is shadow sticks there's there's super amazing there's something new in the fabric from box that you will discover each season and you'll realize it's a product that you're going to want to incorporate in your rudy routine your fitness routine lifestyle anything like that and it would basically like forever you know it's like you find products that you're gonna continue to buy right and what i love about it is that it's it's not like you know the cheap little funds sizes it's like actual regular size items and it's just a great way like ashley was saying to try out new stuff because who is the money to like walk into a beauty store and buy everything this is such a fun way to get a box sent to your house with a bunch of amazing goodies in it like i i can't even tell you guys i use almost everything box he's not like oh there's one or two things that are good and the rest are gift i keep everything and i'm i'm sorry not having to buy like storage just because they don't want to be on your closet yeah i was going to say that items are customizable so you can go on their website and pick out like the ones you want from each category pretty cool and like that says they're not sample sizes and the box that in because of that the box usually is war it's always worth over two.

seven days three months four hours four days ten years
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on I Don't Get It

I Don't Get It

02:45 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on I Don't Get It

"I choose in that dead weight so you've been acting for a while i got the book that the the first year i started bald is beautiful that was my fi- you as my second one i was in the city the city but at different episode i because i episode when we're not about us justice but they they wanted real cancer patients in the scene so after i'd done my first sex in the city appearance it was a featured thing little moment but i had i told the showrunner i have an idea for a story and i would love to share it with you and he said stay in touch which i can't take your story idea we don't do that but you know we're going to we're going to address the issue of cancer i can't say how or why just staying touch and we did it and then they called me to cast the scene and i brought those women you know who all were survivors some of them had alopicia also they deal with a similar issue issue even though it's not life and death circumstances but and so our pictures just the loss of hair lot it's an autoimmune disease and they it deals with quickly dividing cells which coach that's why you lose the hair because hair is fast dividing cells in the body that's why they're here goes to do people developed also come to bald is beautiful it's not just for cancer survivors do they also like attend bald is beautiful events we don't have oh beautiful prom i'm sorry tended which is okay okay yeah i haven't had though that's okay i literally was just going to say i want to come into the next john john things chemo buddy i've gone with someone who like who's going to you know who's going to lose our hair and shave their heads you know make fun event like my haircut and head-shaving brady's is that i had for myself i wonder we could do support group like that they yeah you could or they you know they keep nobody thing was something like ah you know it's just you go with someone while they're going through treatment if they don't have someone to either get them there or stay with them but yeah it's so it's a a huge opportunity just to to to to be part of the community and not feel alone even though it's a very solo experience yeah but walking around without hair you meet a lot of people wanna talk which is great you know we'll get to talk about it yeah it's basically in now in in my job description to have white teeth but i think it's kind of like just something that everyone strives to have because whether it's a job interview or dating profile your smile can help make.

cancer autoimmune disease brady john john
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on I Don't Get It

I Don't Get It

06:25 min | 1 year ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on I Don't Get It

"Language he used like watch what i was really concerned about you know well what does it mean to you know can you not take out my ovaries without you know and he said this exact phrase used which i always he said i will do my best to honor your feelings while i'm in there but i don't know until i get in there i won't be able to see what's going on but i'll do my best to honor your feelings while i'm in there there that is the most comforting thing to hear going into surgery because i want to know everything so i'm asking them all kinds of detailed questions i wanted to see pictures he he would not he did not show me pictures tumors until i was officially more in remission after the third recruit i wanna take mine home john let me do it well when when i saw the pictures i understood why because it probably would i probably would have freaked out and had even other kinds of different nightmares but but he he knew i was the person i want to know everything and like because my thing was well i'm going to be knocked out on a table spread open and you're going to be getting me like fish so i wanna i wanna do visual exercise i i want to be able to do things to visualize what you're doing and support you energetically in some way while i'm knocked out so he would describe what's going to happen but then some questions you'd be like we're not going to discuss that right now and then my concern about you know well i don't want you to just go in there and take stuff out and he said then that's when he said that beautiful thing hang of like okay i feel so safe right now and it was so beautiful and he's so he did he took out just the right ovary and the tumor and parts of my leftover add little implants najah throughout the abdominal cavity at lost my own mental which is this sheath that separates it those organs from the rest of the abdominal organs so so implants lanson nachos had to be taken off but i didn't lose parts of my other like bladder or anything like that but they were there are no jobs and stuff on those organs but he just did that and then we did chemo oh and also i had a rare form and he wasn't sure of chemo would work so we did a consensus of what should we do if it comes out again i i don't know anything anything about this yeah so it's not completely out you have to go through chemo for well because because they don't know and i was staged three c. so late stage he's got it because they're not sure on a cellular level what's left in there they can take out where they can physically see when he's doing surgery you know but there's stuff possibly on a cellular level and based on the timeline of what i was i had a normal gynecological exam in august and in october i had this grapefruit size tumor so it seemed like an aggressive form yeah so they felt like you're young enough you're strong better safe than sorry let's go aggressive and do chemo mhm it came back during chemo after my fourth treatment so obviously the chemo wasn't working so then we went back to surgery again and i said can you just take out part of the left ovary every in that the whole thing so i'm not mad about twenty eight question mark and he said yes but again i don't know until i go back and look at things but and but again i will do the very best i can to whatever and then he took part of my left over so i was in remission for a year and then i had to do my test every month i was doing UCA one twenty five and a cat scan and then when he came back and get like my see twenty-five went up again so it was back and then here's another beautiful moment where you don't hear doctors actors do this sort of thing but by that next recurrence he said look i you know we've been together for two years now and i'm i'm i'm putting your feelings ahead of my medical opinion about what to do yeah so i want you to read it man is this man his name is dr james a lean i mean he's just florida florida that's so good to know for me was at baptist hospital which is where i was born and mercy hospital so it was crazy i had a surgery where i was born i'm a twin so me and my twin sister are in this hospital where we were born and i'm having this life savings origin kinda there was so much cosmetic stuff around with my old the attorney to the cosmic crazy because i had the stomach problems and i was in florida visiting my parents for a week and that turned into this three year thing but i had another stomach thing the night night before supposed to go back to new york and see all my doctors to figure out what was going on and it was sort of like the universe is like you're staying in florida in your family i saw some like family family but also a friend of the family had just finished five years of herbs and acupuncture study chinese herbs and acupuncture straight so he hell yeah oh yeah he introduced me to his teacher so she did all she oversaw my herbs meyer chinese herbs and she did certain acupuncture treatments and he gave me free acupuncture everyday during chemo which i would not have any ford and i was able to sleep during some of those guys slept two hours a day basically during chemo okay guys so we wanna tell you about one of our sponsors that are just our favorite favorite i really love this sponsor because they are sustainable giving back to the earth but also super fashionable which are two things that i really hope deeply and my heart so these these are these throughout the year that energize interrupt so if you haven't heard of these companies basically making stylish shoes for women and girls out out of recycled plastic water bottles and get this they are insanely comfortable and machine washable rossi's is one of those sponsors that i just talk up yep and i think it works because you keep calling us back to do more atoms podcast but that's because i love them and i think the energy that i played out there our guys pick up on it and then you buy them and you're like oh crap these are truly the most stylish most comfortable flats you can wear their the flats that like your friends want to steal out of your closet they don't cut your foot and that's what makes them super unique to me because i go bowl no no blisters like no other flat have ever found doesn't give me blisters and they also come in new styles and colors and prints every like every so often so you have to keep checking back and you're gonna find more and more and you're going to have a whole full frigging closet of rossi's right because they're just everyday flats on the go and let's be real guys falls coming up you know i can't be wearing flip flops all of the time now they go with almost all my outfits it'll blow your mind.

five years three year two hours two years
A new story from The Troubleshooter

The Troubleshooter

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

A new story from The Troubleshooter

"New health guidelines say more women could benefit from gene testing focused on breast and ovarian cancer the U. S. preventive services task force says that women who have survived breast cancer related to a gene mutation and women who have a family history of a specific gene mutation should be

ImmunoGen drug fails cancer study, shares slide 40 percent

WBZ Midday News

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

ImmunoGen drug fails cancer study, shares slide 40 percent

"Right now, the price hit a new fifty two week low losing about half its value after the company reported that its ovarian cancer treatment failed in a late stage trial, a mutagens says the drug had a higher initial response rate, but did not lead to a longer survival rate without the disease spreading right now. Shares of immunogen are down about forty six percent and

Forty Six Percent Fifty Two Week
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"And from Wes a trans man to woman will never have ovarian cancer. A trans woman. Demand will never have testicular cancer sums it up. Based on the kind of cancer. You can get that tells you what gender you are. Done deal. Okay done. It's like it's like cliff notes version of being able to tell. Oh, I want to get to this. Bill de Blasios thing. This guy is on believable. He's the mayor of America's largest city. And yet I mean he's been in the past. He was a an avowed communist. He actually supported a America's enemy in the eighties. The Sandinistas in the. Allah. And now he has deciding who needs wealth, and who doesn't who rightly has it. And who doesn't here's what he had to say about this is in his sixth state of the city speech. So there's plenty of wealth just in the wrong hands. That's all fifties. There's plenty of money in the world. There's plenty of money in this city. It's just in the wrong hands. You deserve a city that gives you the share of prosperity that you have earned. Wow. Wow. Is dangerous stuff. That's. Communist rhetoric is all. There's plenty of wealth. It's just in the wrong hands into government hands. Correct, sir by who's estimating who who are you to decide who should have wealth, and who shouldn't it's in the wrong hands. What what hands is it in the of the people who earned it? Talk about. Then he talked about what else they deserve here. It is we deserve to be there for our families. The people we love we deserve to be able to take care of ourselves. We all deserve a little more happiness don't week. I don't know. I don't know comrade. But. Thank you comrade to blah's. Oh..

ovarian cancer testicular cancer America Bill de Blasios Wes blah
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Keep your breast or Luger breast or keep your pancreas or lose your pancreas or get endless chemo. You get to decide and these are all decisions that we talk about. We talk about things to each patient. Just this week. I had a woman came in with ovarian cancer was one of the super duper. Biggest hospitals about seventy years old born in Hungary here with her husband loving family. Loving daughter. She has ovarian cancer and chemotherapy it obviously didn't work and the cancer spread tour Dewa them, which is a part of the intestine by the stomach and it's blocking her stomach. It's blocking your stomach. They put a stent in the Dewa NATO, lower teats. I'm another one cut out her Duarte radical surgery without staging her up without seeing where the cancer is is that makes sense to radical surgery difficult surgery that may take weeks or months to convalesce without seeing where the patient cancer is. And she came to me I met with her and her husband and her daughter about this ovarian cancer recurrent to the Duar. And I said, well, if it was me, I would stage you up I would find out exactly where the cancer is before I do any treatment. And while I'm talking to her and like every patient. I sit down and talk to patients about their whole body. And she's telling me for months, she's had headaches had had. Experts. Here's at that other super duper big place. But no one asked her and they did do anything about it. So here we staged her up within a day, we staged her up. She got scans of her head scans over body. And we found that the cancer had traveled to her grade. They can imagine if she stated that big hospital they cut on her stomach could take weeks or months to convalesce. Maybe should have never got better. Meanwhile, someone someone some day maybe that today or maybe tomorrow that super duper hospital would find out that she's having damage to her brain from the brain metastases and get a scan. And then while she's tried to recuperate from the stomach surgery, treat, the brain. Well, we do things differently here we like to establish what the patient has I answer all the questions first. And then make a plan that satisfies the patient and their family their loved ones, and that makes a medical sense, and we do so much consultation. Second opinions like this woman, probably saved her such a headache and such chaos by allowing her to avoid that radical unnecessary useless surgery on her stomach useless. And no one at that big hospital talk to about radio surgery for the them. To try to avoid that surgery. No one talked about that. No one talk to her about her headaches. No, one talk to her about her brain no-one got a brain scan. And when the daughter asked the doctor about a pet scan. They said, oh, we don't do that here at the super duper super famous hospital. Why I believe because they don't really want to know where the cancer is. I just want to do another surgery and more chemo more surgery another chemo, which just at a certain point. Does it make sense anymore? So for this woman who so grateful, I said, well, if you want another opinion and go back to where you came should I never want to go there ever again. She never wants to go to that super duper super famous place ever again because how they treated her how they pushed her to have the surgery how they didn't do the pet scan. How they didn't listen to her butter headaches. Wow. What a difference. It makes where you get your cancer care. So who do we see here at thirty four? Broadway. My name is Dr leader, we see patients with cancer newly diagnosed cancer. We see patients with recurrent catcher. Like this woman, who's ovarian cancer, months and months of fancy dancy chemotherapy didn't solve the problem. The cancer grew back not only in the abdomen around the doi-. But in the brain it's spread right to the brain. And to the spy so it makes such a huge difference. Where you get your care. What the motivation of the doctor is here. Doctors don't pay kickbacks from the drug companies don't sit on the boards of drug companies, don't get kickbacks from the pharmaceutical industry. These pharmaceutical companies are spending tens of billions of dollars giving money to these big hospitals. And what did you think they expect an exchange? You think they're giving it for.

cancer ovarian cancer chemo Hungary Dewa NATO Duar Duarte seventy years
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"I knew when ovarian cancer recurs, it's often incurable. It was terrifying. Waiting for the other shoe to drop until recently following chemotherapy women with recurrent, ovarian cancer had to simply watch and wait for their disease to come back. Well, we say not on. On my watch. Not on my watch. Not on my watch now with maintenance therapies women can extend their time in response and delay, recurrence, knowledge and awareness of your choices empowers you and gives you a greater sense of control. Let's call for a change in ovarian cancer care. The not on my watch movement. Empowers women facing recurrent, ovarian cancer to take an informed an active role in managing their disease. Visit not on my watch dot com. To learn more. Welcome to the orphan diaries. Here's the founder of food for orphans. Gary Van Dyke Kim doesn't know how old is he guesses at around seven. His whole life has been centered on finding food you see he lives at a dump and he's never been anywhere else. You can find Kim walking into decaying landfilled of riding garbage plastic bags and shards of broken glass. His parents are long gone Ken is one of about one hundred children living in the dump some live with their parents, others are orphaned, abandoned, alone. They walk around the dump hoping to find a bit of food to get them through the day. They'll eat whatever food they can find for them. There's no such thing as food too rotten to eat can also collects bottles and plastic for three cents a sack, and it takes nearly all day for the seven year old to earn three cents his bare feet or filthy and ribbon with cuts choosy fines are usually on wearable too, many kin and children liking more invisible. But they're not are they for more information. Visit.

Gary Van Dyke Kim Ken founder seven year
How one comedian made 'Saturday Night Live' a cultural phenomenon

Business Beware

00:40 sec | 2 years ago

How one comedian made 'Saturday Night Live' a cultural phenomenon

"CNN has announced it will air a bittersweet nostalgic tribute to Gilda Radner on New Year's day. Here's more on this story from USA's. Rick Vincent, Gilda Radner was an original member of NBC's, Saturday Night, Live and her comedy inspired many. Who came after love guilty is a documentary directed by Lisa deep Alito to be aired on CNN on New Year's day here. She highlights the struggles reading your face struggling with eating disorders. If there was always a sense of humor. You always wonder if people are funny in real life, and from what everyone told me, it was really funny and in her journals and her audio recordings. She was really a unique and different person. She died from ovarian cancer in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine

Gilda Radner Alito CNN Rick Vincent USA Lisa NBC
Johnson & Johnson: Our baby powder is safe

News, Traffic and Weather

00:54 sec | 2 years ago

Johnson & Johnson: Our baby powder is safe

"J J is reacting J and J blast. The report is one-sided false and inflammatory insisting it's baby powder is safe and his best is free. Juries have return mixed verdicts against the company and ovarian cancer cases. More than twelve thousand lawsuits are pending health update. Sara Lee Kessler NBC news RA. Radio. A dictionaries out with its word of the year. ABC's Dave Schreiber reports. Miriam Webster says Justice is it's twenty eighteen word of the year Webster's editor at large says Justice portion of the top twenty or thirty look ups on the company's website the designation for Justice came soon. After Michael Cohen was sentenced to three years in prison for crimes that included arranging for the payment of hush money to conceal his bosses, alleged sexual affairs.

Miriam Webster Justice Sara Lee Kessler Dave Schreiber Michael Cohen NBC J J ABC Editor Three Years
New study links processed meats to breast cancer

Dr. Bob Martin

03:08 min | 2 years ago

New study links processed meats to breast cancer

"Show a link between tumors cancerous tumors that start in the breast associated with women. More commonly those women who eat hot dogs and burgers on a regular basis. Women who consumed the most processed meat were nine times nine percent. I should say more likely to develop the disease, breast cancer. According to a meta analysis and data of twenty eight previous studies world cancer research fund recommends cutting out red meat altogether. Here in the US, the so-called experts don't recommend a specific limit. Of course, they don't because why. Well, the cattle industry rains here. They have made many. Lobbyists that can can really rain in any kind of education on this process. And it's not that red meat necessarily is unhealthy for you in eating once in a while. I don't eat red meat haven't had red meat in forty years. I grew up on it in the mid west. But we're talking here about processed meats, mostly vacant hotdogs. Now listed as carcinogenic by the international agency of research on cancer, a branch of the World Health Organization. The same agency also says red meat is a probable carcinogenic agent. Now, of course, you know, Marta. The problem is how we adulterate meets we feed these animals, the wrong stuff antibiotics and hormones and bovine growth hormones and recombinant hormones, and they get all kinds of stuff in their bodies that are passed on to those people who bury their carcasses in their bodies the amount of processed meat in the American diet has dropped in recent years, but millions of people still easily exceed the proposed limit which they don't even list. The new research by Harvard University offers another reason for women to keep cutting out hot dogs and hamburgers and red meat in general, mainly because it increases their risk of. Of breast cancer by nine percent. And they believe that is significant and we're not just talking about hot dogs and hamburgers. We're talking about salami bacon ham, corned beef put that on the list. So the goal here would be to consume more omega rich fish, and maybe some organic poultry and stay away from the red meat. And a specially the processed red meat's. That's for sure. All right. We're going to go back to your telephone calls and your questions now. And we'll say Hello to as always. Thank you question up. Read something in a paper a correlation between taking ibuprofen Advil stuff like that and ovarian cancer at women. No, I don't know. There's a truth to that. But if it does have a correlation what about men, well, it's long term use when you're talking about.

Breast Cancer United States Harvard University World Health Organization Ibuprofen Advil Nine Percent Forty Years
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

03:19 min | 2 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"I think it's fun time to walk around the garden center, bringing unbrella there's my math teacher from Xi. Tar. I was so stupid under the table. I took geometry slow. I did MRs all hand. God bless her. God bless her. I can't believe she even come. You know, why it comes in the store? She knows how bad I am at math feels sorry. No. She thinks that she's going to get something for free. Gotta he trained those cashiers. I should be able to get out with three dollar moms two three nine ninety three ninety three. Speaking of mums. It's George paper from b window. Hey, George good morning. Are you doing well doing, well, I cannot believe is September ovarian cancer awareness month? Timber is ovarian cancer awareness. Martin george. Yeah. I feel like we've just we just did this. And I know this means so much to your family. Tell us a little bit about. Pm's her story and stuff. I think it's pretty powerful. Well, fortunately diagnosed. Ninety four early stage with ovarian and fortunately with through treatments, and she's been. Unfortunately, a lot of times ovarian is diagnosed at a later stage, and it's it's a much tougher disease. Early detection as important. And so what we try to do is we try to raise awareness in September by one percent of all of our sales to overcoming together. Which is the group. Pam to other women started here in Indianapolis and has turned into a national group. And then what we also do. We put signs out with our previous customers, and and people going out to sea on project could narrow berry cancer signs that try to raise awareness, and you know, we always call our color employers. If we stay warm woman's life of this after it's worked at and so it's a big big month for us and we run special promotions. Like, we'd have a by six get three free promotion going with twelve months same as cash and. And to be able to support that. And so it's a big month and be window are helping support ovarian cancer, and George there's an event that goes along with this. Is there a walk or tell me I kind of forget what it is run downtown. And I'm going to have to date right here. It's coming up and that. Overcoming. Erica gathered group does. Great event, and it raises a lot of money for supporter of ovarian cancer detection. Well, good for you. I mean, I know that early detection is the key there and the the education that they do, and they wariness, and I guess I'm just amazed at how quickly the years go by because I feel like we just had that in here. It is right back to it again in September. Yeah. It's it's that time of year. You know, starting to get a little starting to get cool, and you know. Before long. We'll be November December beer you. Snow flurries. Wandering around and.

Martin george ovarian cancer Indianapolis Pam Erica twelve months three dollar one percent
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Ten that's med that, Chicago this is the Dale pet world and WGN. Wreck Pearson will be here after seven. O'clock he will be talking about a whole lot of things regarding. Politics his guests include Tom, color ten state, Senator of course very well known in this state for all that goes on in the state all the, time and we'll talk to Pat Brady About the legend of John, McCain and much more than that Are doing so much you talked. About in mentioned an outing I think that's where we begin when is that outing that in fact soon will be act coming into. Town, and you're helping. Raise money for everything, we're talking about well it's next Sunday. It's a September ninth LeRoy oaks forest preserve in Saint Charles we have Walkers we have sixty dogs. We start registration so dog walk. Okay it's actually our nights Donald guac and it's a great community affair with veterinarians bet tax doctors nurses volunteers they all come up. With, their dogs early. On t shirts so, the -til because that's the ovarian cancer. Color know The? The great thing about this is for it brings the veterinary community together with the human medical, community with just, folks and some are survivors of ovarian cancer and some are people, because sadly there isn't a person I don't think who hasn't lost a relative of. Some, kind of, cancer. Right so, it just brings everyone together and all you're asking people to do is. Take a walk take a walk and if you have, a dog dog and it's one. Of our it's our biggest awareness event because, we have a opening ceremony, and our co-chairs Dr Kristen, John Kasich Dr Alexis Newman and they're. On our board, and Dr Newman's there. With her pet. Ambulance Kris Jenkins. Is. A veterinary oncologist at right animal, hospital and it's just a great opportunity we, have King County, sheriff, with, canine Erin the bloodhound and Kane county and and other dog, handlers and we'll have a couple of rescues there will Have a sound beginning program that supports so that sort of a basic training program for shelter for shelter dogs yeah that's Julie's, right yeah and she amazing yes, and everybody just comes. Together because they believe in it's just a heart warming event yeah it. Is? And that event again is the accent five k. dog walk September ninth registration eight thirty you, can go to, our website click on the events page still time to sign up, we have opening ceremonies dargwa come back for lunch lunch lunch I really wish I. Couldn't, FOX trot, organic. Farm is, one of our partners and they supply some wonderful vegetables and fruits for. Our lunch so it's a great sort of one Health, Day instead run as well it. Could be if you want to do it, next year and everyone bets, to see if I finish, on the same day.

ovarian cancer Wreck Pearson Dr Alexis Newman John Kasich WGN LeRoy oaks forest Chicago Kris Jenkins Donald guac Dr Kristen FOX Pat Brady Senator Julie Tom Saint Charles King County Kane county McCain Erin
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:25 min | 2 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WGN Radio

"The studio ovarian cancer symptom awareness is the name of the organization Valley I wanna get to what ovarian, cancer symptom awareness is what the organization is about an event you have coming up but I am not going to bury the lead and the. Lead is, dogs are. Being trained quite effectively as it turns out to. Detect cancer so that's I'm gonna I'm? Going, to start in the middle there ex- explain explain what that is all, about well our organization has a partnership at the, veterinary community and through that partnership we. Formed a great relationship with Dr Cindy Jato and the pin. Bet working dog center and she, has a team of four dogs that are sniffy now the odor inside ovarian. Cancer we've been supporting. Her for the last five years and they're very close to Determining the sense of ovarian. Cancer that will be transmitted to an, electronic knows. That will all now you're confusing so explain so. The dogs let's do it one step at it's the dogs are actually being trained by Dr. Otto that the university, of Pennsylvania school of veterinary medicine to actually determine that one is ovarian cancer and that one isn't yes okay so that's happening yes and it's. Happening effectively, yes all. Right so because there isn't going to be though. I like the idea a dog in? Every, exam room in America right what would be the use of these dogs, and I think that's what you were getting to, when I said whoa explain that so. The dogs are identifying the odor ends and they're taking that. Data, and giving it to Manila. Chemical company is working very closely with Dr Otto and her team and they Are the dogs have been ninety nine percent accurate in determining ovarian cancer cell lines and so that information is being transmitted and turn electric knows and the the ultimate. Result. Of. That will be? A. Blood test and that? Will. Be given. To women that will identify if they have ovarian cancer all right so let's do this again step by step. So. At some point in the not too distant? Future we're helping so at some point relatively soon yes not decades, away, I suspect. But years away yes because it still has to be approved by the government I mentioned okay so. You'll be able to go to your doctor's office and then what, will happen They you it'll, be. A blood blood tests now and then the problem now with ovarian cancer and lots. Of other kinds of cancers is that by the time the blood test says here's some bad news you've already had ovarian cancer, for some time and they don't find it until stage three or four typically that's. Correct all. Right so the way to salvo Varian cancer. To treat it better like a lot of things is simply defined. It earlier cracked this will help. That, to happen yes. It'll be a blood test. That, will determine immediately if there is over in cancer in. In the. Blood. And which and that could be stage one which is ideal ideal gonna find yeah So I mean it's a a blood, test now that you know we have our blood tests that determine our you know. Our kidney levels are what it'll be, that kind of testing that will be an, alert an early alert simple blood test or a part of the blood panel I suppose, women yes that's the. Hope insurance would pay for it is the, hope hope yes and and then the blood panelists sent. To? Wear mo-. Nell chemical. Company is the organization that has created this electronic knows that. Will review doesn't view the test does it literally Mimika, dogs. In some ways yes so the. Idea, it sounds crazy so if valley if you would have thought that you would be telling me this fifteen years ago I suppose you wouldn't have thought, you'd be ever telling anybody this. Now No but my father was a veterinarian and, I believe all things possible in the veterinary world so the dog's nose A. Dog's, nose is. So. Incredible that these dogs, are finding ovarian, cancer and this is a replica of that dog's nose yes sort. Of yes and and this replica? If, you will this. Computer generated. Will. Be able to determine whether ovarian? Cancer cells are there early on early on yes in early detection save? Lives, yeah so talk about that is what what's the difference between finding ovarian cancer stage one. Compared to stage four They it's is, there a short answer the person lives essentially potentially yes but it's. It's good to know that there? Are, thirty three different. Kinds of. Ovarian. Cancer at different levels yeah you? Can have a stage one that is as serious as a stage four So. It's, you. Know if you have a family, history and you have any of the symptoms. For two weeks or more don't ignore them go see your doctor and we'll talk about what symptoms are because the mission of your organization I believe. Is to educate people yes, yes so we'll. Do some, education. Here but. It's quite amazing what dogs can do all of, this started, in part because of a? Friend of mine who, has? Since, passed away and a friend of sued Janssen who's on the phone sue Johnson writes about companion animals as. Well, good morning sue good morning thank you for getting up so early for us So tell us what. Our mutual friend and your, dear friend dare. Lean art, and. Did before. She passed away of ovarian cancer of all things He was a certified animal behavior consulted dogs and cats She was a writer Had several books she, did a radio show so she would periodically be on our show and sometimes poor. Thing. Beyond her show exactly Yes yes so she said I understand the interrelationship here between people dogs and the ability of, dogs noses to find things that we couldn't even fathom finding actually had that foresight a. Couple of years ago and created a fund and you have an announcement to make having to do with all that Exactly I Wanted to do something to continue her. Legacy And to continue to honor and. The work that she was so passionate about so I am creating a funder starting this fun too Gift To the ovarian cancer symptom awareness group in order to continue their outreach, program veterinary outreach, program and the dog sniffing program that will hopefully eventually lead to early detection which will lead to saving lives I mean this this is, quite incredible and we're talking ovarian cancer valley but Dr Otto herself the researcher. Who you know I know. Has told me I'm, more than one occasion gee, if we could do this for ovarian cancer I think we've opened up the genie's bottle, and now we have the super-secret these are not her words I can assure you he's. Not, her. Scientific words, but we, have now the secret and we can replicate this, for other texts of cancers particularly those like stomach cancer uterine cancer bladder cancer are typically not found until later. On right exactly and that's you know we're focusing on the ovarian cancer piece of, it but our entire team is so energized that the thought that it could lead to early detection for other cancers and when sue talk to, you off the, air days and days ago and said I'm coming in for your event which you can talk about she Another announcement as well. Correct Yes I she's we're delighted that show becoming to our dog walk on September. Ninth To LeRoy oaks forest preserve in Saint Charles and she's. Coming in from, Kansas and we're thrills she and I have. Never met in person so I'm very very happy to welcome her to Saint Charles? And, she's going, to talk about the fund that she is supporting Darlene to memory Yeah and you know helping us with an ongoing fund that can help us not only support Dr Otto's work but get out there and get the word out on the silence sometimes you know sue I know you were dare leans dearest friend in the world and, this must mean a lot to, you to know that these dollars that you continue to raise. That the ovarian, cancer symptom awareness organization continues to raise are. Really making a difference in a way that might even go beyond with Darlene envisioned Oh absolutely I it's it is really thrilling and I, just excited to be a part of it well I'm sorry that. I can't see. You. Out in San, off somewhere I don't even know where I'm going to be I think Myrtle Beach speaking, at a conference and then onto Portland somewhere but I'll be somewhere. Other, than here, unfortunately, but I'm glad you're coming here and I thank you for, your help with all this yeah we'll talk more about the benefit in detail when we come back and what ovarian cancer symptom awareness is what the organization is what they do and much more on WGN.

Cancer cancer Dr. Otto uterine cancer sue Johnson Dr Cindy Jato WGN Darlene Kansas America LeRoy oaks forest Manila San Saint Charles Pennsylvania school Myrtle Beach Janssen writer Portland
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

KUGN 590 AM

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on KUGN 590 AM

"Good day how Here's, an addendum to our conversation. The jury in Saint Louis that, awarded five billion dollars, to twenty two women who sued Johnson and Johnson this is on a lot of women's mind so I thought I'd, give me an update the allegation was that they all of these. Women the twenty you had, ovarian cancer and they claim it was caused. By using Johnson and Johnson powder as part of their. Daily feminine hygiene routine so five hundred fifty million dollars in, contempt, penalty damages, to each of the ladies plus four billion dollars, in punitive damages for an, aquarium somewhere in there but the total is a, little under five billion. Dollars the largest Bernard against the company that has been selling. Baby powder shower to shower talcum for many decades the jurors sat. Through weeks and weeks of testimony they listened to experts who went through. The Science they listened to work as Johnson Johnson who. Kept saying over and over again their. Product was safe they also heard. From cancer survivors and loved ones have six who have died from these cancers is not the first case. Brought against Johnson and Johnson probably not the. Last either thousands of cases actually making their way through the court systems all around the country, the science. Is up for debate, concerned about a lake between talking tau powder ovarian cancer started servicing in the seventies when scientists wrote about finding. Talk particles embedded in ovarian and cervical tumor tissue wow how can you argue with that since then some of the studies that have been done at universities. And Dr centers have shown that there are and updated. Risk in women who use Tallec and their general area so maybe, a word of the wise stay with. The talk and the baby powder from Johnson and. Johnson Dr Ken krona's here on good day The health..

Johnson Johnson Dr Ken krona cancer Saint Louis Tallec five hundred fifty million dol five billion dollars four billion dollars
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on Drinky Fun Time

Drinky Fun Time

02:55 min | 2 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on Drinky Fun Time

"So badly just left yo ponte went missing place to me here anymore now that ben might have been could have been we put it was almost bullying humiliating i will say that so we're going to start doing more beer and all along those nuts i'm an old friend and she aaron aaron peter she does a she'd been doing this blog called a blog website the beer goddess so is even a website there was not things as blog back then and she just knows beer she's been doing beer forever covering it on the beer goddess dot com and she is doing her tenth anniversary party of the beer goddess is happening on august eighteenth in ventura at barrel house want to one in ventura can anybody in the area guy can they attended any anybody can go all they need to do is go to the beer goddess dot com and her social feeds are at the beer goddess and they'll have all the information there it's a cool event and the reason i bring it up to is erin has was diagnosed with cancer ovarian cancer stage three ovarian cancer she is fighting like a mojo like that she is and this you know some some of the of the proceeds from this event are going to help offset her medical bills to drink beer and there is a tremendous raffle i love a raffle and so that's obviously you buy ticket and the price he's got and help aaron out unjust a just a input besides the cancer is that you know aaron started a blog ten years ago you mentioned food at the she was like the first go out the gate to be like biz awesome i'm a woman on i'm going to write about this and she's been doing so for a decade which is quite amazing to think about giving that with trying to do this puzzle is killed a lot of peer near i mean imagine i imagine we beers the cheese reviewed so many biz i'm going to ask her a question i wanna say erin you so well the embiid do you feel bib gives you bigger boobs does and west this soda smoking that's why big makes bells boobs bigger bony a little bit it also makes it also makes girls acids bigger no yes poppy cup making but just will not think about this event of sea venture if you're familiar with california coastline it's gorgeous is just a little further south of santa barbara so terrorist people visiting california if you going to be in the wine regions of santa barbara and you want to just sort of break it up a bit with some cool refreshing bid then this event is the won't be on the day again done is date again is saturday august eighteenth from five to nine pm go to www dot the beer goddess dot com.

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"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WLAC

"Talk about ovarian cancer and whether that's you as a patient families caregivers health providers we have to understand not just the physical toll that it takes but the emotional toll that an ovarian cancer diagnosis can take and not just that diagnosis but throughout treatment and then post treatment the concerns of recurrent all of those things go into it in addition to raising awareness of ovarian cancer what are some other things that you're involved in these days oh goodness there's always something going on like i said as someone who's involved with health and wellness for women were always involved in in different projects with regard to fitness and nutrition and motivation and certainly cancer awareness is a big part of that because it is so personal to me who is the most challenging part about being a olympic athlete oh goodness yeah i think the most challenging part is retiring you you know you you love it i grew up doing gymnastics i enjoyed it so much not that there weren't tough days but i loved competing i love putting on the red white and blue and going out and representing my country and so kind of the day it ends you kind of wonder where the family wins and you still in your mind can do all the skills and you're my body won't do that anymore so i think just being able to relive those memories and take those friendships with me for lifetime i mean that's that's just amazing to anymore in coaching or mentoring i don't do any coaching i stay involved primarily as a commentator and analyst so that's a lot of fun for me every olympics i get to watch these athletes walk onto the competition floor and i know what they're feeling the butterflies and and it's just incredible to watch these athletes perform certainly at the level that they do these days i certainly would want would not want to be competing with them now this weekend's jennifer kushinka with olympic gold medallist shannon miller it's twenty one minutes after the hour on this weekend.

jennifer kushinka shannon miller ovarian cancer analyst twenty one minutes
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"I'm well doctor thank you for taking my call questions about family members my mother who is eighty seven has been diagnosed with md at and i'm wondering if stem cells can help the bone marrow to function the way it's supposed to function walston cells can go to any area of your body and we've had people osteoporosis that with combinations of vitamins and stem cells had some pretty dramatic benefit the question with md this is thought to be within a group of disorders that are cancer like disorders so because i'm not an oncologist i can't use stem cells to treat things that are in the group of cancer disorders now doctors that are on colleges that are you know only or primarily in the hospital can do that they can take a patient abstract the stem cells typically they'll use chemo radiation or certain meds you know and then they put your stem cells back into repopulate your immune system to kill the cancer that's been around for many years is just that i don't do that i'm not a cancer doctor so i don't do that so that's possible you just need to speak to somebody our doctor at a hospital that does that type of therapy so i think you know for many cancers they do stem cell therapy because it's repopulating your immune system to create that ability to fight and helped to kill the cancer but again all would be the same for my sister who's also she has ovarian cancer great okay thank you have to contact a hospital that does stem cell therapy in hospital for cancer bye bye scottish league okay question i've had this annoying issue of excreting mucus and i'm not sure it could be maybe from allergies or from a postnasal talking about three.

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"ovarian cancer" Discussed on Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

"From nothing i don't know but seriously i actually went to the doctor about my back because i thought i actually saw my obgyn because it was so low that i thought oh my gosh do i have some sort of huge ovarian cyst or you know being the like catastrophes i have ovarian cancer likely cancer likely likely going to die tomorrow and she did a whole you know all the blood work and did the ultrasound because my back every morning and especially around my period when i'm audie leading it hurts so that so she told me how a tilted uterus la too and we we just have so many things in common you meakers power tin type lary nelson uterus tilted uterus and growers disease know what we're talking about if you back sarah and i discovered that we had the same very obscure skin condition that mostly effects old men yes i actually had it biopsy it is grover disease at some sort of inflammatory skin condition that men that are over seventy yet and suddenly so where does basically falling apart and i don't i feel like i could go on so many different tangents i've totally run away and we will get right back to you with the feeling very old all the time but i'm feeling really old time to well i don't even think i told you about i went speaking of going to the gyn i went to mine a few weeks ago because i am doing that ablation thing and yeah i'm on here and talk about it.

ovarian cyst sarah
"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And i didn't know that we had a history of ovarian cancer and my family at my mother past way unfortunately from breast cancer but they're leapt everything is linked so i think you're right like asking what if someone passed away and we're all gonna pass way of a certain thing it's good to know snatches for you went right for your children do childrens children absolutely in with diabetes for me is very personal because my grandmother had it my mother had it my sister has it and so i am at risk you know they're they're stages before diabetes which is called prediabetes and that's an a very interesting stage because at that stage you can learn how to manage your blood sugars with diet and exercise and having that in having the are being knowledgeable about that stage you can make changes so that you don't develop diabetes losing 5 to 10 percent of your body weight can put you out of the prediabetes range so as not even an issue interesting and we're talking about diabetes type two is that that's qaraqeh so you're that's mainly what you work with korea opaque and type 2 diabetes is different and it's it when it when we talk about i think it was millions of people that have diabetes in this country were talking about type 2 diabetes there so yes type 2 diabetes about thirty million people now i'm sorry diabetes overall about thirty million people prediabetes and diabetes a hundred million so twice over twenty five percent of the us population sizable number and when we look at even state data we're talking at a about a million people just in the state of illinois that have diabetes so it's it's an important one and you know i mean i think you bring up a really interesting point with with kind of luring more information out when you bring up a person because i think especially some generations you don't want to talk about certain things and i think there's like stigmatise some things to especially when we're talking about mental health or and on my family my had a grandparent the died of cancer in.

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"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WCTC

WCTC

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"ovarian cancer" Discussed on WCTC

"From look university chancellor hickenlooper of a wonderful the crew or not by your only group or go to open people quite rude look i'm always very clear from over formed a camper and we're going to have to help work purple almost talk about uh ovarian cancer on the program for the court of crowd support ovarian cancer patient cuomo formally orthogonal have material but we can hand out with information about trump them with crack with quote unquote decrease the likelihood of developing ovarian cancer oh quite a woman with horrible we will also going to have written quantitive from a trip oregon kufo foundation based on a lawrenceville pronuclear mohtashemi who will talk about one of their program our foundation ponding here and look what we but it went on alert program when program that or support for women or who have overrun cold weather a cooperative work for hardship over the week with a group of women who are undergoing primo irradiation equipment traveled the kuna home owner how corcovado also going to have a couple of information video replayed on the lord jumbotron chris way screen in the yard wondered resented by arctic aren't carjon in newport important aspect ovarian cancer in a video of the background of our firm now the more one of the most important crack about ovarian cancer it up there were no early bucar from her and most creditworthy not bright note for coogan could negatively agree graham only about cuckoo cochran are diagnosed from your own behavior and confidently one year for viable rate required for.

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