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35 Burst results for "one hundred years"

Why Did the T. Rex Have Such Tiny Arms?

BrainStuff

03:39 min | 1 d ago

Why Did the T. Rex Have Such Tiny Arms?

"With a name that literally means tyrant Lizard King You'd assume that tyrannosaurus rex would get a bit more respect, but the giant predators disproportionately small arms have been the subject of ridicule for decades there are also a scientific puzzle more than one hundred years after discovery of this species, experts still don't know why huge animal one that could reach lengths of forty feet, or twelve meters, or more had four limbs. That were much longer. Longer than an adult humans, if the arms were limp muscle free pegues, it'd be easy to assume that they serve no purpose. However, the evidence hints at a more complicated story, a few studies have argued that judge by the muscle scars left behind on T. rex limb bones, a full grown dinosaur could curl more than two hundred and twenty pounds or one hundred kilograms with each one of their biceps then again. This isn't as impressive as it sounds. Thomas R Holtz of vertebrate paleontologist at the University of Maryland tells us that some people like to overrate Tirana sources upper body strength that figure from before only translates to about one point. Two five percent of the dinosaurs total body weight, which may have been in the ballpark of around eight tons or eight thousand kilograms. Holt says that's like a two hundred pound or ninety kilogram man proud. Proud of the ability to curl two point, five pounds or one kilogram on these grounds, a few experts have concluded that tyrannosaurus arms were either functionless or seldom used, but not all paleontologists by this idea for his money. Kenneth Carpenter of UTAH. State University thinks the little limbs made great hunting tools in two thousand, eight, he and fellow paleontologist Christine. Lipkin impaired the five to source rex wishbones. For years that were known to science at the time shaped like a giant boomerang. Sits between the shoulder blades, three of the five wishbones that carpenter and Lipkin studied show, telltale signs of injury, among these were stress fractures, which must have re healed in life. So, what does this mean well? According to carpenter? The fore limbs were subjected to a great deal of repetitive stress, which was not uniform or steady, instead there were moments of extraordinarily great force applied to the arms. The likely explanation is that t rex used its fore limbs to grab hold of large struggling prey, a plus sized thrashing victim could easily fracture the carnivores, wishbone, or at least tear a few arm. Arm Muscles loose other ideas about the purpose of T.. REX arms have nothing to do with subduing victims. One School of thought involves naptime perhaps after a good night's sleep. Taran disorders use those arms to push itself up off the ground, or maybe they had a sexier function. Henry Fairfield Osborn the paleontologist who named the species back in nineteen o five believed that males used their four limbs to grab hold of their mates as Holtz and others have admitted. There simply isn't enough evidence at this time to conclusively refute or verify any of these notions, such is often the nature of paleontology.

Kenneth Carpenter Thomas R Holtz REX Henry Fairfield Osborn Lipkin Tirana Taran Holt University Of Maryland State University Utah Christine
How one farmer is adding carbon to the soil

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 4 d ago

How one farmer is adding carbon to the soil

"Jim Munch raises beef cattle in western Wisconsin and his heard has something in common with the Wild Bison that once roamed the area. They never graze in the same place for long munch moves his cattle through a series of pastures. They eat the grass in one area for a days and then move on, so it has time to recover. Called rotational grazing, the practice can build soil carbon over time. As the animals graze manure and plant material. Get worked into the ground. Munch says over the forty years. He's had Carolina's land. Just by rotational grazing. We've built organic matter twofold. That's good for the climate and the farm soil rich in organic matter holds more moisture so much is pastors are more resilient to droughts. Three years ago when we had this six week dry period, I never took off pastor. And during heavy storms, healthy soil absorbed drain instead of washing away. We've had a number of one hundred year rains in the last decade. On our farm when you went out and walked onto pastures, it was like walking on a wet sponge, so he says rotational grazing is a way for farmers to reduce carbon pollution and adapt to climate change.

Jim Munch Wisconsin Carolina
6 more coronavirus deaths reported in Miami-Dade County

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

00:21 sec | 6 d ago

6 more coronavirus deaths reported in Miami-Dade County

"A one hundred year old man among the latest to succumb to the corona virus in Palm Beach county his death one of eleven in the county yesterday announced by the Florida department of health along with six more deaths in Miami Dade County Miami Dade holds a state high nine hundred fifty three deaths from corona virus over eighty five hundred new cases the virus reported yesterday state wide with twenty nine

Palm Beach County Miami Dade County Miami Dade Florida Department Of Health
Giving Rise to the Famous Phrase 40 Acres & a Mule

Black History in Two Minutes

02:40 min | 2 weeks ago

Giving Rise to the Famous Phrase 40 Acres & a Mule

"The months following the civil war, and the start of reconstruction offered African Americans in the south hope for equality. It also offered the possibility of owning land. Within months African Americans would be betrayed by a harsh reality. You probably heard the phrase forty acres and a mule. Here's what happened. In January eighteen, sixty, five, a meeting in Savannah Georgia. Between Union, Military Leader General William to come Sherman and a group of twenty black ministers resulted in a plan to redistribute confiscated and abandoned confederate land from south, Carolina to Florida. They. Call the Land Sherman's reserve. Newly freed slaves would be allocated forty acres of land along with a mule, the phrase which became well-known, even then spread quickly. The plan had the potential to revolutionize race relations in the south and the economic future of the African American community. The significance about formerly enslaved being given the land that they had actually worked was that they would be able to generate wealth as well as create wealth generation. But the summer of eighteen sixty five thousands of black families had settled on portions of the Sherman Reserve and were excited to plot their futures. But later that year, as part of his reconstruction plan, actually intended to appease the former confederacy President Andrew. Johnson abruptly cancelled the order giving the land back to its previous owner's. The United States had the opportunity to make it possible for the formerly enslaved people to be. Independent and the country failed to do it. That initial meeting more than one hundred years ago between General Sherman and Savannahs, leading black ministers was historic at least for a brief moment in history, the opinion of black leaders had led directly to a radical public policy initiative remarkably over a century and a half later on June nineteen, two, thousand nineteen, the House of Representatives held a hearing on H R forty, a bill named in honor of the famous phrase, forty acres and a mule. The bill would establish a commission to study the concept of reparations for slavery and Jim Crow Segregation, including the merits of a formal apology by the United States government.

General Sherman Sherman Reserve United States Jim Crow Segregation African American Community Savannah Georgia House Of Representatives President Andrew General William Johnson Carolina Florida
Are Vitamins Just Expensive Urine?

Green Wisdom Health Podcast by Dr. Stephen and Janet Lewis

06:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Are Vitamins Just Expensive Urine?

"Hello and welcome to this edition of the Green Wisdom Health. Show I'm Janet Lewis Sir. Lewis and we're here to give you a very informative show today, Hopefully we'll try to keep all this straits can is going to be a bunch of information and we hope all of you enjoy it, and we hope all of Y'all are doing well out in green wisdom land. this show is going to be called our vitamins, just expensive urine, and for those of you that are taking vitamins and know what they can do. There are many of you out there. That are new to listening to hell shows and are taking vitamins at. Maybe you're buying a big box store, and you don't really notice any difference and could say well. Maybe they're just expensive urine, so Dr Lewis is going to dispel some of those myths. He's GonNa tell you the differences. He's going to tell you. What a good vitamin and a different! Grade of category will do on lab work. What it what it can move for as far as lab value numbers, which is why we run lab and what a bad one can do as well but I I think we WANNA. Start this show off. We've got a bunch of questions but we have got a letter from one of our very loyal patients for many years at was kind enough to refer his friend to us. Who in turn had his wife do her lab with us? Michelle and so. Eric the one that actually did the referring to start with. Thank you very much Eric we love you. wrote a very nice letter to us over the weekend. And you guys as much as we try to inspire. You really helps when you inspire us as well and this did that for us, so I'd like to read that letter to you and then I'd like Dr Lewis to comment if that's okay this. He's ready to comment I know he is. So he wants to pass on, Eric wants to pass on some really good news Michelle did her lab with us and followed our instructions after a doctor visit that said her blood was out of whack, and she needed a bunch of prescription medications, and honestly that's when we get. A lot of people is when they don't want to take all these prescriptions. They Kinda. Wait until they've been hit with Oh my gosh, you're you're really sick, so let's lay all these drugs on you. So she got scared and her lab with us. Fast forward to this week when she went back to the doctor and told him well I. Did this Doctor Lewis Thing, and he looked at seven labs of panels and gave me some supplements to take. The doctor looked at the nurse. They chuckled and said you're peeing that down the drain, and they don't work, and you just need this ten dollar prescription and your cholesterol and triglycerides and blood pressure will be fine. So. He ran her blood work again call two days later and said he apologized I. Don't know who this guy is, but keep doing what you're doing and don't take these prescriptions. had better than fifty percent improvement in three months. How cool is that? Thanks for all you guys do. And you know the basics the. Of this I guess. The doctor actually wanted to know who Dr Lewis was so that was pretty cool. So Dr Lewis you want to tell us a little bit about What made you different? What made you do something different with her lab? Been What? Anybody, else would do I. Guess Well, because I'm a car proctor. I wouldn't prescribed drugs. Even if I could which I can't, but and I'm not against drugs, at all I love her medical profession, and but I've seen many many years ago where the medical doctors and osteopaths. they got were. They cannot really practice the the the and they have so called standard of care, which is not necessarily what's in the best interest of the patients, and they're frustrated, too. I've never seen an MD or do that wasn't just a wonderful person and had good intentions. But they're not trained that way. You know. I'm a contractor I. think everything's nerve supplier nutrition and he know sergeant everything's What can I do surgically to fix it, so we're all good people they're trying to help. Just you know one has opinion you like and so. Eric sent this email and he told me said. Don't let Janet Reba below the line. He had a little colorful remark about what he had to the doctor to see it at all. Eric, actually, she didn't until I pointed it out your Eric you're funny. I'm going to go down to port. Nitrous Texas wherever that is southeast. Texas Word Northeast Texas I'm. Go visit them sometimes. Some David I talked to Michelle. and. She's a sweetheart and she told me the story also and you know I'm not anti medical. They've saved my bacon more than once, but here's the problem. And unfortunately I'm pretty simple guy. Maybe unfortunately but. Since. When do we think that God is not involved in this process and why you know this thing, Oh, you just have expensive urine and I said on this one huge huge podcast I was a guest in. This guy has like quarter million listeners. Said something about expensive year and I said well. I just had a forty two dollar rib. I do. I have expensive excrement? You know it's foolish to think that your body doesn't take what it needs from that and use it for good. you have to take vitamins. You have to take good ones I've seen vitamins. Put out by famous doctors. You get famous by paying somebody ten or twenty grand route a book you know. Most of these books are not even written by the doctor. That's the only reason I could write a book. Have somebody do it better than me, but what happens is. Are The reason why you need vitamins and they have to be good ones. You know I've had a good wife and a bad one, so there's a difference in women. There's a difference in vitamins say. one of the things you have to realize that God's in control and he works in your body. Whatever you think God is, but North America is probably the most well fed, but undernourished people in history, the the souls been depleted of this nutritious at least for one hundred years. and now we're saturate and it with chemical fertilizers, pesticides, and it's Kinda. Killed The microorganisms that allow the nutrients to get up into. into the plant itself, and then we're feeding mannerly in inside and vitamin deficient. Food to our livestock, so they're not what they should be.

Dr Lewis Eric Janet Lewis Michelle North America Janet Reba Texas David Michelle.
Making Earworms

Topgold Audio Clips

03:34 min | 2 weeks ago

Making Earworms

"It's Bernie Goldbach its top audio clip five to three in the background. You might be able to hear on sound as you're familiar with from autumn. Oh. Mono tribe by SEMI TUNA SM to split in the background in the morning nine o'clock in the morning. June twenty twenty. I've lost the concept of date and time might be the seventeenth or eighteenth. And Anyway the point is I want to update on some things that some creative interns are doing with me? Go back I happen to work as a creative media lecturer I'd met the author of the background piece Simon. Online more than ten years ago, doing audio, an annual collected of people sharing snippets of life the audio. And I thought it'd be interesting to know that the word ear were. Is Synonymous with audio Mo. if you have an Amazon Smart Speaker so today I just asked Amazon. My Smart Speaker. The a word. I'm not going to use some of you. Listening may have that a word sitting in your local audible reach. I asked my Amazon Speaker to enable the speaker's skill, and then I asked my Amazon speaker. To. Ask Speaker to play earworm. This is what came up. A long process well, it's a simple process. It's long if it's meant to be an archive of all the audio work done during the month of June twenty twenty. On twitter tagged as audio. Now. We're GONNA get some cross pollination because some of the audience. Hashtag content with clips include people talking about twitter making the IOS twitter APP able for some to produce audio on the fly. But if you've got a smart speaker, has made by Amazon, and you ask for the. SPREAKER APP to be enabled. You ask your smart speaker to play ear worms. You might be treated to a cacophony of. Audible. During the month of June. And July and August September, because once there. They will always play as at your worm as a side note I know now that. Should have named the directly directory in which these audio clips are posted. I should've named audio, but I had a legacy directory running. Just, use that. It may affiliate to the word audio. Mo- when using. Voice Search. On Google PODCASTS and may affiliate to audio when using the apple podcasts player in three weeks time time will tell I'm learning I do it. If your. Voice isn't. In the audio collection that's on speaker, let me know, and I'll add it. And I've tried to go around and talk to everybody voice. We have used to make sure they don't mind being there. The Internet archive the way back machine's GonNa, grab all the stuff recorded as important audio snippets while the world recovered from the first major lockdown that it has endured. In, the last one hundred years.

Amazon Twitter Bernie Goldbach Voice Lecturer MO Google Simon Internet Apple
Roger Bennett (Men In Blazers) on the Return of the Premier League

ESPN Daily

06:41 min | 2 weeks ago

Roger Bennett (Men In Blazers) on the Return of the Premier League

"We Win Stadium you will be at home. I can promise you will feel you support. Stay safe. We are still with you and. You'll never walk alone. That was liberal F. C manager Jergen KLOPP in a message released yesterday. That will bring a tear, not just the eyes of his supporters. The dare I say anyone who cares about the most popular sports league in the world. That's right folks. After a three-month hiatus. The English Premier League is back today. Roger Bennett from men in blazers fills us in on these frantic few remaining weeks. So grab a pint and US as sub optimal tour of English soccer. I'm sorry, English football. I mean it comes. It's Wednesday. June seventeenth. This is ESPN daily. Presented by marathon. Roger! Kim's. Are you relieved? Your any skin daily and not my NFL pod, talking about your beloved quarterback Mitch Trubisky You Know God Love Mitch. trubisky is an incredible pressure to be knowing that your whole life is just destined to pan out to become the answer to a trivia question in about ten years, who was taken ahead of Deshaun Watson Patrick Mahomes. Roger Bennett is suffering bears fan. He's also the CO host of men in Blazers on the NBC. Sports Network and the men in Blazers podcast by just braced for him to end up with the green. Bay Packers, leading them on a fourth quarter drive two feet, my beloved Chicago Bears, and I can't wait for that movement. They'll probably deserve it. And we're not talking about bears football today. The wait is over the English premier league. The most Popular Sports League in the world is back after a one hundred day hiatus due to the coronavirus pandemic Roger I'm sure you've been getting your fix from Bundesliga but I have to imagine the return of English. Soccer is hitting a little different for you. One hundred days feels like one hundred years to be candid. I've been staring at squirrels running up trees in the park, and feeling the adrenaline burst of a run through midfield, watching raindrops charge down my window and feeling just an incredible wing-play into play of missed from the primarily, but yes, it's back today with its global ratings I mean in Britain for much of Europe for much of the rest of the world outside of the United States, it's kind of a seismic as the NFL and the NBA rolled into with the Pantheon of heroes and villains to moments of glorious ecstasy, searing dispath fuse with dodgy haircuts snack tattoos. One hundred days off. When are going to have ninety two games scattered almost daily over the next couple of weeks. It's coming back because we love it because we miss it. It's coming back for. Hard news commercial reasons ultimately to an economic decision. It's going to come back and ghost game situation where it's fabulous. It's going to be different. The lack of an audience will have an impact on the football. We watched, but most importantly it is going to be good enough. It's GonNa. Be Great enough to connect us to a ruling global conversation and that's ultimately I think. Think we will miss about sports as our calling them. Ghost Games I hadn't heard that got left the Germans. They have a name for everything. Lay. They Call Them Guy Bela. And that is what they will be. Sam Darnold knows a thing or two about those back to English premier league, so we hit positive with most of the season done with exception of Liverpool they're. They're still to be decided. The top half of the table. Seven teams vying for five spots determine who will qualify for Champions League and Europa League which for those who don't know are the midseason European tournaments to be held next year. Roger Liverpool have clinched Champions League. Spot Manchester City has of course been banned from Champions League for Breaking Financial Fair play rules so that. That spot remains open despite city being second in the League. Right now. Arsenal wolves Chelsea Menu Lester Tottenham Sheffield all in the mix. What are you expecting to see from the top of the table? When the race for Champions League qualification, which is a bit like football's march madness, it's big tournament in which the best teams in the world. You're rail, Madrid, your boss Alana's. Para Sanjay Man's by Munich's compete all. Big English teams won't be in that for brand reasons for competitive reasons for commercial reasons and is. And completely wide open at the bottom of the table. All say English football has some Incorr- ellegation, which is if you watch game of thrones? It's a bit like the moon door. Teams get flung through that in baseball, the worst teams every year like the Orioles in the mall in which is flung out of the major leagues, the mooted, and in that place. We had the Tulsa drillers around rook. Rook Express and that is, it's a searing. It is a haunting. It is a savage palm of the global football tradition, and you have six teams at the bottom who are fighting to avoid what can be economically devastating their revenue roughly hauls flung out. The Premier League is savage for the fan base. One Minute. You are watching your team. Take to the glamorous fields, Manchester United and Arsenal the next. Round Brentford Luton Barnsley barring a miracle the Jewish using Norwich canaries will disappear, but there's five teams Aston. Villa Bouma th what furred and West Ham amongst them, two of which will go with them for the big story line. Meena is Liverpool Football Club. American owned little football. Club owned by the Boston Red SOx owners, F S J and their yearning. They're dreaming of a return to greatness that was once titletown by when I was a kid growing up in Liverpool. Just six points away from lending the title that they have dreamed of then. That is the great storyline of the season. On that note. This Sunday. The team that you root for I'm sorry. I'm getting a producer this side you support. Everton, we'll be squaring off against Liverpool. They are twenty five points clear off the other teams in the League, and there's possibility they can clinch the title at Goodison Park Against Your beloved Everton on Sunday

Football English Premier League League Champions League Roger Bennett Blazers We Win Stadium Soccer Liverpool NFL United States Liverpool Football Club Roger Liverpool Europa League Espn Roger Sports Network
]Trump to sign executive order on police reform Tuesday

Politics and Public Policy Today

02:50 min | 2 weeks ago

]Trump to sign executive order on police reform Tuesday

"The president's counsel kellyanne Conway confirmed to fox news fox news in an interview with Harris Faulkner that the president will be announcing new executive action on law enforcement amid the protests that have sparked the deaths of George Floyd and more recently over the weekend in Atlanta over the death of her sharp Brooks more from fox news earlier today you know as as we go forward today I'm wondering what the discussion is like inside the White House after this latest shooting was a greater discretion Harris obviously the entire country the world in fact they watch the tape of George Floyd from several weeks ago now in great disgust and horror I've said that he was murdered before our eyes is slowing senseless murder that is true and how we today see another with another family heartbroken because of what's happened the last time I certainly don't want to involve myself in the investigation that your reporters they will be taking place in Atlanta where it belongs but everybody should feel grief and sorrow for the family every sharp rocks and all and and again we just we have to heal we have taking care of people here in Washington DC Nancy Pelosi let's just take down some statues I mean what what how is that a response to what we see on these tapes and how will we ever heal but I want to tell you no at certain terms and I should because I have a law degree liberty and justice for all means everyone and we're fragile young democracy our women have the right to vote for about one hundred years this summer and the civil rights activists with in most people's lifetimes and we're fragile democracy we have to get this right for all Americans so to the extent that we are expressing our pain or grief for others I thought her composure presence of mind to her grief this is a sense of loss for her family and for all of them and they said Peter playing it is very committed also to making sure that law enforcement has the resources and the respect that razor of to be able to do their job somebody like that the murderous coffee in in Minneapolis against George Floyd more than a thousand complaints against him the union is protecting him is eligible for a pension I mean they're all kinds of things that can be done with it who are doing their job I want to ask you about what the president is getting ready to announce an executive action on law enforcement as soon as tomorrow obviously for all the reasons that you and I have been talking about for weeks now the system needed so now it's time to drill down on what exactly that could look like that announcement sure well there are several principles that have been discussed obviously the presence of listening to many different people Ross the island across the country when he is formulating these ideas and is a very large group of people helping him with that as well

President Trump Kellyanne Conway
Technology Pioneer Brian Roemmele Discusses Coronavirus' Impact on Voice Technology

The VoiceFirst Roundtable

05:21 min | 2 weeks ago

Technology Pioneer Brian Roemmele Discusses Coronavirus' Impact on Voice Technology

"So so I want to ask you Just I guess I'll start with. We'll get into plenty of car stuff but I WANNA I wanna ask you about something which fortunately has not been brought up at many times over the last day or so. In. That is the corona virus. So the sense is that? The time we're in now with this corona virus stuff going on this pandemic. I want to get your thoughts on. The there's a sense of what the intersection between the corona virus and voice technology is. That it's it's a strong intersection, and that voice technology is benefiting greatly from. The need to have contactless touching a button in elevators like Roy by Harav high auto spoke about. The Need. To be able to to speak to things like in an uber like was mentioned as well. I would just like to hear your perspective on what the Corona virus has done to the to either complement or set-back the. Voice Technology Well Brilliant. Question Sir Bradley. You know I I'm a studier of history and and for a lot of my clients, my. Utility I. Think in what I do for them is give them a little bit of a boost of what's above the horizon. What's on the other side and I utilize his? And Future ISM and fuse those two things together. And I studied. Midsummer I started studying the nineteen thousand nine hundred nineteen Pandemic! And there was a reason for that. There was There a conference that was held Virtual Conference and sort of assimilation tell by number of institutions in the medical field bill. Gates that predicted enters videos out there I think it's called plan one or two. And event one zero two. And when I saw that you know I'd always. Have understood that real pandemics not just epidemics you know, look it up the definitions, but not have time to cover that real pandemic are going to impact You know every one hundred years, or so. It's been cyclical pretty much as far back as you can go on history, and there's a lot of reasons for that but I said Okay these folks are very smart. They're planning for a pandemic. This is interesting. You look at the videos. Try Not to get goosebumps because there's a whole lot of things that are being said in videos from August and September That are taking place right now. So I started studying the pandemic and I said well. What was the impact of that event to technology? As a as a general subject, well, the very first thing I noticed and I had not noticed this before and I've studied a lot of history books. From, the subject is communication technology exploded post, pandemic, one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, nine, and these are two technologies. One was an older technology called the telephone. And the other one was a newer technology called radio and or broadcast radio. And what happened was. The impact to people after this pandemic, there was no national news service There was no broadcast radio that anybody was really using and nineteen, eighteen or nineteen, hundred nineteen, there were crystal radio sets in some hobbyists were broadcasting and my latest twitter feed I put up a video showing the. First Broadcast Radio Station, eight K. x out of Pittsburgh area, and that was in nineteen nineteen. So what happened is unity came out of a sort of close setting. where communication was. kind of local and you really didn't need to know about national news. Kinda same today, but we are just junkies for, but we didn't really need to know about national news unless it really had a material impact on our life in our local environment, and that's of course. World War One. People were getting news from that and newspapers. Presidential elections. And maybe some news from former homelands or generational homelands. What's going on in Europe or Africa or Asia or something of those nature of that nature, so the radio exploded? And so the the telephone post pandemic, and it wasn't an accident, because people now wanted to connect in different ways and more meaningful ways, and so there's a psychological repercussion to everything that's going on right now, and everything has gone on the past. You could see cause and

Twitter Sir Bradley Harav ROY Pittsburgh Gates Europe Asia Africa
Minnesota pardons black man in century-old lynching case

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 3 weeks ago

Minnesota pardons black man in century-old lynching case

"Minnesota may pardon an African American man convicted of raping a white woman almost one hundred years ago three other people arrested with Max Mason in Duluth were later lynched by an angry mob two others were acquitted but Mason was convicted despite the almost complete absence of evidence evidence he he served served five five years years in in prison prison and and then then was was ordered ordered to to leave leave the the state state none none of of the the winters winters were were ever ever charged charged with with murder murder at at the the site site of of the the killings killings is is now now a a memorial memorial to the victims

Minnesota Max Mason Duluth Murder
Truth vs Hollywood

Filmspotting

04:50 min | 3 weeks ago

Truth vs Hollywood

"Welcome to truth versus Hollywood I'm David, Chen and A. Truth versus Hollywood is look at films that are based on a true story, but we don't just talk about the film. We also talk about that true story. On this podcast will touch on what really happened. How that differs from the film and why and we're not just talking, heads will hear about the true story through interviews from experts, witnesses and people who were involved in it. It's both the real facts and the real facts are l. fix. What do you think that Joanna I loved it today Ridge? Today! We're talking about Martin. Scorsese's classic film Goodfellas Goodfellas is based on the book Wiseguy. Nicholas Pathology which, in turn is based on life of Mobster Henry Hill Hill was actually alive when the film came out and was very pleased with his film based on him, and as we'll talk about later, it definitely had an effect on his life. Pathology worked with Scorsese to write the screenplay and the film was. was a complete. It nominated for six Academy Awards and won one Joe Pesci for supporting actor. It's considered one of the best gangster movies of all times. If I put it on their list of one hundred years, one hundred movies and the Library of Congress decided that it was culturally important and added it to its preservation archives all right well. Let's get to the movie itself. It stars Ray Liotta. Hill Robert Deniro as Jimmy, the Gent Conway, who's based on Jimmy the Gent? Burke Joe Pesci as Tommy devito based on Tommy desimone Paul Sorvino Paul cicero based on Paul Vario and Lorraine Bracco as Henry's wife Karen Hill. Many real life figures at this movie was based off of an apparently Henry Hill ended up getting paid five hundred eighty thousand dollars because of the use of historian, this movie, which is a lot of money to pay to a mobster who has done very horrible things you know in watching this movie again. John Robinson one of the things that. I kind of realized you know or reflected on is the fact that we've been lost you decades seen so many movies about bad men, doing bad things, and that this movie kind of one of the prototypical examples of how they can be glorified an elevated in this. Movie makes that lifestyle look really glamorous while at the same time depicting some of the negative consequence lifestyle, but at the same time it does rubbed me the wrong way that like the people who are involved often are rewarded. We also saw this Martin. Scorsese's Will Wall Street as well. Similar dynamic, there so I'm kind of curious like as you're reflecting on your overall experience of watching the movie, and now that we know little bit more about what happened with the real life characters, and we're GONNA. Talk about it during the courses podcast like. How did it strike you that? This is based off of Real Person I. Think Scar says he couldn't have picked a better release. Go subject to to glum onto here than Henry Hill because though he is gangster and he's fully involved in this gangster life, he is a the likability of this character, which is really what's Cortesi was going for I've seen interviews. We talked about the nineteen thirty two scarface, which was the first time he ever saw. Gangsters depicted as really likable. When you Henry Hill. And he does terrible things, but he's a gangster who is a little squeamish. We see this the film and it's corroborated by true story of his life. He was violent crimes, but he wasn't a a mass murderer and You know the the charisma of him. I think is really important. He wasn't one of the most vicious people in this story. And so I think you're making good point that like. If you're GONNA choose an entry way into this world. Henry Hill is probably the ideal candidate in this case so. Well, the film opens with three men driving in a car, having a seemingly normal evening. It's then revealed that there is a captive in the trunk and than shortly after him, we mmediately get Henry's voiceover with the iconic line as far back as I can remember I always wanted to be a gangster. It's one of the most. Openings and Awesome History Joanna Robinson after nearly three decades. How effective did you find this opening? Well, it's funny. I did not see I was eight years old when fellows came out, or maybe nine so I did not see it in theaters and I didn't see it until later in life and but by then it already seats into the culture because it was so iconic. You know there's. Maniacs good feathers, pigeon parody, and like all sorts of stuff, so I'm going to wear of the beats of it, even though the first exposure to goodfellas was. Is what you're saying. Thousand percent absolutely. But you know so by the time I had seen it. I had also seen so many things that had imitated it, and this is true of like so many of our great films like by the time you get around to watching it. Maybe you seen a bunch of people. Knock it off and so you're like well. How groundbreaking? Is this

Karen Hill Henry Hill Hill Scorsese Joe Pesci John Robinson Goodfellas Goodfellas Henry Nicholas Pathology Martin Joanna I Ray Liotta Hollywood Library Of Congress Academy Awards Tommy Desimone Paul Sorvino Pa Robert Deniro Joanna Robinson A. Truth Jimmy Paul Vario
Trump's Tulsa Rally Is Just More Racist Trolling

The Young Turks

04:34 min | 3 weeks ago

Trump's Tulsa Rally Is Just More Racist Trolling

"Donald Trump's rallies unfortunately. Are Coming back in full force. In fact, he has decided that his first rally since the pandemic will take place in Tulsa Oklahoma, where there is just a horrible horrible history of racism and brutal violence against the black community. We'll get to that in just a second, but here's what we know so far about this upcoming rally trump has largely remained silent as we all know on the issue of systemic racism and resistant to some of the changes proposed in the. The wake of the protests now in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, one at Tulsa was the site of a massacre of hundreds of African Americans during racial unrest in the historic section of the city known as Black Wall Street there were more than two hundred black owned businesses that were completely destroyed in the area, and this again on June, first nineteen twenty one and I. Don't think it's any mistake that trump has not only decided on that location. For this rally, but he also decided on June. June eighteenth to be the day that this rally takes place. So June. Teeth is when the slaves were freed in America and so. We're GONNA. Celebrate that here at Ti t as we did last year. We're going. Do another special this year and but Donald. Trump is not going to celebrate June team. He's going to the place where they killed. Hundreds of black folks at and and this is very important in a place that was known as Black Wall Street in other words. You know they say and then back back then to us. Nineteen twenty almost exactly one hundred years ago. They say arly Americanism meritocracy, and if you work hard you know you can get what you want and. If you don't have what? You need that's because you're a bombing. You didn't work. Are Those folks were really hard back then and actually became financially independent, and some even wealthy, so they went and murdered them. So now all those families instead of having that wealth accumulate for the next one hundred years, went back to being destitute, a lot of orphans, and they ripped everything down, and now Donald Trump on a day will resell supposed to be celebrating African American independence is going to in essence. Celebrate the murder of successful black people in this country. It's even for Donald. Trump It's. It's the most outrageously over the top thing I've ever seen. This is not a dog whistle. It's a bullhorn and and so. I think he's also making a mistake so a lot of Republican voters. Are subconsciously racist, so they have a sense of entitlement. This is my stuff, my country I WANNA make America great again. I want I want my country back and we see it over and over again, but they don't believe that they are racist. They think that racism is a bad thing. They're not racist. It's just everything is there is an you should get anything right? When you turn the doors into a bull, bullhorn. It takes away their possible deniability. It makes a conscious racism. And I think that that it makes even people who voted for in twenty, sixteen, uncomfortable supporting him now he's going to over the top and I'm not talking about the twenty eight percent that are sticking with them. No matter what we've talked about that number. Plenty Times before poll shows that even when Donald Trump does the most outrageous things. Matt Imaginable Twenty side of. Of the country will not move. It's not because they don't realize it's outrageous, but for them that will we call? Outrage is not the bug. It's a feature, so that twenty eight percent is immovable, but there's a giant difference being twenty eight percent and some number in the forties that could win you a national election and he's. He's wiggling that number down because. He doesn't get it. He thinks that his voters are as race as overtly racist as he is. Going and doing this on June teeth in in in Tulsa is. It's it's just

Donald Trump Tulsa Black Community America Oklahoma Ti T Murder Matt
Philly police commissioner lays out crime reduction, department reform plans at Council budget hearings

KYW 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 3 weeks ago

Philly police commissioner lays out crime reduction, department reform plans at Council budget hearings

"Oh one Philadelphia police commissioner Danielle outlaw laid out ambitious plans for reducing crime and reforming her department at city council budget hearings today K. Y. W. city hall bureau chief Pat Loeb reports she told council reforms do not come cheap you can't say commissioner outlaw isn't aiming high each of us are in a position to reimagine smiles one person and I just love it I thank you for the next one hundred years she's devised a plan to get there during just four months on the job while also managing the covert nineteen shut down and civil unrest steps include setting a schedule for revising department policies reviewing staffing with an eye to civilian Ising the department and creating

Danielle Outlaw Pat Loeb Philadelphia K. Y. W. City Hall Bureau
James Baldwin: The 1967 Detroit Riots

LGBTQ&A

06:24 min | 3 weeks ago

James Baldwin: The 1967 Detroit Riots

"Recently, I've been thinking a lot about the work of James Baldwin and in particular this one speech that he gave about the racial problem in America. We're GONNA. Hear a click. Today is from Horace, vase nine thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, nine short film called Baldwin's and word, and like so much work. It feels like he's describing this very moment in time, and then the other thing you'll hear I think is his patriotism James. Baldwin wanted to make our country and world the best possible place for everyone that is true of people protesting in one, thousand, nine hundred. Hundred Sixty seven that he describes, and it's also true with people protesting today hearing from Queer figures like James Baldwin it always makes me feel just a little bit more grounded, and I think it also show is why we unfortunately have to continue to say yes. Black lives do matter and I sang. Nut is also just the beginning of the work that we have to do so to that. We've got some links in the show notes. If you're still looking for resources for how involved where to start, he'll check all those out and then without further ado. Here's James Baldwin. School really was the streets of New York City. My frame of Reference was George Washington and John Wayne. And you are formed by what you see choices you'd have to make and later discover what it means to be black in new. York I know how as you grow older, you watch in the richest city in the world the richest. Nation in the world. In the Western World I know how you watch as you grow older. Literally This is not a figure of speech. The cost of your brothers and your sisters pile up around you. Not for anything they have done. They were too young done anything. And the case to help. What one does realize is that? When you try to stand up. And the world in the face like you had a right to be here. When you do that without knowing this the result of it, you have attacked. The entire power structure of the Western, world. And speak plainly. We know. Everybody knows. No matter what recessions in my unhappy country maybe? But we are not. Bothering people out of existence in the name of freedom. Concerned with freedom, boys and girls, not as Istan here, the perishing streets of Harlem. We are concerned with power nothing more than that. In most unluckily for the Western world is consolidated its power. On the backs of people who are now willing to die. Rather than be used. Any longer. In short. The economic range in the Western world. Food to be too expensive for most of the world. And the Western world will change US arrangements. All these arrangements will be changed for them. This is what it's beneath all the rhetoric. And all those ashamed speeches coming from my president. This imposes on us then. Very considerable burden. I for example do have in principle least choice. I can make a living. And well enough known to be an ornament. And Short I could ally myself on the side of what I most seriously considered to be. A criminal nation. But if I can't do that. All the reasons that I can. When is tried? I tried for a long time and I don't person. Things I wrote things I said. That I was alone. I'm using myself as an example. You to my. White and black. Nature of a danger. And where we were going to go if he cannot resolve. The situation cities and then I'll streets now houses. If they come. When you realize that you cannot make yourself heard that people who? You are addressing plea on the previous ever super. One Saying, look at it. Get all the mountains of nonsense that had been written. And everything has been set. What you look at what is happening in this country? What really happening is the brother has murdered brother knowing it was his brother. White men have been negroes to be their son. Why women have had negroes burn knowing to be their love. It is at a ratio problem. Is a problem whether or not you're willing to look at your life and be responsible for it. And then begin to change its. That Great Western House I come from one house. Nine one of the children that house. Somebody on the most despised child that house. And it is because the American people are unable. The face of fact tonight back I'm flesh out their flesh. Bone of your bone. Created by them. My blood! My father's but is in that soil. They can't say that. And that is why. The Detroit another plane. And when has got to decide I think? The actual. And the moral base. which the world we know now rest. Obsolete. And deposit obsolete. They're wicked. As well as their obsolete, they are oppressive. Is simply not conceivable. That's another five hundred years of two hundred years or one hundred years. Should live and die. In the minds. Being, treated like animals to make other people rich. Civilization which is doing this. By doing this doomed itself. And it's not possible. To agree with it. Nor the possible to compromise with it. As much the much overused word. And it may not be as real as slavery. A very concrete thing. But freedom loved ones actor, and as it cannot I suppose beginning. Then obviously must. Take.

James Baldwin United States New York City NUT York America Harlem Istan President Trump George Washington John Wayne Detroit
Climate change isn't going anywhere, and investment could soon rise

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Climate change isn't going anywhere, and investment could soon rise

"While people around the country deal with the COVID, nineteen pandemic and protests for police reform and racial justice. The climate is continuing to change the US just experience. The warmest may on record, a UN report last week warned that mass extinctions are happening faster than expected and while climate change solutions are on the back burner for now they are as urgent as ever as part of our ongoing series. How we survive, we've been looking at how technology can help us adapt to climate change, so we wondered if you're an investor focused on climate tech. How are things going? Seth! Bannon is a founding partner at the venture firm fifty years, the human and economic tragedy of Covid. Nineteen has shown pretty clearly, the dangers posed by natural systemic disastrous. This pandemic has shown the dangers of ignoring science and I think we'll see a surge of interest for sustainability initiatives and investments in the wake of this pandemic, because of those things embracing that science will lead to resiliency and profit and ignoring it will lead to fragility. Downfall city group launched a new arm within its investment banking division that will be dedicated to sustainability. They specifically said Covid. Nineteen has increased interest in their client base in sustainable and resilient strategies, so part of it could be helped along by the recognition of what true disaster looks like right, which was was kind of abstract, maybe for a lot of people before this, absolutely I mean even with pandemic preparedness. people have been saying. Hey, there are some investments we can make. And yet they might cost a few dollars, but you know Ville payback ten volt, if a pandemic ever comes and regulators and investors, and even in some case. People in Academia You know didn't make those investments. And we're paying the price now. I think the parallels to the climate crisis are pretty clear. We know what investments we should be making. We haven't making them because some of them are hard. And some of them are expensive. and I think this is a pretty big wakeup call. In terms of the value of making those investments. It seems likely that there could also be though a renewed focus on public health preparedness like. Do you think that there's a risk for you? That money that might have come into climate change and resilience might now actually go toward public health resilience, while I think in times of crisis more money flows into the truly important things. Some of that will public health preparedness as it should. I think more will also flow into into climate tech climate preparedness, the places where less money will flow. Flow will likely be the nicest to have the ECOMMERCE technology. The the Ad Tech the social networking site I. Think these things will likely be the things that suffer and the beneficiaries will be all the things that are truly important. How is your fund raising going? You said you're raising a new fund now, right? Yeah, so we had our first close of that. Find on the day the New York Times had the first graph of the unemployment numbers. You know that was initially going to. To be a forty million dollar close to ended up being twenty million, luckily, the twenty that was supposed to close on that day didn't disappear. Everyone, said Hey, we just we'd like to continue to move forward to the closed at a later date hair on fire right now but I think for sure the last couple of months. It's been hard to get anyone's attention for you know VC's. There's typically two types of investors of individuals and family offices, and then those what are known as. As institutional investors that later group has largely pulled out of the market entirely I think a lot of funds that might have had a difficult time. Raising normal time just won't be able to raise unless of course things magically recover and and economies just back contract by the end of the year which I don't think it's going to happen. Seth Bannon is a founding partner at the venture firm. Fifty years. You can find our entire how we survived series at marketplace dot org slash climate. And now for some related links, research published last Monday in the proceedings of the national. Academy of Sciences found that five hundred species could become extinct in the next twenty years, and that our window to prevent those extinctions is only about ten or fifteen years. Long scientists had thought there would be more times more numbers here to illustrate that the researcher said that in the last one hundred years we've lost at least five hundred and forty three species of plants and animals. Now they're saying five hundred more could go extinct in just twenty years. T. L. Dr, the pace of extinction is accelerating. And scientists warned that mass extinctions can cause a cascade effect that can endanger human life on this planet they point to among other things, an increase in new diseases and pandemics.

Covid Seth Bannon Founding Partner United States UN New York Times Downfall City Group Academy Of Sciences Researcher T. L. Dr
The resonance of racial violence across generations

NBC Meet the Press

02:05 min | 3 weeks ago

The resonance of racial violence across generations

"President John. F Kennedy gave his nationally televised address civil rights. He said one hundred years of delay had passed since Abraham. Lincoln freed the slaves and that black Americans. Still we're not free. Confronted merrily with a moral issue. It is old as the scriptures, and it is clear the American constitution. That was fifty seven years ago this week. Generations have passed since and full equality has not been achieved this morning. We're GONNA bring together two generations in this fight for equal rights. lani bunches the secretary of the Smithsonian Story and the founding director of the national. Museum of African American history and culture here in Washington and Lisa Garza is one of the three women who founded the black lives. Matter Movement. Welcome to both of you, Lonnie Bunch I'll get to you in a moment. Want to begin with Lisa Garza. Let me start with this. The symbolic painting of Sixteenth Street with the yellow pain of black lives matter. And I know it's symbolism. It was on the front page of the so many newspapers on Saturday. I'm curious. From a Hashtag and twenty thirteen to now majority of Americans multiracial coalition. Rallying around a symbol right now, what does this mean and how do you take this from symbol to policy? I think what this. Is that. Lives. Matter is not just a radical a year. And frankly when we look at. A lot of consensus in the consensus is that it is time. In us our money in our resources in a fully different. At the end of the day Tuck. Everyone can agree that we don't have that. We need to look well and that we are using policing. In a way that far exceed certain. From

Lisa Garza Matter Movement F Kennedy President John Museum Of African American Lincoln Abraham Founding Director Secretary Washington
How Modsy Brought Consumer Interior Design Online

The Small Business Radio Show

04:54 min | Last month

How Modsy Brought Consumer Interior Design Online

"In one of the biggest shifts in consumer behavior we have ever seen. Companies are rushing to bring their traditional offline businesses online. My next guest has done exactly this many years ago. She speaks on topics ranging from game development to women in Technology Organizations Shawna. Tiller is the founder and CEO of. She was previously at Google ventures where she focused on the future of retail experience three year experience and SAS platforms. She also marcy new. Google ventures to connect fortune five hundred companies with relevant startups sean welcome to the show. Thank you very much. So how are you doing sheltering in place with your family? Adventure. What has been the one thing that will stand out when you look back in this time being the most adventurous. Honestly not Super Adventures, but just special. My son is just about to turn to and to be able to spend this much time with him. And watching his brain really developed like all the words that he learned on a daily basis has just amazing and one hundred years ago. They'll GRANDPA. What was it like? During the pandemic twenty twenty, he'll say I was only two years old I. Don't remember exactly and he will. Bullets Vally. I think that's time. So want to go back to your college days because I saw that you majored in entertainment technology I don't even know there was a major like that. What made you interested in that subject? It's a good question. I didn't know that either I was an Undergrad fine arts, and I liked science, and I could never figure out where they combined, but I took this class doting virtual worlds when I was a senior allege it was It was talked by Randy. Powell shoes a famous professor a. he wrote the last lecture. The course was amazing. It was early virtual reality. It combined like everything. I loved technology and art and design and storytelling. Working in teams, and at the end of the semester with like a week to go, I was like I have to do this. For the rest of my life and I applied to the graduate school. There, we are world history. So, where did this idea come from to take an? Taken offline business like consumer, interior design and dimmer online, offer tools, and also independent Zayn resources. You Know I. Think like a lot of ideas. From my own experience and it didn't really start as like I wanNA. Take this professional online. It started as me as a consumer, I was trying to design my own home with my husband. Pick out furniture. Imagine how everything would look and I just felt that there was a gap in the world like that. There was a missing place where I as a consumer could do that. All in the comfort of my home I wasn't planning to hire like interior designer to come to my house. Tell me how to do it I thought that was more both expensive in kind. kind of elite, but also it was It was outsourcing more of the control that I wanted I imagined instead solution where I would basically like upload pictures of my room, and what would come back? We would be visualizations like a catalog, but beautiful visualizations of how my room really could be that I could fully shop, and that really was kind of the cropped to end up starting Wasi, but you didn't just use of the technology. You also have personal resources that people can get a hold of now connecting the folks that the service to someone that can provide it right. Correct yes, it's beautiful. Of, services, so we have designers that you work with and technology where the product that we deliver it to. You is a virtual product that shows you how things would look in your space, and both have to go together in order to make the whole thing work. Here's the key question. What role did game development play and how this whole service and website turned out? It's a good question. I in turn. Graduate School on the surface to had I will say that that has been a big astray. Shake for what we're doing. And also I spent most of my career using game technologies in tools for the things that I've dealt and you know I believe that. There is like it's amazing. Combination of what already exists so that gains obviously gives you sandboxes things to play around with and a certain amount of control, but they also put you on rails so that it's not. Not so much control that you can't get your end destination. You can't can't play the game and we try to do the same thing in balanced that that right ability of the tool and the process of the product guide you at the designer to guide you, but also giving you the flexibility to make a lot of your indices within experience.

Tiller Google Graduate School Founder And Ceo SAS Powell Randy Marcy Professor
Gold

PODSHIP EARTH

07:07 min | Last month

Gold

"Standing above the angle. Bright Damn A army corps US Army Corps of Engineers Dam on the main stem of the river. Where is that though in Nevada county? We're about halfway between Tahoe. And Sacramento. A little north of that would not actually in Nevada. Nope we're in the state of California and we are standing right between Nevada County and Yuba County and we're standing on the beautiful Yuba River which flows down to the feather. And then the Sacramento from there down into the San Francisco Bay in the ocean. So you were a county board of Supervisors member when you first came here. Tell us about your first experience with this. Damn down a few different times over my life had been here my whole life. It was built and commissioned in nineteen forty seven by the Army Corps of Engineers so that people could resume hydraulic mining blocks hundreds of miles of potential fish passage for fish. Come from the ocean and go up into the high sierra to lay their eggs so when I first came to the damn understanding that the state of California had targeted this spot em federal government as maybe the best place to restore passage at the very first meeting we went to the. Us Geological Survey stood up and said you can't do anything to that. Damn until you look at the material behind it is holding back a whole bunch of mercury and that was the very first time I had ever heard anything about mercury and the state of California and its role in the goal rush. Or how long have you lived in this part of the world? My family came to California as part of the Gold Rush. We were quakers. Escaping the east coast. Ten violent religious oppression moved out to become farmers I was raised in Concord California on that form and in one thousand nine hundred five. I married a farmer and we moved to Nevada county beautiful organic farm in a place called Penn Valley. Tell us about this county and just its history and the gold rush because it is a lot of history here. Nevada county was ground zero of the California Gold Rush. Far More gold was taken out of this county and specifically this river that we're standing above than any other place in the state of California. It's where the very destructive technique called hydraulic mining which is using power water monitors to to scrub mountainside. Looking for gold is where that was invented. They started to dam the rivers and convey that water over to these huge hydraulic mining activities. Which were recovering thousands of of gold but millions of tons of sediment not material here from Nevada county rolled down the river and kept flooding the Sacramento Valley and eventually the farmers downstream who are really tired of having their houses filled with all this debris sued and stopped the activity known as hydraulic mining. Was the connection between Mercury and gold. Tell us how that process works. Everybody came to understand that the very dramatic impact of hydraulic mining because it was blowing these huge amounts of sediment down the river. But people didn't understand. Was that before they use. Those hydraulic monitors. They would treat the cliffs with Mercury Mercury on the cliff. Pound the cliffs with water the water to wash down into sluices and in those sluice boxes were also filled with mercury. Why did they use mercury keep? Mercury helped enhance called processing. It has a unique ability to amalgamate or hold the gold. So little tiny flecks of gold. That might be smaller than an eyelash would fall into the pan. But they're just wash out unless they were captured by mercury. Mercury would grab the gold. Make it heavy fall to the bottom of the sluice. When they turn the water off. Miners would come through and suck that mercury out of the bottom of the sluice they would take the mercury put it in a hot place they would call retort it like think of a hot iron frying pan and the mercury sort of melting off the top or or training into gas off the top and at the bottom of your pan. You'd have sparkling gold. The problem is curious. Mercury is a very dangerous neuro toxin. And it's dangerous in a variety of ways so badly that the United Nations World Health Organization Amnesty of California have both named it. The top bioaccumulative toxic material of concern. Mercury is a neuro toxin. It affects the developmental human being so our ability to deform our nerves are heart or lungs. Our brains it creates Serious birth defects and people have focused on that for many many years but as research has been done we learn that it continues to damage us as adults. It seems to be causing problems with our hearts with our lungs and with our various different organs which accumulate mercury. So it's a known neuro toxin and that's strike one against it strike to is it bioaccumulates in our body. It doesn't really easily leave our bodies many of the things we take in. Let's take alcohol. You drink it and two days later. It's all out of your body not so with Mercury it stores itself in your body and builds up over time strike. Three is that this material does. What's called bio magnifies in the environment? So the most dangerous place for a piece of mercury to be is in water particularly in warm water. Mercury is taken up by the little bugs at the bottom of the food chain. They eat a little bit of it. It transfers up to the bigger bugs and then the bigger bugs and then the fish and then the humans or as we watch here today. The waterbirds that are flying around might pick up. Officiant eat it. They are eating a highly toxic potent load of mercury so much so that the lake. We're looking here like Anglo. Bright has fish advisories on it that advice that a woman of childbearing age eat not a single bass out of this lake fish mornings. I run along this Anchorman River. There will along the Sacramento. And then you go down to San Francisco Bay. The same warnings that so it's in fact the entire ecosystem. The mercury that is in the Delta is entirely from these legacy minds in the areas. We are the gold mines and sadly for California. We had a unique geology which led us have mercury in our state as well. The coastal range has the mercury minds. Whether it's the ones down in San Jose or the ones Tamales Bay or up over on the clear lake there are serious old legacy mercury minds which are contaminating the coastal range and the tributaries that drain from there into the bay or into the ocean where we are everywhere. There was gold mining. They use this mercury not only for the the hydraulic mining but also for the hard rock mines which dominated the landscapes for one hundred years and all of those continue to leak mercury into the state of California water bodies every time it rains

Mercury California Nevada County Us Army Corps Of Engineers Sacramento San Francisco Bay Nevada Yuba River Yuba County Concord California Tahoe San Jose Anchorman River Sacramento Valley Tamales Bay Penn Valley United Nations World Health Or
"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 11 months ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Years trying to get a hope. The real hotel tell room is very hard. I spoke to someone. I met at the event who goes every year in state at the holiday inn. He had to agree to a minimum of five days and paid about route three hundred and fifty dollars per night yikes <hes> he's been going for years and he kinda renews each year but there's other options <hes> this year he says i stayed at the university of wisconsin oshkosh. I pass along a brochure <hes>. It's a dorm rooms. You know what dorm rooms are like their there are no. They're simple <hes> the bathrooms down the hall maybe but the price is good lo- <hes> low prices around seventy five dollars a night and he's got some other tips on that he says is that the <hes> the university of wisconsin nash kosh is easy to get to a busta leaves. He's the dorms for ya every <hes> <hes> every. I'm not sure what it is maybe every half hour. It's it's very frequently and it costs. I five dollars a ride or thirty dollars rides so <hes> that's another option that i will be looking at. I don't know about you max but i've done camping. I've done the university and i've done believe it or not a family farm house down the road from the airport yeah so there's a lot of options besides the hotel the hotels and i don't my my remembrance. The first time i went with with the museum my remembrance of the dorm room was it was a dorm room and if you don't mind going down and showering down down the hall and know how to deal with it. It's a comfortable bed and it does have a little bit of a._c. So it's nice to come back and get a shower a._c. Not nine climbing to attend but that's just my own personal personal opinion sorry guys who can't bake and i like that idea yeah. The camping is fun <hes> you you know hotels are nice. The only concern i have is what if you're on one of those upper floors of the dormitory and you don't have air conditioning. That's gotta be pretty hot. I would imagine yeah yeah. I think there's a recommendation to bring a fan if you don't have an air conditioner in the room but <hes> hey as as for community showers i mean hey. I'm a product of the sixties. M used to beat in there with a bunch of people that who knows where they came from all taking showers. It's not a big deal but <hes> <hes> showers are nice. Patrick wiggins wrote us. He said i saw this while taxiing to my hanger salt lake international. Maybe something for the show notes oops. I send us a photo says i've seen be seventeen before an f. eighteens before but never together this <hes> photo makes for a great old meets new picture and there's just you know which be seventeen. This is david di recognize. This must be the collins foundation as i didn't i. I didn't look that closely at it. I saw be seventeen and went yup. It's be seventeen. Sorry okay. I don't know how many flying b seventeen are is there more than just one of the collings foundation. There's there's at least ten. <hes> oh yeah yes yes certainly there is i'm thinking this was parked over by the the military section you know when you come into salt lake international national general aviation military is on the other side of the field from the the terminal so i'm thinking this may be parked over there. I will put that that picture in the show notes. Somebody can identify this. <hes> this play maybe even where the eighteen comes from based on the markings which are the the markings on the f. eighteen have actually i don't really see very many markings on that if eighteen but i'm looking at a small version of the picture <hes> but patrick also says are he mentioned about how david made a comment comment about people being cargo patrick's is according to far ninety one point one quote. No person may operate in the aircraft aft carrying passengers for hire in formation flight and yet. It's not at all uncommon for this to happen in skydiving. Were jumpers paid a jump from the planes that are flying in formation. So how can it be legal for. The purpose of jumping parachute is not considered passengers..

Patrick wiggins busta david di university of wisconsin oshkos salt lake university of wisconsin collings foundation collins foundation seventy five dollars thirty dollars fifty dollars five dollars five days
"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:27 min | 11 months ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Is really the most successful jet engine manufacturer curious syria and so yes. I talked to my friends from pratt and whitney. They always say it. Wasn't i still owe you either right there right there absolutely absolutely right now that that was the one thing you know working for g for thirty years. I always thought of c._f._m. International joint-venture the bills the engine for the seven three seven the three twenty. I always thought as joint venture of two companies as they did the research it was so obvious it's a relationship between g._e. And the french government it's a government relations should be so. It's like second joint venture between g._e. And france that's simple it gonna go if it wasn't for pompidou chiampou president pompidou's france the jet the joint venture never would have been binging been created so so you go from you know the tia thirty nine with a high bypass engines lisa see six commercial engines and then that leads were relationship with a friend and then she creates the effeminate national and the rush system and the m fifty six engine. They're great engines there. They're really really good engines pratt. I don't you know i'm i'm a little out out of touch but <hes> at least for a while there pratt had a engine overhaul shop that did c._f._m. Fifty-six engines and i it was kind of a joy to to tour for that years ago in this i it's a it's a great engine. There's no doubt about that. Well the first generation to see if the secret was as is we use the the <hes> the hot section of the b one bomber engine that was called the f. one. No one had single stage turbine. I'll get too technical technical with your audience but now you can get technical. Go ahead now. I can't and that was the secret yup. Oh that was the secret i was. The absolute secret is that had a single stage turbine and so the strategy and philosophy was we may never win on fuel burn. We may never went on admissions. We may never win on knows that damn thing will be reliable as hell and kill everybody on maintenance costs and so that was the philosophy. You're going to see a families to keep that engine really simple now when you get to the next generation which is when pratt's dorms and with the geared system. You're turbofan. Dan then again see offense. Let's keep it simple.

pratt pompidou chiampou president po france syria french government whitney Dan thirty years
"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 11 months ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Powering aircrafts in war too so we were the logical choice to do the jet engine so people are always confused by g._e. Did engines. It's like well oh yeah because we had to create power for those electrical products and that power system lead right to turbo superchargers and then from there to jet jet engines and i think it's interesting how the the government of integral to not as g._e. Aviation but aviation companies in in general in terms of pushing and in many cases funding the development of technologies well. That's exactly right. I mean gee would never i mean in the early days. A turbo superchargers was the direct result of a work with the government to try to figure out how they get piston piston planes to fly higher as we all know. Is you get hired. There's less oxygen and the piston playing can't inserts losing power so that was a major government government initiative and war one they got involved and then of course by the mid nineteen thirties with the advent of a b seventeen turbo superchargers made that very lethal weapon and so from there you go into all the fighter jets of the forties and fifties. She's i mean. She didn't really have a viable commercial business until the nineteen th avenue right. I think people may not may not realize that during the war effort the second world war of course pratt and whitney and right were focused on producing as many radio engines his could in g._e. Was supporting the effort the war effort with these <hes> turbo superchargers that's right yeah right in fact the and they selected g._e. To do the first the u._s. jet engine because they didn't want wright aeronautical and pratt and whitney to be distracted because they needed them to produce those piston piston engines and the jet engines very different so they took the frank whittle design from england and it was a it was a competition between westinghouse and g._e. But she was perfectly perfect should have to do that but you're right. I mean and then of course pratt them credit. Manny didn't take them long once. The jet engine was a viable product by the early fifties they they were all over it. They were all yes. <hes> tried to to play catch up and of course it was some early successes. Does that really kind of lodged them in. I would say carried the company in many ways for for many many years but but we'll we'll get up to that time period one of the fun things that <hes> some people may not realize is there was actually it at one point an effort to develop the atomic engine and both g._e. He and pratt where it's separately on that. That was the one of the things that in doing this book. I worked at g._e. For thirty years it's funny when you write a book you have a chance to step it back and see these broad themes and she was always attracted by exotica. You know we love the atomic engine. The supersonic engine that that was canceled the j. ninety three engine power the x._p. Seventy and while we're doing all this league tzadek stuff perhaps like okay. We'll just do a this figure bigger away to do a google spool compressor on our military engine and they just cleaned our clock on those first jetliners of first generation but you're right right. There was an effort to do an atomic engine. It went for purity years. It was finally killed by john kennedy's administration but the idea was that the atomic reactor was where the combustion was so great thing about jet engine we always joke suck squeeze bang and blow so the air comes through you compress the air and then you bring that compressed air into atomic reactor and that i pointed blows out the outside the determine so the idea was that the aircraft would just you know basically circle the world nonstop for months on end yeah but <hes> that's kind of g. was very involved in all this kind of exotic concepts. <hes> were pratt was doing that but but they were also thinking. We're going to get involved in this jetliner. Business g was a little slow to get through the game. They really are different companies..

g._e pratt whitney wright aeronautical john kennedy Manny england westinghouse thirty years
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"War is more burke different what i told myself i mean you'll have to read and decide i'm right well i told myself is and i've mentioned some of this already so i'm telling the story of the entire century plus a bit more which actually being done very often and he certainly hasn't been done in accessible way so i've already mentioned that i have tried to tell the story often from both sides which is difficult to do radio tempted again to read it will have to judge whether i've succeeded in doing that i've talked about the familia elements of the story i mean you know is can be quite boring to rehearse them all i've done that because you can't avoid those inevitable milestones of warren diplomacy in peace initiatives and sold that i tried to go beyond that to give a sense of ordinary people their lives economic culture language to make the story a bit more human than it is conventionally under last thing i've done is my story stays more or less completely within the borders of israel and palestine whatever period still a story of history of the arabisraeli conflict doesn't take much to does bit but not ready to damascus into washington london and car it stays on the ground in this dispute country but i mean you you have to judge young the tools i mean i didn't say that i believe that two states is going to happen very easy to new rachel the reasons why it isn't very likely nevertheless i think that there is no other solution i understand people who've ticked on the palestinians i'd have despaired of it but i don't myself see that there is any other possible solution the argument goes like this it's not particularly original for me but i concur with it that it is so difficult to achieve as two state solution.

israel rachel damascus washington
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Hi my question is what do you think you contributed in terms of the book that was written in terms of the general kind of knowledge because you so that a lot of material has been written up to now and been covered but what do you think why do you think your book is different than others or how is it better so less but how is it is it better is a different is it gives a different perspective the ten sell it to us nicklaus would we run studied tools prot israel and also the west bank and doddie a very county contributes to to them i want to know where in you get your belief in the two states suit solution and the pap's an idea of optimism about that when we travel around the west bank i think it's very difficult to see the viability of a palestinian state i think the pa only controls about seventeen percent of the area there's a huge amount of disillusion wound with the government there and there are many young palestinians who really no longer see the possibility of a a palestinian state taking place so in geographically just seeing the entrenchment of israel within that but ritz the roads the infrastructure it's very hard just even visually looking around to see how that could become a palestinian state or nation again and i'd like to see how you could see that working thank you very much my.

nicklaus israel seventeen percent
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"The trump doing i'm not unheard of course but i think we know pretty much what he's going to do i don't think it's on the same level of importance as the bell for their curriculum you not comparing like lichen like the the situation that exists today exist for a very very long time is very complicated trump is being making it worse in my voting for his own reasons whether it's nobody really knows do they resentment among needs thirty responsible given the role the key is playing that on the allow new there had paroda worries about what he's doing with regard to new climate change will north korea role promoting islamophobia i think this is an unhelpful intervention that will doubtless does have some kind of negative consequences but i do agree with you the to the speed and magnifico version of things because of the mud media is a hugely important element of this year when the both the declaration on we just made the comparison with century precisely a century ago the buffer at rationing was revealed in private initially by the british cabinet to designers leadership the existence of it wasn't published until a week later in the jewish chronicle that the time it was never published in palestine they itself because the british who buy them routing the country will wind about its implications and it took a long time for the news and its implications two feeds through so speed and intensity of media coverage that they really really does matter advice for journalists on the bit stumped beyond the general advice that i give to anybody who is contemplating a career in journalism he wind principle should be different for this admittedly divisive and contentious issue you need to be an infusion asked you need to one to communicate inflammation you need to be prepared to book quite hard and sometimes difficult circumstances you need to understand that however little you know you probably know moles and most of your readership the lessons of universal ones anew you apply them in the in the certainly difficult circumstances of this the inevitably controversial issue rich people on both sides are angry for different reasons that can be very challenger but the fundamentals of under different from reporting on the vote.

climate change jewish chronicle palestine media coverage north korea
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Thank you so much for these interviews in these conversations where we're going to do now is opened up to the audience because we want to give everybody a chance to ask your questions and we'll do we have about maybe 25 minutes for moderated questions take maybe three at once them so my question apologize in advance simple book i was just wondering whether any parallels worth talking about between the balfour declaration in what we expect donald trump to say today in terms of historical significance and controversy and they should not waffle but i was stroke i mean i've been thinking about this a lot today but i was struck by what you said about feedback you would take two weeks to receive a last year and another weaken the the intensity of what we have today discos today's huge because all the communications instant i expect in 1917 communication was even slower and i'm just wondering whether that's the thing that makes what donald trump's doing today worse than the balfour declaration you're probably different gress knows this wondering if you have any particular advice fainting younger journalist looking to report in or around the region particularly between israel and palestine premier try missed the first pole just if you hunting particular advice found journalists looking to report in or around that rocard were thank you i really enjoyed your tuck an i'm sorry to say that i share your understanding that these are two national narratives that are running in parallel lines that seemed to never be able to meet but do you see the role of journalism to report on each of these narratives or to take more activist or interventionist approach to try and find a way to if not merge these narratives helped them converged in the future.

donald trump israel palestine 25 minutes two weeks
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Sure media about emotion oversee the israeli palestinian conflict provokes a huge amounts of emotion but there's any place for that to motion in the reporting of it yes i think there has to be how can you you know we're all human beings we will have emotions out can you convey what people are experiencing without giving some sense of how they feel i think the again the age of social media were more intensely aware of the power of images that have always been images of course they went invented yesterday that the proliferation of the accessibility images i mean i'm israelpalestine i i'm not sure that i can think of anything memorably vivid that if you look elsewhere in recent years across the wasteland of the middle east think of the pictures of six children in yemen people suffering in syria but of course your emotions also have to become texture legs time for the report should correspondents show emotion because obviously it does they are human beings you say is they're place for emotion in the reporting miles evacuation is linked to what i said earlier about the first person journalism is a famous raw wasn't of the bbc with barbara plitt osher as i recall who with bbc correspondent in jerusalem or ramallah whatever of and yasser arafat died in two thousand to the full she was overcome by emotion and whipped on that was a great idea to be honest but unite she's human being perhaps as a journalist you need to put your humanity and these theater to one side or in abeyance will save it for drinks at the bar of two new i think verge your role is to describe what other people are experiencing a not to thrust yourself to be at the center the store.

social media yemen syria bbc jerusalem yasser arafat ramallah
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Palestinians moved falbo frequently and never easily but more easily inside israel and they did again after the second intifada one of the tragedies i think of recent years is that even under the conditions of military occupation palestinian economic dependence on israel and israeli dependence on palestinian labour for that matter there was a degree of human interaction that was drastically reduced after the second intifada in two thousand after sharon's visit to the temple mount in the ill judged palestinian decision to have an armed uprising against the israelis the human consequences that never mind the people who lost their lives and horrific acts of violence but the human consequences of it but there was very little interaction young palestinians and israelis today very rarely see each other the palestinians meet israeli soldiers settlers sometimes secret policeman and that's about it i remember being a the sacraments fraud when was based there i was done in my midthirties most gazans of my age should have casual jobs in israel some of course have been in prison but they had had some kind of interaction with israelis which was almost entirely absent amongst the younger generation people under thirty on a building on that subject to a new writes about the politics of language who learns walked who speaks whose languages now you speak hebrew and arabic most western correspondents don't how important you think is that to your insights language matters wherever you are the main language enables you to better understand people you know talking to and society you they're covering and it gives you insight somebody did the does you know technical things that you can read what it says that slogan on the wall you can hear the order saying a dispersal we will opened fire it's obviously quite useful to be able to have that ability i'm and i'm struck actually by took him a journalist and.

israel sharon fraud
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"A sense of why this was sandra hypersensitive issue now as then near i mean i think history is key to understanding it for a for a foreign correspondent very difficult things sometimes to bring in state news coverage i was very interested in very struck by what you wrote about this situation often nineteen 48 when the city was completely divided knows and that one crossing point demand obam gates knee say foreign diplomats clergymen and pilgrims were able to cross but ordinary arabs and israelis would could not summing there were similar turns on pepsi even now we're moving towards a similar common one thinks of the way that the palestinian territories of not accessible to many israelis and vice versa i mean that how important a factory in your perspective was the fact that you as a foreign possible holder could go to places that many palestinians and israelis couldn't play with it was absolutely crucial i mean i could live in west jerusalem or i did or who get in my car i could drive this is before the whole even joined even during the intifada but certain before the first intifada i'm sure many of you will know many of you will be nice if very small place you can get up in the morning have breakfast in west jerusalem and you'd be having kofi in ramallah half an hour later in an hour later you can be eating wonderful cannot fail homeless in a nablus officie go farm possible it straight who is held to have a foreign passport or foreign idea what other of course things have changed on that front too not hasn't remain the same they used to be is ratings romeo all over the west bank far more easily than there are today today's you go into the areas of the west bank deemed to be under the control of the wound carefully but the palestinian authority there are big science israelis in hebrew and english and arabic saying you know you may not enter this your life is at risk you're not allowed to do that wasn't doors the case that was in the after the second intifada i think.

pepsi west jerusalem kofi sandra ramallah nablus
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Offcie comes up a lot in daytoday reproaching but how does the challenge ultra when you have five hundred or you suggested 600 pages i mean can you do those to now to more justice would that sort of space to play with i like to thinks or indeed was one of my motives the every believes worked as a journalist news the limitations on the frustrations of telling a complex story in what is limited space so many and even in the age of the internet you know you're still you call right endlessly you have two things have to be manageable accessible and so all so to be able to revisit these issues but to have a more space the ability to explore things a bit more is of course great you have to nevertheless still you know you call it right endlessly you have to tell the story as well as interpreters is quite a complex process off fact some member interpretations of facts and so on and so forth but i think certainly the space and the platform gives your greater ability to the zoo by roots and to keep a sense of that big picture emrich locate crucial detail the malir trump in jerusalem everybody here will of red over the last twentyfour 48 hours efforts to explain this very complicated story that she why counties israel that jerusalem israel's capital it is a complicated story it's hard to reduce two four or five hundred words when you have the leisure space to do it and tell the story you know i remember the book than you root for interesting book about reporting on the israelipalestinian conflict diamond the writing about him in the guardian the immediate context of that was trouble on the temple mount in at the beginning of what some people described if you recalled as the third intifada video third intifada but it looks as a might be and it was vital vein i remember you writing in me responding to the you really need to know what had happened to jerusalem backing 1929 to catch.

Offcie israel daytoday reproaching jerusalem twentyfour 48 hours
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Thanks you have a responsibility bitter suit that informed the way i wrote the book people friends acquaintances contacts on both sides with whom i as a journalist interacted endlessly i want to go back to another one the theme that i raised before about how much of this seems to be repeated or longterm processes in themes that appear cyclical i have a few examples it might take a little while to read them but you wrote for example of the bus three hundred affair where there was a bus hijacking palestinians hijacked a bus two of them were later captured alive filmed and then killed it was a cover up and then we just had the as aria fair where an israeli soldier executed a palestinian who is ready incapacitated at one example you right of the simmering rage both palestinians against plo elites in the late 90s early 2000s and the corruption in the two milliondollar villa on burma's entry you say fifty six percent at that point said the pa was corrupt nowadays palestinians are angry at the pa for being corrupt and twothirds want obamas' into resigned another parallel and then just as i was reading the part about arial sharon taking his famous walk on the temple mount in two thousand which sparked the second defied a here we are getting headlines rolling in about trump making a little bit of drama about recognizing jerusalem as israel's capital to quote you quoting dennis ross that israel said i can think of a lot of bad ideas but i can't think of a worse one these things seem so cyclical their parallels for every consequential thing that happened we have three gaza wars to lebanon wars are we at more than two of them no to them and i'm word on countering what breaks the cycle do you see moments were processes that can break these cycles will be one yet i finger all the things you mentioned rural or indeed elements of continuity the rules through burial in as you say during the jumper the bus three hundred that's a boat israel's security yogurt people hijacked you're bustle you call it people hijacker bus wherever you will but of course in israel the people who got buses the palestinians and the people who fight them all israelis are there any particular case this for rollover mercury's the the is ready domestic secret service and as.

burma obamas jerusalem israel plo dennis ross gaza lebanon fifty six percent two milliondollar
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Current demands i think that the demands about the both of the rotation are an expression of frustration nothing much could be done to undo the longterm impact of that under the velvet originals with supplanted by what the united nations decided ninety forty seven argued before more important argued that wouldn't have happened without the tough declaration but the un vote by forty seven gave the state of israel legitimacy which initially rejected by all arabs has now come to be accepted by the majority of errors i think the thing that matters for purposes of this kind of conversation is to remind ourselves that the palestine liberation organisation has founded in nineteen sixty four with the view of eradicating this the illegal racist colonialists zionist entity in 1993 a recognize the state of israel that remains to this day that says something that is forgotten that it shouldn't be difficult because it does represent a historic shift on than adjustment on the side of the palestinians reluctant pragmatic joyous could nevertheless to the existence of the state of israel that lies at the core of everything that we are discussing today and we'll discuss even more whom we seem what trump says in his speech but that hasn't been revoke not everybody is bound by the hamas doesn't accept that it's an issue but the plo recognize the state of israel continues to do so i want to go now to the act of fat too bright and book session for it as we said the sequel is being written as we speak the book is up meticulously researched in dense i would say has has really using facts a holds more than five hundred pages because it's a long and eventful a conflict that it it covers i want to ask you how long was the first draft and what did you have to leave out well.

united nations israel hamas un
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Are you quota very interesting passage from 1918 i wanna quote it for a minute you quote lawrence olifants describing early european jews in the following way fresh from the ghetto of some romanian town unaccustomed to any other description of exercise than that of their wits but already quite convinced that they knew more about agriculture than the people of the country full of suspicion of all advice with these romanian jews was the arabdiou who acted as interpreter in oriental garb as unlike his european coreligionists as the philippine themselves now found this a fascinating passage because we have something of the israeli personality going way back to the beginning of the century and already some of the cleavages in israeli society so i'm curious do you think that these divides this cleavage within israeli society can ever be reconciled between the european and the middle eastern and that leads me to a bigger question which is to what extent could things have been different apropos the previous question if the europeans had made more of an effort to integrate into european culture sorry into into middle eastern culture be it's a great passes from lauren solar from lawrence over was the famous english he was sort of feyler see might he resign is the now designers but the passages from earlier it's from 1880s why does that matter matches because th the date does matter because it really is one of the very very earliest the earliest description i either the rid of an encounter light batch of these very early jewish setters i think it's from eighteen ag winery tune 82 it describes the meeting which was held in a place schools on marine which became the phone yaacov and in which is a now a substantial in israel but it was one of the very first over the colony's settlements live you want to cooling founded by the cultivates the owned the lovers of design and what's interesting about the passage i think is indeed i mean there are a couple of enemy found that this these newly arrived rumanian jews who have never seen a plow or.

lawrence olifants lawrence israel lauren
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"Figures more more peerage diesel written certain in britain on this subject go laney other middle east subject on thousands of books appear every year a english in arabic and hebrew and visit strong theme that recurs which is about missed opportunities moments in the history of the conflict when things could have been different while of course we don't touch me know because that's counterfactual we know what did happen we tried to explain why it happened we don't know what would have happened if those decisions will moves hadn't taken so for example one of the most important of those is of course never been 47 but the un voted the un in the early days of the cold war voted to partition palestine into separate states people will be familiar with the it's a very dramatic story people on the jewish side during a trusted round radios to hear the vote being broadcast live the palestinians less aware of it and very negative about and the decision the radi wall is more than the balfour declaration but among the created certainly created the state of israel did the palestinians make a terrible error well you could argue they made a terrible error but i think that if you look at the story and you've followed quite closely you understand over the list why they made that decision said mistake but in my view and actually my view of this has changed likely in the course of writing the book at undestandable mistake given that they were being asked to agree to politics what they saw was their country being handed over to another people who they saw this foreign intruders pragmatically that decision politically arguably and understandable one in addition to all this thinking about the israeli palestinian conflict per se you also have a lot of insight into the development internally of each society and i'm struck by another overall theme which is how many things do not seem to have changed or have very very old routes that we see coming back on israeli society in particular.

britain cold war israel un palestine israeli palestinian
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"You go back in the book to the origins of the design assessment of palestine in the eight 1880s and of course sign isn't did not start in nineteen seventeen all the conflict didn't start in 1917 why did you choose 1917 as your starting point i mean at least in the title i mean covering one hundred years of conflict you do 1917 messes because in through synteen or the buffet declaration but we can talk about its significance but it is amazing on many of you will know this year i imagine you're interested in this subject to those you wouldn't be here so it is extraordinary how in the seventh year of every decade for the last one hundred twenty years something significant as happened in this story i could whiz through them you've got eighteen ninety seven the first sign is congress okay nineteen oh seven was the aftermath of the young turk revolution leave that to one side 1917 is the balfour declaration 1927 there was a very bad earthquake in palestine it was unusually it was a natural disaster rather a man made one 1937 was the report of the british peel commission which of course famously recommended that palestine be politician did to separate jewish and arab states nineteen forty seven we just had the seventy th anniversary of the un's politician decision and so it goes on nineteen 67 needs no introduction by king seventy seven sold the rise of likud to power in israel anwar sadat visiting jerusalem 1987 was the first palestinian intifada and it goes on and on two thousand and seven so the hot mess islamist movement over gaza i have said before that i think the thing we will people were member about twenty seven is she donald trump and whatever effect he turns out to have on the story in what's happening right now i want to go into the introduction you have indecision to all of this fascinating archival work in a lot of detail you have insights that sort of appear throughout the book and in the right in the introduction you write that one of the.

palestine un likud jerusalem donald trump israel one hundred twenty years one hundred years
"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"one hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"The tel aviv review thank you very much for coming tonight i'd like to welcome you all to a city university pull this special recording of the television review podcast for me personally a particularly emotional moment i am a graduate of the generals and be a program here at city and it is really heartening to be back here at the striking the renovated tate building after more than a decade and thank you very much it's nice really nice to see see you so many familiar faces and familia is so thank you very much for coming and this is alive recording of the review podcast which is an israeli englishlanguage program dedicated to books and ideas is broadcast on tv one radio which is an online radio based in tel aviv and all program is a sponsor bye bye near jerusalem institute i'm dahlia shenlin thank you for coming everybody tonight's event is extremely special because we had the opportunity to speak with our author live and we'd like to thank these city university of london as well as dr james rodgers of the journalism department who is cohosting the event with us and of course our distinguished guests in black is a very very veteran journalist he hardly needs an explanation but let's do it anyway he was the guardians middle east editor european editor diplomatic editor and foreign leader writer for in thirty six years on the paper he's now visiting senior fellow at the middle east center at the london school of economics today we'll be talking about his brand new book entitled enemies a neighbors arabs and jews in palestine and israel 1917 to two thousand seventeen it is published by annan in an imprint of penguin books it's an extraordinarily comprehensive overview of one hundred years of conflict in our little corner of the world.

tate building dr james rodgers editor annan jerusalem institute city university of london leader writer visiting senior fellow london school of economics palestine israel one hundred years thirty six years